Camouflage
Autism in women and girls is still not widely understood, and is often misrepresented or even overlooked. This graphic novel offers an engaging and accessible insight into the lives and minds of women with autism, using real-life case studies. The charming illustrations lead readers on a visual journey of how women on the spectrum experience everyday life, from metaphors and masking behaviours to communication online, dealing with social pressures and managing relationships.Fun, sensitive and informative, this is a fantastic resource for anyone who wishes to understand how gender affects autism, and how to create safer, more accommodating environments for women on the spectrum.

Camouflage Details

TitleCamouflage
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 21st, 2019
PublisherJessica Kingsley Publishers
ISBN-139781785925665
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Sequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Psychology

Camouflage Review

  • Amalia Gavea
    January 1, 1970
    Studying any material related to autism should be mandatory for all teachers. Apart from the actual teaching of a specific subject, we must support our students, we must care for them and their problems and do everything within our means to help them. We didn’t choose this profession to kill time, we chose to be teachers out of love for children and the need to offer. At least that would happen in an ideal world. Unfortunately, there’s always a significant number of teachers who consider teachin Studying any material related to autism should be mandatory for all teachers. Apart from the actual teaching of a specific subject, we must support our students, we must care for them and their problems and do everything within our means to help them. We didn’t choose this profession to kill time, we chose to be teachers out of love for children and the need to offer. At least that would happen in an ideal world. Unfortunately, there’s always a significant number of teachers who consider teaching a chore that they must carry out and be done with it. Psychology and research mean very little to them. So, this is not reading material for these ‘’teachers’’. However, it is of special importance to the rest of us. Dr. Sarah Bagiela has developed a concise booklet on the ways autism can be diagnosed and its influence on various aspects of daily life. ''Camouflage''. An excellent choice for the title of the booklet, in my opinion. Dr. Bagiela stresses the differences between women diagnosed with autism and men who face the same situation and presents a number of extremely interesting conclusions. Women hide, camouflage autism by resorting to social mimicry skills. In my opinion, this is one more indicator of the subconscious, powerful influence of social norms on the sexes. Developed around three interviews of women diagnosed with autism, we are introduced to the notions of restricted interests, repetitive behaviours, and sensitivities. The difficulty of social interactions and the importance of interests in the life of these women. And what about men, you may ask. This is not a book on men with autism but on the secrecy and complexity of the world of autistic women. It has nothing to do with equality or inequality as a review mentioned and it's time to stop seeing monsters where there are none. It's getting tiresome. Researchers deal with specific fields. This is exactly a specific field, whether some like it or not (or choose to let their prejudices blind them...) And it is an excellent read.Enriched with beautiful illustrations by Sophie Standing in green, orange and white and with a very interesting bibliography, Camouflage will interest those who seek to start reading on autism and the ones who have extensive knowledge on the subject. It is moving, powerful and very, very real.Many thanks to Jessica Kingsley Publishers and NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.My reviews can also be found on https://theopinionatedreaderblog.word...
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  • C.G. Drews
    January 1, 1970
    This was a really beautifully done comic about autistic women! The art is just perfect...it's clever and fluid and really nice to look at. This is just a 40-page comic/graphic novel, so its aim is to introduce you to what women with autism look like. It covers some of the differences in male vs female presenting symptoms and why women go undiagnosed so much. As an autistic myself, I was really keen to see how it would sum up life as an autistic woman...and I think it did well! My only caveat is: This was a really beautifully done comic about autistic women! The art is just perfect...it's clever and fluid and really nice to look at. This is just a 40-page comic/graphic novel, so its aim is to introduce you to what women with autism look like. It covers some of the differences in male vs female presenting symptoms and why women go undiagnosed so much. As an autistic myself, I was really keen to see how it would sum up life as an autistic woman...and I think it did well! My only caveat is: it's just an overview. You'd really give this to someone who has NO idea what autism is. You'd give this to the person who says, "Aw no you're just shy, not autistic!" to give them a place to start on understanding it.I loved how it never pitched autism negatively. Thaaaanks. Would hi five. But it emphasised the whole way through that girls with autism generally have less issues than boys because we internalised and mask. (Hence the title of "Camouflage".) I think it should've underlined the cost of this more: serious depression, meltdowns and shutdowns, high suicide rates, etc. I KNOW it was just an overview, but by the end (if I'd known nothing about autism) I would've felt like autistic women felt different but it was no big deal...when in reality I think we need to bring awareness to the dangers of camouflaging. And that women with autism need to be believed and supported and not doubted.
