Death in a Budapest Butterfly (A Hungarian Tea House Mystery #1)
Hana Keller serves up European-style cakes and teas in her family-owned tea house, but when a customer keels over from a poisoned cuppa, Hana and her tea-leaf reading grandmother will have to help catch a killer in the first Hungarian Tea House Mystery from Julia Buckley. Hana Keller and her family run Maggie's Tea House, an establishment heavily influenced by the family's Hungarian heritage and specializing in a European-style traditional tea service. But one of the shop's largest draws is Hana's eccentric grandmother, Juliana, renowned for her ability to read the future in the leaves at the bottom of customers' cups. Lately, however, her readings have become alarmingly ominous and seemingly related to old Hungarian legends... When a guest is poisoned at a tea event, Juliana’s dire predictions appear to have come true. Things are brought to a boil when Hana’s beloved  Anna Weatherley butterfly teacup becomes the center of the murder investigation as it carried the poisoned tea. The cup is claimed as evidence by a handsome police detective, and the pretty Tea House is suddenly endangered.  Hana and her family must catch the killer to save their business and bring the beautiful Budapest Butterfly back home where it belongs.

Death in a Budapest Butterfly (A Hungarian Tea House Mystery #1) Details

TitleDeath in a Budapest Butterfly (A Hungarian Tea House Mystery #1)
Author
ReleaseJul 30th, 2019
PublisherBerkley
Rating
GenreMystery, Cozy Mystery

Death in a Budapest Butterfly (A Hungarian Tea House Mystery #1) Review

  • Book of Secrets
    January 1, 1970
    Vasorrú Bába!Hungarian folklore, European high tea, and just a touch of the paranormal come together to make DEATH IN A BUDAPEST BUTTERFLY a delightful start to a new cozy mystery series!Three generations of the Horvath/Keller family run Maggie’s Tea House in suburban Chicago. Hana, her mother Maggie, and grandmother Juliana are shaken when a guest is poisoned to death at one of their events. With a murderer on the loose and their business in danger, Hana is willing to help Detective Erik Wolf w Vasorrú Bába!Hungarian folklore, European high tea, and just a touch of the paranormal come together to make DEATH IN A BUDAPEST BUTTERFLY a delightful start to a new cozy mystery series!Three generations of the Horvath/Keller family run Maggie’s Tea House in suburban Chicago. Hana, her mother Maggie, and grandmother Juliana are shaken when a guest is poisoned to death at one of their events. With a murderer on the loose and their business in danger, Hana is willing to help Detective Erik Wolf with his investigation and do a bit of sleuthing on her own.The Hungarian history, culture, and myths blended throughout this book made for an enjoyable and unique cozy mystery. I also loved the budding romance between Hana and Erik. Looking forward to seeing what happens next!P.S. How amazing is that book cover!Disclosure: I received a copy of this book through Penguin’s First to Read Program in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • WhiskeyintheJar/Kyraryker
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 starsI received this book for free in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.Hana works at her family's Hungarian tea house and loves her job. When the Magyar Women, a group of older Hungarian women, rent out the space for an afternoon tea, she expects it to be gossip, “when you going to meet a nice boy” talk, and friendship sharing, she does not expect murder.With the reputation of their tea house on the line, Hana and her moth 2.5 starsI received this book for free in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.Hana works at her family's Hungarian tea house and loves her job. When the Magyar Women, a group of older Hungarian women, rent out the space for an afternoon tea, she expects it to be gossip, “when you going to meet a nice boy” talk, and friendship sharing, she does not expect murder.With the reputation of their tea house on the line, Hana and her mother and grandmother work with Detective Wolf to help solve who wanted Ava Novak dead. Hungarian myths, legends, magic, food, and new and old mysteries swirl around as Hana wonders who could do such a thing and if maybe she should let a Wolf into her heart. “They’ve got poor Mrs. Kalas out there, looking all deflated and nervous. Can you really picture one of these old ladies committing murder?”“Of course I can. They’re a scary batch of Old Country women, full of superstition and paprika-scented resentment.” The first in a new series, Death in a Budapest Butterfly, introduces us to Hana. She's of Hungarian descent and even though she is American, the Hungarian culture plays a big part in her life. She helps her mother and grandmother run Maggie's Tea House, a business that has been in her family for generations. When Hana sees that one of the members of the Magyar Women is drinking from her very rare Butterfly tea cup that was only supposed to be a for looks center piece, she makes a move to rescue it. When she sees a Hungarian message about a witch written inside the cup, she immediately searches for Ava, the woman drinking from the cup, and discovers her dead in the bathroom. This starts off the mystery of who could have poisoned a woman in such a public setting and why.I liked the beginning way the author started off the mystery, the murder happens fairly quickly and then we get relaying of events with each chapter having a specific character giving their account to Detective Wolf. This helps to introduce us to the characters, set the scene, and engage the reader in who is and isn't telling the truth while shifting through the character's testimony.While I thought the layout of the murder mystery started off strong, I would have liked to have felt like I knew Hana and her family better. It is not until the latter half of the story that I finally felt like I “knew” them, cared, and felt settled in their world. The murder mystery is obviously the highlight of the story but I like to care about the main characters we are following along with. “You’re falling prey to an illusion. They’re elderly, and they have accents, but they’re not automatically harmless.”My stomach felt sick. “Jekyll and Hyde,” I said.