Cheshire Crossing
The three meet here, at Cheshire Crossing--a boarding school where girls like them learn how to cope with their supernatural experiences and harness their magical world-crossing powers.But the trio--now teenagers, who've had their fill of meddling authority figures--aren't content to sit still in a classroom. Soon they're dashing from one universe to the next, leaving havoc in their wake--and, inadvertently, bringing the Wicked Witch and Hook together in a deadly supervillain love match.To stop them, the girls will have to draw on all of their powers . . . and marshal a team of unlikely allies from across the magical multiverse.

Cheshire Crossing Details

TitleCheshire Crossing
Author
ReleaseJul 16th, 2019
PublisherTen Speed Press
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Fantasy, Comics, Young Adult, Retellings, Fiction

Cheshire Crossing Review

  • Tucker
    January 1, 1970
    Many thanks to Ten Speed Press for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest reviewOh, this was such a mess. I had such high hopes because I love Sarah Anderson's art and I've heard so much praise for Andy Weir. Now, the art was great. Sarah did her best with what she was given but the story. And the characters. Oh dear god. First off, it read like very poorly written fanfiction. It is based on The Wizard of Oz, Peter Pan, and Alice in Wonderland. It felt as though the author was trying to mak Many thanks to Ten Speed Press for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest reviewOh, this was such a mess. I had such high hopes because I love Sarah Anderson's art and I've heard so much praise for Andy Weir. Now, the art was great. Sarah did her best with what she was given but the story. And the characters. Oh dear god. First off, it read like very poorly written fanfiction. It is based on The Wizard of Oz, Peter Pan, and Alice in Wonderland. It felt as though the author was trying to make the old-timey characters "hip" and relevant. But it just ended up being cringey. Like when your grandparents try to quote a vine. The whole thing felt very juvinelle. Relating back to the above mentioned point, this was aimed at young adults but it felt like it should have been aimed at elementray schoolers. But it didn't fit any of those age ranges. Overall, this was cringey, crappy and unenjoyable.| Goodreads | Blog | Twitch | Pinterest | Buy
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    This work is getting an awful lot of buzz and excitement and accompanying favorable reviews. This tale of Wendy, Dorothy, and Alice after their adventure coping with life now in the early 1900s told in graphic novel format by Andy Weir.Perhaps the same crowd who is excited about this would also be interested in the tale of Wendy, Dorothy, and Alice after their adventure coping with life now in the early 1900s told in graphic novel format by Alan Moore. Written in 1991.
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  • julianna ➹
    January 1, 1970
    a graphic novella that is above three stars... finallyMaybe it was that it was in a physical format? Maybe it was that this was a gift to me from my friend?? (thank you to her!!!!! idk if she reads my trashfire reviews or immediately clicks away before grimacing, which I would totally understand) But anyways, this was so FUN to read and also really short, so it could be easily added to my reading challenge. :)I love Sarah Anderson and her Sarah's Scribbles, and it was so interesting to see an al a graphic novella that is above three stars... finallyMaybe it was that it was in a physical format? Maybe it was that this was a gift to me from my friend?? (thank you to her!!!!! idk if she reads my trashfire reviews or immediately clicks away before grimacing, which I would totally understand) But anyways, this was so FUN to read and also really short, so it could be easily added to my reading challenge. :)I love Sarah Anderson and her Sarah's Scribbles, and it was so interesting to see an altered art style from her that I previously hadn't seen! There were so many really beautiful page spreads?? The entire story was pretty entertaining, although I wouldn't say hilarious-funny as more of just... weird with sarcasm mixed in?? (I feel like from the point of a millenial/gen z, this isn't as funny vs. the perspective of someone older, like Andy Weir.) But I really liked the expansion of the character's powers as well as seeing all of the worlds be visited again by our three girls. Also, I'm 99% sure one of the characters is basically Mary Poppins.