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  • Toni
    January 1, 1970
    A huge thank you to Amalia Gaveawhose beautiful review of this book made me add it to my shelf. Thank you for 'passing it on' and caring so passionately about teaching.‘Camouflage: the hidden lives of autistic women’ is a great introduction into autistic disorder spectrum in women. The book is well-researched, informative and beautifully-illustrated. We get a brief overview of what autism is, the prevalence of low and high-functioning autism in men and women (it is also explained why terms 'low A huge thank you to Amalia Gaveawhose beautiful review of this book made me add it to my shelf. Thank you for 'passing it on' and caring so passionately about teaching.‘Camouflage: the hidden lives of autistic women’ is a great introduction into autistic disorder spectrum in women. The book is well-researched, informative and beautifully-illustrated. We get a brief overview of what autism is, the prevalence of low and high-functioning autism in men and women (it is also explained why terms 'low and high- functioning autism' may be unhelpful) and the reasons why fewer women are diagnosed with autism. The book illustrates in a very accessible manner what exactly restricted social communication and interaction, repetitive behaviours, sensory sensitivities and eccentric, special interests are. I loved the way differences between autistic men and women are presented through infographics, case studies and stories. I could almost feel the exhaustion brought by the perceived need for social mimicry and camouflage- ‘It’s very draining trying to figure out everything all the time’. The most shocking part for me was the one dealing with vulnerability in intimate relationships and need to assert oneself so as not to become a victim of abuse.I will definitely pass the information contained in this remarkable book dedicated to challenging common misconceptions about autistic women in order to promote better understanding of their experiences.Thank you to NetGalley and Jessica Kingsley Publishers for the ARC provided in exchange for an honest opinion.
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  • Kristy K
    January 1, 1970
    With the great graphics and bite-sized chunks of information, Camouflage can almost be seen as a large pamphlet. It's quite short, only around 40 pages, and yet it's packed full of data and firsthand accounts of autistic women. Illustrated and well-researched, Bargiela introduces us to the differences between men and women with autism (and Asperger's). I found it informative, eye-opening, and to the point. She also gives additional reading recommendations at the end which I always find helpful.
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  • Ana
    January 1, 1970
    Sophie Standing is not a new name to me. Having done research on trauma in autobiographical graphic novels, I gathered all kinds of articles and books, including her collaboration with Steve Haines for “Trauma is Really Strange,” which is an essay on the nature of trauma in, well, comic format. The “Really Strange” series (Singing Dragon), also includes volumes on pain, forgiveness, and anxiety, which I recommend you check out. Camouflage: The Hidden Lives of Autistic Women goes along the same Sophie Standing is not a new name to me. Having done research on trauma in autobiographical graphic novels, I gathered all kinds of articles and books, including her collaboration with Steve Haines for “Trauma is Really Strange,” which is an essay on the nature of trauma in, well, comic format. The “Really Strange” series (Singing Dragon), also includes volumes on pain, forgiveness, and anxiety, which I recommend you check out. Camouflage: The Hidden Lives of Autistic Women goes along the same line: informative, eye-opening, and gorgeously illustrated!Since I was already a fan of Sophie’s work, I thought I might look into Sarah Bargiela before reading Camouflage , I was surely impressed to find that her research focuses on the experiences of young women with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Camouflage defines the terms for its reader, pointing out why there are fewer girls and women diagnosed with autism compared to boys and men, which – it pains me to admit – is not something I even considered. If you’re thinking she would be a female version of “Rain Man,” read this book! It’s not even close…The core of this book is based on the stories Sarah Bargiela gathered doing interviews with autistic young women - Paula (24), Ellie (19), and Mimi (30) - trying to deconstruct the labelling of women on the spectrum, often dismissed by people as anxious, depressed, or simply shy, and having them explain how they tried to “fit in” by “camouflaging,” “pretending to be normal.” Whether it’s creative writing, crafts, or playing music, finding friends with common interests has helped these women to better understand themselves and the others to better understand their autism. At the end, there is a “Further reading” list of articles, books, and websites, if you want more information. “So once you’ve read it, pass it on!” 4.5 stars *Thanks to NetGalley & Jessica Kingsley Publishers for the opportunity to read a digital ARC in exchange for an honest review.*
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  • Etienne
    January 1, 1970
    A visual representation of what living with autisms is for women. Not bad, between information and biographies, they are very personal facts here and more scientific as well. The think I didn't like about this book is the constant, something we saw more and more in modern days, trying to make/show the difference between women and men in everything. We never talk so much about trying to eliminate the barrier between sexes and at the same time we always underline the fact that everything is so dif A visual representation of what living with autisms is for women. Not bad, between information and biographies, they are very personal facts here and more scientific as well. The think I didn't like about this book is the constant, something we saw more and more in modern days, trying to make/show the difference between women and men in everything. We never talk so much about trying to eliminate the barrier between sexes and at the same time we always underline the fact that everything is so different. They're difference that we can't deny and there are also things that are mostly the same. A book explaining autism is great, a book explaining autism of women... not necessary, a chapter exploring the difference between autism women and men would have been enough, because yes there are differences, but there are more similarities. Anyway... editorial review this morning!
