End Times
What is going to cause our extinction? How can we save ourselves and our future? End Times answers the most important questions facing humankindEnd Times is a compelling work of skilled reportage that peels back the layers of complexity around the unthinkable-and inevitable-end of humankind. From asteroids and artificial intelligence to volcanic supereruption to nuclear war, 15-year veteran science reporter and TIME editor Bryan Walsh provides a stunning panoramic view of the most catastrophic threats to the human race.In End Times, Walsh examines threats that emerge from nature and those of our own making: asteroids, supervolcanoes, nuclear war, climate change, disease pandemics, biotechnology, artificial intelligence, and extraterrestrial intelligence. Walsh details the true probability of these world-ending catastrophes, the impact on our lives were they to happen, and the best strategies for saving ourselves, all pulled from his rigorous and deeply thoughtful reporting and research.Walsh goes into the room with the men and women whose job it is to imagine the unimaginable. He includes interviews with those on the front lines of prevention, actively working to head off existential threats in biotechnology labs and government hubs. Guided by Walsh's evocative, page-turning prose, we follow scientific stars like the asteroid hunters at NASA and the disease detectives on the trail of the next killer virus.Walsh explores the danger of apocalypse in all forms. In the end, it will be the depth of our knowledge, the height of our imagination, and our sheer will to survive that will decide the future.

End Times Details

TitleEnd Times
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 27th, 2019
PublisherHachette Books
ISBN-139780316449618
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Science, Politics

End Times Review

  • Grumpus
    January 1, 1970
    The grumpus23 (23-word commentary)The demise of humanity. Asteroid? Volcano? Nuclear? Climate change? Disease? Biotechnology? Artificial Intelligence? Aliens? Excessive political editorializing not appreciated. Just the facts, please.
  • Lissa
    January 1, 1970
    So a strange thing happened while reading this book.  While reading a chapter about the possibility and consequences of an asteroid striking the Earth, I happened upon a news story about an asteroid coming within such a near distance to the planet that it surprised scientists.  Suffice to say, that definitely brought home the timeliness of the book.  I will say that I have read about this before (but I am a glutton for apocalyptic scenarios) but this was well written and many chapters, especiall So a strange thing happened while reading this book.  While reading a chapter about the possibility and consequences of an asteroid striking the Earth, I happened upon a news story about an asteroid coming within such a near distance to the planet that it surprised scientists.  Suffice to say, that definitely brought home the timeliness of the book.  I will say that I have read about this before (but I am a glutton for apocalyptic scenarios) but this was well written and many chapters, especially the one about aliens, were extremely enlightening.  I received a digital ARC of this book through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  
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  • Steve
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting look at possible apocalypses I enjoyed this book. Despite the subject matter, Bryan Walsh manages to incorporate appropriate humor. Walsh also puts himself into the story, which I generally like. It creates a closer relationship between me and the author. When I started the book, I found the preface was grim and I wasn’t sure that I wanted to read the book but the tone of the book was actually lighter than the preface, considering the subject. It wasn’t all doom and gloom as Walsh di Interesting look at possible apocalypses I enjoyed this book. Despite the subject matter, Bryan Walsh manages to incorporate appropriate humor. Walsh also puts himself into the story, which I generally like. It creates a closer relationship between me and the author. When I started the book, I found the preface was grim and I wasn’t sure that I wanted to read the book but the tone of the book was actually lighter than the preface, considering the subject. It wasn’t all doom and gloom as Walsh discusses what we as a society can do to try to mitigate the end times. I also found no obvious biases in the book. I am happy that I didn’t let the preface discourage me and that I read the book.Disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of this book via Netgalley for review purposes.
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  • Kaitlyn
    January 1, 1970
    End Times was my first glimpse into a book outside of my comfort zone. I've never read beyond fiction, but this was just so interesting. It's no unknown fact that the world is bound to come to an end soon with the way humanity is continuing to live, but the book gives a glimpse of the way it could end, and the way we could probably try to save it too.The author does a stellar job of merging research and "what-ifs" together. Each chapter leads into the next, and it gets more and more interesting End Times was my first glimpse into a book outside of my comfort zone. I've never read beyond fiction, but this was just so interesting. It's no unknown fact that the world is bound to come to an end soon with the way humanity is continuing to live, but the book gives a glimpse of the way it could end, and the way we could probably try to save it too.The author does a stellar job of merging research and "what-ifs" together. Each chapter leads into the next, and it gets more and more interesting further into the book. Highly recommend!