“You bet. And it’s my job to find Hyde. In everyone.” His face was solemn. The relationship between Erik Wolf and Hana was a bit too immediate. Wolf's character was very dry and not fleshed out enough for me; he felt like a blank slate. I did like how the author created a plausible excuse for Hana to be somewhat involved in the investigation, her and her family translate Hungarian to English for him and explain some Hungarian cultural norms and structures.The story structure reaches out from Hana and her mother and grandmother, this was a matriarchal cozy mystery. There was some supernatural or mystic elements added with Hana inheriting “gifts” or “sight” from the female line in her family. The Jekyll and Hyde theme is threaded throughout with the how could the killer be a “little old woman”? Later, I realized it was because we had innocent hearts, and my grandmother had always told me that the innocent heart cannot see the evil one, but that evil could see evil because “they live in the same darkness, and they learn to see in the dark.” I thought the mystery was wrapped up well, the author gave us meaning and backstory for reasons and it wasn't all Scooby Doo dumped at the end. I did think this had a little bit of a heavier feel than the usual light cozy mystery. The inclusion of recipes at the end was delightful as the author will make you hungry with all the descriptions of food throughout the story.Detective Wolf was too much of a blank slate for me and his romance with Hana lacked depth in its immediacy. The murder mystery started off strong, lost some steam in the middle, but had a satisfactory explanation, and sad one. Hana's family supernatural abilities added a fun twist and all the Hungarian folklore, food, and culture additives gave this a special feel. A pleasing start to a series where I'll look for more depth to certain characters and relationships when the next mystery pops up.
    more
  • Betty
    January 1, 1970
    The first book in the Hungarian Tea Shop mysteries is fun read where it explains family life in a Hungarian family. Hana Keller works alongside with her Mother and Grandmother in the family business, Maggie Tea House. The story is a cozy mystery with a twist of paranormal as the woman in the family have inherited the gift of sight. It is refreshing to read a book will the police are willing to work with the protagonist.Hana has a collection of teacups which treasures highly. She receives a gift The first book in the Hungarian Tea Shop mysteries is fun read where it explains family life in a Hungarian family. Hana Keller works alongside with her Mother and Grandmother in the family business, Maggie Tea House. The story is a cozy mystery with a twist of paranormal as the woman in the family have inherited the gift of sight. It is refreshing to read a book will the police are willing to work with the protagonist.Hana has a collection of teacups which treasures highly. She receives a gift of a Hungarian teacup, a Budapest teacup that is decorated with a butterfly. Hana uses it to decorate the tea room when they are hosting a Hungarian group of ladies. Someone uses the cup, adds tea, a poison, and hands to the victim, Ava Norvak. She drinks some of the tea and collapsed. Hana aids the police providing information on the Hungarian background. The homicide detective is named Wolf. What does the name mean in Hungary? I HIGHLY RECOMMEND THIS BOOK.Recipes from Nana's kitchen are included.Disclosure: Thanks to Berkley for a copy through NetGalley. The opinions expressed are my own.
    more
  • Minx
    January 1, 1970
    Being the kind of reader who is attracted to a book by its cover, it is no wonder I was eager to read this book. I just find the cover to be adorable! Death in a Budapest Butterfly is the first book in the A Hungarian Tea House Mystery series and what a delightful cozy mystery this turned out to be. I loved the inclusion of Hungarian culture and folklore which permeated everything in this story. At the start I was introduced to Hana, her mother and grandmother, who are all co-owners of Maggie’s Being the kind of reader who is attracted to a book by its cover, it is no wonder I was eager to read this book. I just find the cover to be adorable! Death in a Budapest Butterfly is the first book in the A Hungarian Tea House Mystery series and what a delightful cozy mystery this turned out to be. I loved the inclusion of Hungarian culture and folklore which permeated everything in this story. At the start I was introduced to Hana, her mother and grandmother, who are all co-owners of Maggie’s Tea House. They were getting ready for a high tea event for the Magyar Women group, which was a group of ladies who were all of Hungarian decent, like a club. It was during this event that a murder most foul was committed and Hana and her family were quickly drawn into an investigation that would open their eyes to danger and mystery as well as bring a family secret out into the open.I was so excited that the murder happened at the start because the police were immediately brought in and the action began. I especially loved the chapter titles during the interrogation portions because the title named who was being interviewed, it was clever. Each chapter was a different accounting from eye-witnesses and I felt like I was a part of the mystery itself rather than a bystander. Since the murder happened up front, it is not till later in the book that I really got to know Hana and her family and I came to really like them! There was also a burgeoning romance taking place but I wish there had been more of a romantic buildup because as it was, I was not drawn to the romance. Additionally, there was a slight paranormal element introduced in this book and I think it is going to have a larger focus as the series continues. Overall, Death in a Budapest Butterfly was a wonderful cozy mystery that will appeal to mystery lovers and tea aficionado’s everywhere!This review is based on a complimentary book I received from Berkley Prime Crime. It is an honest and voluntary review. The complimentary receipt of it in no way affected my review or rating.
