George Marshall
The extraordinary career of George Catlett Marshall—America’s most distinguished soldier–statesman since George Washington—whose selfless leadership and moral character influenced the course of two world wars and helped define the American century. Winston Churchill called him World War II's "organizer of victory." Harry Truman said he was "the greatest military man that this country ever produced." Today, in our era of failed leadership, few lives are more worthy of renewed examination than Marshall and his fifty years of loyal service to the defense of his nation and its values. Even as a young officer he was heralded as a genius, a reputation that grew when in WWI he planned and executed a nighttime movement of more than a half million troops from one battlefield to another that led to the armistice. Between the wars he helped modernize combat training, and re-staffed the U.S. Army's officer corps with the men who would lead in the next decades. But as WWII loomed, it was the role of army chief of staff in which Marshall's intellect and backbone were put to the test, when his blind commitment to duty would run up against the realities of Washington politics. Long seen as a stoic, almost statuesque figure, he emerges in these pages as a man both remarkable and deeply human, thanks to newly discovered sources.Set against the backdrop of five major conflicts—two world wars, Palestine, Korea, and the Cold War—Marshall's education in military, diplomatic, and political power, replete with their nuances and ambiguities, runs parallel with America's emergence as a global superpower. The result is a defining account of one of our most consequential leaders.

George Marshall Details

TitleGeorge Marshall
Author
ReleaseJul 9th, 2019
PublisherDutton Caliber
ISBN-139781101990971
Rating
GenreBiography, History, Nonfiction, War, Military Fiction, North American Hi..., American History, Politics

George Marshall Review

  • Eric Wishman
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve always thought that George C. Marshall deserved a great, one volume account of his life that would interest a broad audience. While Forrest Pogue is Marshall’s definitive biographer, his four volumes might be too much for most so I’ve been hoping for something like Truman by McCullough for Marshall. I was excited to pick up George Marshall: Defender of the Republic by David L. Roll when it was released earlier this month. While I haven’t read his book on Harry Hopkins, another lesser known I’ve always thought that George C. Marshall deserved a great, one volume account of his life that would interest a broad audience. While Forrest Pogue is Marshall’s definitive biographer, his four volumes might be too much for most so I’ve been hoping for something like Truman by McCullough for Marshall. I was excited to pick up George Marshall: Defender of the Republic by David L. Roll when it was released earlier this month. While I haven’t read his book on Harry Hopkins, another lesser known player in the drama of World War II, I've seen and heard positive reviews and was anxious to see if he could help shed light and recognition on one of America's underappreciated leaders. I was initially disappointed when I started and realized it wasn't a typical cradle-to-grave biography. Mr Roll jumps right into Marshall’s military service in World War I without much attention to his childhood or early adult years. However, I soon realized his focus on Marshall's professional career was well-written and balanced. At times, he does focus on his personal life, but the majority is focused on his Chief of Staff, Secretary of State, and Secretary of Defense roles. Mr. Roll devotes considerable space to Marshall's years as Army Chief of Staff before and during World War II. In addition to describing his role in key decisions and his relationships with key political and military leaders, Roll also objectively calls out Marshall where he falls short like his part in the lack of warning to Pacific commanders before the attack on Pearl Harbor and the lack of effort to desegregate the Army. Marshall's time as Secretary of State focused on two main topics: the Marshall Plan and U.S. recognition of Israel. I appreciated the insightful and descriptive retelling of how the Marshall Plan was conceived and passed through Congress, especially the bipartisan partnership with Senator Arthur Vandenberg which makes one long for the days when pelicans could work together across the aisle. The books ends with quick overviews of his time as Secretary of Defense as well as his last years.While I'm still waiting for the great, one volume biography on Marshall, overall, David L. Roll's look at Marshall's professional career is a good read that I hope will make George Marshall better known and his contributions to our country more appreciated. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to know more about this great American.
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  • Chrissie
    January 1, 1970
    ********************The Hopkins Touch: Harry Hopkins and the Forging of the Alliance to Defeat Hitler 4 stars
  • Dizzle729
    January 1, 1970
    A thorough, in-depth, and fair review of a complex man. His contributions to 20th Century American military and foreign policy response cannot be understated. This book did a very nice job of highlighting both his strengths and flaws. This was a deep, engaging look at a man more American should be aware of and admire.
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  • Steve
    January 1, 1970
    I never read a full biography of George Marshall, until now. I have read about him in other books but this is the first full biography I read about him. This was an interesting book. George Marshall was chief of staff of the United States Army during World War II and worked behind the scenes in planning invasions with other top military leaders and the President of the United States, Franklin Roosevelt. Before World War II, Marshall had experience as a young Army officer in World War I planning I never read a full biography of George Marshall, until now. I have read about him in other books but this is the first full biography I read about him. This was an interesting book. George Marshall was chief of staff of the United States Army during World War II and worked behind the scenes in planning invasions with other top military leaders and the President of the United States, Franklin Roosevelt. Before World War II, Marshall had experience as a young Army officer in World War I planning night movements of troops into the battlefields which brought that experience to the table in the Second World War. After World War II, Marshall developed the Marshall Plan to rebuild war torn Germany.
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