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  • PinkAmy loves books, cats and naps
    January 1, 1970
    ***Thanks to NetGalley for providing me a complimentary copy of CAMOUFLAGE by Sarah Bargiela in exchange for my honest review.***CAMOUFLAGE is a short, nonfiction, graphic book aimed at distinguishing autism in females vs males.For years medical science researchers using primarily Caucasian men. Doctors were surprised, for instance, that women had different heart attack symptoms than men. As knowledge progressed, scientists began to study different races, geographies, economics and other factors ***Thanks to NetGalley for providing me a complimentary copy of CAMOUFLAGE by Sarah Bargiela in exchange for my honest review.***CAMOUFLAGE is a short, nonfiction, graphic book aimed at distinguishing autism in females vs males.For years medical science researchers using primarily Caucasian men. Doctors were surprised, for instance, that women had different heart attack symptoms than men. As knowledge progressed, scientists began to study different races, geographies, economics and other factors in diagnosis and treatment.We shouldn’t be surprised that until recently, autism criteria was developed based on male symptomology. Additionally, Aspergers was added as a new diagnosis then encompasses back into Autism Spectrum Disorder in the latest DSM V. CAMOUFLAGE identifies differences in symptom presentation girls and women have.The multicultural illustrations helped show the information in a user friendly manner, simple enough for tweens without talking down to young and older adults. The only reason I held off giving five stars is that the book didn’t distinguish between having some criteria or a lesser degree of a symptom that fits a diagnostic criterium, instead showing dramatic differences between interested and obsessed. CAMOUFLAGE didn’t consider that doctors sometimes see patients and/or parents looking for a diagnosis in order to explain what feels inexplicable. As a child psychologist I had some parents pushing for an ADHD diagnosis without considering we needed to rule out whether lack of structure and candy bars for breakfast might be causing symptoms. The example is true and extreme. I’ve also had teens looking for diagnoses as a way to understand themselves and receive support for issues with different diagnoses (often eating disorders). I’ve also noticed an uptick in some people with Aspergers trying to convince strangers online they must also have the disorder. I would have liked CAMOUFLAGE to add talking to a professional for evaluation and a caveat against self-diagnosis.I do recommend CAMOUFLAGE for doctors, therapists and schools to share with potential autistic folks and to help further the understanding for those new to diagnosis.
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  • Stephanie Jane (Literary Flits)
    January 1, 1970
    See more of my book reviews on my blog, Literary FlitsI love reading in order to discover more about the world around me and also to discover more about myself. I often find myself questioning how I would react if I were to experience fictional situations in novels or genuine ones in memoirs and biographies. Occasionally, I don't get the chance to ponder though. A book will figuratively smack me between the eyes and I'll just know it's talking about me. The last book to do that was Susan Cain's See more of my book reviews on my blog, Literary FlitsI love reading in order to discover more about the world around me and also to discover more about myself. I often find myself questioning how I would react if I were to experience fictional situations in novels or genuine ones in memoirs and biographies. Occasionally, I don't get the chance to ponder though. A book will figuratively smack me between the eyes and I'll just know it's talking about me. The last book to do that was Susan Cain's Quiet. Now Camouflage has had exactly the same effect. This is me!I chose Camouflage from NetGalley because when I saw it was a graphic novel about autistic women I realised that I couldn't actually think of a single one. I recall several novels with male characters on the autism spectrum, but women? It turns out that, much like heart attacks I think, women generally experience autism in a more low-key way to men and so our symptoms are often misunderstood and misdiagnosed. In this short book women briefly explain how they came to realise that they were autistic, how the condition has been a hindrance or sometimes a benefit, and how they have learned to mask their symptoms especially in social situations. So much of this is very Very familiar!I would have loved for Camouflage to have been a longer and more in depth book. However that isn't its intended purpose so I will need to look for further reading on the subject. Here, instead, we get a stunningly illustrated introduction to female autism. Sophie Standing's drawings raise the book to the standard of a graphic novel, although it is definitely nonfiction, and I loved her almost vintage style. This is a beautiful little book and one that I am particularly grateful to have encountered.