    more
  • Annie (Under the Covers Book Blog)
    January 1, 1970
    review to come
  • Kristina
    January 1, 1970
    Death in a Budapest Butterfly is the first novel in A Hungarian Tea House Mystery series written by Julia Buckley (A Writer’s Apprentice Mystery series). Hana Keller is twenty-six years old and of Hungarian descent. Hungarian food and the culture are a big part of the family’s lives. We get a comprehensive account of the various Hungarian dishes prepared. It was interesting to learn more about the Hungarian culture, cuisine, traditions and folklore. I wish, though, that the Hungarian words had c Death in a Budapest Butterfly is the first novel in A Hungarian Tea House Mystery series written by Julia Buckley (A Writer’s Apprentice Mystery series). Hana Keller is twenty-six years old and of Hungarian descent. Hungarian food and the culture are a big part of the family’s lives. We get a comprehensive account of the various Hungarian dishes prepared. It was interesting to learn more about the Hungarian culture, cuisine, traditions and folklore. I wish, though, that the Hungarian words had come with a pronunciation guide (next to each word). Hana works with her mother (Maggie Keller) and her grandmother (Juliana Horvath) to run Maggie’s Tea House which features high tea and delicious pastries made by Francois, a French culinary student. I enjoyed hearing about Hana’s teacup collection. The mystery starts off with a bang early in the book. Since many of the suspects are Hungarian, Detective Wolf asks them to be present while he conducts interviews to help with translations. This allows readers to be introduced to various characters plus we find out what they knew about the victim. Hana stays involved in the case as she uncovers information and relays it to Det. Wolf. While I was able to pinpoint the who, I did not know the why. Clues are revealed as Hana talks to various people in the community. I appreciated that we are given all the details of the murder for a complete wrap-up. There were instant sparks between the single Hana and the fetching detective. Hana’s grandmother is happy to give them nudge or two since she would like to see Hana wed. Erik Wolf needs more fleshing out because I thought he was one-dimensional (lacks life). There is a hint that Hana and her grandmother have special psychic abilities. I hope this will feature more prominently in future books. Julia Buckley is a detail oriented writer. She needs to find a balance between not enough and too much which would greatly help the flow and pacing of the book (in my opinion). My favorite phrase was when Detective Wolf said to Hana, “You’ve got the bug, haven’t you? Solving puzzles exhilarates you.” I can certainly understand the feeling. There are recipes at the end for Chicken Paprikash, dumplings and stuffed cabbage. Death in a Budapest Butterfly has Hungarian charm, dainty teacups, a poisoned patsy, a canny killer, a dashing detective, and a neophyte sleuth. 3.5 out of 5 stars
    more
  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    A Budapest Butterfly china teacup is a thing of beauty but can it be turned into a weapon of death??Hana Keller sets up a special display for the Anna Weatherley butterfly teacup in Maggie’s Tea House for a function hosting a group of Hungarian women.Somehow the teacup is removed from the display. AHungarian saying is written inside the cup, poisonadded then the cup is served to one of the attendees by a non employee of the Tea House. After drinking from the cup, she dies. Who removed the cup, a A Budapest Butterfly china teacup is a thing of beauty but can it be turned into a weapon of death??Hana Keller sets up a special display for the Anna Weatherley butterfly teacup in Maggie’s Tea House for a function hosting a group of Hungarian women.Somehow the teacup is removed from the display. AHungarian saying is written inside the cup, poisonadded then the cup is served to one of the attendees by a non employee of the Tea House. After drinking from the cup, she dies. Who removed the cup, added poison to the team and gave it to the woman???This is a very informative read as the reader will learnabout Hungarian customs, folklore, common saying andmany delicious Hungarian food specialties.Hana, her mother, her grandmother and her mother havea paranormal gift of sight which will aid in the solving ofthe murder.Characters are vivid, very colorful, well define, quirky and extremely interesting. There are several fur babies that add to the story: Hana’s cats: Anthony & Cleopatra (one black & one gray), Boris the wolfhound, Serena the Siamese cat, Inspektor the store cat and a Major a housecat.The plot is complicated by mixing the past and present.It is a fast moving story, intense with plenty of thrills and chills, intrigue plus some humor and romance.This is the first book in the A Hungarian Tea House Mysteries series. A very enjoyable read!!!Hungarian Recipes included at the end of book.I volunteered to read Death in a Budapest Butterfly. Thanks to Penguin’s First-to-Read Program for the opportunity. My opinion is my own.
    more
  • Book
    January 1, 1970
    Three generations of Hungarian women own and manage Maggie’s Tea House, specializing in the European high tea. Grandmother Juliana is known for her ability to read the future in a person’s tea leaves. The tea house is named from Hana Keller’s mother, Maggie. The three women are getting ready for a special event for the Magyar Women. During the high tea, Ana Novak’s tea is poisoned. Detective Erik Wolf comes to investigate and through the course of inquiry learns that Hana and Juliana both have s Three generations of Hungarian women own and manage Maggie’s Tea House, specializing in the European high tea. Grandmother Juliana is known for her ability to read the future in a person’s tea leaves. The tea house is named from Hana Keller’s mother, Maggie. The three women are getting ready for a special event for the Magyar Women. During the high tea, Ana Novak’s tea is poisoned. Detective Erik Wolf comes to investigate and through the course of inquiry learns that Hana and Juliana both have special abilities for sensing what’s going on around them. Hoping to help catch the killer before their business is ruined, Hana does her own sleuthing, feeding what she finds to Erik. Julia Buckley incorporates the rich Hungarian culture throughout the story adding layers of interesting background on Hungarian food, art and mystical beliefs. Ms. Buckley fabricates an imaginative mystery with twists and a suspense driven pace. The first Hungarian Tea House Mystery is truly a treat to be savored.
