The Last Book Party
"That perfect summer read." -KirkusA propulsive tale of ambition and romance, set in the publishing world of 1980’s New York and the timeless beaches of Cape Cod.In the summer of 1987, 25-year-old Eve Rosen is an aspiring writer languishing in a low-level assistant job, unable to shake the shadow of growing up with her brilliant brother. With her professional ambitions floundering, Eve jumps at the chance to attend an early summer gathering at the Cape Cod home of famed New Yorker writer Henry Grey and his poet wife, Tillie. Dazzled by the guests and her burgeoning crush on the hosts’ artistic son, Eve lands a new job as Henry Grey’s research assistant and an invitation to Henry and Tillie’s exclusive and famed "Book Party"— where attendees dress as literary characters. But by the night of the party, Eve discovers uncomfortable truths about her summer entanglements and understands that the literary world she so desperately wanted to be a part of is not at all what it seems.A page-turning, coming-of-age story, written with a lyrical sense of place and a profound appreciation for the sustaining power of books, The Last Book Party shows what happens when youth and experience collide and what it takes to find your own voice.

The Last Book Party Details

TitleThe Last Book Party
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 9th, 2019
PublisherHenry Holt & Company
ISBN-139781250225474
Rating
GenreFiction, Historical, Historical Fiction, Adult, Contemporary

The Last Book Party Review

  • Nicole (Read Eat Sleep Repeat)
    January 1, 1970
    4.5, rounding up. The Last Book Party is a charming coming of age story that feels both timeless and nostalgic.“Everyone seemed so confident. It was like they were preparing to become the ‘voices of their generation’ and I was struggling to clear my throat.”Told through Eve’s perspective, the reader is drawn in as she attends the party of an acclaimed writer and introduced to a new world she wasn’t previously privy to. Eve is in her mid-twenties, working a job she doesn’t particularly love, and 4.5, rounding up. The Last Book Party is a charming coming of age story that feels both timeless and nostalgic.“Everyone seemed so confident. It was like they were preparing to become the ‘voices of their generation’ and I was struggling to clear my throat.”Told through Eve’s perspective, the reader is drawn in as she attends the party of an acclaimed writer and introduced to a new world she wasn’t previously privy to. Eve is in her mid-twenties, working a job she doesn’t particularly love, and aspiring to be a writer but never actually writing anymore. As she struggles to figure out her identity and path in life, becoming accepted in this new world gives her a sense of purpose that she hasn’t felt in a while. While I didn’t necessarily agree with all the choices she made, I could certainly understand her reasons for said choices and found her to be an overall empathetic and relatable character.Set in the publishing world of the 1980’s between New York City and Cape Cod, The Last Book Party has a solid sense of place. Plenty of references from the time period are tossed casually throughout, from mentions of a Walkman to a Rolodex and popular music, that reminded me of my own childhood and added authenticity to the story. At the same time, the writing style is current and flows effortlessly, making it feel lighthearted even through some of the issues that Eve goes through along her journey. I didn’t read this at a fast pace with an urgent need to know what happens next, but it did hold my attention completely and stayed in my mind even when I had to put it down.“You need to stop the magical thinking. You have to just push through, even when it’s not easy.”Overall, I’m thoroughly impressed with The Last Book Party. Dukess clearly has writing chops; this may have been her debut novel but it certainly didn’t read like one. I can see this becoming one of the hot beach reads this year. Fans of books about books and coming of age stories are sure to enjoy this.*Thanks to the publisher for providing an arc of this edition via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jamie Brenner
    January 1, 1970
    As a serious book lover with endless nostalgia for the 1980s, I completely lost myself in this beautiful book. It's a joy!