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  • La Coccinelle
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this would be an interesting look at how autism affects women, but unfortunately, the book simply promotes and reinforces what appears to be a flawed premise, while simultaneously ignoring the severe end of the autism spectrum, making incorrect assumptions, and disparaging people (especially women) who don't have autism.The biggest problem with this book is that it posits that females are underdiagnosed with autism because they don't meet the male-based criteria. Here's the thing: Ther I thought this would be an interesting look at how autism affects women, but unfortunately, the book simply promotes and reinforces what appears to be a flawed premise, while simultaneously ignoring the severe end of the autism spectrum, making incorrect assumptions, and disparaging people (especially women) who don't have autism.The biggest problem with this book is that it posits that females are underdiagnosed with autism because they don't meet the male-based criteria. Here's the thing: There is no medical test for autism. There's no blood test or scan that you can take that will tell you, definitively, if you have the condition. So a diagnosis is based solely on observed or reported behaviour. This book talks about how women don't tick as many of the symptom boxes as men. Logically, it would follow that fewer women would be diagnosed. But this book argues that point to a ridiculous degree. According to this, if you don't meet the established criteria for autism, then the criteria is wrong.Some of the assertions are just plain silly. There's a section where the women talk about running into trouble with abusive partners or narcissistic behaviour, as if that's something that can only happen to women with autism. Domestic violence wouldn't be such a huge problem if only autistic people were vulnerable to it! Another part of the book has one of the women implying that men are better because they'll come right out and be rude, while neurotypical women "never really say what they mean". Well, I'll come right out and say it: that is rude, disrespectful, and inaccurate. (There goes that generalization about neurotypical women...)The little bit of background on the discovery of autism didn't really impress me. I've read about it previously. The casual mentions of Hans Asperger were a little bit disturbing, though; he was a eugenicist who collaborated with the Nazis and ended up sending mentally ill and disabled children to their deaths. None of that is mentioned at all.The erasure of the lower end of the spectrum is perhaps the most disturbing part of the book (but one I'm not surprised by). Much is made of narrow special interests, but the women featured in the book are high-functioning enough to have age-appropriate obsessions. Nowhere is there any mention of the girls and women who are still obsessed with Elmo or PAW Patrol after puberty. Some more extreme symptoms (such as meltdowns) are mentioned, but only in passing. There's absolutely nothing about co-morbid conditions that go along with many autism diagnoses (seizures, bowel disorders, immune dysfunction), likely because that would show that there is a lower end of the spectrum. (The book states that the terms "high functioning" and "low functioning" are considered by some in the autism community to be unhelpful, claiming that it has to do with IQ. I don't think I've seen it referred to in such a way; the functioning levels seem to be more to do with things like how verbal a person is and the ability to perform basic self-care... not an IQ score.)The layout of the book is sort of like an illustrated picture book. It's not a graphic novel. There's no continuous narrative. The pictures aren't really my thing; they're too chunky and simple, more like something you'd see in an infographic.Overall, I wasn't impressed. I expected there to be more from the autistic women themselves, other than a few quotes. I didn't really learn anything I didn't already know, and I just got annoyed by the continued insistence that the criteria for the condition was wrong. I recently read Regression by Twilah Hiari, and it's much better at offering insight into the workings of an autistic woman's mind.
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  • Laura (Book Scrounger)
    January 1, 1970
    While the text in Camouflage: The Hidden Lives of Autistic Women is probably comparable to a magazine article or blog post in length (and therefore is a very quick read), the illustrations fill out the information and help to humanize this topic. We get to hear from a few different autistic women about some of the challenges and differences that they face in life. There is also some information about the differences in the ways that autistic men and autistic women present their symptoms, which c While the text in Camouflage: The Hidden Lives of Autistic Women is probably comparable to a magazine article or blog post in length (and therefore is a very quick read), the illustrations fill out the information and help to humanize this topic. We get to hear from a few different autistic women about some of the challenges and differences that they face in life. There is also some information about the differences in the ways that autistic men and autistic women present their symptoms, which can lead to women being underdiagnosed. Despite its short length, I found it fairly informative and a good resource for anyone who wants to learn more about the gender differences in autistic people, and the lived experiences of autistic women.(Thanks to NetGalley for the review copy.)
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  • Charlie-Anne Butterworth
    January 1, 1970
    This is not only gorgeously illustrated, but informative too. A teacher of mine in school made an offhand comment about me having autistic traits, but I always thought they were 'normal' and have never spoken to a doctor about it. This has definitely opened my eyes and I'll be looking into that in the future, so I can thank this book for that.
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  • Manon
    January 1, 1970
    I was provided an ARC by the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.This nonfiction book talks about autism and specifically autism in women, how it can be more discreet, and that even specialist don’t always know how to tell a women is autistic.It was very interesting and informative. It was very well done. It had graphics and everything and I just really found it perfect. The only thing that could have made it better would have been if it had been longer.