    more
  • K.A. Davis
    January 1, 1970
    DEATH IN A BUDAPEST BUTTERFLY, the first in the new Hungarian Tea House Mystery series by Julia Buckley, is a delightful introduction to the author’s Hungarian culture. It’s packed full of mystery, folklore, and three generations of strong women who run Maggie’s Tea House. The protagonist, Hana Keller, along with her mother, Maggie, and grandmother, Juliana, are known for serving European High Tea and specialty events with a Hungarian flair. Ms. Buckley did an outstanding job capturing the essen DEATH IN A BUDAPEST BUTTERFLY, the first in the new Hungarian Tea House Mystery series by Julia Buckley, is a delightful introduction to the author’s Hungarian culture. It’s packed full of mystery, folklore, and three generations of strong women who run Maggie’s Tea House. The protagonist, Hana Keller, along with her mother, Maggie, and grandmother, Juliana, are known for serving European High Tea and specialty events with a Hungarian flair. Ms. Buckley did an outstanding job capturing the essence of the Hungarian community through the use of vernacular and accents added to speech between the characters. Her introduction of Hungarian heritage via myths and legends, along with amazing food descriptions, added to the authenticity of the setting. The characters are well-developed and I enjoyed the touch of paranormal, especially with Grandma Juliana and her tea leaf readings.When a woman is murdered with poisoned tea served from Hana’s special butterfly tea cup during one of the Tea House events, she gets involved in the investigation to help clear the Tea House’s reputation after clients start cancelling. Detective Wolf, the investigator, pulls Hana, her mother, and her grandmother into the interviews, to help translate the Hungarian spoken by the event’s attendees. These scenes add some light humor as the women help the detective understand their culture, plus it gives Hana an insider’s opportunity to sort out the clues from the witnesses. As the book progresses, so does Hana’s involvement with the detective, and a romance blossoms. Clues were liberally sprinkled throughout the plot but instead of trying to guess, I sat back and enjoyed the story as it unfolded until I’d read the very last page.Hana’s grandmother is quite the accomplished cook and I was excited to see the author includes recipes for several of her own family’s Hungarian dishes.I was provided an advance copy via Netgalley. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
    more
  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to the publisher, via Netgalley, for an advance e-galley for honest review.3.5 stars, rounded. I liked this one and think the series has a good deal of potential. The level of involvement that the detective allowed Hana strained credulity, but the inclusion of Hungarian culture and the folklore element set this one apart.
    more
  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    Ever since I went with my husband on a river cruise on the Danube, which included Budapest, I have been drawn to all books that have something to do with Hungary. Hungarian authors such as Sandor Marai, Magda Szabo and Miklos Banffy have been wonderful to read. So as soon as I this title, I knew I had to pre-order it. I really enjoyed all the Hungarian culture included in this book.
    more
  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    I love a cozy, but there's always a balancing act between getting high on the coziness scale and staying low on the cheese scale. Death in a Budapest Butterfly does a pretty good job walking that line.Pros:-I love the Hungarian family and community, especially delving into their folklore. It was new and interesting to me.-Tea room! Tea rooms make me happy.-Awesome grandmother. Some of the best characters in cozies are the wise and/or feisty grandmothers, and this book delivers.-Psychic powers! I I love a cozy, but there's always a balancing act between getting high on the coziness scale and staying low on the cheese scale. Death in a Budapest Butterfly does a pretty good job walking that line.Pros:-I love the Hungarian family and community, especially delving into their folklore. It was new and interesting to me.-Tea room! Tea rooms make me happy.-Awesome grandmother. Some of the best characters in cozies are the wise and/or feisty grandmothers, and this book delivers.-Psychic powers! I love a paranormal twist and can't wait to see how Hana's abilities progress. Cons:-I don't think that's how an actual police investigation works.-I like a very slow romantic build in my cozies; this one ramped up too quickly for me.-Cozies are cozy for their sense of place - the quaint setting is part of the appeal, and I felt that this book could have been stronger in that respect.All in all this was a fun read and I'm interested in seeing what happens next.