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  • Rama
    January 1, 1970
    An interesting perspective for the future of the planet The author offers an interesting view for the future from a variety of catastrophes; asteroid impact, volcanoes, nuclear war, climate change, diseases, biotech, artificial intelligence, and aliens. He articulates these world-ending apocalypse with passion. It's not just the rising tide of climate change and the deadly natural disasters that seem to be piling up with each passing year. Our very future is in danger as it has never been before An interesting perspective for the future of the planet The author offers an interesting view for the future from a variety of catastrophes; asteroid impact, volcanoes, nuclear war, climate change, diseases, biotech, artificial intelligence, and aliens. He articulates these world-ending apocalypse with passion. It's not just the rising tide of climate change and the deadly natural disasters that seem to be piling up with each passing year. Our very future is in danger as it has never been before, both from an array of cosmic and earthbound threats and from the very technologies that made us prosperous.We know how bad it can get; the two world wars; the Black Death which killed 200 million people in the fourteenth century; the biggest hurricanes and most devastating earthquakes. These risks are darker than the darkest days humanity has ever known. Our species has always lived under the shadow of existential risk we just didn't know it. At least five times over the course of our planet's 4.5-billion-year history, life was wiped out completely, but each time it was reborn with vengeance. It is good to know that life regenerates itself when the planet offers interesting possibilities. Solar system has another 4.5 billion years to go and earth may shape into new future.
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  • Brent Alley
    January 1, 1970
    I read this mainly because I won in the giveaway. I've mainly been reading fantasy so this was a break in between the wheel of time series and it was a good break. It was really interesting. The author clearly put in a lot of work and research to put together a list of the most likely ways for the human population to go extinct. Kind of morbid but not really as he's also researched and put together ways to stop the various threats. A couple of them I don't think are quite as big a extinction thr I read this mainly because I won in the giveaway. I've mainly been reading fantasy so this was a break in between the wheel of time series and it was a good break. It was really interesting. The author clearly put in a lot of work and research to put together a list of the most likely ways for the human population to go extinct. Kind of morbid but not really as he's also researched and put together ways to stop the various threats. A couple of them I don't think are quite as big a extinction threat as he does but for the most part I agreed with what he said and now I have his research to validate my thoughts. In general I like that he inserts his opinions otherwise it would have been a dull read but I didn't really like the Trump bashing. I'm not a Trump fan anyways but it was kinda ridiculous to me to act like Trump's going to end the world, he isn't. Trump does have the ability basically as he has the ability to launch US nukes but it wouldn't benefit him. Trump only does things if they benefit him. There's no motivation for it. It would never happen. Anyways that's really my only complaint. Oh and this author wrote this because he just had a baby and I'm about a month from having one so we're in a similar boat. I want the world to survive and thrive just like he does and I see many ways we can make things better and I think humans are resilient. We got lucky to make it this far but now we have the intelligence and technology to slow or stop most of these threats and I think we'll be around for a long time.
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    End Times: A Brief Guide to the End of the World by Bryan Walsh (a former Time magazine editor and foreign correspondent) is nothing short of brilliant!In this thoroughly engrossing and compelling read, Walsh explores the various existential scenarios that might cause the end of humankind. He shares his detailed research into each of the possibilities, gives us important background and probability information along with what has/is being/could be done to mitigate the risk. Though this is complex End Times: A Brief Guide to the End of the World by Bryan Walsh (a former Time magazine editor and foreign correspondent) is nothing short of brilliant!In this thoroughly engrossing and compelling read, Walsh explores the various existential scenarios that might cause the end of humankind. He shares his detailed research into each of the possibilities, gives us important background and probability information along with what has/is being/could be done to mitigate the risk. Though this is complex information, Walsh does an excellant job in presenting it in a very understandable way.He repeatedly warns, as do many of the scientists that he references, that the biggest obstacle to preparing for these dangers is that people tend to bury their heads in the sand. Research shows that if people feel that the apocalypse will not occur within their lifetime, or the lifetimes of their children/grandchildren, they are content not to give priority to or taking preventative measures that should be already underway. We must take a longer-range view if we are to save ourselves and our planet.This is a very eye-opening book, and a real page-turner. I highly recommend to every person on the planet who can read! Many thanks to NetGalley and Hachette Books who let me read an ARC of this book in exchange for an unbiased review.
