Seven Endless Forests
In this gorgeous standalone companion to the critically acclaimed fantasy, The Boneless Mercies, April Tucholke spins a bold and blood-hungry retelling of the King Arthur legend that is perfect for fans of Naomi Novik, Garth Nix, and Laini Taylor.On the heels of a devastating plague, Torvi’s sister, Morgunn, is stolen from the family farm by Uther, a flame-loving Fremish wolf-priest who leads a pack of ragged, starving girls. Torvi leaves the only home she’s ever known, and joins a shaven-skulled druid and a band of roaming Elsh artists known as the Butcher Bards. They set out on a quest to rescue Torvi’s sister, and find a mythical sword.On their travels, Torvi and her companions will encounter magical night wilds and mystical Drakes who trade in young men. They will sing rowdy Elshland ballads in a tree-town tavern, and find a mysterious black tower in an Endless Forest. They will fight alongside famous Vorseland archers and barter with Fremish wizards. They will feast with rogue Jade Fell children in a Skal Mountain cave, and seek the help of a Pig Witch. They will face wild, dangerous magic that leads to love, joy, tragedy, and death.Torvi set out to rescue a sister, but she may find it’s merely the first step toward a life that is grander and more glorious than anything she could have imagined.

Seven Endless Forests Details

TitleSeven Endless Forests
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 28th, 2020
PublisherFarrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR)
ISBN-139780374307097
Rating
GenreFantasy, Young Adult, Retellings

Seven Endless Forests Review

  • emma
    January 1, 1970
    I wish I read an encyclopedia instead of this book.Well, okay, not any encyclopedia. A fantastical one. A magic-y fairytale-y encyclopedia documenting the crazy cool little things of a made-up world. Written by April Genevieve Tucholke. It can even be about the universe of this book, for all I care.This author is a complete full-on genius at making up worlds. The world-building here is legitimately stellar.Its the everything else that Im not a fan of.This author is so good at creating worlds I wish I read an encyclopedia instead of this book.Well, okay, not any encyclopedia. A fantastical one. A magic-y fairytale-y encyclopedia documenting the crazy cool little things of a made-up world. Written by April Genevieve Tucholke. It can even be about the universe of this book, for all I care.This author is a complete full-on genius at making up worlds. The world-building here is legitimately stellar.It’s the everything else that I’m not a fan of.This author is so good at creating worlds populated with fantastical peoples and cultures and places and foods...but she is just the worst at blending all of those into an exciting plot.Seriously, please, I’m begging: Someone tell April Genevieve Tucholke that Walking for 200 pages does not count as an exciting narrative. And also that if we spend 200 pages walking towards something, that conflict should not be over in a fraction of the pages spent making eye contact.I can’t stand the pacing!! At one point our ragtag group of wanderers encounters a GHOST WITCH made of DUST AND MAGIC in an OLD ABANDONED TOWER they had to FLY INTO and she TEARS THEIR SKIN INTO PIECES. Guess how much coverage this insane huge rad event gets? One page. The encounter itself, the aftermath, the discussion of it: all together, one page. KILL ME.I want to read about evil creepy magic witches of yore. Is that so wrong?And it’s not like the characters are much to write home about either. They’re flat as hell. Or maybe just boring. It’s hard to say.Regardless, that does not stop everyone from becoming obsessed with each other immediately upon meeting, like a fanfiction in which a 16-year-old with a messy bun experiences two teen pop sensations falling in love-at-first-sight with her within ten minutes. (Will she fall for the bad boy or the goofy lovable one?!?! Who knows?) (I do. The answer is both.)When our main character Torvi and her sister Morgunn meet a girl named Gyda, they call her their “sister” after literally one (1) day of acquaintance. When Torvi and Gyda join a ragtag group of wanderers and one of the group leaves a few hours later, Torvi does everything short of dressing in black for two months and laying in the street to mourn. Not to mention the departer, Stefan, straight up makes out with Gyda upon his exit and she reacts to it as if they are life partners. Every one night stand and bedtime conversation results in a deeper relationship than I have with some of my family members.The second half of this was much better than the first, but more because I adjusted to the state of things than through any actual improvement.Although at one point in the second half, a nation called “Finnmark” is referenced, which is easily the funniest thing I’ve ever heard.Bottom line: Probably done with April Genevieve Tucholke at this point! (Unless she takes my advice and begins writing reference tomes.)