  • Jypsy
    January 1, 1970
    I was drawn to The Last Book Party because it's a story about books. Eve loves book and wants to work in the publishing industry. She takes a job as an assistant for a famous writer. The job is an eye opener. The writer's life is not as great as Eve thought. The story portrays a time when Eve is trying to figure out who she is. She wants approval from her family, a mistake in my opinion. She is lost in her search for identity and makes some bad decisions. Live and learn and all that. The story i I was drawn to The Last Book Party because it's a story about books. Eve loves book and wants to work in the publishing industry. She takes a job as an assistant for a famous writer. The job is an eye opener. The writer's life is not as great as Eve thought. The story portrays a time when Eve is trying to figure out who she is. She wants approval from her family, a mistake in my opinion. She is lost in her search for identity and makes some bad decisions. Live and learn and all that. The story is well written and does talk about books. It's predictable at times but still engaging enough to keep you reading until the end. It's a good read overall, especially for book lovers. Thanks to NetGalley for an arc in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jonah ❤️LIBROCUBICULARIST❤️
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsOops… I did not mean to finish this book in one sitting and let alone to like it so much either. The Last Book Party is like a bad drug that you shouldn’t dabble with, but you will try anyways because it sounded SOO good. I do not really read romance and they are not really my genre, but this sucked me right in and I wanted to know how is it like for people in their 20’s to grow up in the 80’s. The story was narrated by Eve Rosen – a 25-year-old booklover and works for publishing indust 4.5 starsOops… I did not mean to finish this book in one sitting and let alone to like it so much either. The Last Book Party is like a bad drug that you shouldn’t dabble with, but you will try anyways because it sounded SOO good. I do not really read romance and they are not really my genre, but this sucked me right in and I wanted to know how is it like for people in their 20’s to grow up in the 80’s. The story was narrated by Eve Rosen – a 25-year-old booklover and works for publishing industry in New York – who made bad decisions with men and other life choices. Her entanglement with the series of men she chose along with her family problems led her to alter her dreams and to start anew. On the first few chapters, I had a problem with the character as she was weak, lost and somewhat helpless in her mid-twenties. But I had to remind myself that this was way back in the late eighties and women were different back then. But her choices in life is so relatable how people make mistakes after mistakes and I wondered what she’s going to do next. Karen Dukess did a wonderful job with this novel as she showed real-life experiences and how people go back up and how to face the world again. Highly recommended for summer’s reading. If you're looking for something addicting and somewhat satisfying, this book must be for you. Again, Ooops… I didn’t mean to like this book. Thank you to NetGalley and Publisher for an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Andrea Rothman
    January 1, 1970
    In simple and elegant prose that literally flies on the page, The Last Book Party offers a realistic and enchanting insider look at the high-powered world of publishing and writing. Set in Cape Cod and NYC in the late 1980’s, this coming-of age story is told through the eyes of 25-year old aspiring writer, Eve Rosen. Smart and ambitious yet impressionable and unaware of her potential, Eve looks up to successful writers, young and old, and mostly male, for insight about the craft and approval of In simple and elegant prose that literally flies on the page, The Last Book Party offers a realistic and enchanting insider look at the high-powered world of publishing and writing. Set in Cape Cod and NYC in the late 1980’s, this coming-of age story is told through the eyes of 25-year old aspiring writer, Eve Rosen. Smart and ambitious yet impressionable and unaware of her potential, Eve looks up to successful writers, young and old, and mostly male, for insight about the craft and approval of her skills as a writer. She soon discovers, not without heartache, that behind the glamorous façade of literary success there’s a heavy dose of self-doubt, disappointment, and deceit. Mainly though, and perhaps the most valuable lesson that she learns, is that writing doesn’t just happen by magic, and that it takes much more than inspiration and talent to write a book. I loved the vivid sense of place of the novel, the descriptions of the Cape Cod beaches and the landscape are majestic, and for me set the emotional tone of the story, and I particularly enjoyed the references to classic books: “On Monday, after discussing the book with Henry, who adored Dorothea as much as I did, he handed me what he called “a palate cleanser,” a novel called Zuleika Dobson by Max Beerbohm.” One of the sentences that really resonated with me because it evokes Eve’s journey, is her former boss’s opinion towards the end of the novel about newspaper writing vs. fiction writing: “The truths of the world are not captured in the who-what-when-where-why of an inverted pyramid.”
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  • Kate ☀️ Olson
    January 1, 1970
    (free review copy) 4.5 stars. Bookish, nostalgic, fabulous timeless narrator and setting. Highly recommended for anyone who loves to read about writing and the publishing industry, and for anyone who adores books set in beach towns as much as I do.
