Nanaville
Mother, mother-in-law, grandmother--the Pulitzer-winning columnist and #1 bestselling author reflects on the roles we play throughout our lives, sharing personal stories and advice on the special joys and complexities of middle age.It's a little challenging to suss out why exactly it can be so magical. . . . All I know is: The hand. The little hand that takes yours, small and soft as feathers. I'm happy our grandson does not yet have sophisticated language or a working knowledge of personal finance, because if he took my hand and said, "Nana, can you sign your 401(k) over to me," I can imagine myself thinking, well, I don't really need a retirement fund, do I? And besides, look at those eyelashes. Or the greeting. Sometimes Arthur sees me and yells "Nana!" in the way some people might say "ice cream!" and others say "shoe sale!" No one else has sounded that happy to see me in many many years.Before blogs even existed, Anna Quindlen became a go-to writer on the joys and challenges of family, motherhood, and modern life, in her nationally syndicated column. Now she's taking the next step and going full Nana in the pages of this lively, beautiful, and moving book about being a grandmother. Quindlen offers thoughtful and telling observations about her new role, no longer mother and decision-maker but secondary character and support to the parents of her grandson. She writes, "Where I once led, I have to learn to follow." Eventually a close friend provides words to live by: "Did they ask you?"Candid, funny, frank, and illuminating, Quindlen's singular voice has never been sharper or warmer. With the same insights she brought to motherhood in Living Out Loud and to growing older in Lots of Candles, Plenty of Cake, this new nana uses her own experiences to illuminate those of many others.

Nanaville Details

TitleNanaville
Author
ReleaseApr 23rd, 2019
PublisherRandom House
ISBN-139780812996104
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Biography, Writing, Essays

Nanaville Review

  • JanB
    January 1, 1970
    “Sometimes Arthur sees me and yells “Nana!’ in the same way some people might say “ ice cream!” and others might say “Shoe Sale!” No one else has sounded this happy to see me in many, many years.”“Mama means Mama, Daddy means Daddy. But Nana might just be a piece of fruit (i.e. banana)”. Well, if that didn’t put me in my place I don’t know what will, lol.And this, my friends, is the yin and the yang, and perfectly sums up what it means to be a resident of Nanaville. I’m a proud Nana. Our son and “Sometimes Arthur sees me and yells “Nana!’ in the same way some people might say “ ice cream!” and others might say “Shoe Sale!” No one else has sounded this happy to see me in many, many years.”“Mama means Mama, Daddy means Daddy. But Nana might just be a piece of fruit (i.e. banana)”. Well, if that didn’t put me in my place I don’t know what will, lol.And this, my friends, is the yin and the yang, and perfectly sums up what it means to be a resident of Nanaville. I’m a proud Nana. Our son and daughter-in-law have made my husband and myself the proud grandparents of 3: a 3 year old and 5 month old twins. The love I have for these children and what I wouldn’t do for them knows no bounds. It’s an indescribable love that surpasses all understanding. So when one of my favorite authors, Anna Quindlen, wrote a book on the subject I was first in line. Her best advice to give a grandmother (or grandfather): butt out. It can all go so very wrong for this generation of helicopter parents who are now grandparents. The impulses are powerful, but must be curbed.A major question all grandparents need to ask before opening their mouths:Did they ask for your opinion?I had to laugh at the daughter who gave her mother a 3 page single-spaced word doc before letting her babysit. Haha…been there done that 🙋🏻‍♀️ Suck it up Grandma, it’s all about spending time with the grandchild. Never mind that you have successfully kept your babies alive and they are now fully functioning adults. Your unsolicited advice will be perceived as judgment and criticism, so be quiet.The two commandments of Nanaville:1. Love the grandchildren2. Hold your tongue“Nana judgement must be employed judiciously, and exercised carefully. Be warned: “those who make their opinions sound like the Ten Commandments see their grandchildren only on major holidays and in photographs.“There’s no relationship on earth like that of a grandparent and child. It is true unconditional love and one that benefits both the grandparent and the child. if the roles are recognized and the boundaries observed, there’s nothing on earth quite like it.“In Nanaville, there is always in the back of my mind the understanding that I am building a memory out of spare parts and that, someday, that memory will be all that’s left of me.”Amen.On the love a grandparent has:“I am much more capable of seeing him purely as himself than I ever was with his father (the author’s son)”It’s about being our best, to be our best selves around our grandchildren. It’s not about what you have to do but about what you want to do. What you want to do out of pure unconditional love. I myself wouldn’t want to live anywhere else on earth but Nanaville. It's truly the happiest place on Earth. And this book is a love letter to grandparents and grandchildren everywhere. I am not nearly as eloquent as Anna Quindlen and I'm ever so grateful she has put into words what I feel in my heart. *Many thanks to NetGalley for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Toni