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  • Bonnie Evie
    January 1, 1970
    Camouflage: The Hidden Lives of Autistic Women had to be one of the top books I was looking forward to reading this month. When I saw a graphic novel from one of my favourite publishers (JKP), about autistic women and camouflaging, I knew I’d have to read it. My expectations were pretty high - perhaps too high.Written by Dr. Sarah Bargiela, a clinical psychologist with an interest in autism and gender, along with illustrator Sophie Standing, Camouflage is...well, I’m not entirely sure who it’s f Camouflage: The Hidden Lives of Autistic Women had to be one of the top books I was looking forward to reading this month. When I saw a graphic novel from one of my favourite publishers (JKP), about autistic women and camouflaging, I knew I’d have to read it. My expectations were pretty high - perhaps too high.Written by Dr. Sarah Bargiela, a clinical psychologist with an interest in autism and gender, along with illustrator Sophie Standing, Camouflage is...well, I’m not entirely sure who it’s for, if I’m being honest. There are a few things worth noting before you get started:It uses person-first (not identify-first) language This...is a massive sticking point for me. Whilst the autistic community isn’t unified with their preferences, research from the National Autistic Society has shown that the term ‘autistic person’ is still widely preferred by autistic people themselves, rather than ‘person with autism’. For many on the spectrum, this language (whilst preferred within the medical community) suggests autism is something separate, rather than intrinsic; it’s something other or curable, instead of just a different way of being. It’s hard to pin down the target audience Is this a general introduction for a complete novice to autism? Is this something I should be handing to friends and family post-diagnosis to help explain my shiny new label? Is this something I should be reading myself whilst trying to figure out if I fit within the category of autistic woman (or while seeing if I even want a label in the first place)? The information presented feels so...mixed. It goes between a quite factual overview of what autism is (and when the diagnosis first came about), right through to personal experiences of women on the spectrum. Rather than feeling like an overview, it seems disjointed in places; instead of flowing naturally between sections, abruptly changing course. It still makes some pretty big generalisations it could just be me being overly-sensitive here, but a few instances really stood out to me, such as when it said ‘subtle social cues like someone looking at a watch (which to autistic folk is pretty much invisible)’ feels like it is a bit too much of a blanket statement, bordering on a stereotype. While I’m sure it’s true for some, it may not be for all. It might be being picking, but language matters.---I don’t want to make it sound like it’s all bad points - there are some excellent things covered. The section highlighting the differences between traits in autistic men and women (how they can present differently) is well laid out and easy to understand. It’s great to see the emphasis more on adults rather than children, as well as the primary focus on how autistic women can have different traits than their male counterparts. The exploration of the question ‘why are there fewer women and girls diagnosed with (ick) autism compared to men and boys?’ is both an interesting and important point of exploration.One of the best sections towards the latter half of the book aims to give readers a better understanding of what autism ‘looks like’ (though really, does autism have ‘a look’?). Focusing on three women - Paula (24), Ellie (19) and Mimi (30), it’s great to have the authentic voices of autistic women represented here. It’s a shame that all three women are only five to 11 years apart in age (I would have loved to have hard from an older autistic woman), but it’s still one of the best parts of the book.This second half of the book is great for seeing parts of yourself if you’re autistic, as well as seeing some of the common reactions people may have in denying someone is autistic - eg saying it’s anxiety, being quirky, or being shy. It also doesn’t dampen or try to avoid the misconceptions some experts/professionals themselves can have - such as special needs teachers assuming autism is only ‘being good at maths’ stereotype, or that intense interests can’t be extended versions of typical interests (eg, ponies or collectables). The brief section on ‘social scripting’ that some autistic women practice to help mask in social situations was both written and drawn superbly, outlining just how complex (and tasking) social masking really can be. While I wouldn’t say I am a huge fan of Camouflage, I do think it highlights just how much the medium of graphic novels can aid in sharing complex subjects and making them more digestible for readers. I really hope JKP continue to create more graphic novels around similar complex topics.
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  • brittany ☼
    January 1, 1970
    » I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.I really enjoyed my time with this. It was very informative and had absolutely beautiful illustrations. Prior to going into this, I really didn't know much about autism. At all. I vaguely knew of special interests but beyond that, I was pretty clueless. This book lays out a brief history of the first people to study and publish about autism, behavior patterns of autism, and mainly how autism presents differentl » I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.I really enjoyed my time with this. It was very informative and had absolutely beautiful illustrations. Prior to going into this, I really didn't know much about autism. At all. I vaguely knew of special interests but beyond that, I was pretty clueless. This book lays out a brief history of the first people to study and publish about autism, behavior patterns of autism, and mainly how autism presents differently in women as opposed to men. I learned quite a lot while reading. Everything was broken down into very simplistic language and I came out the book having an understanding of autism that I didn't prior. The second half of the book was devoted to discussing three autistic women's experience with their autism and how they each experienced it individually. I absolutely loved hearing how different each of their experiences were and how they've grown throughout them. In a book that explores how autism presents differently in women, I think it was very critical that we hear from multiple autistic women and this book delivered. Finally, the illustrations! I loved how this book was illustrated so much. Initially, I clicked on this because of the cover and the rest of the book is just as beautiful.
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  • Jim
    January 1, 1970
    It’s fascinating to see the differences between men and women in autism - especially in the way they are diagnosed. All I have to say is: The patriarchy strikes again! I find it interesting that more men are diagnosed with autism - often because women who have autism are dismissed. I blame the patriarchy because this is why women are just more easily dismissed in general. If women are second class citizens, are just here to please or serve men, then they are more likely to be encouraged to ignor It’s fascinating to see the differences between men and women in autism - especially in the way they are diagnosed. All I have to say is: The patriarchy strikes again! I find it interesting that more men are diagnosed with autism - often because women who have autism are dismissed. I blame the patriarchy because this is why women are just more easily dismissed in general. If women are second class citizens, are just here to please or serve men, then they are more likely to be encouraged to ignore any social or communication problem they have and deal with it. It feeds into this greater issue of making women more compliant in general. This is such a systemic problem, that it’s interesting to read about it in such a specific area. I don’t mean to minimize this specific issue by placing it in the realm of a larger one - the general oppression of women. This is an issue that should be tackled in and of itself. I just think it needs to be discussed with the greater issues we have in our culture. I think if we tackle these specific issues head on - but also address the larger overarching one - we can move forward that much more quickly. Thanks to NetGalley and Jessica Kingsley Publishers for a copy in return for an honest review.