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  • The Nerd Daily
    January 1, 1970
    Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Annie McCannAndy Weir, author of The Martian, Artemis, and The Egg, is back with a graphic novel like no other. What happens to Alice when she comes back from Wonderland? Wendy from Neverland? Dorothy from Oz? This graphic novel is an interesting cross over of three completely different characters from three completely different worlds. A unique story of what becomes of these characters when the worlds we know and have read have come to an end.I Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Annie McCannAndy Weir, author of The Martian, Artemis, and The Egg, is back with a graphic novel like no other. What happens to Alice when she comes back from Wonderland? Wendy from Neverland? Dorothy from Oz? This graphic novel is an interesting cross over of three completely different characters from three completely different worlds. A unique story of what becomes of these characters when the worlds we know and have read have come to an end.I thought this was such a very clever storyline and I liked how this brought three completely different tales and worlds together in a real world setting. It was interesting to see how the characters were initially perceived as mentally ill when disclosing their supernatural and otherworldly experiences. This landed them committed to wards until one day, they all meet at the Cheshire Crossing – a boarding school that acknowledges their experiences as truth and nurtures them to cope with their past experience and harness their magical world-crossing abilities.This isn’t like anything you would have read before, the underlying storyline for each character is present and acts as a foundation but the characters are very different to what we know in their original stories, making it a humorous and insightful twist. From their attitudes, to their illustrated appearance, to their mannerism, they are all very different to what we remember. In this story, the characters: Alice, Wendy Darling and Dorothy are now teenagers and are not content to sit still in a classroom. Soon they are dashing from one universe to the next – landing in each other’s supernatural worlds and, inadvertently, bringing the Wicked Witch and Hook together in a deadly supervillain love match. This is when it the three need to draw on their abilities to stop destruction from across each universe.The plot is fast paced and the story flowed quickly, it was easy to follow the dialogue in each box. The illustrations didn’t look extravagant but were simplistic and elegant. The artwork is suitable for a younger audience, however, the dialogue does include course language so please exercise discretion if you choose to read this graphic novel. If you’re a fan of graphic novels that features retellings of the classics then definitely give this one a go!
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  • Tina Christopher
    January 1, 1970
    This was rather charming and a lot of fun. I love the concept and Sarah's illustrations. Andy did a good job connecting the original stories to his new mash-up world.
  • Samantha Beard
    January 1, 1970
    Somewhere between a 4 and a 5 for me! I really enjoyed this take on portal fantasy, and what happens to our favorite childhood heroines after their adventures are over. It is a bit of a grown up story, though at times I found myself forgetting that the girls were older. Some things in the plot just progressed a bit too quickly, I thought, so that's my main reason for taking a star off. However, I think it's a really fun book and anyone who feels a kinship with Wendy Darling, Alice, or Dorothy wi Somewhere between a 4 and a 5 for me! I really enjoyed this take on portal fantasy, and what happens to our favorite childhood heroines after their adventures are over. It is a bit of a grown up story, though at times I found myself forgetting that the girls were older. Some things in the plot just progressed a bit too quickly, I thought, so that's my main reason for taking a star off. However, I think it's a really fun book and anyone who feels a kinship with Wendy Darling, Alice, or Dorothy will find something to like here.
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  • Vanesa ✌️ ♡
    January 1, 1970
    I read the first 10 episodes online and I absolutely loved it. I cannot wait until July to get the full story. AMAZING!
  • Bob
    January 1, 1970
    What did I think? What did I think?I'm sorry. You can't ask me this after I've read this book, 'what do you think'.Screw you, Andy Weir. Screw you for all you've done. I bought this book, and do you know what? At first, I liked it. At first I decided 'hey, i'll give it a shot! he's a friend of my uncle' and you know what I got?A HEAPING PILE OF CRAP. Turns out your little "book"? Yeah? Had traces of LSD on it. I live in Detroit, and do you know what? I lost my job. I lost my job because of your What did I think? What did I think?I'm sorry. You can't ask me this after I've read this book, 'what do you think'.Screw you, Andy Weir. Screw you for all you've done. I bought this book, and do you know what? At first, I liked it. At first I decided 'hey, i'll give it a shot! he's a friend of my uncle' and you know what I got?A HEAPING PILE OF CRAP. Turns out your little "book"? Yeah? Had traces of LSD on it. I live in Detroit, and do you know what? I lost my job. I lost my job because of your stupid book, Andy.One star. Go to hell.
