Bad Day at the Vulture Club (Baby Ganesh Agency Investigation, #5)
In the gripping new Baby Ganesh Agency novel, Inspector Chopra and his elephant sidekick investigate the death of one of Mumbai's wealthiest citizens, a murder with ramifications for its poorest. The Parsees are among the oldest, most secretive and most influential communities in the city: respected, envied and sometimes feared.When prominent industrialist Cyrus Zorabian is murdered on holy ground, his body dumped inside a Tower of Silence - where the Parsee dead are consumed by vultures - the police dismiss it as a random killing. But his daughter is unconvinced.Chopra, uneasy at entering this world of power and privilege, is soon plagued by doubts about the case.But murder is murder. And in Mumbai, wealth and corruption go in hand in hand, inextricably linking the lives of both high and low...

Bad Day at the Vulture Club (Baby Ganesh Agency Investigation, #5) Details

TitleBad Day at the Vulture Club (Baby Ganesh Agency Investigation, #5)
Author
ReleaseAug 8th, 2019
PublisherMulholland Books
Rating
GenreMystery, Cultural, International, Fiction, Crime

Bad Day at the Vulture Club (Baby Ganesh Agency Investigation, #5) Review

  • Paromjit
    January 1, 1970
    This is a fabulous crime mystery series set in the vast metropolis that is Mumbai in India, written by Vaseem Khan with its star central protagonists of retired police Inspector Ashwin Chopra and his resourceful and intelligent baby elephant, Ganesha who goes everywhere with him, generating equal levels of consternation and joy in his wake. This latest addition to the series is a stellar read, which begins with Chopra worried about Ganesha feeling the blues. At the magnificent, if crumbling pala This is a fabulous crime mystery series set in the vast metropolis that is Mumbai in India, written by Vaseem Khan with its star central protagonists of retired police Inspector Ashwin Chopra and his resourceful and intelligent baby elephant, Ganesha who goes everywhere with him, generating equal levels of consternation and joy in his wake. This latest addition to the series is a stellar read, which begins with Chopra worried about Ganesha feeling the blues. At the magnificent, if crumbling palace, the Sumandra Mahal, Chopra is hired to investigate the 3 month old shocking murder on holy ground of the rich Cyrus Zorabian, one the most respected grandees of the Parsee community, with its Zoroastrian faith. His reputation as a industrialist and philanthropy had made him a force to be reckoned with and much loved in Mumbai. He was estranged from his son, Darius, and it is his daughter, Perizaad, who believes the police investigation was incompetent in dismissing the murder as a random killing.So begins an intricate and complex investigation that brings Chopra in contact with the hated and corrupt ACP Suresh Rao of the political Central Bureau of Investigation, in charge of the original murder inquiry. Chopra struggles to make headway as he enters the world of power, privilege and corruption, but is intrigued by strange notes in Latin, a piece of paper with what looks like an unbreakable code and the shooting of an unidentified man and woman whose bodies were burnt. Chopra's deputy in his agency, Abbas Rangwalla, is pursuing a separate investigation involving a explosion that killed many and which resulted in the imprisonment of the owner of the building. As Chopra digs deep, he begins to uncover a nest of secrets, political corruption, the involvement of ruthless underground figures, a murder victim that bears little resemblence to his saintly reputation and surprising connections with Rangwalla's case. Poppy, Chopra's idealistic wife has the bit between her teeth as she champions the real Unicef social campaign Poo2loo, and a poisoned and injured vulture, an endangered species, takes up residence in the Chopra home to recuperate.Khan provides an insightful social and political commentary on the state of India as he vibrantly brings alive Mumbai with its desperate poverty and vast inequalities, the corruption, fraud, injustice, and the criminal underworld. One of the most fascinating aspects of this novel was its coverage of the powerful but well liked Parsees, a sect of which little is known, originally Persian, but who settled in Mumbai after persecution and were historically integral in the growth and prosperity of the city. It is true that the Parsees believed in having their dead disposed of by being eaten by the carrion vultures. This was a brilliantly entertaining read with it's wonderful comic touches, it immerses the reader into the everyday life and culture of Mumbai, and with the winning inclusion of the charismatic Ganesha, a baby elephant you cannot help but fall for. Many thanks to Hodder and Stoughton for an ARC.