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  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    *I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This year I've taken particular interest in studying how autism presents itself in women after doing an e-learning module via the National Autistic Society. When I came across this book I just knew I had to read it with the art style itself drawing me in. Firstly, the art is beautiful - the illustrations feel very comforting and not overly complex, and do a great job conveying what some of the symptoms 'feel' l *I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This year I've taken particular interest in studying how autism presents itself in women after doing an e-learning module via the National Autistic Society. When I came across this book I just knew I had to read it with the art style itself drawing me in. Firstly, the art is beautiful - the illustrations feel very comforting and not overly complex, and do a great job conveying what some of the symptoms 'feel' like. The information presented is accessible and easy to understand, it's important to recognise that autism in women seems to be woefully underdiagnosed and there's a large spectrum of neurodiversity and this book is a fantastic way to educate yourself (and others) on the experiences of women with autism and, hopefully, challenge some of the misconceptions we have as to what autism 'looks' like. I especially like the inclusion of what further studies are happening within autism research. This is definitely a book I can see myself recommending it to people I know who have experiences with autism but mostly through knowledge of how the condition presents in men.
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  • Liz (Quirky Cat)
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of Camouflage through NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. The full title of this graphic novel should give you a pretty strong idea of what it covers. It’s all about autistic women, their differences from the typical expectations of autism, and how that results in them blending in better (and thus being less likely to be identified and/or diagnosed). There were a lot of things I didn’t know about autism in women that I learned while reading this. It was incre I received a copy of Camouflage through NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. The full title of this graphic novel should give you a pretty strong idea of what it covers. It’s all about autistic women, their differences from the typical expectations of autism, and how that results in them blending in better (and thus being less likely to be identified and/or diagnosed). There were a lot of things I didn’t know about autism in women that I learned while reading this. It was incredibly informative, while still being very approachable. I like that they chose to talk about the subject in a visual way, as it made everything feel more casual and comfortable to talk about. It felt less like I was reading a textbook and more like I was reading about real people (which was actually the case). I found this to be a very informative, and enlightening graphic novel. It was nice to take a break from reading fiction and instead learn something true and important. For more reviews, check out Quirky Cat's Fat Stacks
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  • Ms. Arca
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to the publisher and author for this ARC in exchange for an honest review. This is a graphic novel with one woman as the narrator, with three other women chiming in about their experiences with being women with autism. I loved that this specific content was put into a visual format and that it had own voices as the format.I am not exactly sure who the audience would be, because I could see this being affirming or providing a bit of an introduction to autism for others. I actually liked th Thanks to the publisher and author for this ARC in exchange for an honest review. This is a graphic novel with one woman as the narrator, with three other women chiming in about their experiences with being women with autism. I loved that this specific content was put into a visual format and that it had own voices as the format.I am not exactly sure who the audience would be, because I could see this being affirming or providing a bit of an introduction to autism for others. I actually liked the art, especially the color choices! The angle of looking at autism for women specifically, felt long overdue and especially important. Research focused on women and autism did not start until the 1980’s so there is still so much we do not know... and so many layers to wade through (societal expectations, gender norms..) that will inform how we understand how autism can be expressed in women today. I enjoyed reading this one, it was quick and had no new content for me, but was interesting. 3.5.
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  • Danielle
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't know what to expect going into reading this and I came away surprised. I learned a lot about autism in women! I would give this book 3.5 stars - a deduction which I'll go into even more detail as the publication date nears. This was a great medium for teaching about the subject matter and I enjoyed the anecdotal approach. One big hang-up I have about the book is how gender essentialist it is about sex differences. The author makes overarching generalizations about the societally influen I didn't know what to expect going into reading this and I came away surprised. I learned a lot about autism in women! I would give this book 3.5 stars - a deduction which I'll go into even more detail as the publication date nears. This was a great medium for teaching about the subject matter and I enjoyed the anecdotal approach. One big hang-up I have about the book is how gender essentialist it is about sex differences. The author makes overarching generalizations about the societally influenced behavior of cis-men and cis-women (assumed that this is what she is talking about, as she does not indicate otherwise) without many citations to support these assertions. I almost stopped reading because of the generalizations - aren't we past an antiquated science supporting the separation of gender into two categories? Other than the gendered nonsense, I enjoyed this book and the information it offered. I'll give an even more extensive review as the publication date nears. Thanks to Netgalley for the advanced copy of Camouflage and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Vanessa
    January 1, 1970
    There are many differences between the sexes, not only physically, but mentally as well. I believe we are coming to realize more that most of the knowledge we learn to recognize certain behaviors and disorders are common among men, which leaves women to flounder through life undiagnosed. There has long been a perceived divide of men more commonly having ADHD than women but we are finding out that it's because many women have different indicators and they have gone through life undiagnosed. I tho There are many differences between the sexes, not only physically, but mentally as well. I believe we are coming to realize more that most of the knowledge we learn to recognize certain behaviors and disorders are common among men, which leaves women to flounder through life undiagnosed. There has long been a perceived divide of men more commonly having ADHD than women but we are finding out that it's because many women have different indicators and they have gone through life undiagnosed. I thought the illustration style of this was fine, it made me think of an extra long magazine article (nothing bad about that), and I think the style is interesting. The information was pretty clear and easy to read but I felt that sometimes the info-graphics left me confused about what the article was trying to say. I also expected a little more in depth answers from the women interviewed as there seemed to be mostly surface level information that was repeated. I still think this is a good starter point for this information and it has a high readability.