  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    I feel so fortunate being among the first to review this extraordinary novel. I was unable to put the book down for a moment. Eve Rosen works for a publisher, dreaming of becoming a writer. It is a visit to a party among the literary elite in Truro that changes the course of her life. Rather than inspiration, Eve becomes entangled in the lives of the Grey family. It is in the few summer months, following the party that she learns difficult life lessons. . The story is not a typical coming of age I feel so fortunate being among the first to review this extraordinary novel. I was unable to put the book down for a moment. Eve Rosen works for a publisher, dreaming of becoming a writer. It is a visit to a party among the literary elite in Truro that changes the course of her life. Rather than inspiration, Eve becomes entangled in the lives of the Grey family. It is in the few summer months, following the party that she learns difficult life lessons. . The story is not a typical coming of age saga, rather a beautifully written novel about the maturation of a young woman and very well drawn studies of the people who change the course of her life. So many of the characters don’t do what is expected, nor are they who we assume. Every page brings exciting revelations that propel the plot and engage the reader. The author uses foreshadowing, in a nuanced and intelligent way, preventing the book from becoming trite or predictable. Eve expects life lessons but on the night of THE LAST BOOK PARTY, Eve’s world is upended. I loved the way it was written, Karen Dukess is a writer who will have a fabulous future walking in the footsteps of other great female authors. I eagerly look forward to her next novel. I know that my book groups and seminar will love reading and discussing Eve’s struggles and the actual process of becoming a writer. Thank you Netgalley for this privilege!
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  • Julia Phillips
    January 1, 1970
    I tore through this novel in a single night. Intensely charming, intelligent, sexy, and specific, THE LAST BOOK PARTY immerses us in the incestuous world of the 1980s literary elite, from boozy publicist-thrown parties in Manhattan to the writing nooks of a New Yorker staff writer on Cape Cod. The novel's narrator, Eve, has all the insecurities and doubts of any 25-year-old aspiring writer but doesn't let those stop her from being a compelling, bold, active heroine in charge of her own life. Thi I tore through this novel in a single night. Intensely charming, intelligent, sexy, and specific, THE LAST BOOK PARTY immerses us in the incestuous world of the 1980s literary elite, from boozy publicist-thrown parties in Manhattan to the writing nooks of a New Yorker staff writer on Cape Cod. The novel's narrator, Eve, has all the insecurities and doubts of any 25-year-old aspiring writer but doesn't let those stop her from being a compelling, bold, active heroine in charge of her own life. This is the summer's most delicious and intelligent beach read.
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  • Tucker
    January 1, 1970
    Many thanks to Henry Holt for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review| Goodreads | Blog | Twitch | Pinterest |
  • Maggie (mugandnook)
    January 1, 1970
    Set in the late 1980s following Eve Rosen, a recent literature grad, who dreams of one day becoming a writer and starts as an editor’s assistant at a publishing house in NYC. She becomes acquainted with a memoir writer, Henry Grey, and snags an invitation to their family’s beach house in Truro near Cape Cod. They host a semi-famous annual Book Party where guests come dressed as their favorite literary characters. Eve finds herself getting more and more entrenched in the New York writing scene ov Set in the late 1980s following Eve Rosen, a recent literature grad, who dreams of one day becoming a writer and starts as an editor’s assistant at a publishing house in NYC. She becomes acquainted with a memoir writer, Henry Grey, and snags an invitation to their family’s beach house in Truro near Cape Cod. They host a semi-famous annual Book Party where guests come dressed as their favorite literary characters. Eve finds herself getting more and more entrenched in the New York writing scene over an unforgettable summer seaside in Truro.This is a book for book lovers, English majors, and writers. There are so many literary Easter eggs throughout the book, and it gives an insightful glimpse into the world of writing and publishing. It’s well-written, quiet and slow, with Eve’s examinations on life and relationships. It took me back to my days studying creative writing in college and that disorienting phase post-graduation when you’re meant to find your place in the world. The Cape setting makes this a perfect summer read, and it’s a book you could easily get lost in on a beach vacation. This was a NetGalley advanced reader copy. The publishing date is July 9th.
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  • Megan Collins
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book so much. In addition to reminding me of summers I spent on Cape Cod, it was also such a comforting, satisfying, and entertaining read. Even better, it had so much delicious bookishness in it—fun literary allusions, scenes in libraries, entire paragraphs devoted to the incomparable pleasure of losing yourself in a book, references to the agony and thrill of writing. But this book won’t just appeal to writers alone; it’s for anyone who’s ever felt lost, who’s had to stumble down I loved this book so much. In addition to reminding me of summers I spent on Cape Cod, it was also such a comforting, satisfying, and entertaining read. Even better, it had so much delicious bookishness in it—fun literary allusions, scenes in libraries, entire paragraphs devoted to the incomparable pleasure of losing yourself in a book, references to the agony and thrill of writing. But this book won’t just appeal to writers alone; it’s for anyone who’s ever felt lost, who’s had to stumble down many different paths before they finally found their way. (And that’s all of us, right?) On top of all that, Dukess’ writing is so beautiful and graceful, it’s easy to sink into this book and quickly find a home there.