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  • Carolyn
    January 1, 1970
    *3.5* Stars. This is the 5th book in the Baby Ganesh Agency series, and I have enjoyed them all. I have always found Inspector Chopra’s adventures with the young elephant, Ganesha, to be delightful, and the vibrant contrast of the wealth and squalor of Mumbai provides a vivid sense of place. This book did not quite live up to the previous ones for me. I am not a big fan of mystery plots dealing with complex, intricate webs of corruption in business and politics. The plot involves the extortion *3.5* Stars. This is the 5th book in the Baby Ganesh Agency series, and I have enjoyed them all. I have always found Inspector Chopra’s adventures with the young elephant, Ganesha, to be delightful, and the vibrant contrast of the wealth and squalor of Mumbai provides a vivid sense of place. This book did not quite live up to the previous ones for me. I am not a big fan of mystery plots dealing with complex, intricate webs of corruption in business and politics. The plot involves the extortion of property owners to sell at below-market rates. If they refuse they are threatened, even killed. A criminal mastermind is at the head of the conspiracy and hides behind associated real estate companies. Fraud results in furthering the enrichment of the wealthy to the detriment of the poor. Inspector Chopra, a policeman who retired due to ill health, now runs a private detective agency. His young elephant accompanied him on his rounds, to the amusement of many and the consternation of a few. This resourceful little elephant has saved Chopra’s life on occasion. A wealthy, prominent member of the Parsee community, Cyrus Zorabian, has been found bludgeoned to death. He was a leading industrial magnate renowned for his philanthropy. His body was found in a Tower of Silence, where the Parsees ( members of the Zoroastrian religion) lay out their dead to be consumed by vultures. Chopra has been hired by Cyrus’s daughter, Perizaad, to find his murderer, because she believes the police were incompetent. As in investigates, Chopra learns that Cyrus was not the upstanding citizen generally believed. Cyrus had many enemies. These included: an estranged son who was left out of the will, a longtime household aide who changed his name and fled England after being in prison, a friend in the Vulture Club who hated him for breaking a promise, an impoverished worker at the Tower Of Silence who despised him for not raising the wages for the workers who helped dispose of the corpses. Also, it is learned that Cyrus was in financial difficulty and on the verge of bankruptcy. He was involved in a plan to sell property to a corrupt company which would put him in disrepute with the Parsee community. Parsees try to live by the ideal of integrity, a strong business sense and philanthropy, and Cyrus seemed to be failing. Chopra finds some clues among Cyrus’s belongings. They are seemingly threatening letters written in Latin, a difficult code, and a newspaper clipping about two unidentified young people shot and their bodies burnt beyond recognition. With suspects in the family, household, the social Vulture Club, The Tower of Silence, and in the shady real estate world, Chopra has a difficult investigation. Meanwhile, his deputy, Rangwalla, is following the case of thirteen people killed when a building exploded. The owner of the property is in prison. Will this connect with Chopra’s complicated investigation?Something has been causing the vultures at the Tower of Silence to be disappearing, and Chopra has taken an injured vulture home for care and rehabilitation by his family. His wife, Poppy is engaged in a UNICEF campaign, Poo2Loo, to educate the people on making Mumbai a more hygienic place. Recommended for fans of Inspector Chopra and his elephant ward, Ganesha, and those interested in mysteries set in India.
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  • Abir Mukherjee
    January 1, 1970
    Best of the series so far. Disclaimer - Vaseem is a friend of mine, but the opinion is honest.