-----------my favorite part of this book was something called the black apple, which is just an apple except the peel is black.pretty hardcore.review to come / 3 stars-----------thought i'd finish this book in a day...it's day 3 and i just hit the halfway point. HELP-----------someone tell me to stop reading books set in the same world as books i did not likethanks to the publisher for the arc
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  • Jasmine from How Useful It Is
    January 1, 1970
    This is my first read from the author. It's a bit of getting used to because the character and location names are so foreign to me though Pig Witch and its living situation is funny. This story relive the past often, like how Torvi met Viggo, how the Butcher Bard came to town, wolf-priest came to their farm, etc. I'm not a fan of flash back. The knife dance is interesting and the Bard are sure bold to wear it in that place they chose. I like the old beliefs that the needles of the red pine tree This is my first read from the author. It's a bit of getting used to because the character and location names are so foreign to me though Pig Witch and its living situation is funny. This story relive the past often, like how Torvi met Viggo, how the Butcher Bard came to town, wolf-priest came to their farm, etc. I'm not a fan of flash back. The knife dance is interesting and the Bard are sure bold to wear it in that place they chose. I like the old beliefs that the needles of the red pine tree can whisper secrets. The siblings with the names start with i's are hilarious! The cover of this book is gorgeous!
This book is told in the first person point of view following Torvi, 18. The snow sickness, a kind of plague, that comes once a year in winter and kills people. This year her mom and a couple of servants along with her lover Viggo are among the dead. Surviving at the one thousand acres farm in Voresland now are just her and her sister Morgunn, 14. They worry the wolf-priests will come to hurt them. They plan to wander. Then Gyda came and told them she's in search of a magical sword. Before they take off, Morgunn disappeared. Now Torvi and Gyda join a group of Butcher Bard to rescue Morgunn.
Seven Endless Forests is imaginative and well written. It's a bit dark for young readers with all the interests in slitting throats of enemies and animals. I like the supporting characters of Madoc, Ink, Stefan, and Gyda. The Drake and all of their knowing is cool. The story on the sword is good. I enjoyed the actions and adventures and the friendship even though at times the wolf-priests are too feral for me. I'm a bit overloaded with this book because there's not one kind, but a bunch: magicians, wizards, witches, etc.
***Many thanks to Fierce Reads for the opportunity to read and review. Please be assured that my opinions are honest.xoxo, Jasmine at www.howusefulitis.wordpress.com for more details
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  • Candace Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    When I saw there was going to be a companion to The Boneless Mercies, I knew I needed it! And this cover alone is golden!Torvi was the perfect MC with an emotional backstory. On her journey, she doesnt forget about what had happened to her in her past, but instead, let it make her new path stronger. Madoc was probably my favorite side character, but I loved them all, especially the Pig Witch, too!I always love Tucholkes writing so much! This book was beautiful and strong and I never wanted it to When I saw there was going to be a companion to The Boneless Mercies, I knew I needed it! And this cover alone is golden!Torvi was the perfect MC with an emotional backstory. On her journey, she doesn’t forget about what had happened to her in her past, but instead, let it make her new path stronger. Madoc was probably my favorite side character, but I loved them all, especially the Pig Witch, too!I always love Tucholke’s writing so much! This book was beautiful and strong and I never wanted it to end! I loved the characters, the world building, the myth. Perfection!
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  • Nenia ❤️️ I hate everything you love ❤️️ Campbell
    January 1, 1970
    I'm getting SABRIEL/BONE HOUSES vibes from this and I am all for it.