    January 1, 1970
    A thoughtful and funny tale on becoming a grandmother! Anna entered her own, “Nanaville” with joy and love, thinking, “great, a do over.” (my words.) She was over-the-moon to welcome her eldest son, Quin’s, and daughter-in-law, Lynn’s, first child into the family of waiting relatives. As Anna explains, “First of all, let us acknowledge that, like virtually everything else they’ve done, the baby boomers tend to act as though they’ve invented grandparenting.” My answer to that would be, just as to A thoughtful and funny tale on becoming a grandmother! Anna entered her own, “Nanaville” with joy and love, thinking, “great, a do over.” (my words.) She was over-the-moon to welcome her eldest son, Quin’s, and daughter-in-law, Lynn’s, first child into the family of waiting relatives. As Anna explains, “First of all, let us acknowledge that, like virtually everything else they’ve done, the baby boomers tend to act as though they’ve invented grandparenting.” My answer to that would be, just as today’s parents think they invented parenting; which was never even a word when I grew up! Well, as we all know, we’re all wrong since it’s been done since mankind existed.While Anna was adjusting to being a new Grandmother, this is to say trying to find those invisible borders of helping or intruding, she learned to bite her tongue and shove her hands in her pockets. She willingly admits this was difficult for her considering her personality is not usually in line with a quiet person. Her career as a journalist and writer leans toward speaking up. But there are new rules now, “I know you don’t want to consider this if you’re in the same position I am, and I keep hearing that there are people who pay the notion no mind, but we grandparents are secondary characters, supporting actors. We are not the leads. Mama. Daddy. These are the bedrock.”Anna builds a trusting relationship with her daughter-in-law, Lynn, and tries to help her in any way she can; knowing new mothers have the physical conundrums to deal with other than a nursing infant. Sleep comes to mind, nutrition a fast second and perhaps a few minutes with her spouse. She does the same with her son, Quin, who once said he was never having kids, as many of us did in our mid-twenties, as she marvels at how loving and patient he’s become with his son, Arthur.Best yet is the chapter on “NONO’s,” these are the women who are in denial of being grandmothers. “Which brings us to what I think of as the nono’s. These are the women who telegraph, at least privately to me, that they have mixed feelings about all this. The aging beauty who asked to be called ‘Glamma.’ A socialite who told me she’d invented the name Tootsie. ‘I’m happy to be a grandmother, but I don’t want to be a babysitter,’ another woman said. But for many of the nono’s, the issue is not time management but growing older. There is no question that whether you are forty or seventy, the simple fact of being a grandparent telegraphs aging.”I could easily go on and quote so many funny and tender words from this fantastic book. I have always enjoyed anything Anna Quindlen has written, and this is no exception. Although we are the same age, graduated the same year from high schools less than 10 miles apart, she’s well ahead of me on grandparenting. (plus a few other things!)I highly recommend this book whether you are in Nanaville, about to be in it, years from it…..oh whatever, read it, you’ll still enjoy yourself. Thank you NetGalley, Random House, and the great Anna Quindlen
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  • Kasa Cotugno
    January 1, 1970
    Anna Quindlen is one of those writers that makes a reader happy that she is so prolific. As with Dani Shapiro, she is as proficient in memoir as she is in fiction, and this lovely sharing memoir of grandmother-hood is a good example. Having been a prize-winning journalist, she writes in a style I appreciate, in dispensing information in fine language without padding. Here she discusses the role of the grandmother, how the hardest part of the role is stepping aside as an auxiliary, not performing Anna Quindlen is one of those writers that makes a reader happy that she is so prolific. As with Dani Shapiro, she is as proficient in memoir as she is in fiction, and this lovely sharing memoir of grandmother-hood is a good example. Having been a prize-winning journalist, she writes in a style I appreciate, in dispensing information in fine language without padding. Here she discusses the role of the grandmother, how the hardest part of the role is stepping aside as an auxiliary, not performing the major role or make the big decisions. She examines, also, parts played by the mother, daughter, mother in law, and daughter in law, all of which she has been, leading to the differences in how the landscape of the concept of family has changed over the years even in her lifetime. Nowadays, the gradual morphing of the cookie jar gramma for instance into a get-down-on-the-floor-and-play glamma. Although she is a boomer and I am a war baby, I can still relate to many of her observations and theories.