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  • Ann Mah
    January 1, 1970
    Karen Dukess has written a modern yet timeless coming-of-age story about friendship, romance, and one young woman's complicated relationship with a wickedly charming family of literary superstars. Emotional and evocative, THE LAST BOOK PARTY left me aching for the hard lessons of youth, trembling with hope – and utterly transfixed until the final page.
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  • Tisha (IG: Bluestocking629)
    January 1, 1970
    When a book starts off in the year 1987 and there is mention of a Laura Ashley sundress with background music of The Bangles, you just know you are in for a nostalgic ride though the calendar of life. The first chapter pulled me into the life of Eve, our protagonist, and what her parents refer to as her dreamy bookishness. Her parents are very unyielding and stodgy, in my opinion. Eve is a “mere editorial secretary” who dreams of being a writer. Chapter one finds Eve at a party in Truro, Massach When a book starts off in the year 1987 and there is mention of a Laura Ashley sundress with background music of The Bangles, you just know you are in for a nostalgic ride though the calendar of life. The first chapter pulled me into the life of Eve, our protagonist, and what her parents refer to as her dreamy bookishness. Her parents are very unyielding and stodgy, in my opinion. Eve is a “mere editorial secretary” who dreams of being a writer. Chapter one finds Eve at a party in Truro, Massachusetts. The gathering is filled with all types of artistic party-goers. Two other characters we are introduced to at the party are father Henry and son Franny. The commentary between them was delightful! It was chapter two when I realized Eve and I could be friends. Eve normally, when at a party, would leave early to go home and read!The author has a way with words. Indulge me if you will in reading the following two sentences. And trust me they are not spoilers. “As I sipped my coffee, the houses on the other side of the marsh came into view, emerging from the mist like images sharpening on a Polaroid. I loved how kindly the weather changed on mornings like this, as if sparing you the shock of awakening into a bright, clear day and instead taking your hand and gently guiding you from the cloud of sleep”. Am I Right? How poetic was that? Makes you want to read more, am I correct?Ok, this is another book you will appreciate having an electronic device nearby so you can look up all the literary references or books you are unfamiliar with. At the very least have a pen and paper nearby so you can jot everything down you need to look up later. This my friends is a fictional book about books! How is it I never knew the movie Gentlemen Prefer Blondes is based on a book? How have I not yet read Middlemarch? Heck I’ve not yet read Harold and the Purple Crayon. (Voice command proves I have a Philly accent. Voice command and I renamed the book Harold and the Purple CROWN). When a comment was made on how Eve reads so fast, she borrowed a line from a recently read book: “I utilize all my spare moments”. Don’t we all Eve, don’t we all!Ok this is a true coming of age and finding oneself book. It seems as if it’s not just Eve doing the searching. Pretty much every character, regardless of their age, is still searching. There were a few events in this book that were gritty and lacking in morals. So,e bad decisions were made. Yet it still made for a fabulous read. If I were a beachgoer I’d call it a great beach read. Thank you to the publisher Henry Holt and Company and the author Karen Dukes for the advanced copy of this most entertaining book.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky enough to get an advanced copy of this book, which comes out in July, and I loved it! The protagonist is a young woman named Eve who works in publishing and then becomes the assistant to a semi-famous writer, and it's set during one summer in 1987 in Manhattan and Cape Cod. The characters all felt like such real people, and there is a strong sense of time and place while at the same time the book feels very timeless, like the story could happen today too. There's also a lot of discus I was lucky enough to get an advanced copy of this book, which comes out in July, and I loved it! The protagonist is a young woman named Eve who works in publishing and then becomes the assistant to a semi-famous writer, and it's set during one summer in 1987 in Manhattan and Cape Cod. The characters all felt like such real people, and there is a strong sense of time and place while at the same time the book feels very timeless, like the story could happen today too. There's also a lot of discussion of writing, reading, and books, which gives the book a pleasantly intellectual feel without being pretentious or heavy. So it's light enough to be a perfect summer book, while still just so smart. If you're a fan of smart insightful authors like Curtis Sittenfeld and Meg Wolitzer, I think you would like this too. Highly recommended. 4.5 stars.Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for a free copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Ilyssa Wesche
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked this - I always dig books about the publishing world, especially when publishing is the background and the main focus isn't on 20-something marketing assistants and their love lives. Which actually I guess this book kind of is about that in a way, but the characters were so fleshed out, and the story was the perfect amount of believable and intriguing. I loved the end, which also had the perfect amount of resolution, closure, and ambiguity. Everything about this book was the perfe I really liked this - I always dig books about the publishing world, especially when publishing is the background and the main focus isn't on 20-something marketing assistants and their love lives. Which actually I guess this book kind of is about that in a way, but the characters were so fleshed out, and the story was the perfect amount of believable and intriguing. I loved the end, which also had the perfect amount of resolution, closure, and ambiguity. Everything about this book was the perfect blend - all the characters had just the right amounts of flaw vs. redeeming character, and I felt for them all, even cold Tilly and the suburban mom.