  • Amy (libraryofamy)
    January 1, 1970
    A COMPANION NOVEL TO ONE OF MY FAVORITE BOOKS OF ALL TIME?!? HOW DID I NOT KNOW ABOUT THIS
  • Mara YA Mood Reader
    January 1, 1970
    8/2/2019: All I needed to hear was Arthurian Legend! I am here!2/25/2020: Okay but why yet another gotta-save-my-sister plot 😫? Come on! Other than that I am here for Druids and Tucholke
  • Caidyn (BW Reviews; he/him/his)
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review!DNF at 50%When I read The Boneless Mercies, I thought it was a good book with fantastic writing, but the characters weren't that interesting and the plot was rather nonexistent. I attributed that to not being a huge Beowulf fan, so when I requested this, I hoped I would like it more since I love Arthurian mythology.But, I came across the same issues.The retelling wasn't really a retelling. Uther was mentioned a few times and I received an ARC through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review!DNF at 50%When I read The Boneless Mercies, I thought it was a good book with fantastic writing, but the characters weren't that interesting and the plot was rather nonexistent. I attributed that to not being a huge Beowulf fan, so when I requested this, I hoped I would like it more since I love Arthurian mythology.But, I came across the same issues.The retelling wasn't really a retelling. Uther was mentioned a few times and that was it. I couldn't see any relation to anything else Arthurian. Then, there were way too many characters and I never felt as though I got a good grip on them at all, even the MC. And then there was no plot to speak of.I wanted to love this since I love King Arthur and that general mythology. But I ran into the same problems I had with her other "retelling". Sadly, I don't think that Tucholke is my kind of author.
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    Based on the title Im guessing this is somehow related to The Boneless Mercies and I am HERE for it. Based on the title I’m guessing this is somehow related to The Boneless Mercies and I am HERE for it.
  • ♠ TABI ♠
    January 1, 1970
    oof that cover
  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    The Seven Endless Forests is a book that I can probably only review through a pros / cons list.Pros: - The writing in this book is absolutely gorgeous. It feels like old-fashioned fantasy without ever being boring or clunky. This was definitely one of my favorite aspects of the book. - The world-building is truly impressive. It's clear that Tucholke has thought a lot about this world and all of the stories it contains. There's tons of lore scattered throughout the story. The whole experience The Seven Endless Forests is a book that I can probably only review through a pros / cons list.Pros: - The writing in this book is absolutely gorgeous. It feels like old-fashioned fantasy without ever being boring or clunky. This was definitely one of my favorite aspects of the book. - The world-building is truly impressive. It's clear that Tucholke has thought a lot about this world and all of the stories it contains. There's tons of lore scattered throughout the story. The whole experience reminded me a lot of one of my favorite video games -- Dragon Age: Inquisition -- because it felt like there was something great to be discovered around every corner.Cons:- There were a lot of characters in The Seven Endless Forests, which made it tough to keep them all straight and develop an emotional connection to them. - I didn't feel like the frequent comparisons to Arthurian legends was fitting. There's a hint of it, absolutely, but the majority of this plot reminded me more of The Lord of the Rings since a lot of the story revolves around the journey itself. This didn't quite resonant for me in the same way that The Boneless Mercies did. That said, there was enough in The Seven Endless Forests that I enjoyed, which would make me read more books by Tucholke in the future. Thank you to Edelweiss and the publisher for an advance reader's copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Marie
    January 1, 1970
    SO badass. The last chapter (not the epilogue) was one of the best closings of a novel Ive ever read. SO badass. The last chapter (not the epilogue) was one of the best closings of a novel I’ve ever read.