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  • Donna Davis
    January 1, 1970
    Author Anna Quindlen is queen of all things warm and wise, and so it’s not surprising that her ode to grandmothering hits just the right note. I was lucky and read it free and early, thanks to Random House and Net Galley, but it would have been worth the purchase price had it come down to it. This friendly little book is available to the public now. Quindlen’s memoir can double as a primer for her peers that are new grandparents also, but that’s not where its greatest strength is found. The most Author Anna Quindlen is queen of all things warm and wise, and so it’s not surprising that her ode to grandmothering hits just the right note. I was lucky and read it free and early, thanks to Random House and Net Galley, but it would have been worth the purchase price had it come down to it. This friendly little book is available to the public now. Quindlen’s memoir can double as a primer for her peers that are new grandparents also, but that’s not where its greatest strength is found. The most resonant aspect is that common chord, the eloquence with which she gives voice to our common experience. It makes me feel as if she and I are sitting together with our baby pictures—the grandbabies and our children that created them—and as she speaks, I am saying, “I know, right?” I chuckle as she recounts trends in the advice given by experts to new parents: when our first babies were born, we were told to put them to bed on their stomachs so they wouldn’t spit up and choke to death on it; then later children slept on their sides, which seems like a safe bet either way, but babies don’t stay on their sides very long; and now babies are supposed to be safer on their backs. And she voices so well the pride we feel when an adult that we have parented turns into a wonderful parent in his own right. And I nod in agreement as she says of her toddler grandson, “No one else has sounded that happy to see me in many, many years.” Quindlen speaks well to the ambivalent moments as well, to the need to hold our tongues when we want to offer advice that hasn’t been requested; at the same time, there’s the relief that comes of not being in charge of all the big decisions. And I echo the outrage that she feels when some ignorant asshole suggests that our biracial grandchild is not part of our blood and bones. (A jerk in Baby Gap wants to know where she got him; she replies that she found him at Whole Foods.)Unequivocally joyful is the legacy grandchildren present. “I am building a memory out of spare parts…someday that memory will be all that’s left of me.” And then, there are the books: “’In the great green room…’“’Mouse,’ Arthur says.“’There is a mouse,’ I say…falling down the well of memory as I speak, other children, other chairs.”Go ahead. Read it with dry eyes. I dare you. Quindlen is writing for her peers. If you aren’t a grandparent and don’t expect to become one anytime soon (or perhaps at all,) then this memoir will probably not be a magical experience for you. But the title and book jacket make it clear exactly where she is going, and I am delighted to go with her. Highly recommended to grandparents, and to those on the cusp.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Essentially the literary equivalent of a grandmother proudly whipping out a wallet full of photos (or, more accurately these days, an IPhone) of her much adored grandson. Prolific author Anna Quindlen pens a love letter to her role as paternal grandma of Arthur, the first child of her son and daughter-in-law. As expected, being a Nana is a title she covets and Arthur a child upon whom she devotes much love and attention. Although this a quick read without any new or profound revelations, even I, Essentially the literary equivalent of a grandmother proudly whipping out a wallet full of photos (or, more accurately these days, an IPhone) of her much adored grandson. Prolific author Anna Quindlen pens a love letter to her role as paternal grandma of Arthur, the first child of her son and daughter-in-law. As expected, being a Nana is a title she covets and Arthur a child upon whom she devotes much love and attention. Although this a quick read without any new or profound revelations, even I, not a Nana much less a mother myself, felt my heart lift with satisfaction and joy as Nana Quindlen expressed her sentiments.