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  • Lesley
    January 1, 1970
    I got this book for free at ECCC 2019. I was excited to read it, as I love graphic novels! Unfortunately, it was just okay for me. Maybe if I had a stronger tie to the characters I would have enjoyed it? I think the art was really fantastic, but the girls didn't "read" as older teens to me, but rather maybe 13 year olds? All I know as a bookseller is that parents and kids will see the art and feel it is aimed them/their 5th grader, and the language of the book will not go over well. I'm not sayi I got this book for free at ECCC 2019. I was excited to read it, as I love graphic novels! Unfortunately, it was just okay for me. Maybe if I had a stronger tie to the characters I would have enjoyed it? I think the art was really fantastic, but the girls didn't "read" as older teens to me, but rather maybe 13 year olds? All I know as a bookseller is that parents and kids will see the art and feel it is aimed them/their 5th grader, and the language of the book will not go over well. I'm not saying kid's books shouldn't have the word "damn" in them, but there is language and situations that are just odd for something that looks like it is geared towards kids. Some tidying up of the story would have been great, I think folks can get away with a lot more on a webcomic that doesn't necessarily work for the Scholastic graphic novel reading crowd. That being said, there are plenty of readers here that thought it was great, so YMMV. I had a parent angrily return Raina Telgemeier's Drama to the store because they deemed it inappropriate for their 13 year old. I can see this book causing some drama (ha!) with parents as well.
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  • Courtney
    January 1, 1970
    I was not expecting to like this. I love these characters; they are my childhood heroines.However, somewhere along the way, I changed my expectations and I thought of this as expensive/mainstream fanfic, which made it more bearable. There were things I thought were well done (Alice being immune to the poppies in Oz, Dorthy’s silver slippers), and there were things I disliked (what about Wendy’s brothers? Alice’s sister?).Some of the characters were handled well and good moments of humor.
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  • Paul Black
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks for the great read, Andy. I read it in one evening! I kinda' wish I could have stretched it out longer. I regret that I had a hard time keeping the girls straight. The nanny was an extra, delightful bonus. Perhaps the doctor's assistant, Lem, was Lemuel Gulliver.I lowered my review to three stars because there was a lot of swearing, in addition to the frequent appearance of "punctuation swear words".
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  • Ashlee Null
    January 1, 1970
    3.5Fun crossover of classic characters! Definitely not groundbreaking but I found myself chuckling and overall amused.
  • Darkovary
    January 1, 1970
    The artwork is great, the story is kinda weak
  • Brittany
    January 1, 1970
    This is delightful. I'm hoping it's not a stand-alone, because it leaves a lot of questions unanswered. But it's a fun crossover, an interesting premise, and legitimately funny. Sarah's artwork is clean and pretty, and the coloring is bold and eye-catching.
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  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    I got this because I'm a huge fan of Sarah Andersen from Sarah Scribbles. The sneak peak she posted was enough to get my attention, and while it's not the first time these three characters have been put together, I was definitely willing for something easy and light.However, it wasn't until after I bought it that I realized it was written by Andy Weir of The Martian fame. Now, The Martian was cute, but I think once people started reading Weir's second book Artemis they learned that his talents r I got this because I'm a huge fan of Sarah Andersen from Sarah Scribbles. The sneak peak she posted was enough to get my attention, and while it's not the first time these three characters have been put together, I was definitely willing for something easy and light.However, it wasn't until after I bought it that I realized it was written by Andy Weir of The Martian fame. Now, The Martian was cute, but I think once people started reading Weir's second book Artemis they learned that his talents really only stemmed for writing one kind of character. And when you can only write one kind of character (a sassy smartass), then it gets a bit old when that's the entire cast of characters.The art style is cute, but it doesn't save the halted pacing of the comic. There are some good ideas but it's clunky and the dialogue is sometimes almost painful as the characters make thinly veiled pop culture references. If this was a webcomic, I think it would do well enough, but I'm not going to continue reading the series.
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  • Meghan
    January 1, 1970
    This was a really cute comic by a really strange team. Sarah Andersen, of Sarah’s Scribbles fame and Andy weir, hard sci-fi author of The Martian. Making a graphic novel retelling of children’s stories. Together. Okay, I can get behind that. Even though it’s not super original, its a nice retelling of the many tellings of Dorothy Wendy and Alice meeting each other. It’s a bit like every heart a doorway in the “boarding school for children who have to deal with returning to their home world after This was a really cute comic by a really strange team. Sarah Andersen, of Sarah’s Scribbles fame and Andy weir, hard sci-fi author of The Martian. Making a graphic novel retelling of children’s stories. Together. Okay, I can get behind that. Even though it’s not super original, its a nice retelling of the many tellings of Dorothy Wendy and Alice meeting each other. It’s a bit like every heart a doorway in the “boarding school for children who have to deal with returning to their home world after going to magic-town.” It was fun to watch the girls visit each other’s worlds.