    more
  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    I was drawn to this book because of the teahouse. I’m studying to become an herbalist, and making tea is a daily event for me, so I love reading stories that revolve around it. And this being the start of a new cozy mystery series made it that much more enticing! Also, I read and really enjoyed the first book, A Dark and Stormy Murder, in A Writer’s Apprentice Mystery series by Buckley, so I was pretty confident this would be a good book. I know nothing about Hungary or it’s legends, so that asp I was drawn to this book because of the teahouse. I’m studying to become an herbalist, and making tea is a daily event for me, so I love reading stories that revolve around it. And this being the start of a new cozy mystery series made it that much more enticing! Also, I read and really enjoyed the first book, A Dark and Stormy Murder, in A Writer’s Apprentice Mystery series by Buckley, so I was pretty confident this would be a good book. I know nothing about Hungary or it’s legends, so that aspect was also very interesting to me. Legends and folklore always add a unique layer to fiction, and learning about cultures this way has always fascinated me. And I always look at the recipes at the end of cozies, but have never made any of them. With the Hungarian recipes that Buckley has included though, they actually seem pretty easy to make and super tasty. Maybe I’ll finally make something.For me, cozies need to have good character development, and Buckley has a real talent for it. I enjoyed watching the different generations interact with each other, and you could see the love that Buckley has for her own heritage through these characters. I’m excited to read more about Hana and her family, and see where Buckley takes this series next.So often in cozies, the heroine is not believed by the police and greatly discouraged with their investigating. Buckley did something I really like, and have been seeing more of recently in newer cozies, the detective actually worked with Hana and didn’t tell her continually to stop investigating. Det. Wolf even told her a couple of times she should become a cop because she has such an inquisitive nature. This is such a refreshing change.Even better, Det. Wolf believed Hana and her grandmother when they started sharing information that came to them from their feelings and psychic powers. He didn’t believe them right away, but came around quickly enough, and didn’t ever make them feel like they were crazy. It is nice to see open channels of communication and encouragement in a cozy mystery.Buckley also handled the romance part of the book well, not only between Hana and Det. Wolf, but with all the other couples. It was sweet seeing older couples still in love, and Hana’s brother trying to encourage his girlfriend to become more part of the world. I’m happy that Buckley doesn’t make use wait forever to see if Hana and the detective will be together, and am looking forward to see how everyone’s relationships continue.As for the mystery itself, Buckley had me guessing through most of the book. The clues and red herrings she left were the perfect amount. And the final reveal was handled really well. I’m excited to see what Buckley comes up with for the next book in the Hungarian Teahouse Mystery series!
    more
  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    What draws you to read a cozy mystery series? Cozies are unique: murders aside, they are set in places you'd like to visit, with characters who are basically good people (murderous impulses notwithstanding) who often fall in love. Murders are generally solved without significant damage to the community. The focus can be food, cats, libraries, knitting, or other creative endeavors (as in Julia Buckley's Writers' Apprentice series). The reader can relax, read, and enjoy a respite amongst the lovel What draws you to read a cozy mystery series? Cozies are unique: murders aside, they are set in places you'd like to visit, with characters who are basically good people (murderous impulses notwithstanding) who often fall in love. Murders are generally solved without significant damage to the community. The focus can be food, cats, libraries, knitting, or other creative endeavors (as in Julia Buckley's Writers' Apprentice series). The reader can relax, read, and enjoy a respite amongst the lovely (if occasionally lethal) elements.This new series takes to to a small town in Illinois, home to a thriving community of expatriate Hungarians. Three generations of women run Maggie's Tea House, where fancy teas and traditional Hungarian delicacies are served on lovely china. Hana, Maggie's daughter and Juliana's granddaughter, collects Hungarian porcelains and tea services, which she uses to create the establishment's signature decor. When we meet Hana, she is gathering butterfly decorations to complement her newest teacup, the Budapest Butterfly, for a tea to be hosted by the Maygar Women of St. Stephen's parish. She has coaxed her grandmother to do tea-leaf readings by offering to use the teacup in her centerpiece. Hungarian foods and desserts perfume the air as the women set up and serve.The event seems to go well. Although it seems odd to Hana when Mrs. Kalas, president of the group, rudely snubs quiet Ava Novak, the other women happily nibble, mingle, and queue up to have their tea leaves read. They are all familiar with the symbolism Juliana calls forth from the leaves - animals, acorns, supernatural creatures - and they are accustomed to readings that are both vague and positive -- so they are all shocked when Mrs. Kalas receives a dire warning from her cup.As for Hana, she was distracted already when she notices that the precious teacup disappeared from her grandmother's table, and reappeared on Ana's. She sees Ana sip from the cup moments before she falls ill and dies. Juliana's dismay when Detective Wolf arrives is tied to Hungarian folklore depicting wolves as predatory and trustworthy. By the time the mystery is solved, the reader will be immersed in Hungarian legend and folklore, will learn backstories from a stalwart group of expatriates, and witness a budding romance. Old-country superstitions mingle with modern sensibilities in the beautifully-detailed, immersive book. To this reader, all of the elements of a wonderful new series are in these pages, and I can hardly wait for its sequel. Five stars! Thanks to NetGalley for providing the ARC.(By the way, the Budapest Butterfly is quite real, the work of artist Anna Weatherley. If you look at her work online, prepare to be enchanted and very, very tempted.)