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  • Les
    January 1, 1970
    Nanaville is another irresistible memoir (especially for new grandmothers) by one of my most favorite and prolific authors, Anna Quindlen. I was thrilled to learn that I had won an Advance Reader's Copy through Goodreads, but waited until we were on our three-week road trip before I started reading. I knew I would enjoy it, but wanted to wait until I had a big chunk of uninterrupted time before beginning. From the opening pages, I was hooked, reaching for my Post-It flags, nodding my head in agr Nanaville is another irresistible memoir (especially for new grandmothers) by one of my most favorite and prolific authors, Anna Quindlen. I was thrilled to learn that I had won an Advance Reader's Copy through Goodreads, but waited until we were on our three-week road trip before I started reading. I knew I would enjoy it, but wanted to wait until I had a big chunk of uninterrupted time before beginning. From the opening pages, I was hooked, reaching for my Post-It flags, nodding my head in agreement. While my desire to mark passages eventually waned, my interest never did.On the Shifting Rules of Parenting:He is also not supposed to be sleeping on his stomach. I cycled through prevailing medical opinion on sleep positions as a young mother. I was supposed to put the first on his stomach so that if he spit up he wouldn't aspirate it into his lungs. (I love it when you hear things like this. The doctor is saying very calmly, "Aspirate into his lungs" and you're nodding and thinking, Aspirate? Into his lungs?) Number two was supposed to be on his side. Have you ever tried to get a baby to sleep on his side? The package is not designed that way. By the third there was some debate, side or back. It seemed someone, somewhere, had decided the lung-aspiration danger no longer applied. I settled the matter with my youngest by choosing the position in which she was most likely to settle down. I had three children under the age of five. Pragmatism was my middle name. If she wanted to sleep upside down like a bat, I would have put a bar on the ceiling above the crib. Whatever gets you through the night.and a few more favorite passages:Sunlight spreads across the checkerboard tiles in the kitchen, and so do many other things: wooden spoons, a rubber frog, Tupperware, a couple of puzzle pieces, some plastic letters, elements of the obstacle course of the active toddler. Did you know that the wheels on the bus go round and round, all through the town? They do, over and over again, sung by the robotic voice of some plastic magnetic thing on the refrigerator. Oh, and Old MacDonald has a farm. The hokey pokey? That's what it's all about.This soundtrack, I know, will continue into perpetuity, first the nursery song, then the pop song, the rock song, the earworms of motherhood that emanate from the toy radio, the computer, from behind a closed bedroom door with a placard that says PLEASE KNOCK. I have been here before. Sort of.andIt's a complicated relationship, being a good grandparent, because it hinges on a series of other relationships. It's an odd combination of being very experienced and totally green: I know how to raise a child, but I need to learn how to help my child raise his own. Where I once commanded, now I need to ask permission. Where I once led, I have to learn to follow. For years I had strong opinions for a living. Now I need to wait until I am asked for them, and modulate them most of the time. Probably I overreact.and...I'm learning that being a grandmother is not about the things you have to do. It's about the things you want to do. The fact is that motherhood is mainly about requirements. Very, very little of it is optional, if you're doing it with even a modicum of care. There's no sitting on the couch with a cup of coffee and the remote control, saying to yourself, I don't really have to feed that baby. I don't have to change his dirty diaper. I don't have to keep an eye on the toddler when she's around the cat or take her to the pediatrician when she's a hot little bundle of bright red pulling at her ear and sobbing. Motherhood is mainly a roundelay of thou shalt, shalt, shalt.Nana, unless she has become de facto Mom for some sad reason, is pretty much purely about desire. I've fed the baby, changed the diaper, crawled around on the floor while he went straight for the electrical outlet or the dog's tail. But I've done that because I offered and was accepted. Most grandparents are tethered but not tied, connected but not compelled, except by choice.andIs there anything better than sitting in a rocking chair with a little boy next to you while you read him Goodnight Moon? Is there anything more magical than the connection between reader and book, Nana reading and grandson listening? Arthur discovered the book The Story of Ferdinand, and because of the gentle bull, he is interested in both flowers and bumblebees. I assume he learning lessons about the possibility of being both strong and gentle, but who knows? All I know is that books are magic. The Story of Ferdinand was published when my father was seven years old, and yet here is his great-grandson attending as Ferdinand is taken to the bullring and refuses to fight.Nanaville can easily be read in a single day, but as with most of Quindlen's books (a half dozen of which I have written about here), I prefer to read slowly, savoring this new book, drawing it out as long as possible in an attempt to make it last just a little bit longer.My only grandchild (a beautiful, intelligent and kind-hearted young woman) is turning 17 this summer, has two part-time jobs lined up, and is heading off to college in the fall. While much of Quindlen's vignettes and advice apply to new grandparents, this gem of a book is one I look forward to reading again. My daughter is engaged to be married this fall and is hoping to start a family. I must admit, I would love to cuddle another little grandbaby again some day...Now that I've finished her latest release, I want to get a copy and read Alternate Side, a novel of Quindlen's that was published 2018, which I somehow neglected to read. I received a complimentary copy of this book. All opinions are my own.