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  • Andrienne
    January 1, 1970
    What happens when you team up Alice (in Wonderland), Wendy Darling and Dorothy (from Oz)? The girls are teenagers now and they are all diagnosed with “dissociative psychosis.” Out of the three characters, Alice is the sullen and troublesome one. Her antics gets all the three girls and their nanny into a heap of trouble when they cross paths with the Wicked Witch and Captain Hook. The artwork is done in a muted but regal palette of colors with a style that young readers will be familiar with. The What happens when you team up Alice (in Wonderland), Wendy Darling and Dorothy (from Oz)? The girls are teenagers now and they are all diagnosed with “dissociative psychosis.” Out of the three characters, Alice is the sullen and troublesome one. Her antics gets all the three girls and their nanny into a heap of trouble when they cross paths with the Wicked Witch and Captain Hook. The artwork is done in a muted but regal palette of colors with a style that young readers will be familiar with. The flow of the story is quick, but like another reviewer suggests, seemed hurried, but it’s entertaining nevertheless. Thank you so much to the publisher for letting me read an advance review copy.
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  • Sophie_The_Jedi_Knight
    January 1, 1970
    3/6/19:OH MY GOODNESS.THAT COVER. DOROTHY, ALICE, AND WENDY????I AM SO IN.Y'know, I've thought of a book with Dorothy and Alice as the MCs, but if I imagined a third member it would've been Lucy from the Chronicles of Narnia. Wendy is an excellent choice, though.I've read all of these gals books. (Well, not all of the Oz books, but the first five. I'm getting there.) I've loved all of them and am so utterly pumped to read a graphic novel about Dorothy, Alice, and Wendy. Seriously, this is goin 3/6/19:OH MY GOODNESS.THAT COVER. DOROTHY, ALICE, AND WENDY????I AM SO IN.Y'know, I've thought of a book with Dorothy and Alice as the MCs, but if I imagined a third member it would've been Lucy from the Chronicles of Narnia. Wendy is an excellent choice, though.I've read all of these gals books. (Well, not all of the Oz books, but the first five. I'm getting there.) I've loved all of them and am so utterly pumped to read a graphic novel about Dorothy, Alice, and Wendy. Seriously, this is going to be epic. (They better stay true to Dorothy's book character, though, not the movie's.)I am so frickin' ready.
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  • Nic
    January 1, 1970
    Why haven't I heard about this yet? OMG, this sounds absolutely amazing!!
  • Lee
    January 1, 1970
    Find this review on BookTrib.com!In an exhilarating convergence of literature’s best female heroines, Cheshire Crossing (Ten Speed Press) is not your mother’s storybook. Sure, it includes romps through Wonderland, Oz and Neverland, but the characters are older and scrappier than ever. Now teenagers, Alice, Dorothy and Wendy have been carted off to asylum after asylum since no one believes their tales. That is, until they all come together at Cheshire Crossing and learn a secret that will risk th Find this review on BookTrib.com!In an exhilarating convergence of literature’s best female heroines, Cheshire Crossing (Ten Speed Press) is not your mother’s storybook. Sure, it includes romps through Wonderland, Oz and Neverland, but the characters are older and scrappier than ever. Now teenagers, Alice, Dorothy and Wendy have been carted off to asylum after asylum since no one believes their tales. That is, until they all come together at Cheshire Crossing and learn a secret that will risk the security of the whole multiverse.Written by the visionary Andy Weir (The Martian) and hilarious Sarah Andersen ("Sarah’s Scribbles"), this graphic novel surpasses all tropes and expectations. The character design is inclusive and fresh, the art is cinematic and the banter is hilarious.Fans of all ages will be surprised and enchanted by the way the girls are familiar yet more intense. They are no longer helpless and bumbling around, but take charge to start their own mischief. And when Captain Hook and the evil Witch of the West show up to challenge them? The girls and their fantastical friends put up a legendary fight.Nothing here is as it seems: Dorothy is fed up with Glinda for always sending her to stop the Wicked Witch; Alice is flirted with by Peter Pan; and Wendy goes knife to hook with pirates. Each girl starts the story sent away by their families for their oddness and belief in other worlds. They are thought to be delusional: a little girl cannot fly through the air!However, at the Cheshire Crossing estate, they are believed and encouraged to use their powers and cleverness. They go from outcasts to the best of friends that would risk everything for each other.Just like Alice through a looking glass, reading allows kids to slip into another world where their imagination is unlimited and their choices matter. Cheshire Crossing echoes this yearning for adventure and importance. You get a sense that the allies Alice, Dorothy and Wendy make along the way are also your own. Kids learn to have faith in their own abilities and wacky ideas.Above all, this graphic novel is innovative and just plain fun. The coloring is so vibrant and design so detailed that you feel like you are watching a Studio Ghibli film. A field of poppies sparkles and magic spells seems to spill off the page. A favorite of mine is the table where Alice takes tea with the Mad Hatter. Andersen outdoes herself with the intricate curves of each rose petal, delicious macaroons and delicate porcelain. You can almost smell the tea wafting up at you.I will make a bet with you that your kid will probably finish this in one sitting. And then you will read it. And then pass it on to someone else. Just like the girls, the adventure is so exciting that you can’t help but take part in each other’s stories.