  • Bex
    January 1, 1970
    When you've loved a book and you discover that there is a companion novel set in the same world as that book you obviously have to read it. But Seven Endless Forests was like going to see a band that you really love, only to discover that their new album isn't anywhere near as impressive.Tucholke is a real poetic master. Her writing is the epitome of atmospheric and is absolutely the reason I persisted with a book that I was otherwise finding boring. Seven Endless Forests is marketed as a When you've loved a book and you discover that there is a companion novel set in the same world as that book you obviously have to read it. But Seven Endless Forests was like going to see a band that you really love, only to discover that their new album isn't anywhere near as impressive.Tucholke is a real poetic master. Her writing is the epitome of atmospheric and is absolutely the reason I persisted with a book that I was otherwise finding boring. Seven Endless Forests is marketed as a retelling of sorts of Arthurian legend (seems to be a popular trend right now!). And much like some of the other Arthurian retellings of late, this one doesn't really have that something special which makes it stand out from the heavily saturated crowd and it has only an exceptionally tenuous link to the legendary tale (although there is some extracting of weaponry).I didn't really mind that this wasn't much of a retelling, and was instead more of a rescue mission for a girl trying to find her kidnapped sister. But I really struggled with the way the story was told and with the sluggish pacing. The majority of the book feels very much like a collection of stories shared around a campfire, switching between past and present often in a series of old wives tales passed between the characters. This makes the story hugely uneventful - nothing happens really and when it does it's fleeting and just an action point to change the scene a little bit. If it wasn't for the nods to The Boneless Mercies or the great writing I would have given up. I think in order to enjoy this book you would need to be prepared to become immersed in the atmosphere and whimsical world without expecting any emotional connection or character input. Might work for some people, but didn't work for me.ARC provided from netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Olivia
    January 1, 1970
    You know a book has done its job when you are so consumed with the story that you forget who and what you are. This loose retelling of the Arthur legend unexpectedly dug its claws into my heart through its atmospheric writing and magical aesthetic. The constant mention of what the characters are eating, drinking and even smoking (all very fancy herbal blends that they forage), really visualise the location. Full Review on thatfictionlife
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  • Monogamist
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't read The Boneless Mercies and - my bad - I didn't know this was a companion book. There were a few times when I didn't completely get the references to places or fantastic aspects of this story. At least, I personally felt like I was not able to grasp everything. It has a very slow pace, it's really descriptive and I often thought about giving up. Nevertheless, it's beautifully written and it was the only reason why I kept going. Nothing happens for big part of the book, often it's lots I didn't read The Boneless Mercies and - my bad - I didn't know this was a companion book. There were a few times when I didn't completely get the references to places or fantastic aspects of this story. At least, I personally felt like I was not able to grasp everything. It has a very slow pace, it's really descriptive and I often thought about giving up. Nevertheless, it's beautifully written and it was the only reason why I kept going. Nothing happens for big part of the book, often it's lots of story telling and you kind of lose track of the main plot. At 60% the story finally gets going but it became super weird - like the mushroom scene. Also, I didn't get lots of King Arthur vibes, not sure if this can be really considered as a retelling.ARC provided from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review
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  • USOM
    January 1, 1970
    (Disclaimer: I received this book from Netgalley. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Seven Endless Forests is not so much of a retelling, as a story about a girl trying to save her sister. Told by her mother that all she is every going to be good for is someone's bride, Seven Endless Forests is a story about her journey of agency. A companion novel to The Boneless Mercies, you don't need to read the first to enjoy this one! The writing in this book was gorgeous, (Disclaimer: I received this book from Netgalley. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Seven Endless Forests is not so much of a retelling, as a story about a girl trying to save her sister. Told by her mother that all she is every going to be good for is someone's bride, Seven Endless Forests is a story about her journey of agency. A companion novel to The Boneless Mercies, you don't need to read the first to enjoy this one! The writing in this book was gorgeous, toeing the line between epic and lyrical, with emotional. My favorite aspect of Seven Endless Forests was the main character, Torvi. If you like a character who has to figure out how to listen to her heart, embrace her destiny, and prove our parent's wrong, then you will enjoy Torvi. Her character growth was my favorite element of the story and I think YA needs a lot more of these heroines. The ones who have to find their voice, who are told they cannot be heroines, and who have a quiet strengthfull review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...