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  • Diane
    January 1, 1970
    In Nanaville, Anna Quindlen perfectly hits the nail on the head when she relates her personal experiences of being a first-time grandparent in her early 60's, when her son and wife welcomed, their first child, little Arthur, into the world. Here are some of the thought provoking passages which resonated with me. I'm not a "Nana" but, I have been a Grammy" for these last 7 years:**QUOTES**Nanaville is "a place I wound up inhabiting without ever knowing it was what I wanted, needed or was working In Nanaville, Anna Quindlen perfectly hits the nail on the head when she relates her personal experiences of being a first-time grandparent in her early 60's, when her son and wife welcomed, their first child, little Arthur, into the world. Here are some of the thought provoking passages which resonated with me. I'm not a "Nana" but, I have been a Grammy" for these last 7 years:**QUOTES**Nanaville is "a place I wound up inhabiting without ever knowing it was what I wanted, needed or was working toward." Your children, by having children, make you a grandparent: that fate is not in your hands. But the choice of what kind of grandparent to be is.**It's a complicated relationship, being a good grandparent, because it hinges on a series of other relationships. It's and odd combination of being very experienced and totally green. I know how to raise a child, but I need to learn how to help my child raise his own. Where I once commanded, now I need to ask permission. Where I once led, I have to learn to follow. For years I had strong opinions for a living. Now I need to wait until I'm asked for them, and modulate them most of the time**Most of us entered the parental enterprise with one of two impulses: to be much like our own mother or father as possible or to be unlike them in every conceivable way...**All I know is: The hand. The little hand that takes yours, small and soft as feathers. I'm happy our grandson does not yet have a sophisticated language or a working knowledge of personal finance, because if he took my hand and said, "Nana, could you sign your 401(k) over to me?" I can imagine myself thinking, well, I don't really need a retirement fund, do I?**Nana judgment must be employed judiciously, and exercised carefully. Be warned: those who make their opinions sound like the Ten Commandments see their grandchildren only on major holidays and in photographs.**Families are crucibles of so much that shapes and steers and, sometimes, damages us. It's odd when you look at animals and realize that once puppies have been weaned and have grown, their mother doesn't seem to recognize any trace relationship with them. That's not true of humans for good and for ill....Beautifully written and not overly sentimental, this short 172 book is delightful. Grab a copy for a Mother's Day gift for the special grandmother in your life.4.5/5 stars
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  • Mainlinebooker
    January 1, 1970
    This arrived at the perfect time as I will be entering Nanaville in less than two weeks. With her typical warm and candid style, she delivers a heartwarming and entertaining look at entering this new phase of her life. No longer the primary caregiver, she learns how to sit back, button her lip, and play a new role as her grandson's Nana.For me, it reinforced the need to "wear beige and keep your mouth shut."Respecting the parent' decisions even if it clashes with your own allows you to have more This arrived at the perfect time as I will be entering Nanaville in less than two weeks. With her typical warm and candid style, she delivers a heartwarming and entertaining look at entering this new phase of her life. No longer the primary caregiver, she learns how to sit back, button her lip, and play a new role as her grandson's Nana.For me, it reinforced the need to "wear beige and keep your mouth shut."Respecting the parent' decisions even if it clashes with your own allows you to have more time with your grandchild. The book reads like a fresh breeze and is the perfect gift for grandma's everywhere whether newly minted or long past this stage. I want to buy this for all of my friends!