    more
  • The Cozy Review
    January 1, 1970
    Series: A Hungarian Tea House Mystery - Book 1Author: Julia Buckley Genre: Cozy Mystery/Coffee/Tea Shop/ParanormalPublisher: Berkley Page Count: 304Publishing Date: July 30, 2019 The first cozy book Death in a Budapest Butterfly in a new series “A Hungarian Tea House Mystery “from author Julia Buckley hits stores on July 30, 2019, published by Berkley. This new series has stout, gifted women, tasty food, exotic teas, a delightful teacup collection, and a look at Hungarian culture. There are plen Series: A Hungarian Tea House Mystery - Book 1Author: Julia Buckley Genre: Cozy Mystery/Coffee/Tea Shop/ParanormalPublisher: Berkley Page Count: 304Publishing Date: July 30, 2019 The first cozy book Death in a Budapest Butterfly in a new series “A Hungarian Tea House Mystery “from author Julia Buckley hits stores on July 30, 2019, published by Berkley. This new series has stout, gifted women, tasty food, exotic teas, a delightful teacup collection, and a look at Hungarian culture. There are plenty of recipes and tasty treats for those who spend time at Maggie’s Tea House. The main character, Hana, is stubborn, set in her ways and at times naïve. Her mother and grandmother are special and love what they do. Hana’s budding relationship with Detective Wolf will be interesting to watch. With just a hint of the paranormal, this cozy book will make readers smile.Although this is a sweet story and the murder itself intriguing, there was just a bit too much emphasis on the Hungarian side of the women’s lives. There are times when the reader may have to remind themselves that this book is set-in modern-day America. The cultural aspects are fun but seem to be used more for filler than real background information on the characters. I would like to see the paranormal aspects of the three women more defined and enlarged in future books as I felt this was one of the more engaging inclusions in the storyline.Ms. Buckley knows how to write a cozy book. Her story is littered with twists and turns, insightful commentary, and heartfelt family values. Death in a Budapest Butterfly is a cozy book that will entertain readers of all types of mysteries. I am looking forward to seeing the direction this series takes, and the continued development of the characters.
    more
  • Kimberly
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you @netgalley for the review copy of this book. All opinions are my own. I really enjoyed this unique cozy. It’s the first book in a new series called A Hungarian Tea House Mystery. It takes place in the suburbs of Chicago and centers around the cutest family who own and operate a tea house. Hana, her mother and grandmother all enjoy hosting events and perhaps putting on a show of reading tea leaves. Unfortunately, their business is tainted when a patron is poisoned after sipping tea from Thank you @netgalley for the review copy of this book. All opinions are my own. I really enjoyed this unique cozy. It’s the first book in a new series called A Hungarian Tea House Mystery. It takes place in the suburbs of Chicago and centers around the cutest family who own and operate a tea house. Hana, her mother and grandmother all enjoy hosting events and perhaps putting on a show of reading tea leaves. Unfortunately, their business is tainted when a patron is poisoned after sipping tea from a exquisite cup. Hana assists the detective as he begins the arduous process of interviewing the guests, who are older, Hungarian women. They stumble upon quite a few revelations: hidden secrets, new love and unexplainable abilities. The mystery was fantastic. I loved the interview process and how the clues were slowly presented and dwindled down. The suspects left me guessing for quite some time. What really captivated me were the main characters. I’m already invested in Hana’s family. They remind me of the beloved family in the movie My Big Fat Greek Wedding. Loud, meddling, supportive and full of heritage. I loved all the descriptions about Hungarian food and was rather intrigued by the folklore and customs weaved throughout the story. Hana and a couple women in her family have the gift of sight which gives the story a touch of paranormal and pairs well with an investigation. I’m also a huge fan of tea so I enjoyed the chatter about beautiful cups, blends and the overall setting of the tea house. The book concludes with a few recipes. I really look forward to catching up with these characters again and will anxiously be awaiting news of a sequel.
    more
  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    Beauty meets death in this new series by Julia Buckley, which features Hungarian culture, family, and folklore. The Hungarian elements mixed with the cozy mystery nicely, making this a fun, unique read. It was fascinating learning about Easter European history and culture (and yummy food), and the slightly paranormal aspect was entertaining without being overly unrealistic. I love that the Budapest Butterfly is a Hungarian tea cup and that Hana loves it just because it is beautiful. However, the Beauty meets death in this new series by Julia Buckley, which features Hungarian culture, family, and folklore. The Hungarian elements mixed with the cozy mystery nicely, making this a fun, unique read. It was fascinating learning about Easter European history and culture (and yummy food), and the slightly paranormal aspect was entertaining without being overly unrealistic. I love that the Budapest Butterfly is a Hungarian tea cup and that Hana loves it just because it is beautiful. However, the romance was way too insta-lovey, but levels off in a good way, and the police investigation wasn't as realistic, but that is to be expected in a cozy. Overall, I did really enjoy this book. I read it in less than a day! I look forward to reading the next book in the series. There are recipes in the back of the book for the dishes mentioned throughout they mystery. I cannot wait to try them out!Disclosure: I obtained a copy of this eARC for review through NetGalley. The opinions expressed are my own.