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  • Jill Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    WOW. If I wasn't worried BEFORE... Seriously - if you are a worrier, this may not be the book for you. I tend to not be one - and even I'm freaking out a bit right now... Walsh has done a marvelous job encapsulating the top existential threats facing humanity - many of which are of our own making - and providing background, thoughtful commentary, and suggestions for mitigating the potential for worldwide disaster. Walsh has an engaging writing style that pulls you into the drama of the horrors h WOW. If I wasn't worried BEFORE... Seriously - if you are a worrier, this may not be the book for you. I tend to not be one - and even I'm freaking out a bit right now... Walsh has done a marvelous job encapsulating the top existential threats facing humanity - many of which are of our own making - and providing background, thoughtful commentary, and suggestions for mitigating the potential for worldwide disaster. Walsh has an engaging writing style that pulls you into the drama of the horrors he describes. He pairs facts with anecdotes and personal stories about the men and women involved in the crises at hand. It makes for a very compelling read. The book is very well written, thoroughly engaging (and horrifying), and entirely timely.My review copy was provided by the publisher via NetGalley.
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    I received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. What is going to cause our extinction?How can we save ourselves and our future?End Times answers the most important questions facing humankindEnd Times is a compelling work of skilled reportage that peels back the layers of complexity around the unthink I received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. What is going to cause our extinction?How can we save ourselves and our future?End Times answers the most important questions facing humankindEnd Times is a compelling work of skilled reportage that peels back the layers of complexity around the unthinkable--and inevitable--end of humankind. From asteroids and artificial intelligence to volcanic supereruption to nuclear war, 15-year veteran science reporter and TIME editor Bryan Walsh provides a stunning panoramic view of the most catastrophic threats to the human race.In End Times, Walsh examines threats that emerge from nature and those of our own making: asteroids, supervolcanoes, nuclear war, climate change, disease pandemics, biotechnology, artificial intelligence, and extraterrestrial intelligence. Walsh details the true probability of these world-ending catastrophes, the impact on our lives were they to happen, and the best strategies for saving ourselves, all pulled from his rigorous and deeply thoughtful reporting and research.Walsh goes into the room with the men and women whose job it is to imagine the unimaginable. He includes interviews with those on the front lines of prevention, actively working to head off existential threats in biotechnology labs and government hubs. Guided by Walsh's evocative, page-turning prose, we follow scientific stars like the asteroid hunters at NASA and the disease detectives on the trail of the next killer virus.Walsh explores the danger of apocalypse in all forms. In the end, it will be the depth of our knowledge, the height of our imagination, and our sheer will to survive that will decide the future.This is a very informative and scary as all heck book to read - truth be told, we have to accept that the end of the world is inevitable. Maybe not in our lifetime but it will end. We cannot explain the universe ... how does something expand every year into space that does not exist? How can we be billions and billions of light-years away from other stars and planets? How can we find other life out there when we don't have the technology to get even a few light-years aways in less than, say, more generations than we can account on a ship that we cannot build? This book prepares us for life as we can understand it in clear and concise yet still entertaining terms It makes sense but it is not dry or dusty--- it is a well-written and thought out treatise on what is coming even if we don't want to think it will happen to us or our descendants. Read this book --- it is amazing, in my opinion, and if you are the curious type, you will find it fascinating. As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I love emojis (outside of their incessant use by "Social Influencer Millennials" on Instagram and Twitter) so let's give it 🚀🌌🛸🛰🌠
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  • Tuna
    January 1, 1970