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  • Jo Dervan
    January 1, 1970
    Anna Quindlen became a grandmother when her oldest son and his Chinese wife had their first child, Arthur. Quindlen, who soon became know an Nana describes life in Nanaville, a place where she learns to be a grandmother. She takes us from the experience of seeing Arthur for the first time to the point where she learns that her son and daughter in law are expecting a second child, a girl. This book could serve as a guide for first time grandparents as it contains advice on what to do and what not Anna Quindlen became a grandmother when her oldest son and his Chinese wife had their first child, Arthur. Quindlen, who soon became know an Nana describes life in Nanaville, a place where she learns to be a grandmother. She takes us from the experience of seeing Arthur for the first time to the point where she learns that her son and daughter in law are expecting a second child, a girl. This book could serve as a guide for first time grandparents as it contains advice on what to do and what not to do with the grandchild and their parents.I have been a fan of Quindlen since she and I were both young mothers trying to cope with the joys and tribulations of raising children in the 70s. I read her autobiographical books as well as her novels and feel as if she is a good friend. This book is another winner.This ARC was provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Candy
    January 1, 1970
    Wept through most of this one ... and loved it, of course. Quindlen understands the finer points of grandparenting ... a balancing act, but so worthwhile!
  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    Before our first grandchild was born 17 years ago, my husband and I signed up for grandparenting classes at the hospital where our daughter was going to give birth. We left the class one evening with a meaty kernel of advice: “Keep your mouth shut.”It’s a mantra Anna Quindlen advocates in “Nanaville: Adventures in Grandparenting,” an accessible, sweet read chock full of wisdom about Quindlen’s toe-dip into the blessed waters of grandparenthood.“There are really only two commandments of Nanaville Before our first grandchild was born 17 years ago, my husband and I signed up for grandparenting classes at the hospital where our daughter was going to give birth. We left the class one evening with a meaty kernel of advice: “Keep your mouth shut.”It’s a mantra Anna Quindlen advocates in “Nanaville: Adventures in Grandparenting,” an accessible, sweet read chock full of wisdom about Quindlen’s toe-dip into the blessed waters of grandparenthood.“There are really only two commandments of Nanaville: love the grandchildren and hold your tongue,” she writes. This slim book is rife with memorable quotes and endearing times, “Small Moments,” Quindlen has relished with her grandson Arthur, her oldest son’s boy, followed by light-hearted lessons she’s garnered from these experiences. “… I’m learning that being a grandmother is not about the things you have to do. It’s about the things you want to do.” Quindlen’s writing is descriptive and relatable and calls to mind cradling an infant, its downy head in the crook of your arm, the heaven-sent fragrance of babydom radiating from your precious bundle. There is a healthy dose of humor in Quindlen’s book too, the angst of complicated, confounded car-seats, the sacrifices she’ll make for Arthur when he gets older—ride a Tilt-A-Whirl—and communication issues that arise because Arthur is half Chinese and sometimes spouts Mandarin along with English. To her credit, Quindlen gave Mandarin a shot, along with her husband, but they temporarily shelved their lessons. She’s accepted her limitations, “I’m speaking the nana language of love and hoping Arthur recognizes, if not every word, then all the tones.”Quindlen doesn’t focus solely on being a grandparent but also reflects on being the mother of three children, all adults, comparing how her role as mother and grandmother are both different and alike. “Nanaville” is a treasure to keep or gift to another in the grandmother set, a book to refer to when you’re tempted to believe “Mother knows best.” Using Quindlen as a guide, grandparents can’t go wrong.
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  • Jan Fore
    January 1, 1970
    NanavilleAnna QuindlenApril 23, 2019Anna Quindlen is a prominent writer. I have read many of her books and enjoyed them. When I saw that Nanaville was due to come out soon I was overjoyed to read it. Her thoughts on becoming a first and second time grandmother were words of wisdom to me. I felt many of the same thoughts as she, the first years of my granddaughter’s birth. None of us want to be too ambitious in a relationship with our precious baby’s parents. She reflected on those first months a NanavilleAnna QuindlenApril 23, 2019Anna Quindlen is a prominent writer. I have read many of her books and enjoyed them. When I saw that Nanaville was due to come out soon I was overjoyed to read it. Her thoughts on becoming a first and second time grandmother were words of wisdom to me. I felt many of the same thoughts as she, the first years of my granddaughter’s birth. None of us want to be too ambitious in a relationship with our precious baby’s parents. She reflected on those first months as a Nana, mistakes she made as well as ones she managed to struggle through. Her grandson, Arthur is lucky to have such a wonderful grandmother. The first six months of his life, he and his parents moved in with Anna and her husband. I would have loved having my son and his wife at home with us during Lucy’s first year but it would have been tough for all of us to have our own lives without being too presumptuous. Her theories in child development and rearing were a great insight to me. Readers should definitely indulge in Nanaville, especially if you are a grandparent or about to be one. Parents would enjoy this feature as well as, she talks of her relationship with her son and daughter-in-law and their feelings on the family as well. This book mirrors as its title implies, Adventures in Grandparenting. Nanaville by Anna Quindlen is published April 23, 2019. I must thank Random House for allowing me to read the uncorrected proof via NetGalley. A must read, enjoy.