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  • Karli Coventry
    January 1, 1970
    At first glance, I was ecstatic! I mean, Alice, Dorothy, and Wendy in the same universe?! It looked like the ultimate crossover fanfiction! The artwork was cute and the idea sounded great, so I thought, why not give it a try? Again...I said 'the idea SOUNDED great'. When I finally got to read it, I was...disappointed. First of all, the story seemed extremely fast paced. Each page was a viewpoint from each girl and then they switched to the other at a quick pace. Maybe I'm just used to reading ot At first glance, I was ecstatic! I mean, Alice, Dorothy, and Wendy in the same universe?! It looked like the ultimate crossover fanfiction! The artwork was cute and the idea sounded great, so I thought, why not give it a try? Again...I said 'the idea SOUNDED great'. When I finally got to read it, I was...disappointed. First of all, the story seemed extremely fast paced. Each page was a viewpoint from each girl and then they switched to the other at a quick pace. Maybe I'm just used to reading other comics and manga where things take time to explain the story line. Either way, I felt that the story didn't have enough depth. Yes, we see a small snippet to each of the girl's background, but that's it! They left so many plot holes open and it was really confusing. I mean, maybe there will a book two to this and we'll see things deepen, but overall, it felt like I was reading a children's book at times (which by the way, this book is definitely not for little kids!) Also, the time period makes no sense! It's in the 1900's and yet they're sounding like they're from this time period. (Again makes no sense!)Which comes to the other thing I didn't like....cursing! Now, I've read books with minimal cursing and all, but this one...oh my gosh. Alice definitely loves to use curse words. I was shocked to see this right off the bat and was even more shocked when the Wicked Witch of the West said the worst one (except instead of actually writing the word out, which thankfully it wasn't used, the author chose to use punctuation cursing, which was also strange to put in the book). Why did the author feel that the characters should even be using the word in the first place? The one redeeming quality is...the book was engaging. I did enjoy the concept and maybe if there is a book two to this, I'll give it a read. The way that they designed the characters was really interesting because the girls seemed multi-diverse. (Ex: Wendy was a tomboy, Dorothy was of a different skin color, Alice was raised proper, and other characters were different as well) That was a nice touch to set the book different from others. It was a pretty good read, but definitely not what I expected.
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  • Lauren Salisbury
    January 1, 1970
    There were parts of this that I felt really uncomfortable with. The tone of this book was strange and oddly sexualized. (view spoiler)[ The suggestive ending with Tink and Peter Pan was especially cringey (hide spoiler)]. In spots, I found myself thinking about Alan Moore's Lost Girls and not in a good way. Unfortunately Tiger Lily also makes an appearance, without commentary or interrogation and in a similarly racistly depiction. I would have liked Weir to engage with the material and update it There were parts of this that I felt really uncomfortable with. The tone of this book was strange and oddly sexualized. (view spoiler)[ The suggestive ending with Tink and Peter Pan was especially cringey (hide spoiler)]. In spots, I found myself thinking about Alan Moore's Lost Girls and not in a good way. Unfortunately Tiger Lily also makes an appearance, without commentary or interrogation and in a similarly racistly depiction. I would have liked Weir to engage with the material and update it, making her just as strong and fully fleshed out as he does the main characters.If it were not for these creepy parts I could have definitely been on board with this. It's important to keep in mind that this is essentially a glorified fanfic that makes winks and nudges to The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, and Peter Pan. Cheshire Crossing was largely true to each of the worlds and Weir makes some clever crossover moments that fans of each book/series can appreciate. The girls, despite the odd sexualization moments, feel strong and more fully fleshed out than many adaptations make them out to be. Wendy sports a cute pageboy haircut, Dorothy discovers her inner strength, and Alice tries to be a little less morose.