    more
  • Adriana
    January 1, 1970
    Tea house mysteries, in general, are becoming a thing as I've lately read a hundred little variations of this plot. What made Buckley's entry into the overcrowded market interesting was the addition of a Hungarian community and, thus, their culture and beliefs. Three generations of women - with very different personalities despite being family - help the local police solve a crime that takes place in their tea house. And, as with any good cozy mystery, there is the prerequisite romantic interest Tea house mysteries, in general, are becoming a thing as I've lately read a hundred little variations of this plot. What made Buckley's entry into the overcrowded market interesting was the addition of a Hungarian community and, thus, their culture and beliefs. Three generations of women - with very different personalities despite being family - help the local police solve a crime that takes place in their tea house. And, as with any good cozy mystery, there is the prerequisite romantic interest between the homicide detective and the (nosy) leading lady. It really does feel at times like Buckley had a checklist of mandatory cozy mystery elements, but she uses them well so I'm willing to forgive it. This is indeed a very cozy mystery that you can spend a pleasant afternoon enjoying while drinking a nice cup of tea... just not at a tea house because those places are apparently very dangerous.
    more
  • Elyse
    January 1, 1970
    Penguin First-to-Read ARC.I haven't read many cozy mysteries but it's a genre I want to get into! There are just so many and they're long series and I don't have the time for that. But Julia Buckley's first Hungarian Tea House Mystery was a great place to start. It was a cute, contemporary mystery set in an area of Chicago where a lot of Hungarian Americans live. With some romance sprinkled in! I really liked all of the Hungarian elements; the food, the words, the stories. It made for a unique c Penguin First-to-Read ARC.I haven't read many cozy mysteries but it's a genre I want to get into! There are just so many and they're long series and I don't have the time for that. But Julia Buckley's first Hungarian Tea House Mystery was a great place to start. It was a cute, contemporary mystery set in an area of Chicago where a lot of Hungarian Americans live. With some romance sprinkled in! I really liked all of the Hungarian elements; the food, the words, the stories. It made for a unique cozy mystery. I really liked Juliana, Magdalena, and Hana; three generations of Hungarian women who may have some sort of psychic ability? Maggie's Tea House sounds like such a beautiful place! The mystery was pretty straight forward which I'm okay with. We don't always need twists. There was a sad, touching story behind the mystery. I loved that the foods mentioned in the book had recipes in the back! I love when authors do that! Can't wait for more!
    more
  • Kathy Martin
    January 1, 1970
    Hana Keller and her family run a tea house and Hana collects Hungarian teacups and other art. One day, at a tea party for the Magyar Women, a woman named Ava Novak sips her tea from one of Hana's collector tea cups and dies. Hana, her mother, and grandmother get involved in the investigation because of their knowledge of Hungarian and the Hungarian myths that seem to underlie the investigation. Police Detective Erik Wolf is glad for their help. He and Hana develop a relationship around the inves Hana Keller and her family run a tea house and Hana collects Hungarian teacups and other art. One day, at a tea party for the Magyar Women, a woman named Ava Novak sips her tea from one of Hana's collector tea cups and dies. Hana, her mother, and grandmother get involved in the investigation because of their knowledge of Hungarian and the Hungarian myths that seem to underlie the investigation. Police Detective Erik Wolf is glad for their help. He and Hana develop a relationship around the investigation since she seems to find lots of clues to bring to his attention.The story was filled with Hungarian myths, food, and language. There was also a lot of description of things that didn't necessarily need to be described. I kept thinking that the various detailed descriptions would feature in the plot, but they did not. Fans of cozies with recipes and with an interest in Hungarian culture would be the best audience for this story.
    more
  • Katherine
    January 1, 1970
    Death in a Budapest Butterfly is a well-written story. Three strong Hungarian women successfully operate Maggies's Tea House. There are references to Hungarian Fairy Tales, which are very dark and Dr. Jeykll and Mr. Hyde throughout the mystery. I thought the aurthor did a great job weaving together the Hungarian culture, superstitions and fairy tales with a murder mystery. Once the murderous deed was done, Detective Erik Wolf had his work cut out for him, but he did a great job. He was a good in Death in a Budapest Butterfly is a well-written story. Three strong Hungarian women successfully operate Maggies's Tea House. There are references to Hungarian Fairy Tales, which are very dark and Dr. Jeykll and Mr. Hyde throughout the mystery. I thought the aurthor did a great job weaving together the Hungarian culture, superstitions and fairy tales with a murder mystery. Once the murderous deed was done, Detective Erik Wolf had his work cut out for him, but he did a great job. He was a good investigator, especially with questioning suspects. Hana Keller, our aspiring sleuth, assisted Erik in any way she could. Of course, I understand the detective is good looking, so, I don't think she suffered. There's plenty of romance in the air! Hana has a fun but quirky family, especially Grandma, who is eccentric. I liked Domo, her brother. I thought the mystery was a little different, even creepy, but I can't say I didn't like it. A BIG thanks to Berkley Prime Crime!
    more
  • Homerun2
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsAppealing series debut featuring a Hungarian teahouse setting. Hana Keller helps run the family teahouse with her mother and grandmother. The family characters and relationships and the mouth-watering descriptions of Hungarian food are well-done.The mystery begins when a woman dies after drinking poisoned tea at a teahouse event. Naturally, Hana and her family want to prove that the teahouse is blameless. Soon she begins to untangle a long line of stories and kinships from the old count 3.5 starsAppealing series debut featuring a Hungarian teahouse setting. Hana Keller helps run the family teahouse with her mother and grandmother. The family characters and relationships and the mouth-watering descriptions of Hungarian food are well-done.The mystery begins when a woman dies after drinking poisoned tea at a teahouse event. Naturally, Hana and her family want to prove that the teahouse is blameless. Soon she begins to untangle a long line of stories and kinships from the old country. There is a hint of other-worldliness when Hana and her relatives begin to talk about psychic abilities, but that isn't a huge focus of the plot. There is also a love interest for Hana in the form of the lead detective.A pleasant and readable start to a new series. Thanks to the publisher and to Net Galley for providing me with an ARC in exchange for my honest review.