    End Times is an interesting overview of several topics of interest regarding the many different existential risks associated with ways that humanity and even Earth itself can end. From common topics such as super volcanoes, nuclear winters/autumns, asteroids to more outlandish discussion points like alien invasions or wars and the rise of generalized artificial intelligence deeming the existent of humans are at odds with their own existence, concepts are covered with excruciating yet intriguing End Times is an interesting overview of several topics of interest regarding the many different existential risks associated with ways that humanity and even Earth itself can end. From common topics such as super volcanoes, nuclear winters/autumns, asteroids to more outlandish discussion points like alien invasions or wars and the rise of generalized artificial intelligence deeming the existent of humans are at odds with their own existence, concepts are covered with excruciating yet intriguing detail. The insights from experts in the field of the topics selected are really what sets this book apart from others. I came away from the book feeling like I’ve not only learned something new but gained invaluable insights into ways that some people are working to bring awareness of the some of the risks associated with scientific research, communications with aliens, and even ways we can perhaps alter the climate so that we can push off some of the harmful effects that our ancestors are presently making us endure and ones that we will make our successors experience.Some of the historical research is also intriguing in that the writer covers topics from a personal point of view from reporting in the field, such as SARS, or the climate aspect in a northern territory country, to visits with observatories. There is this kind of personal connection with the issues that makes it feel more than just another nonfiction book but something like a realistic, suspenseful, and enlightening report. This makes it a great read.One of the faults with the book is that several of the end of the world topics are left in a state where there is no hope. There is really no hope against climate change without governments working together. There is no hope against say doing anything to defend against volcanoes beyond well just praying that the small chance that a massive eruption happens at Yosemite truly and does in fact not happen in many of our lifetimes. There is little to no hope against the looming nuclear crisis beyond hoping the countries with them never actually accidently fire one of or have a trigger happy finger and press it due to some mistake or quick reaction. While there seemed to be defenses against something like asteroids of a certain size, the smaller ones that say hit over one of the eastern European countries that razed land and destroyed property are simply not detected and still cause panic. It is only thanks to the small risk of them hitting major cities that they haven’t caused calamity. Really there is this feeling that we only have the small risks associated with many of the topics detailed that continues to allow us to stay hopeful about thriving. The scariest topic was the aspect of their being some evolutionary or galactic/great filter that civilizations/planets go through and that we have yet to cross it which is why we are the only sentient beings in the galaxy. I mean, when you think that no other lifeform exists out there and the reason we haven’t detected them is that they were already wiped out, you kind of get the chills. Perhaps this is a stretch on my part and the writers, but it is scary. On the other hand a hypothesis suggests that maybe we passed it?Overall I enjoyed this book.
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  • Chad Guarino
    January 1, 1970
    End Times is an entertaining (albeit terrifying) collection of existential threats to the human race from Bryan Walsh, a long time editor and reporter for TIME. All of the heavy hitters are here that you're most likely familiar with, from celestial impact to supervolcano eruptions, super-intelligent AI to hostile alien races. What sets this book apart from the myriad other end-of-the-world books is Walsh's easy to follow prose, superb reporting, and the willingness to dig deeper into each issue. End Times is an entertaining (albeit terrifying) collection of existential threats to the human race from Bryan Walsh, a long time editor and reporter for TIME. All of the heavy hitters are here that you're most likely familiar with, from celestial impact to supervolcano eruptions, super-intelligent AI to hostile alien races. What sets this book apart from the myriad other end-of-the-world books is Walsh's easy to follow prose, superb reporting, and the willingness to dig deeper into each issue. Instead of merely describing the threat to humanity and moving on, Walsh reports on what is being done to prevent it, what can and should be done in the future, and gives examples of the worse case scenario (these are often graphic but page turning).This is a timely read that people should pay attention to. While the chances of an alien attack soon are very remote, the parts on climate change, pandemic, and AI are relevant to our current political climate and Walsh's research tends to show how unprepared we potentially are for them. Highly recommended. **I was given a copy of this book by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. My thanks to Hachette Books.*
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  • Realms & Robots
    January 1, 1970