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  • Michaela (Journey into Books)
    January 1, 1970
    DNFed 45%While I didn't hate this book it just wasn't able to capture my attention.This book started off quite promising I was intrigued by the characters and the world being built up seemed pretty interesting however for some reason the more I read the more I felt myself disengaging from the story and the less ! cared about what was actually happening which ultimately led me to giving up on it.
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  • Lyndall Clipstone
    January 1, 1970
    I recieved an ARC from Edelweiss and absolutely adored this book. It has all of the things that draw me back constantly to Tucholke's books: heart-breakingly lush prose, expansive casts of unique characters, and the most atmospheric settings. It was wonderful to revisit the world of the Boneless Mercies again, and I loved all of the little references to how Frey and her mercies had impacted the world.
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  • Sophie
    January 1, 1970
    Look at this cover it is BEAUTIFUL!! And fulfils my desire for all the green covers!! I need this book and this story!! I remember the writing was so beautiful in the first one (with was a companion to this-- both are standalones) as well!!
  • Megan (YABookers)
    January 1, 1970
    disclaimer: I received a copy free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.I absolutely adored The Boneless Mercies and it's grand, atmospheric, and lush fantasy world. So when I heard The Seven Endless Forests was a companion, I was stoked. And while it succeeded in dragging me back into the brilliant world-building and lush writing, it failed in making me really fall for the characters, these characters just didn't resonate with me as much as the girls from The Boneless Mercies disclaimer: I received a copy free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.I absolutely adored The Boneless Mercies and it's grand, atmospheric, and lush fantasy world. So when I heard The Seven Endless Forests was a companion, I was stoked. And while it succeeded in dragging me back into the brilliant world-building and lush writing, it failed in making me really fall for the characters, these characters just didn't resonate with me as much as the girls from The Boneless Mercies -except maybe Gyda. The world that Tucholke has created is so brilliantly vivid full of culture, mythology, and brilliant tales of quests and heroics. Like The Boneless Mercies, The Seven Endless Forests is a very slow-paced book with an odd action scene, it was a book that focused heavily on character interactions and their journey and while that worked for me in The Boneless Mercies, I struggled with that aspect for The Seven Endless Forests. That isn't to say I didn't enjoy this book, I did, I just wishes I cared more for the characters. Full review to come.
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  • Teresa
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley, Macmillan Children's Publishing Group, and April Genevieve Tucholke for the opportunity to read Seven Endless Forests in exchange for an honest review.I loved Tucholke's style in Wink, Poppy, Midnight, and wanted to try something else from her. I do have Boneless Mercies, though I have not read it yet, as I understand it, Seven Endless Forests is a standalone companion piece to Boneless Mercies, which means you can read one without having read the other. If I had read Thank you to NetGalley, Macmillan Children's Publishing Group, and April Genevieve Tucholke for the opportunity to read Seven Endless Forests in exchange for an honest review.I loved Tucholke's style in Wink, Poppy, Midnight, and wanted to try something else from her. I do have Boneless Mercies, though I have not read it yet, as I understand it, Seven Endless Forests is a standalone companion piece to Boneless Mercies, which means you can read one without having read the other. If I had read Boneless Mercies first, I see some areas of potential crossover and little hints to the first work.As it stands, this book is a solid piece that a young reader can tackle without having read any of Tucholke's other books first. It is a nice quest storyline featuring a female protagonist seeking to pull a sword from a stone tree to become the ruler of a jarldom. Overall enjoyed the story. I thought the character relationships between each other could have been more fleshed out. It was a rather quick read that could have been expanded, though the end offers potential for other stories in this world.