    more
  • Megan W. (pnwbookworm)
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this book was a great start to a new cozy mystery series. I loved the setting and the Hungarian traditions and customs added a really unique touch to this book. The story started off quickly, the murder happening at the beginning and flowed nicely from there. There is a hint of the paranormal in this book as well, and I felt like that added another dimension to the story. I enjoyed the characters of the mother and grandmother quite a bit but I found the detective to be a little bit fla I thought this book was a great start to a new cozy mystery series. I loved the setting and the Hungarian traditions and customs added a really unique touch to this book. The story started off quickly, the murder happening at the beginning and flowed nicely from there. There is a hint of the paranormal in this book as well, and I felt like that added another dimension to the story. I enjoyed the characters of the mother and grandmother quite a bit but I found the detective to be a little bit flat for me. I am hoping that he will be a bit more dimensional as the series going on. Overall I enjoyed the book and would recommend to anyone who enjoys cozy mysteries.
    more
  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    This is a truly delightful first in a new series.This is a fresh and unique take on a "tea shop" cozy mystery.It is great to have a female protagonist who is strong and not starting over again after a messy break-up, divorce or job loss.I really enjoyed the characters of Hana and her family. The Hungarian folk tales and customs that were mentioned in the mystery were interesting and ones I would like to read more about. The Hungarian food that was discussed made my mouth water and wish I had som This is a truly delightful first in a new series.This is a fresh and unique take on a "tea shop" cozy mystery.It is great to have a female protagonist who is strong and not starting over again after a messy break-up, divorce or job loss.I really enjoyed the characters of Hana and her family. The Hungarian folk tales and customs that were mentioned in the mystery were interesting and ones I would like to read more about. The Hungarian food that was discussed made my mouth water and wish I had some.The whodunit was top notch and kept me guessing.I highly recommend this book and look forward to the next one in the series!
    more
  • Deborah Almada
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my, what a wonderful new series!!!! This book grabbed me from the beginning and kept my attention the whole way. Wonderful characters, the whole family and their Hungarian heritage are a major part of this story, as is their Tea Room, the family business. Hana is one of a long line of Hungarian women with a gift, and this gift and a knowledge of Hungarian folklore, customs and language make Hana, her mother and her grandmother people who can help find the killer when one of their patrons is p Oh my, what a wonderful new series!!!! This book grabbed me from the beginning and kept my attention the whole way. Wonderful characters, the whole family and their Hungarian heritage are a major part of this story, as is their Tea Room, the family business. Hana is one of a long line of Hungarian women with a gift, and this gift and a knowledge of Hungarian folklore, customs and language make Hana, her mother and her grandmother people who can help find the killer when one of their patrons is poisoned at one of their events.The was a fast moving, intriguing and warmhearted mystery with just a touch of something special, can't wait for the next volume!!!!!
    more
  • Deborah
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley for an ARC copy in return for an honest review.The Hungarian folklore and community make this a unique mystery. Hana and her family are well drawn and this is a good series start. The food and tea should make this a fun, interesting read for those with little Hungarian experiences. I do find it hard to believe that the police in the Chicago area wouldn't have access to a Hungarian interpreter so they wouldn't have to use a potential suspects to help with the Hungarian aspects Thanks to NetGalley for an ARC copy in return for an honest review.The Hungarian folklore and community make this a unique mystery. Hana and her family are well drawn and this is a good series start. The food and tea should make this a fun, interesting read for those with little Hungarian experiences. I do find it hard to believe that the police in the Chicago area wouldn't have access to a Hungarian interpreter so they wouldn't have to use a potential suspects to help with the Hungarian aspects of the investigation. Still, this is a very enjoyable mystery.
    more
  • Jenny T.
    January 1, 1970
    This is the 1st book in a new series (Hungarian Tea House Mystery) introducing Hana Keller and her family. One of the customers dies at a tea event at the family owned Tea House and appears related to rumors rooted in the local Magyar Women community group. An entertaining cozy mystery with a dash of Hungarian - I liked the different setting, meeting the new characters, and the introduction to Hungarian culture.Thanks to First to Read- Penguin Books USA for the free copy of this book.
    more
  • Pat Plummer
    January 1, 1970
    Great new seriesHungarian culture, folklore and food come together to solve a murder at Maggie's Tea House. Mix in butterflies, wolves, and noodles, and you have a great afternoon's read. I can't wait for the next book!
  • Norma
    January 1, 1970
    A nice start to a series. I enjoyed it over all.
  • Amber Dawn
    January 1, 1970
    No book has ever made me laugh out loud, sigh or drool like this one has. I started reading this today and couldn’t put it down. It was the perfect blend of a cozy mystery with just a dash of romance. While it follows the same formulas as most cozy mysteries there is something special about this one. I received a free e-arc in exchange for an honest review from first to read.
    more
Write a review