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  • Lea
    January 1, 1970
    This is absolutely the gift to give for Mother’s Day to grandmothers—new ones, veteran ones. It doesn’t matter because it is perfect gift. Told with truth and humor, this is the story of Anna Quindlen becoming a grandmother for the first time. She explores families with different nationalities and learning different languages. She offers her sage advice about when to butt out and when to give your two cents worth. This was a very fast read and enjoyable the entire time that I was reading. The vi This is absolutely the gift to give for Mother’s Day to grandmothers—new ones, veteran ones. It doesn’t matter because it is perfect gift. Told with truth and humor, this is the story of Anna Quindlen becoming a grandmother for the first time. She explores families with different nationalities and learning different languages. She offers her sage advice about when to butt out and when to give your two cents worth. This was a very fast read and enjoyable the entire time that I was reading. The vignettes were humorous as well as realistic which make the book very readable and enjoyable. I plan to purchase a hard copy for myself so that I can read it again and again when I need to remind myself of my true role as a “Nanna.” Loved it!DisclaimerDisclosure of Material Connection: I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher via Netgalley. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255, “Guides Concerning the Use of Testimonials and Endorsements in Advertising.”
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    This was my first Anna Quindlen book and it was lovely. When I saw Nanaville was coming out right around Mother’s Day, I wanted to check it out and see if it would make a good gift for a grandmother or grandmother to-be.She writes beautifully about her love and admiration of her grandson and sheds a light on what it’s like to go from mom to nana. Not quite the decision maker anymore, one of her friends had to remind her “did anyone ask you?” after she provided some unsolicited parenting advice t This was my first Anna Quindlen book and it was lovely. When I saw Nanaville was coming out right around Mother’s Day, I wanted to check it out and see if it would make a good gift for a grandmother or grandmother to-be.She writes beautifully about her love and admiration of her grandson and sheds a light on what it’s like to go from mom to nana. Not quite the decision maker anymore, one of her friends had to remind her “did anyone ask you?” after she provided some unsolicited parenting advice to her son and daughter-in-law. Even though I’m not a grandmother I still enjoyed reading her stories about her children and her grandson.I would definitely recommend this to anyone who is a fan of Anna Quindlen, especially if they’re a grandparent. I think it would make a lovely gift!The publisher provided me with a free copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    I liked it but didn't love it. Not sure what I was expecting but I guess more funny, laugh out loud moments like the many I have had and continue to have with my two darling grandchildren. At times it seem to read more like a what "not to do" and since that is purely subjective, I could not always relate. Also, my daughter is the mother of my grandchildren, so I do believe that makes a huge relationship difference: even though the author says not necessarily so. Not a huge, long read so that mad I liked it but didn't love it. Not sure what I was expecting but I guess more funny, laugh out loud moments like the many I have had and continue to have with my two darling grandchildren. At times it seem to read more like a what "not to do" and since that is purely subjective, I could not always relate. Also, my daughter is the mother of my grandchildren, so I do believe that makes a huge relationship difference: even though the author says not necessarily so. Not a huge, long read so that made it a little easier.
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  • Ruthann
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a grandparent of a 20 year old granddaughter and 6 year old grandson. I also have a 17 month old grandson and a 14 month old granddaughter. I'm already dreading the day when they don't want to spend lots of time with their grandpa and me. However, I guess we must have did something right because the 20 year old between working and school still has time to text me, call me or stop by at least once a week. There is nothing like being a grandparent, so I definitely loved this book.