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  • Annabel Monaghan
    January 1, 1970
    I read the ARC in a day. I was hooked from the very beginning on what is the ultimate story for book lovers and writers. It immersed me in what publishing was in 1987 until I could actually feel the bindings of the books and hear the typewriters click. The story is part part romance, part coming of age and a great study of that moment in life in your 20s when you're not sure what's going to become of you. Dukess knows how to keep a story moving so that you have no choice but to read one more cha I read the ARC in a day. I was hooked from the very beginning on what is the ultimate story for book lovers and writers. It immersed me in what publishing was in 1987 until I could actually feel the bindings of the books and hear the typewriters click. The story is part part romance, part coming of age and a great study of that moment in life in your 20s when you're not sure what's going to become of you. Dukess knows how to keep a story moving so that you have no choice but to read one more chapter, while pausing briefly for observations like this one: “His comment made me feel as though i was an afterthought - like a piece of furniture so plain and functional that you had to think hard for a moment to remember if you still had it in your house or had already given it away.”Highly recommend this one!
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  • Amy Lawson
    January 1, 1970
    This was the most charming coming of age story I have read in a long time. The story is based around an annual summer "book party" where guests come dressed as their favorite literary figure. I LOVED THE PREMISE. The protagonist Eve was someone I could relate to and any book set in Cape Cod is something I want to read. The "literary Easter eggs" through this story were FABULOUS and I ended the story with a few new books on my TBR list as they were mentioned over and over in this story.I LOVED EV This was the most charming coming of age story I have read in a long time. The story is based around an annual summer "book party" where guests come dressed as their favorite literary figure. I LOVED THE PREMISE. The protagonist Eve was someone I could relate to and any book set in Cape Cod is something I want to read. The "literary Easter eggs" through this story were FABULOUS and I ended the story with a few new books on my TBR list as they were mentioned over and over in this story.I LOVED EVERYTHING ABOUT THIS BOOK and am going to try and frame the cover art as I think it is wonderful.Pick this one up this summer people! You won't regret it. Hits book shelves in July. Thank you NetGalley for the advanced copy. This was five very bright stars in my book!!
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  • Daniela Petrova
    January 1, 1970
    The Last Book Party is a beautiful coming-of-age story about a young writer who struggles to find herself as a woman and an artist. The elegant breezy prose and fascinating characters pulled me in from the first page and I finished the book in two sittings. There is so much to love about this novel—the vivid descriptions of Cape Cod, the witty exchanges about writing, publishing and love, the brilliant depiction family dynamics and relationships. What it takes to be an artist? Hard work or divin The Last Book Party is a beautiful coming-of-age story about a young writer who struggles to find herself as a woman and an artist. The elegant breezy prose and fascinating characters pulled me in from the first page and I finished the book in two sittings. There is so much to love about this novel—the vivid descriptions of Cape Cod, the witty exchanges about writing, publishing and love, the brilliant depiction family dynamics and relationships. What it takes to be an artist? Hard work or divine inspiration? How do artists deal with self-doubt? If you’re a book-lover, you’ll love this rich, easy-to-read story about the publishing world.