  • Cathy Cole
    January 1, 1970
    After the slapstick comedy of the last Baby Ganesh Agency mystery, Murder at the Grand Raj Palace, this latest book has a much more serious tone and is the best and tightest constructed mystery so far in the series. Although the tone is more serious, there are still scenes that gave me fits of the giggles, so those of you who prefer light-hearted mysteries, take note. I think one of my favorite chuckles was Khan's homage to Edgar Allan Poe with an injured vulture glaring at people from atop Chop After the slapstick comedy of the last Baby Ganesh Agency mystery, Murder at the Grand Raj Palace, this latest book has a much more serious tone and is the best and tightest constructed mystery so far in the series. Although the tone is more serious, there are still scenes that gave me fits of the giggles, so those of you who prefer light-hearted mysteries, take note. I think one of my favorite chuckles was Khan's homage to Edgar Allan Poe with an injured vulture glaring at people from atop Chopra's bookcase.The mystery in Bad Day at the Vulture Club kept me guessing, and Chopra, with all his years of police work, is an excellent investigator-- even if his baby elephant sidekick does get into mischief occasionally. In fact, Chopra has such a good reputation with many in the Mumbai police force that his contacts and goodwill there stand him in good stead.One of the things I enjoy most about this series is the way the character of Chopra's wife, Poppy, has grown. Chopra has a one-track mind and focuses on his investigations while Poppy adds her social issues and causes to the mix. This makes Poppy a very important part of the series because what she's involved in really give readers a true feel for Mumbai-- armchair travel at its best. She and her mother are also gifted with some of Khan's wonderful sense of humor.After reading Sujata Massey's two Perveen Mistry historical mysteries and now Bad Day at the Vulture Club, I feel that I'm getting to know the Parsees, a group that continues to play such an important part in Mumbai's past, present, and future. In addition, my appreciation of vultures has grown (they may be ugly but they are an important part of life on our planet), and my learning about the Poo2Loo movement (pun intended) has enriched my knowledge of one of the most fascinating countries in the world.Yes, I highly recommend Vaseem Khan's Baby Ganesh Agency mysteries. Read them and you'll enjoy, learn, and laugh. It doesn't get much better than that.
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  • Elaine Tomasso
    January 1, 1970
    I would like to thank Netgalley and Hodder & Stoughton for an advance copy of Bad Day at the Vulture Club, the fifth novel to feature the Mumbai based Baby Ganesh Detective Agency.Former police inspector Chopra, proprietor of the Baby Ganesh Detective Agency, has built a solid reputation as an investigator since his forced retirement from the police force on health grounds, in fact he has more requests than he can handle but there is something about the murder of rich Parsee, Cyrus Zorabian, I would like to thank Netgalley and Hodder & Stoughton for an advance copy of Bad Day at the Vulture Club, the fifth novel to feature the Mumbai based Baby Ganesh Detective Agency.Former police inspector Chopra, proprietor of the Baby Ganesh Detective Agency, has built a solid reputation as an investigator since his forced retirement from the police force on health grounds, in fact he has more requests than he can handle but there is something about the murder of rich Parsee, Cyrus Zorabian, that intrigues him. I thoroughly enjoyed Bad Day at the Vulture Club which is a charming mix of mystery and social commentary. The plot, told in the third person from Chopra’s point of view, held my interest from start to finish with its gradual unravelling of Cyrus Zorabian’s character and the resulting emergence of suspects and motives. It is well done with regular reveals at strategic moments but not enough to give the reader a sporting chance of an early guess.For me, as good as the plot is, the main attraction of these novels is the light they throw on Indian life which is something I know little about. It could be argued that as the novels are on the cozy side there is no grit to the social commentary but surely any light is better than darkness? Without preaching Mr Khan makes it abundantly clear that poverty and corruption go hand in hand at the expense of the poor. It’s an interesting approach which I like and in the case of Chopra’s wife Poppy’s Pooh2loo campaign, a humorous take on a serious issue.I also enjoyed the insight into the Parsee culture. This is a secretive sect with Persian origins which has, over the centuries, cultivated a reputation for wealth and philanthropy. Every day is a school day with these novels.Characterisation is another strength of the novel. Chopra is a thoughtful, almost idealistic man with a thirst for justice. Accompanied by his “ward”, a two year old elephant cub called Ganesha he pursues his investigations diligently and persistently across Mumbai. He is a serious, literal man so Ganesha produces the light humour, along with Poppy who is the underestimated star of the novel. Childless, Poppy throws her energies into social campaigning with the Poo2loo being the latest (NB this is a real UNESCO sponsored initiative). Her campaign style in unorthodox with frequent, amusing mishaps but she is bright, enterprising and imaginative and gives Mr Khan another vehicle for commentary.Bad Day at the Vulture Club is a good read which I have no hesitation in recommending.