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  • James Hill
    January 1, 1970
    We often say things about our favorite authors like, "I'd read a shopping list written by her." Well, I'm eons away from being a grandparent and will never be a Nana, but this book grabbed me. It's as much about parenting and interactions with our own parents as it is about grandparenting. It's a quick read and, like most of Quindlen's writing, is exceedingly entertaining and quotable. Highly recommended.
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  • m
    January 1, 1970
    Fours stars for this memoir of grandparenthood by essayist, novelist, and besotted nana Anna Quindlen. Her fans, particularly loyal readers of her columns in the New York Times and Newsweek (later collected in book form), will enjoy this update on her life and family and her thoughtful, personal, often funny musings on becoming and being a grandmother. In addition to being a very enjoyable read, this book would also be a great gift for a Nana-to-be. (Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for thi Fours stars for this memoir of grandparenthood by essayist, novelist, and besotted nana Anna Quindlen. Her fans, particularly loyal readers of her columns in the New York Times and Newsweek (later collected in book form), will enjoy this update on her life and family and her thoughtful, personal, often funny musings on becoming and being a grandmother. In addition to being a very enjoyable read, this book would also be a great gift for a Nana-to-be. (Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for this ARC, provided in exchange for an honest review.)
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  • Jacob Collier
    January 1, 1970
    This is a life changing book that I have read after a long time. You can buy this and many other bestsellers at great discounts from here: https://www.amazon.com/s?i=stripbooks...
  • Terry
    January 1, 1970
    I have long been a fan of Anna Quindlen's and was thrilled to win an ARC edition of this book in a goodreads giveaway. Even though I never had children of my own and my step-grandchildren all have other grandparents, I still immensely enjoyed every chapter in this keenly observed and wittily written book; definitely a book you want to share with all your grandparent friends.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    This is a very sweet book about a woman growing older and navigating the changing waters of being a grandparent. I really like the tone of it and the easy writing style. I don't quite relate to all of the experiences in this memoir, but that is more of my experience as a young woman. I would be interested in reading more works from this author.
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  • Becky Morlok
    January 1, 1970
    Given I am 7 years into grandmotherdom, it was interesting to read Nanaville with a different measuring stick. Quindlen captures it all, especially the tight rope walk between enthusiastic participation and being over-involved. Grandparenting IS the greatest role in the world. This is a great book to gift. I've already done so!
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  • Mama K
    January 1, 1970
    I waited several years to become a grandmother, and it is likely that one is the only one I'm going to get. And that is fine. I LOVED this wise, wonderful, witty book. Quindlen is a noted Pulitzer prize winner. But she is also "just" a mom and a grandmother. No different than the rest of us. I received an ARC from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Kim Denise
    January 1, 1970
    I hope all grandparents-to-be will take the time to read this brief, happy meditation on grandparenting. Filled with Quindlen's signature warmth and wit, it offers wise counsel on the wisdom of knowing one's place in the familial order of things. Quindlen's thoughtful, fierce, encompassing love for the people in her life leaves the reader feeling loved, too.
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  • Wendy
    January 1, 1970
    Anna Quindlen books are hit or miss. I still yearn for the days when she had her excellent column in the New York Times. Nanaville was a miss. More of a stream of consciousness than a flat-out book, Nanaville recounts the feelings Quindlen had on becoming a grandmother, as well as words of wisdom that seem pretty intuitive. It isn’t even especially well written.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    5 stars....and not just because I am Nana. She totally gets it, including the contrast between her upbringing and her children's to today's parenting and grandparenting, terms that didn't exist until recently. Loved this gem!
  • Brenda Leonard
    January 1, 1970
    For all the grandmother's out there this is a must read. Got to read an advance copy and it made me laugh and cry. Do all the "Nana"s in your life a favor and get them this book for Mothers Day. They will love you for it
  • Carol Ann
    January 1, 1970
    Highly recommend for first time grandparents!
  • Terry Swindell
    January 1, 1970
    This is a beautiful book. Anna Quindlen has captured the essence of being a Nana in short little snippets. I’m a fellow Nana, and I highly recommend this book!
  • Julie Barnard
    January 1, 1970
    A fun book especially for grandmothers, though not as good as other books by Anna Quindlen. Worth reading, though.
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