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  • William Notte
    January 1, 1970
    I have always been a fan of team-ups. As a kid reading comics I could take or leave Iron Man and Thor but put them in an Avengers book with a handful of other heroes and I’d gladly part with my allowance money every month. This book teams up classic children’s book characters Dorothy (Wizard of Oz), Wendy Darling (Peter Pan), and Alice (Alice in Wonderland), bringing them together in a school for gifted youngsters like a 1910 era X-Men.This is a fun, rollicking, world hopping adventure. Some lib I have always been a fan of team-ups. As a kid reading comics I could take or leave Iron Man and Thor but put them in an Avengers book with a handful of other heroes and I’d gladly part with my allowance money every month. This book teams up classic children’s book characters Dorothy (Wizard of Oz), Wendy Darling (Peter Pan), and Alice (Alice in Wonderland), bringing them together in a school for gifted youngsters like a 1910 era X-Men.This is a fun, rollicking, world hopping adventure. Some liberties are taken with the characters – Wendy Darling looks like she would be more at home handing out Riot Grrl fanzines in Portland than traipsing about turn of the century England – but I’m a firm believer that if you want classic characters to live on you need to allow them to evolve with the times.The action and drama come quick, making the book feel a bit rushed at times, but overall this is an enjoyable all-ages read, easily finished in one sitting. If it makes any young (or old) readers seek out these characters in their original books that would be an excellent bonus.I especially enjoyed the girls’ nanny, an unnamed (because still under copyright) but startlingly creepy take on Mary Poppins. And Peter Pan’s reactions after being aged by eating Wonderland berries and thrust into puberty after centuries as a boy added a good dose of humor to the tale.Overall I’d recommend this as an all-ages option for readers looking for further adventures of these classic characters or just in search of a fun standalone adventure. Some parents might not want to give it to very young readers – violence is depicted and profanity (in the form of grawlixes) is used for humorous effect – but that is a matter of personal preference. I have no qualms about reading this with my seven-year-old daughter and think it will make a good introduction for her to these characters.
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  • Alissa
    January 1, 1970
    Meh...this one was OK. Maybe.I was kind of torn on the idea in the first place. On one hand the concept sounded cool, but on the other it sounded like a rip-off of the Wayward Children series, but much less unique, using borrowed characters rather than original. More like one of those half-drunken "what if" scenarios discussed over beer and tacos (or pizza, if that's more your thing). It sounds abso-freaking-lutely awesome at 2:13 a.m., but the idea loses much of its luster in the cold, harsh li Meh...this one was OK. Maybe.I was kind of torn on the idea in the first place. On one hand the concept sounded cool, but on the other it sounded like a rip-off of the Wayward Children series, but much less unique, using borrowed characters rather than original. More like one of those half-drunken "what if" scenarios discussed over beer and tacos (or pizza, if that's more your thing). It sounds abso-freaking-lutely awesome at 2:13 a.m., but the idea loses much of its luster in the cold, harsh light of day.(I won't knock it. Especially since MY 2 a.m. discussions tend to run more along the lines of, "Who would win in a Celebrity Death Match: Garfield or Heathcliff?")Sometimes reboots and mashups kick ass. Other times... Not so much. And this, unfortunately, fell into the later category. There were a lot of balls in the air with this one, what with combining Alice in Wonderland, Peter Pan, and the OZ saga and expecting things to fly--no pun intended. (view spoiler)[And tossing in Mary Poppins (I THINK she was supposed to be Mary Poppins?) didn't add anything. Ditto hitting Peter Pan with puberty (horny, pervy bugger, that) (hide spoiler)]. The end result was kind of messy and muddled, what with all the crossed storylines. And flashbacks to the original stories just confused things further. I was not impressed. There seemed to be a cliffhanger, but by then I wasn't invested enough to continue the series...if there is a continuation.The one redeeming quality of this one was the artwork, which was gorgeous! I love when comic characters look like actual people and not potatoes. Because that happens sometimes.