    End Times is a well-researched account of the many threats facing the planet. We’ve all heard of some, others are less familiar, and a couple seem pulled from the pages of science fiction.The premise is terrifying at times, hopeful at others, and, above all, enthralling to read.Each section goes in-depth into its designated disaster, providing fascinating insights into mankind’s interactions with these given events or objects. In the asteroids section, we get a background on the asteroid that wi End Times is a well-researched account of the many threats facing the planet. We’ve all heard of some, others are less familiar, and a couple seem pulled from the pages of science fiction.The premise is terrifying at times, hopeful at others, and, above all, enthralling to read.Each section goes in-depth into its designated disaster, providing fascinating insights into mankind’s interactions with these given events or objects. In the asteroids section, we get a background on the asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs in addition to the discovery of various objects on a collision course throughout our solar system. It’s mindblowing to understand the sheer force of an object like that and what it can do to a planet. The conversation is at times terrifying, but it’s reassuring to get the facts on these scenarios in place of quick shock pieces on every news station looking to fill a few minutes with terror. I appreciated the deep analysis and digging the author did to present such a coherent, well-formed guide.As a science fiction reviewer, it was most interesting to read through the artificial intelligence and alien sections of the book. Admittedly, the likelihood of these extinction events occurring is slim to none, but the facts are presented thoroughly nonetheless. We get a history of our AI discoveries and the advances in robotics. We get a background on mankind’s monitoring of the universe for extraterrestrial life. There was a lot I didn’t know and I appreciated the learning opportunity.As I’ve said, there’s a definite terror element throughout the sections, but it’s necessary to understanding just how important these various issues are. It’s important to remember how devastating nuclear war can be and what it would do to the world if it was unleashed on a global scale. It’s important to understand the asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs and most of life on Earth, if only to peruse the countless articles and studies with a better sense of understanding. Above all, it’s important to understand that many of these are preventable if mankind could step up and create meaningful change on a global scale. Climate change, nuclear war, the global spread of disease or virus - all of these are real threats that could be eliminated if we could get out of our own way. Overall, End Times gives you a lot to think about. It’s a smart look at the things we fear as a species and the facts surrounding their probability. You’ll leave the book better informed about our history with catastrophe and what it would take to get us to a tipping point. NOTE: I was provided a free copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for my honest, unbiased review.
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  • deep
    January 1, 1970
    SA Starred: "Predictions about the end of the world--or at least of humankind--are as old as civilization itself. But that doesn't mean the end will never happen. In End Times: A Brief Guide to the End of the World, science reporter Bryan Walsh explores all kinds of existential threats to humanity. Among them are super-volcanoes, asteroids, climate change, nuclear war, disease, biotechnology, artificial intelligence and, yes, even aliens. Some of these possibilities might sound outlandish, but W SA Starred: "Predictions about the end of the world--or at least of humankind--are as old as civilization itself. But that doesn't mean the end will never happen. In End Times: A Brief Guide to the End of the World, science reporter Bryan Walsh explores all kinds of existential threats to humanity. Among them are super-volcanoes, asteroids, climate change, nuclear war, disease, biotechnology, artificial intelligence and, yes, even aliens. Some of these possibilities might sound outlandish, but Walsh draws on more than 15 years of investigative journalism at Time magazine to get the science right. He also includes interviews with scientists who study various life-ending phenomena, as well as ways to circumvent apocalypse via advanced technology and elaborate warning systems. This is a book that balances doom and gloom with hope and humor.Walsh shows that some of these threats, like asteroids and super-volcanoes, are not without precedent. Casual readers of science may already know that an asteroid killed off the dinosaurs, but lesser known is the eruption of Toba, a super-volcano that exploded more than 74,000 years ago. As Walsh puts it, "Homo sapiens had a very bad day" when Toba blew. The amount of rock and ash spewed from the mountain, he writes, was the equivalent to 2,800 Mount St. Helens eruptions--enough to darken the skies for years and creating "hell on Earth." Rarely is popular science writing this hair-raising. Breezily written but deeply researched, End Times thrills as much as it educates. --Amy Brady, freelance writer and editorDiscover: This exciting work of popular science explores some possible ends to the world in almost cinematic detail."