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  • Katherine
    January 1, 1970
    Obviously there’s only so much information that you can fit into a fifty page graphic novel, but I think this is a great jumping off point. Bargiela uses research studies with the personal experiences of women diagnosed to be on the spectrum to bring us informative graphic and stories about women with autism. She covers the difference between behaviors in men and women, likely a cause for why women may be under-diagnosed. I read a similar article in the past about the difference in behaviors for Obviously there’s only so much information that you can fit into a fifty page graphic novel, but I think this is a great jumping off point. Bargiela uses research studies with the personal experiences of women diagnosed to be on the spectrum to bring us informative graphic and stories about women with autism. She covers the difference between behaviors in men and women, likely a cause for why women may be under-diagnosed. I read a similar article in the past about the difference in behaviors for ADHD and I find it interesting to compare the differences (and also distressing that women can get ignored because they don’t check the “usual” boxes). This quick, easy to digest guide is a good starting point for understanding different women. Thanks to NetGalley and Jessica Kingsley Publishers for the eARC.
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  • Kristine
    January 1, 1970
    Camouflage by Sarah Bargiela is a free NetGalley e-comicbook that I read in late February.Exploring concepts through the experiences of 4 autistic women in comic book form, like the belief that girls and women are less likely to be diagnosed due to their brains supposedly wired for empathy and being able to echo social cues more effectively; consistency in habit and routine; seeking/avoiding sensory activities and having keen interests; internalizing emotions and masking one’s identity in order Camouflage by Sarah Bargiela is a free NetGalley e-comicbook that I read in late February.Exploring concepts through the experiences of 4 autistic women in comic book form, like the belief that girls and women are less likely to be diagnosed due to their brains supposedly wired for empathy and being able to echo social cues more effectively; consistency in habit and routine; seeking/avoiding sensory activities and having keen interests; internalizing emotions and masking one’s identity in order to appear normal; developing assertiveness during friendships and relationships; and finding community within their diagnosis. The palette offered heathered/spotty pastel hues with focal points of coral, hunter green and black, and, altogether, it was too short and I wanted more!
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  • Kat
    January 1, 1970
    Camouflage is an educational book with illustrations that explores what autism is and how it affects women. I really liked how it went into all of the aspects of having autism, with a few that I already knew but a lot that I didn't.The graphics really enhanced the information given and made visualising certain elements easier. Everything was really easy to understand and I loved the inclusion of the three women's personal experiences. In particular, the differences between autism in men and wome Camouflage is an educational book with illustrations that explores what autism is and how it affects women. I really liked how it went into all of the aspects of having autism, with a few that I already knew but a lot that I didn't.The graphics really enhanced the information given and made visualising certain elements easier. Everything was really easy to understand and I loved the inclusion of the three women's personal experiences. In particular, the differences between autism in men and women were really interesting and insightful, and something I hadn't known of before.Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for providing a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Baylee Miller
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free galley of this book today, and read it in one quick sitting; it was an absolutely fantastic read. My only complaint is that it isn't longer.I learned so much about the experiences of women with autism in such a short amount of time, as well as just autism in general. It definitely was a topical read but makes me want to take in more literature (and there are even suggestions in the back of the book). I want to go out and get myself a copy of this book when it comes out because I received a free galley of this book today, and read it in one quick sitting; it was an absolutely fantastic read. My only complaint is that it isn't longer.I learned so much about the experiences of women with autism in such a short amount of time, as well as just autism in general. It definitely was a topical read but makes me want to take in more literature (and there are even suggestions in the back of the book). I want to go out and get myself a copy of this book when it comes out because the illustrations are just so aesthetically pleasing. I really recommend everyone check this book out!