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  • Emma Kate
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first book I’ve read in 1 sitting. It was an easy, fun read and I loooooove sequels and retelling of fairytales. I’m new to the graphic novel world, but this immediately jumped out at me. Plus I love Weir’s Artemis and subscribe to Anderson’s comics so it was like a match made in heaven! Overall, this book was very clever. I am very interested in asylum stories in general, but particularly Alice and Dorothy. I never considered Wendy before this book but now it makes sense. However, t This is the first book I’ve read in 1 sitting. It was an easy, fun read and I loooooove sequels and retelling of fairytales. I’m new to the graphic novel world, but this immediately jumped out at me. Plus I love Weir’s Artemis and subscribe to Anderson’s comics so it was like a match made in heaven! Overall, this book was very clever. I am very interested in asylum stories in general, but particularly Alice and Dorothy. I never considered Wendy before this book but now it makes sense. However, there were something’s that were unclear and I wish had been tied up a bit better: the time line is unclear because the first page is Alice returning from Wonderland in 1901. That would put this setting around 1906. Which can fit with Dorothy and Wendy’s timelines, but Wendy is dressed very modern throughout? Time passing was not dealt with very clearly and jumping from Alice to Wendy to Dorothy felt jagged and abrupt at times. I wish there had been some indication or a time or setting jump. This book takes place over the course of a month but you don’t realize that until 3/4ths through. How did hook end up in Wonderland with the mad hatter? But my most pressing question is: will there be a sequel? While the humor felt forced and the timeline was unclear, it set up for a very interesting sequel of each girl’s worlds colliding with the normal dimension. I would read that in a heartbeat. And finally: LOVED LOVED LOVED that Nanny was Mary Poppins. Weirdly didn’t see that coming. But I was here for it!
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  • BookTrib.com
    January 1, 1970
    In an exhilarating convergence of literature’s best female heroines, Cheshire Crossing (Ten Speed Press) is not your mother’s storybook. Sure, it includes romps through Wonderland, Oz and Neverland, but the characters are older and scrappier than ever. Now teenagers, Alice, Dorothy and Wendy have been carted off to asylum after asylum since no one believes their tales. That is, until they all come together at Cheshire Crossing and learn a secret that will risk the security of the whole multivers In an exhilarating convergence of literature’s best female heroines, Cheshire Crossing (Ten Speed Press) is not your mother’s storybook. Sure, it includes romps through Wonderland, Oz and Neverland, but the characters are older and scrappier than ever. Now teenagers, Alice, Dorothy and Wendy have been carted off to asylum after asylum since no one believes their tales. That is, until they all come together at Cheshire Crossing and learn a secret that will risk the security of the whole multiverse.Written by the visionary Andy Weir (The Martian) and hilarious Sarah Andersen (“Sarah’s Scribbles“), this graphic novel surpasses all tropes and expectations. The character design is inclusive and fresh, the art is cinematic and the banter is hilarious.Fans of all ages will be surprised and enchanted by the way the girls are familiar yet more intense. They are no longer helpless and bumbling around, but take charge to start their own mischief. And when Captain Hook and the evil Witch of the West show up to challenge them? The girls and their fantastical friends put up a legendary fight.Nothing here is as it seems: Dorothy is fed up with Glinda for always sending her to stop the Wicked Witch; Alice is flirted with by Peter Pan; and Wendy goes knife to hook with pirates. Each girl starts the story sent away by their families for their oddness and belief in other worlds. They are thought to be delusional: a little girl cannot fly through the air!The rest of the review: https://booktrib.com/2019/08/alice-do...
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  • Joe Conley
    January 1, 1970
    Been a fan of Andy Weir since back in the Casey and Andy days, though The Martian was amazing, and Artemis was pretty solid. This is a printed and re-drawn version of the webcomic Andy wrote and posted back in the day. From what I can tell (from my initial read) the dialogue and script is virtually if not identical to what was originally published free online. Andy Weir, famously, is not a great artist, so everything was completely re-drawn by Sarah Andersen. Sarah's quite a good artist, althoug Been a fan of Andy Weir since back in the Casey and Andy days, though The Martian was amazing, and Artemis was pretty solid. This is a printed and re-drawn version of the webcomic Andy wrote and posted back in the day. From what I can tell (from my initial read) the dialogue and script is virtually if not identical to what was originally published free online. Andy Weir, famously, is not a great artist, so everything was completely re-drawn by Sarah Andersen. Sarah's quite a good artist, although I'm not entirely sold on the coloring choices here. They're very dark, sort of muted colors, not exactly what you'd normally choose when illustrating a story set in Oz and Never Never Land. I'm also a little disappointed that there's nothing new in this volume. Weir hints at it in the forward, but I would have liked if there was maybe some new scenes, or an extra chapter...this was just a trip down memory lane with generally "meh" illustrations. Story overall though is pretty good, and there's some pretty good humor throughout, including the sexual awakening of Peter Pan, so it does have that in common with Lost Girls.Hopefully there'll be a Volume II, and we can get some new story.