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  • Diane Hernandez
    January 1, 1970
    A non-religious and well-researched look at what is most likely to kill all of mankind is in the End Times: A Brief Guide to the End of the World.There are eight threats to mankind’s continued existence described within this book:• Asteroid• Volcano• Nuclear Bombs• Climate Change• Disease• Biotechnology• Artificial Intelligence• Aliens (from another planet, sorry Mr. President )Which of the above is more likely and which should be left to fiction? This book will attempt to answer that question.E A non-religious and well-researched look at what is most likely to kill all of mankind is in the End Times: A Brief Guide to the End of the World.There are eight threats to mankind’s continued existence described within this book:• Asteroid• Volcano• Nuclear Bombs• Climate Change• Disease• Biotechnology• Artificial Intelligence• Aliens (from another planet, sorry Mr. President )Which of the above is more likely and which should be left to fiction? This book will attempt to answer that question.End Times: A Brief Guide to the End of the World would be a good reference for thriller writers (I’m looking at you Clive Cussler) or screenwriters of disaster movies (RIP Irwin Allen). It is also an interesting read for open-minded readers. Even though the topic is inherently grim, the author manages to infuse some hopeful notes. 4 stars! More if you are a writer looking for ideas.Thanks to Hachette Books and NetGalley for a copy in exchange for my honest review.
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  • John
    January 1, 1970
    Nothing about this book would qualify it is a "fun," read. He catalogs several ways in which humans are dealing with threats to our survival. Some are human-made, such as climate change or nuclear war. Others are natural, such as asteroids or super volcanoes. And some are almost science fiction, such as AI or aliens. The writing is lucid, well researched, and broadly sourced. And, in the end, the book left me aching for more by way of antidotes and answers than Walsh leaves us with. Might we inv Nothing about this book would qualify it is a "fun," read. He catalogs several ways in which humans are dealing with threats to our survival. Some are human-made, such as climate change or nuclear war. Others are natural, such as asteroids or super volcanoes. And some are almost science fiction, such as AI or aliens. The writing is lucid, well researched, and broadly sourced. And, in the end, the book left me aching for more by way of antidotes and answers than Walsh leaves us with. Might we invent our way out of trouble? Create more ethical humans by genetic manipulation? Build deep earth shelters? Just hope?I'm preaching on the many failed predictions in scripture about the imminent return of Jesus. It would be nice if Walsh's worst case scenarios were wrong too. But if we are going to change course, it will take education, insight, and enthusiasm for the sacrifices we're going to have to make as humans. Maybe spirituality can contribute positively to those necessities.
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  • Jeff
    January 1, 1970
    Much Of This Book Should Terrify You. Walsh does an excellent job of sharing the current state of research into the various existential crises humanity faces - crises that would make the human species extinct if they fully come to fruition. He lays out the narrative in such a way that after beginning with asteroids, each crisis leads into a discussion of the next. Some of his own commentary is hit or miss and different readers will appreciate more or less, but overall the work is solid in its jo Much Of This Book Should Terrify You. Walsh does an excellent job of sharing the current state of research into the various existential crises humanity faces - crises that would make the human species extinct if they fully come to fruition. He lays out the narrative in such a way that after beginning with asteroids, each crisis leads into a discussion of the next. Some of his own commentary is hit or miss and different readers will appreciate more or less, but overall the work is solid in its journalism standards. Very much recommended.
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  • Marsha
    January 1, 1970
    You'd think a book about the many ways the world could end would be depressing, but this isn't. It's highly readable and informative and there's even well-placed humour! From an alien invasion to asteroids to a climate catastrophe, this book covers a breadth of potential disasters. I found it oddly comforting because it isn't just all doom and gloom but is also about how we as humans can mitigate these potential disasters. Well done!
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  • Riann
    January 1, 1970
    A very interesting read which introduced me to existential risks which could lead to humanity's end. The author's detailed explanations allowed me to better under the existential risks he was presenting as well as what can be done in order to try to mitigate those risks. I like the author am hopeful that humanity's growth will also ensure our survival in the face of adversity.
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  • Catherine
    January 1, 1970
    Informative but ultimately quite dull and dry writing. I honestly don’t have much to say in terms of a review because I’m just meh about this book. I thought it would wow me and it didn’t. I found myself skimming chapters. It didn’t grab me like I felt it should, with such an interesting topic at hand. Thank you Netgalley and Hachette for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Dale Dewitt
    January 1, 1970
    This book was a deep and entertaining dive into the posible ways humanity could meet its end. The common theme is that we are very unprepared but by focusing on the hard working people trying to fight these problems we can see that there is hope.
  • Heather Bennett
    January 1, 1970
    End Times is a informative and interesting book. People should read this and realize the clock is ticking and the scientific evidence proves it.
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