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  • Leticia
    January 1, 1970
    I would like to thank NetGalley and Jessica Kingsley Publishers for providing me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Very interesting graphic novel of a not very discussed theme, as the title says, "the hidden lives of autistic women". When a lot of people think of autism all that comes to mind is the "Rain Man" stereotype, but it's essential to know that there are many other different ways in which the autistic traits can make a person and his/her life different. This book is I would like to thank NetGalley and Jessica Kingsley Publishers for providing me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Very interesting graphic novel of a not very discussed theme, as the title says, "the hidden lives of autistic women". When a lot of people think of autism all that comes to mind is the "Rain Man" stereotype, but it's essential to know that there are many other different ways in which the autistic traits can make a person and his/her life different. This book is a good starting point on bringing awareness about Autism Spectrum Disorder and therefore it's great value.
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  • Karen Moll
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Sarah Bargiela for bringing light to this subject. Camouflage is a brief overview of women with autism. I could almost see this book used in schools or workplaces as part of diversity and awareness training. I learned a bit from reading this book, especially the emphasis that autism in women is different than men and may require a different list of criteria for diagnosis. The topics covered here make me want to learn more about women with autism. Thank you to Jessica Kingsley Publis Thank you to Sarah Bargiela for bringing light to this subject. Camouflage is a brief overview of women with autism. I could almost see this book used in schools or workplaces as part of diversity and awareness training. I learned a bit from reading this book, especially the emphasis that autism in women is different than men and may require a different list of criteria for diagnosis. The topics covered here make me want to learn more about women with autism. Thank you to Jessica Kingsley Publishers and NetGalley for the advanced readers copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Holly
    January 1, 1970
    Camouflage is an extremely quick look at some of the ways autism presents in women, using three real life examples from autistic adults. Obviously, being only 40 pages long, there isn’t space for a huge amount of detail, but it provides an interesting overview of some of the key identifying features. I am an autistic woman, and I enjoyed reading the real life examples, as many of the things discussed where things that I have experienced myself. It was worth reading if for no other reason than to Camouflage is an extremely quick look at some of the ways autism presents in women, using three real life examples from autistic adults. Obviously, being only 40 pages long, there isn’t space for a huge amount of detail, but it provides an interesting overview of some of the key identifying features. I am an autistic woman, and I enjoyed reading the real life examples, as many of the things discussed where things that I have experienced myself. It was worth reading if for no other reason than to remind myself that I am autistic, and there are others like me out there.
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  • Chloe Metzger
    January 1, 1970
    A quick and informative read on women with Autism. This is a great starting point for understanding more on the subject, which is hardly ever spoken about. We often see Autism as being male, however, I hope there are more books like this in the future. I have to note that the illustration was also absolutely beautiful, and adds to the book itself. This is definitely something that I want to look into further, particularly after seeing myself in some of the stories. Thank you to the author, illus A quick and informative read on women with Autism. This is a great starting point for understanding more on the subject, which is hardly ever spoken about. We often see Autism as being male, however, I hope there are more books like this in the future. I have to note that the illustration was also absolutely beautiful, and adds to the book itself. This is definitely something that I want to look into further, particularly after seeing myself in some of the stories. Thank you to the author, illustrator, publisher and Netgalley for the opportunity in exchange for an honest review.
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  • eimn
    January 1, 1970
    It was a good and necessary introduction to women in the autism spectrum, but it was unfortunately too short to explained the complexity of the subject and to include deep and complex testimonies. They made the book easy to read and richly illustrated, but the subject deserved more pages to be well introduced and well understood. In comparison, when I think of A Quick & Easy Guide to Queer & Trans Identities by J.R. Zuckerberg, and Mady G, it is a 96-page book which also has to explain a It was a good and necessary introduction to women in the autism spectrum, but it was unfortunately too short to explained the complexity of the subject and to include deep and complex testimonies. They made the book easy to read and richly illustrated, but the subject deserved more pages to be well introduced and well understood. In comparison, when I think of A Quick & Easy Guide to Queer & Trans Identities by J.R. Zuckerberg, and Mady G, it is a 96-page book which also has to explain a very complex and broad subject. That book succeeds in doing so because they took the space that they needed to really cover the subject. "Camouflage", on the contrary, stayed too shallow and without enough explanations or testimonies to become a great book.*Thank you NetGalley for providing me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review*
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  • Manda
    January 1, 1970
    I view this as more of an in-depth informational resource than a typical graphic novel. It's 40 pages so can only go into depth on a very few case studies of characters. What's more important is the strategically laid out content introducing the reader to the world of autism and then sequentially going through signs and symptoms and coping techniques. This is the perfect resource for middle grade students to understand themselves or their classmates. The art is a middle ground of constructivism I view this as more of an in-depth informational resource than a typical graphic novel. It's 40 pages so can only go into depth on a very few case studies of characters. What's more important is the strategically laid out content introducing the reader to the world of autism and then sequentially going through signs and symptoms and coping techniques. This is the perfect resource for middle grade students to understand themselves or their classmates. The art is a middle ground of constructivism and futurism and suprematism with subdued colors that don't distract from the message.
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