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  • Shelley
    January 1, 1970
    *Source* Publisher*Genre* Young Adult / Dark Fantasy*Rating* 4.0*Thoughts*April Genevieve Tucholke's Seven Endless Forests is a standalone companion to The Boneless Mercies. It is also a retelling of the King Arthur legend with a female lead character. This story takes place in the fictional country of Vorseland. The main character in this story is 18-year old Torvi who has suffered great losses. When her only surviving family member, Morgunn, is kidnapped by a vicious band of Fremish *Source* Publisher*Genre* Young Adult / Dark Fantasy*Rating* 4.0*Thoughts*April Genevieve Tucholke's Seven Endless Forests is a standalone companion to The Boneless Mercies. It is also a retelling of the King Arthur legend with a female lead character. This story takes place in the fictional country of Vorseland. The main character in this story is 18-year old Torvi who has suffered great losses. When her only surviving family member, Morgunn, is kidnapped by a vicious band of Fremish wolf-priests, Torvi sets out to rescue her. Accompanying her is Gyda, a shaved headed druid, as well as a band of singing, storytelling Butcher Bards who are all on a quest.*Full Review @ Gizmos Reviews*https://gizmosreviews.blogspot.com/20...
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  • Madeline
    January 1, 1970
    APRIL TUCHOLKE JUST CONFIRMED THIS ON INSTAGRAM I AM HYPERVENTILATING AND its a companion to The Boneless Mercies! Which we all could have guessed but STILL Im so happy its not a sequel APRIL TUCHOLKE JUST CONFIRMED THIS ON INSTAGRAM I AM HYPERVENTILATING AND it’s a companion to The Boneless Mercies! Which we all could have guessed but STILL I’m so happy it’s not a sequel
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  • Elle
    January 1, 1970
    Seven Endless Forests is advertised as a retelling of the King Arthur legend. After the deaths of her mother and lover, Torvis sister Morgunn is kidnapped by a wolf-priest called Uther. Torvi unites with a druid and a group called the Butcher Bards in order to track down her sister and rescue her, as well as seeking out a mystical sword buried within a tree. Whoever pulls the sword will inherit the jarldom.This is less a retelling of the Arthur legend, and more inspired by. The main links come Seven Endless Forests is advertised as a retelling of the King Arthur legend. After the deaths of her mother and lover, Torvi’s sister Morgunn is kidnapped by a wolf-priest called Uther. Torvi unites with a druid and a group called the Butcher Bards in order to track down her sister and rescue her, as well as seeking out a mystical sword buried within a tree. Whoever pulls the sword will inherit the jarldom.This is less a retelling of the Arthur legend, and more inspired by. The main links come through some of the names (Morgunn, Uther) and the idea of a sword buried in part of nature (in this instance, a tree instead of a stone). To a point, it works, but don’t pick this up expecting an actual Arthurian retelling. (And one place is randomly referred to as Avalon at points)This had the potential to be a really good book. There are some lovely ideas wrapped up in here, and the way the relationships are established is lovely to read, with the sort of closeness and affection among all the characters that sometimes isn’t touched upon in books. The problem is it doesn’t feel like we’re given enough time with the characters to actually get to know them. We’re told a lot about them, but we’re not really shown much. And for the most part, it feels like a lot was skimmed over when it came to the characters. One of the Bards has a sad past, but it’s almost forced out of him in such a way and told in so few lines it felt uncomfortable.There’s a piece of advice often told to fantasy writers; know everything about your world, but don’t let the reader know everything about your world. Worldbuilding, when done well, can completely and utterly transport you into the novel. Unfortunately, in Seven Endless Forests there was way too much. Every single location, every single mention of a random place, or thing, or potion or whatever had a legend behind it. It got really tedious, with a character butting in on every page to say “Oh, there’s a story…” and another one going, “Yes, I know that one…” And proceeding to tell it. Even if it’s apparently a common story all the characters know?These tales felt too distracting, taking the reader away from the actual plot. And the plot was hidden among a lot of faff. It felt like playing a video game, maybe Skyrim, and spending so long on sidequests you forget what’s part of the main storyline and what isn’t.The other problem with the book, something which made it very difficult to slog through, was the formatting. I’m relatively new to ARCs in general, and I’m assuming these issues will be cleared up prior to publication, but because of the formatting it was hard to see which errors might lie with formatting, or editing, neither of which would really be the author’s fault. Still, I had to go back a fair few times to check who was speaking or what was happening.The writer has clear talent, but the story felt a little all over the place and, at times, hard to follow. There were too many characters coming in and out, and some parts felt rushed to get to the next point, with the story veering off into this or that legend and losing the main thread at others.I would definitely give Tucholke another chance, but in this instance, Seven Endless Forests just wasn’t for me.Thank you to publishers Simon & Schuster for providing this arc via NetGalley.