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  • Christie Grotheim
    January 1, 1970
    I had the privilege of reading an advanced copy and really enjoyed this novel, especially getting a glimpse into the publishing world of the eighties. The book is a compelling commentary on the industry, the harsh and fickle judgements doled out, and the effects this has on the individual artists within it. Eve Rosen is a complex character, very impressionable and naive, and the story is full of twists and turns—I was a little shocked and surprised by her choices, which made it a page turner. Th I had the privilege of reading an advanced copy and really enjoyed this novel, especially getting a glimpse into the publishing world of the eighties. The book is a compelling commentary on the industry, the harsh and fickle judgements doled out, and the effects this has on the individual artists within it. Eve Rosen is a complex character, very impressionable and naive, and the story is full of twists and turns—I was a little shocked and surprised by her choices, which made it a page turner. The setting was well-described; Dukess made Cape Cod come alive, so much so that I found myself wanting to plan a visit to Truro! Beyond the summer romance, the heart of the book for me was me was about art: what is true and honest art, and who has the courage to produce it. I was pleased with Eve’s character arc and how she finally began to find her own voice and take control of her life.
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  • Lauren Paige Kennedy
    January 1, 1970
    THE LAST BOOK PARTY is the compelling tale of an ambitious young woman who is first enamored, and then quickly seduced, by the literary scene in 1980s New York, whose summer outpost is Cape Cod. Believing herself to be worldly but ultimately revealed to be anything but, she falls into the orbit of a long-revered, if fading, writer, seeming to wish for his gravity to pull her out of publishing obscurity. But she’s in for a major surprise before the summer -- and the writer's annual, glamorous boo THE LAST BOOK PARTY is the compelling tale of an ambitious young woman who is first enamored, and then quickly seduced, by the literary scene in 1980s New York, whose summer outpost is Cape Cod. Believing herself to be worldly but ultimately revealed to be anything but, she falls into the orbit of a long-revered, if fading, writer, seeming to wish for his gravity to pull her out of publishing obscurity. But she’s in for a major surprise before the summer -- and the writer's annual, glamorous book party that bids goodbye to the season -- winds down. With an intelligent and likable protagonist, sharp and witty dialogue, memorable cast of supporting characters whose true motives can’t easily be predicted, and the escapist backdrops of the sleepy beach town Truro and its mirror opposite Manhattan, the reader feels both the sand between her toes and the chilled wine at her lips. A perfectly enjoyable summer fling, it's both frothy and bookishly smart. Buy it now and bring it to the beach!
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  • Debbie Love
    January 1, 1970
    I won this ARC as a Goodreads giveaway. As I sit here and try to decide how to write this, I'm realizing that there really weren't many exciting moments in this book. It was a good story, but I never felt the "I can't wait to see what happens next" that comes from a story that really pulls me in. I also was somewhat disappointed by the ending, as it left alot unresolved for me. Maybe for a second book?
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  • Nina
    January 1, 1970
    I devoured this novel in two days. It had all the things I love in a story: writers, readers, some forbidden romance, an 80s setting, and good literary writing.
  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    A delightful view of late 80s publishing and summers on the Cape. A truly enjoyable - and thoughtful - read. Highly recommended.Thank you to Henry Holt and NetGalley for the digital ARC.
  • Danielle
    January 1, 1970
    So I liked the middle 70% of this book. Illicit affair? Yes. Here for it. But the beginning (with the introductions of Jeremy and Franny) and the ending (where it jumps ahead a year) just seemed so clunky and disjointed from the middle of the book. Would recommend if you just need something easy and with short chapters. .Received this ARC ebook via #netgalley. Set to be published in July 2019.
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  • Suzy Becker
    January 1, 1970
    LAST BOOK PARTY is a totally satisfying read with a lot of laugh-out-loud moments (and I'm stingy with laughs). Dukess realizes the novel's setting (1980s Cape Cod and NYC) and its protagonist so skillfully, reading it was an immersive experience. The plot's deft twists and turns make it nearly impossible to put the book down-- I wish I had (put the book down) more so it would've lasted longer. I can't wait for her next one!
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  • Samantha Alvarez
    January 1, 1970
    Such a wonderful, fun and easy read! Perfect beach book!I received this Advanced Readers copy from Henry Holt and Company and wanted to give a huge thanks to them as well as Karen Dukess!Flattered to be able to read this novel before it comes out on July 9!Eve Rosen is an aspiring writer working as an assistant In a publishing company. She hasn’t written a thing in years and meets one of the writers at a party in Cape Cod and becomes enchanted with Mr Henry Grey. The summers events eventually le Such a wonderful, fun and easy read! Perfect beach book!I received this Advanced Readers copy from Henry Holt and Company and wanted to give a huge thanks to them as well as Karen Dukess!Flattered to be able to read this novel before it comes out on July 9!Eve Rosen is an aspiring writer working as an assistant In a publishing company. She hasn’t written a thing in years and meets one of the writers at a party in Cape Cod and becomes enchanted with Mr Henry Grey. The summers events eventually lead up to a well known Costume Book Party where many truths reveal themselves.I really enjoyed this lazy day type read. It was fast, easily understood and had a good storyline. It’s not a big book so one could easily bring to the beach and read in an afternoon. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Go pick it up at your local library or book store on July 9! You’ll thank me!