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  • Dawn Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    I do believe that these books have gotten better with each installment - as you learn more about Chopra and how he works and ticks and how he interacts with people, you start to get a feeling of what truly drives him and makes you wish there was a real life version of him working for the "lesser" people of India. His love of country, even with all of its flaws, or in spite of them, is what really drives him and these books. He just wants justice for those who have been wronged, no matter what th I do believe that these books have gotten better with each installment - as you learn more about Chopra and how he works and ticks and how he interacts with people, you start to get a feeling of what truly drives him and makes you wish there was a real life version of him working for the "lesser" people of India. His love of country, even with all of its flaws, or in spite of them, is what really drives him and these books. He just wants justice for those who have been wronged, no matter what they may or may not have done. Such is the case with this book - murder is always wrong, even when, in the end, it looks right. Chopra is able to take all of that and show you just how wrong it truly is. This book was...a lot. There are two stories here [along with Poppy's campaign, that will bring much laughter, but also much enlightenment to a problem in India that they all know about, but until recently, rarely talked about] and they are not happy stories. Murder rarely is, but these are particularly heinous. Vaseem Khan does a very good job in writing this so that you see the absolute seriousness of what is going on, while injecting some humor [that never, ever crosses the line] that will have you absolutely laughing out loud. The best of the series in my opinion - I will be waiting with baited breath for the next installment. Very well done. Thank you to NetGalley and Hodder and Stoughton Publishing for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Lynn Horton
    January 1, 1970
    I've read all of the Baby Ganesh books and believe that this one is stronger than the previous installment. Khan draws his characters well, and they're truly unique. The baby elephant is an interesting device, and Khan continues to add to the stories in ways that deepend his characters. I enjoy reading about India—one of the few countries I haven't visited, although I won't be going there any time soon. I'd like to see Khan take the Inspector and his family out of Mumbai for a book or two.I have I've read all of the Baby Ganesh books and believe that this one is stronger than the previous installment. Khan draws his characters well, and they're truly unique. The baby elephant is an interesting device, and Khan continues to add to the stories in ways that deepend his characters. I enjoy reading about India—one of the few countries I haven't visited, although I won't be going there any time soon. I'd like to see Khan take the Inspector and his family out of Mumbai for a book or two.I have only two complaints about Bad Day at the Vulture Club. First, the "take the poo to the loo" campaign isn't necessary and is a little grotesque, although I realize that public defecation is a problem in India's overcrowded cities. Secondly, Khan is including a little too much detail that, in my opinion, bogs his plot. I skipped a bit in places.Recommended.
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  • Karen Whittard
    January 1, 1970
    The new baby ganash murder mystery book that is both fun, funny, serious and gripping. Great book. I have loved this series and this is a great addition
  • Alyson Read
    January 1, 1970
    This is the fifth full length book in the wonderfully charming Inspector Chopra series of stories and although a little more series in nature than some still retains the touches of humour between all the main characters that so often make me chuckle out loud. After his retirement from the Mumbai police and having received his unexpected inheritance of an elephant calf (no ordinary elephant his Uncle Bansi warns him) Chopra has opened a restaurant, and in the wake of solving a huge case as he lef This is the fifth full length book in the wonderfully charming Inspector Chopra series of stories and although a little more series in nature than some still retains the touches of humour between all the main characters that so often make me chuckle out loud. After his retirement from the Mumbai police and having received his unexpected inheritance of an elephant calf (no ordinary elephant his Uncle Bansi warns him) Chopra has opened a restaurant, and in the wake of solving a huge case as he left the police he has also formed a detective agency. I would recommend reading at least book number one first to get all the background to the characters. The resourceful and highly intelligent elephant Ganesha now travels most places with him in the back of his van, and is generally accepted and adored wherever he goes. In this gripping new Baby Ganesh Agency novel, Inspector Chopra and his elephant sidekick investigate the death of one of Mumbai's wealthiest citizens, a murder with ramifications for its poorest. The Parsees are among the oldest, most secretive and most influential