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  • Rae
    January 1, 1970
    I received this ARC via NetGalley for an honest review See this review and others like it on the blog here http://vicariouslyvoraciously.com/rev...After reading any of Tucholke's books you have to sit a minute and soak in everything you just experienced. Because that's what reading her books are like. An experience. They feel like some forgotten folklore that has been uncovered and is now being told for the first time in a hundred or more years. You are sucked in with the magical feel of the I received this ARC via NetGalley for an honest review See this review and others like it on the blog here http://vicariouslyvoraciously.com/rev...After reading any of Tucholke's books you have to sit a minute and soak in everything you just experienced. Because that's what reading her books are like. An experience. They feel like some forgotten folklore that has been uncovered and is now being told for the first time in a hundred or more years. You are sucked in with the magical feel of the writing and the characters that come to life right before your eyes. There are times when I wonder to myself what the heck did I just read, but in the best way possible.Seven Endless Forests was magical and held true to all of Tucholke's standard of other works. This being set in the same world as The Boneless Mercies had a lot of little easter eggs from the first book hidden within its pages. I kind of wish I had reread The Boneless Mercies before jumping into this book just so all the stories and references would have been fresh on the brain. But even so, it was still a really amazing read.I love how even though you feel a connection to the characters, you still stand apart and read this as more of a story being told rather than a part of the story as it happens. Its hard to explain how Tucholke's writing makes you feel. I feel connected but separate from the characters all at once. I am interested but still feel like I'm reading a bedtime story that has been passed down for generations. Its such a unique way of writing that I find I fall in love with a little more with each book I read of hers.Seven Endless Forests while being a standalone leaves the readers ready for more of this world by the end. Its like we were introduced to so many amazing characters with the potential for so much adventure and story to be had. I'm hoping that there will be more set in this world because its just so intriguing! I love how there is magic but its so common that its not set apart from the rest of the world building. There is an ease to the way the world within these books works and it seems every bit as natural as breathing. I love that the female characters are so strong and independent as well. There aren't the fair maidens you are used to reading about, but instead strong willed and powerful women who come into their own on the pages right before your eyes. The touch of romance was also perfect considering I'm a sucker for any type of love story, you get a sense for the chemistry between characters, but its such a small part of the bigger story. These books are not based on the love story but more so the journey that the characters take and how they grow as individuals. And if there happens to be a little kiss here or there, then so be it, but it will not in any way take away from the story you are devouring at the time.I can't wait to see what Tucholke comes up with next, hopefully another set in this magical world she has created because I will snatch it up in a heartbeat. 100% would recommend this book and all her others!!
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  • Mandy
    January 1, 1970
    4.5/5Once again, I wanted to wander off in this book and get lost. Tucholke writes like a person out of time, and I am always ensorcelled.Check out my full review at Forever Young Adult.
  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    NEED
  • Annette
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely marvelous.