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  • K Chess
    January 1, 1970
    THE LAST BOOK PARTY is a fascinating exploration of ambition, belonging and imitation. It's the late 1980s and Eve Rosen works in publishing and summers on the Cape. In the course of a few months as assistant to an older writer, Henry, whose milieu she admires, Eve slowly learns the secrets of two exclusive worlds. This is a smart bit of positioning on Dukess's part, as the reader is sure to be just as curious about these rich, artsy people as Eve is. The coming-of-age plot is bolstered by arres THE LAST BOOK PARTY is a fascinating exploration of ambition, belonging and imitation. It's the late 1980s and Eve Rosen works in publishing and summers on the Cape. In the course of a few months as assistant to an older writer, Henry, whose milieu she admires, Eve slowly learns the secrets of two exclusive worlds. This is a smart bit of positioning on Dukess's part, as the reader is sure to be just as curious about these rich, artsy people as Eve is. The coming-of-age plot is bolstered by arresting descriptions of Truro's natural beauty and by characters like Jeremy, a wunderkind novelist with a prickly appeal and (dun-dun-DUH!) secrets of his own.Also, Henry's annual dress-as-an-obscure-literary-character party sounds awesome.
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  • Katherine Riley
    January 1, 1970
    The Last Book Party is a readers' story, by which I mean it not only tells a compelling story but compels other stories in its pages, through its many literary references, which it uses to anchor its own story contextually and also as touchstones to evoke other rich spaces in our memories and in the main characters’ too.The Last Book Party is a story of a young writer in the process of learning how to live and write and love. It is a story that shows how the lessons we learn from others are as m The Last Book Party is a readers' story, by which I mean it not only tells a compelling story but compels other stories in its pages, through its many literary references, which it uses to anchor its own story contextually and also as touchstones to evoke other rich spaces in our memories and in the main characters’ too.The Last Book Party is a story of a young writer in the process of learning how to live and write and love. It is a story that shows how the lessons we learn from others are as much a process of discarding deadwood as they are of growth.The Last Book Party is a story of sweet and sad and bitter love affairs, but equally it is a story of families, how we come from them but also must separate from them in order to fully become who we are on our own.
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  • Zara Raheem
    January 1, 1970
    I love how this book immediately transports you into the seductive literary/publishing world of the eighties. It has everything you could want from a smart, summer read: romance, betrayal, scandal, charm. All of the characters are so well-developed; I particularly enjoyed how realistically each embody the insecurities and doubts felt by all writers—both aspiring and established. Eve Rosen’s journey to self-discovery is believable and satisfying, and it is lovely to see her finally find her voice I love how this book immediately transports you into the seductive literary/publishing world of the eighties. It has everything you could want from a smart, summer read: romance, betrayal, scandal, charm. All of the characters are so well-developed; I particularly enjoyed how realistically each embody the insecurities and doubts felt by all writers—both aspiring and established. Eve Rosen’s journey to self-discovery is believable and satisfying, and it is lovely to see her finally find her voice and confidence as a young woman/writer. I enjoyed this book immensely, and I definitely recommend it!
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Do you remember what it was like to be in your early 20s, trying to figure yourself out -- career, friendships, lovers? Enter Eve Rosen, the main character of Karen Dukess' new novel "The Last Book Party." Eve works in publishing and is trying to find herself as a writer -- and an adult. Set in Cape Cod and New York City in the 1980s, the book follows Eve as she transitions from a publishing assistant to becoming a personal assistant to a famous older writer to a newspaper reporter. As a former Do you remember what it was like to be in your early 20s, trying to figure yourself out -- career, friendships, lovers? Enter Eve Rosen, the main character of Karen Dukess' new novel "The Last Book Party." Eve works in publishing and is trying to find herself as a writer -- and an adult. Set in Cape Cod and New York City in the 1980s, the book follows Eve as she transitions from a publishing assistant to becoming a personal assistant to a famous older writer to a newspaper reporter. As a former reporter and a book lover, I enjoyed this coming-of-age story. A satisfying easy read.
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