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  • Annie
    January 1, 1970
    I would like to rate this 3.5-4 stars as I thought this was such a very clever storyline that brought 3 completely different tales and worlds together in modern times - Alice in Wonderland, Wendy Darling from Peter Pan and Dorothy from Wizard of Oz. What I found interesting in this story was how all 3 were rendered mentally ill for telling everyone about the worlds they each explored and committed them to wards until one day they are rescued because a Dr believes them. This isn’t like anything y I would like to rate this 3.5-4 stars as I thought this was such a very clever storyline that brought 3 completely different tales and worlds together in modern times - Alice in Wonderland, Wendy Darling from Peter Pan and Dorothy from Wizard of Oz. What I found interesting in this story was how all 3 were rendered mentally ill for telling everyone about the worlds they each explored and committed them to wards until one day they are rescued because a Dr believes them. This isn’t like anything you would have read before, the underlying storyline for each character is present and acts as a foundation but the characters are very different to what we know - their attitudes, their appearance, their mannerism, it’s very different. The story flowed pretty quickly and was easy to follow. The illustrations didn’t look extravagant but they looked elegant (in my opinion) if you’re a fan of graphic novels that features retellings of the classics, definitely give this one a go.. with special thanks to The Nerd Daily for sending me a review copy of this graphic novel.
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  • Shelley
    January 1, 1970
    Dorothy, Alice, and Wendy end up at a boarding school in their teens, after years of their families worried about their sanity, and then end up crossing into each other's "make believe" worlds. The premise is very interesting, and adding an unnamed nanny with an umbrella who can jump into pictures is a nice touch. The art is generally inviting, though Wendy randomly has short hair, making me wonder when this was set. (Still seems to be Victorian era.) Alice is the most traumatized and angry of t Dorothy, Alice, and Wendy end up at a boarding school in their teens, after years of their families worried about their sanity, and then end up crossing into each other's "make believe" worlds. The premise is very interesting, and adding an unnamed nanny with an umbrella who can jump into pictures is a nice touch. The art is generally inviting, though Wendy randomly has short hair, making me wonder when this was set. (Still seems to be Victorian era.) Alice is the most traumatized and angry of them all, though Dorothy is the one who underwent all of the electroshock therapy. But honestly, the story was weak. I didn't like that they included the stereotypical Native American imagery with Tiger Lily. I don't agree with it being for 8-12, especially with Peter dealing with sudden teenager hormones and Alice promising to "take care of his physical needs." This doesn't really know what it wants to be. He wrote this a decade ago, I wonder if it got revised at all? I think it could have used it.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this book at a convention, and the high concept immediately appealed to me. Sarah Andersen's art is absolutely adorable, and there were enough clever allusions and delightful crossover juxtapositions to hold my interest. Ultimately, though, this story has no room to breathe. Characters rush from scene to scene with little time for characterization or motivation, and the book's best ideas don't have room to settle and make the impact they could. I understand that this was ori I received an ARC of this book at a convention, and the high concept immediately appealed to me. Sarah Andersen's art is absolutely adorable, and there were enough clever allusions and delightful crossover juxtapositions to hold my interest. Ultimately, though, this story has no room to breathe. Characters rush from scene to scene with little time for characterization or motivation, and the book's best ideas don't have room to settle and make the impact they could. I understand that this was originally Weir's webcomic that has been redrawn by Andersen, and I found myself wishing more time had been spent revising the script, or even expanding the story, before a new artist was brought on. Plus, while the art, concept, and simple dialogue seem to imply that this book is aimed at children, the high number of bleeped curse words and a subplot with implicit sexual references indicate otherwise. It's not clear who, exactly, this book is for, and ultimately, despite my high hopes, it wasn't for me.
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