  • El
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: 2.5 rounded up to a 3.If adventure comes my way, I will run to greet it. I will grab the world by its leash and make it heel.I feel pretty conflicted about this one. The prose was intoxicating. It was honestly poetic and beautiful, which is something I loved about Boneless Mercies. And I liked Torvi, the main character. Shes obsessed with fairytales and stories, and models herself off the characters that she loves. I think a lot of readers feel like that about their favourite characters, Rating: 2.5 rounded up to a 3.“If adventure comes my way, I will run to greet it. I will grab the world by its leash and make it heel.”I feel pretty conflicted about this one. The prose was intoxicating. It was honestly poetic and beautiful, which is something I loved about Boneless Mercies. And I liked Torvi, the main character. She’s obsessed with fairytales and stories, and models herself off the characters that she loves. I think a lot of readers feel like that about their favourite characters, and it made her super-relatable. The side characters were a lot of fun too. Ink, Madoc and Sven and her arrows were all lovable, and I adored the relationship between Torvi and Gyda.Unfortunately, the plot of this book didn’t land with me at all. I read the entire thing because of how beautiful the prose itself is, Tucholke has a way with words that means I’ll still go out of my way to pick up anything she writes, but Seven Endless Forests just didn’t work for me. I loved the breadth and variety of the lore being included, but there was just too much crammed into every page. It felt to me like a series of RPG side-quests all crammed into each chapter to cover as much ground as possible. I liked the idea of every character having their own quest, and the implication that everybody’s a hero, but when we saw every single one crammed into 368 pages, it felt like nothing had enough time to get any depth. And because the quests had to be resolved so quickly to move onto the next character’s quest, everything just felt a bit convenient. Deus ex machina’s everywhere. It really was beautifully written, but I wasn’t invested in anyone’s story and if the writing wasn’t so gorgeous, I probably would have DNF’d it.
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  • FTLOReading
    January 1, 1970
    Seven Endless Forests falls in the same vein of The Boneless Mercies, giving us a lyrical spin on a classic story. In this book Tucholke tackles King Arthurs rise to the throne with a feminine but no less lethal twist. Theres are two sayings that kept coming to mind while reading: Heros rarely find their happy endings and its hard for a good man to be king. You can see both of these play out throughout the story. I love the atmosphere and the tones that these books give. This title (along with Seven Endless Forests falls in the same vein of The Boneless Mercies, giving us a lyrical spin on a classic story. In this book Tucholke tackles King Arthur’s rise to the throne with a feminine but no less lethal twist. There’s are two sayings that kept coming to mind while reading: Hero’s rarely find their happy endings and its hard for a good man to be king. You can see both of these play out throughout the story. I love the atmosphere and the tones that these books give. This title (along with the Boneless Mercies) are perfect examples of campfire tales. Those stories that people tell of their ancestors around a fire when its time to make camp at night. You follow Torvi on a harrowing adventure to reclaim home, family and freedom. Having to make hard choices that will lead the world to better or let it succumb to the flame and wolves of the priest Uther. With her band of troubled yet endearing misfits you meet up with witches, assassins, bards, traverse tree top villages, cursed towers and hidden kingdoms. Tragic pasts, humorous banter, and relatable characters, Seven Endless Forests is a must read for Fantasy fans. *E-ARC kindly provided by Macmillian via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • Beverly
    January 1, 1970
    When Torvi's sister Morgunn is taken by a wolfish cult, she must venture out into the wide world of witches, quick witted archers, and fate-following druids to rescue her sister and perhaps discover her own destiny along the way.A standalone companion to Tucholke's BONELESS MERCIES, this story fits nicely into the wide pantheon of a world adjacent to Arthurian legend with a Viking flavored twist. As with any retelling, I enjoyed seeing and guessing all the various pieces of myth when they When Torvi's sister Morgunn is taken by a wolfish cult, she must venture out into the wide world of witches, quick witted archers, and fate-following druids to rescue her sister and perhaps discover her own destiny along the way.A standalone companion to Tucholke's BONELESS MERCIES, this story fits nicely into the wide pantheon of a world adjacent to Arthurian legend with a Viking flavored twist. As with any retelling, I enjoyed seeing and guessing all the various pieces of myth when they appeared. For those expecting Arthurian legend, it is there but light on the details. This story is Torvi's and while many of her companions fit into the outlines of legendary knights, they are each their own people.It is an enjoyable and uniquely written book.
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