communities in the city: respected, envied and sometimes feared. When prominent industrialist Cyrus Zorabian is murdered on holy ground, his body dumped inside a Tower of Silence - where the Parsee dead are consumed by vultures - the police dismiss it as a random killing. But his daughter is unconvinced, believing that the police did not investigate properly and employs Chopra to find the truth. Unfortunately this brings Chopra back into contact with his former boss, the hated and corrupt ACP Suresh Rao now of the political Central Bureau of Investigation. Chopra is uneasy at entering this world of power and privilege and is soon plagued by doubts about the case. But murder is murder. And in Mumbai, wealth and corruption go in hand in hand, inextricably linking the lives of both high and low. Chopra has earned so much goodwill during his time in the Mumbai police that he has no trouble in calling upon people to help him with the investigation. This in itself is a measure of the man who fervently believes in justice since half the police and government are suspected of being corrupt. Whilst carrying out his own enquiries into the man believed to be trying to help the poor of the city whilst upholding the old traditions of the Parsee community, he stumbles upon another failed police investigation into two deaths, and it leads him to wonder if they were mixed up in his own case. Meanwhile his assistant in the detective agency Abbas Rangwalla is pursuing a separate investigation into the explosion in a building that killed his client's daughter. The building's owner languishes in prison as a result but the father does not believe he was at fault. Once more this case promises to lead into a murky world of corruption and crime. Chopra's wife Poppy is still proving a force to be reckoned with and is also busy with her own campaigning, the different storylines demonstrating the wide gulf between the richest and the poorest in the land. As the story progresses lots of different threads and theories all come together as the cases are solved but there are many twists and shock discoveries along the way. With each of these books I find myself learning more about the rich and varied history and culture of India, in this case all about the Parsees and their vultures, a much unloved and undervalued bird. I even learned more about the campaigns to make India more sanitary, including "Poo2Loo" - as Chopra often says, "only in India..." I can highly recommend this series for anyone who wants a great mystery story with learning and laughter thrown in.
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  • Breakaway Reviewers
    January 1, 1970
    Another mystery for Inspector Ashwin Chopra and baby Ganesha.Perizaad Zorabian has employed Inspector Ashwin Chopra (retired) to re-open the investigation into her father, Cyrus's death. His body was found inside Doongerwadi, the holy ground where all Parsee bodies are placed after death. Perizaad has called in Chopra because the police investigation, under ACP Suresh Rao of the CBI had ruled it as a “burglary gone wrong”. Chopra, as always accompanied by his baby elephant, Ganesha, must sift th Another mystery for Inspector Ashwin Chopra and baby Ganesha.Perizaad Zorabian has employed Inspector Ashwin Chopra (retired) to re-open the investigation into her father, Cyrus's death. His body was found inside Doongerwadi, the holy ground where all Parsee bodies are placed after death. Perizaad has called in Chopra because the police investigation, under ACP Suresh Rao of the CBI had ruled it as a “burglary gone wrong”. Chopra, as always accompanied by his baby elephant, Ganesha, must sift through Cyrus Zorabian’s personal life, which appears to be almost perfect, to find out why someone has gone to so much trouble to kill him and make it look like a burglary gone wrong. At the same time, Chopra’s assistant private investigator, Abbas Rangwalla is trying to ascertain if a man, now in prison, has been framed for causing not only the collapse of his building but the death of many of the workers trapped inside the building at the time. Could these two cases be linked? There is something so very special about this series. Vaseem Khan captures not just the heart of living in Mumbai, but also the complex natures of India's citizens, both good and bad. Chopra, his wife Poppy and mother-in-law, Poornima are beautifully drawn. In this novel, Poppy has a new campaign, The Poo2Loo Campaign. Some scenes had me laughing very loud.We also get to know Rangwalla better in this book. Again Vaseem Khan has drawn a beautiful picture of a man who is not quite as smart as Chopra but who through tenacity and hard work, manages to find answers that others have not been able to uncover. What fascinated me most was learning about the Parsee faith and their practice of leaving the bodies of their dead on their sacred burial site, for the vultures to consume. Unfortunately, the vultures themselves are being targeted and killed by poison, and Chopra needs to find out by who.If you looking for a series that is different from the run-of-the-mill detective stories, look no further. However, I would recommend that you start with book 1 when Ganesha first joins Ashwin and Poppy Chopra and changes their lives forever.TreebeardBreakaway Reviewers received a copy of the book to review.
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  • Colored Ink
    January 1, 1970
    I had recently started, and in each case given up on, a number of recommended new mysteries because they either couldn't engage, or couldn't keep my interest. This book had me the moment the protagonist introduced his companion--not pet: a year-old baby elephant calf, who accompanies him almost everywhere. I read on just to find out more, and soon got lost in this intricate, many-layered mystery in Mumbai. This is the first book I've read in this series. The author manages to describe the comple I had recently started, and in each case given up on, a number of recommended new mysteries because they either couldn't engage, or couldn't keep my interest. This book had me the moment the protagonist introduced his companion--not pet: a year-old baby elephant calf, who accompanies him almost everywhere. I read on just to find out more, and soon got lost in this intricate, many-layered mystery in Mumbai. This is the first book I've read in this series. The author manages to describe the complex life and confusing juxtaposition of ancient and modern that is present-day India in an understandable fashion, although the detail needed to do so sometimes causes the story to bog down in places. A good ' peeling-the-onion' mystery, as he uncovers each new layer of clues, conspiracies, and connections. There are a number of good characters, including the curious, compassionate, and clever little elephant, Ganesha, and a belligerent buzzard, who's fallen down on the job. During the course of solving the mystery, the story showcases the harsh reality, yawning income disparity, and rampant corruption in this rapidly-rising nation, as well as the earnest and honest individuals trying to make a difference--sometimes hilariously so. A good mystery and a good read.
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  • Carole Knoles
    January 1, 1970
    After reading some heavier material, I am often in a mood for something lighter. Bad Day at the Vulture Club fit my mood very well as an amuse bouche of a book. The novel is a well written mystery featuring an Indian detective and his charming baby elephant companion and actually sent me scurrying to Wikipedia for some background information on the Parsee of India, a sect apart from the better known Hindi, around whom the mystery exists. They did indeed have a tradition of setting their deceased After reading some heavier material, I am often in a mood for something lighter. Bad Day at the Vulture Club fit my mood very well as an amuse bouche of a book. The novel is a well written mystery featuring an Indian detective and his charming baby elephant companion and actually sent me scurrying to Wikipedia for some background information on the Parsee of India, a sect apart from the better known Hindi, around whom the mystery exists. They did indeed have a tradition of setting their deceased out to be picked clean by vultures.
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  • Martina
    January 1, 1970
    #5 is the Baby Ganesh Agency series by Vaseem Khan! I love this series, especially due to the Baby Ganesh! UPDATED: It appears as a pre-order for publication on 8 October and may already be available for nook on the B&N website. It's not showing up in Overdrive yet, however. In Goodreads, the listings are for Amazon UK and Mulholland UK for August and October of this year. In any case, it's on my to read list so I can keep it in mind....
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  • Annie
    January 1, 1970
    What's not to love about a Bad Day at the Vulture Club? Pachyderms, Parsees...and poo! This series continues to be one of my favourites and this fifth installment is just as fun, charming, quirky and well written as the rest. Highly recommended if you like gentle mysteries that are not too dark, gory or will keep you awake at night. If you've read The No 1 Ladies' Detective Agency series then you will love this.Thank you to NetGalley, the author and publisher for the ARC to read and review. I wa What's not to love about a Bad Day at the Vulture Club? Pachyderms, Parsees...and poo! This series continues to be one of my favourites and this fifth installment is just as fun, charming, quirky and well written as the rest. Highly recommended if you like gentle mysteries that are not too dark, gory or will keep you awake at night. If you've read The No 1 Ladies' Detective Agency series then you will love this.Thank you to NetGalley, the author and publisher for the ARC to read and review. I was thrilled to be approved and can't believe I now have even longer to wait for No 6!
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  • Mark
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoy this series, and this was the best one yet! A gripping story of corruption set against the backdrop of India's small Parsee community. Mr Khan will be launching a spin-off series set in the 1950's next year, I sincerley hope that this doesn't mean the end of Inspector Chopra and Ganesha's adventures!
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  • Sarah-Hope
    January 1, 1970
    May be my favorte Baby Ganesh Detective Agency novel yet!
  • Lynne
    January 1, 1970
    The best Inspector Chopra mystery yet! It was great all the way to the end--so I won't say much more. The culture of India is fascinating, especially reading about the Parsees in this book. Enjoy!
  • Shari
    January 1, 1970
    This is really one of my favorite series. It has charming characters, one of which is a baby elephant. Chopra is hired in this one to look into a random murder that the man’s family thinks wasn’t random at all. He was a very prominent man in the Parsee community, and unfortunately, there are many suspects. Along the way, he takes in an injured vulture, deals with his wife’s Poo2Loo campaign, and butts heads with his former boss. A highly enjoyable read with a memorable cast of characters.
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