Queen of No Tomorrows
Part supernatural horror, part crime noir, and set in eighties Los Angeles. Librarian con artist Cait MacReady forges occult tomes, but her latest creation has caught the attention of something magical and terrible. ​LOS ANGELES, THE EIGHTIES​Cait MacReady spends her days in the UCLA library, special collections, restoring old books and saving them from the ravages of time. By night, she works her real job, making copies of antique and occult texts. But don't call them forgeries. She only gives customers exactly what they want.​When her ex-lover, now business partner, shows up on behalf of some customers who want a book that isn't written yet, Cait gets suspicious. When she discovers they're from the organization No Tomorrows, she gets scared. And when she finds out that their leader, the enigmatic figure called the Queen, wants a book that only Cait has, she begins to wonder what's real and what she's manufactured on her own.Cait's latest creation, the Smoking Codex, is a work of complete fiction and all her own, nothing but vodka-fueled occult nonsense and heartfelt desire. It's a fake—no history, no power.Or is it? This book takes on a life of its own, and the police get involved as people start to die. Now Cait must somehow manage to stop a thing that has already happened: the book’s secret god is already known.And its name has been spoken.FROM THE AUTHOR"Queen of No Tomorrows is the kind of book that I want to read," says Matt. "I wrote it simply because of that. Instead of placing things in the arcane and rarified (now all-too-familiar and safe) settings of the old and mannered, I wanted to bring cosmic horror and the uncanny out to the sunshine and neon of Los Angeles. Instead of simply revering a period or place, I wanted to poke at things, to see where the horror might show up in the everyday, even in the simple act of creation itself.​"Besides, there just aren't enough stories that treat crime like magic, or vice versa."

Queen of No Tomorrows Details

TitleQueen of No Tomorrows
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseDec 4th, 2018
PublisherBroken Eye Books
ISBN-139781940372358
Rating
GenreHorror

Queen of No Tomorrows Review

  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book for free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.The nitty-gritty: Full of dangerous magic, secret gangs and books that can conjure monsters, Matt Maxwell’s noir vision of 80s Los Angeles is an addictive treat.Well, this was a strange little book, but I enjoyed it! I had never heard of Broken Eye Books until the author got in touch with me. And when the publisher contacted me as well, I just I received this book for free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.The nitty-gritty: Full of dangerous magic, secret gangs and books that can conjure monsters, Matt Maxwell’s noir vision of 80s Los Angeles is an addictive treat.Well, this was a strange little book, but I enjoyed it! I had never heard of Broken Eye Books until the author got in touch with me. And when the publisher contacted me as well, I just couldn’t say no! And I’m so glad I took a chance on Matt’s book. Queen of No Tomorrows is a novella length story with an L.A. noir vibe and a touch of H.P. Lovecraft influence thrown in for good measure.Cait is a library scientist, but on the side she is a book forger. She skillfully creates forgeries of collectible books and sells them with the help of her “agent” Rico. In order to stay off the radar of the police, she’s created a fake identity, a person named Rory Soame, who is the "actual" creator of the books she sells. She’s successfully kept this secret until one day, she discovers that Rico has sold her out to a dangerous and mysterious Los Angeles gang called No Tomorrows. The Queen of No Tomorrows knows her identity and is asking—no, demanding—to see a book called the Smoking Codex , a book that technically doesn’t exist, since Cait wrote it herself.When Rico turns up dead, Cait knows she needs to meet the Queen for herself, if only to find out how she possibly knows about the Codex. But there are forces at play that not even Cait can stop…Maxwell packs a lot into this short story, including some surprisingly well-developed characters. I loved that Cait knows how to forge books, and I don’t think I’ve ever run across that line of work in fiction before! Cait has literally brought an old god to life, although she certainly wasn’t planning to do so, and I loved seeing her struggle with the repercussions of writing the Smoking Codex . Most of these characters are hard and shady, and live life on the edge. Even the girl in the salon who dyes Cait’s hair in the beginning of the story has some rough edges to her. Maxwell evokes a noir sensibility that had me jumping at shadows and wondering what the hell was going to happen if the book got into the wrong hands.Then there’s the title character, the Queen of No Tomorrows, a scary and determined woman named Ariela who intends to unleash hell on earth no matter what, and one scrawny girl with purple hair isn’t going to stand in her way.For the most part, I loved Maxwell's writing, although there was the occasional awkward sentence that jumped out at me. But overall his writing is atmospheric and evokes a sense of mystery and danger that was perfect for his subject matter.I keep wondering what Maxwell could have created if he’d expanded on his ideas and made this into a full length novel. There’s plenty of great fodder here for even more mayhem, and the city of Los Angeles is a perfect setting for occult gangs and otherworldly monsters. I would not mind if the author decided to write more stories set in this world!The ending was both terrifying and mind-bendingly good, and the fantastic cover art by Gabriel Hardman will clue you in to the cosmic horror that’s in store for readers at the end. I’m so glad I had the chance to read this book, although it will take some time before I’m comfortable looking up at the night sky.Big thanks to Matt Maxwell and Broken Eye Books for supplying a review copy.This review originally appeared on Books, Bones & Buffy
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  • Maria Haskins
    January 1, 1970
    A dark, riveting page-turner set in a near-past Los Angeles where magic lurks just beneath the surface of everyday life. I loved this book, and I especially loved Cait who makes her living making copies (and forgeries) of antique and forbidden books. One of the books she has made attracts interest from a mysterious group of people who seem to think it is a lot more important than Cait ever imagined...This is a fast-paced and engaging read that pulled me right into its strange, unsettling world. A dark, riveting page-turner set in a near-past Los Angeles where magic lurks just beneath the surface of everyday life. I loved this book, and I especially loved Cait who makes her living making copies (and forgeries) of antique and forbidden books. One of the books she has made attracts interest from a mysterious group of people who seem to think it is a lot more important than Cait ever imagined...This is a fast-paced and engaging read that pulled me right into its strange, unsettling world. The ending knocked me out!
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  • Daina
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked the premise of this book, I just didn't enjoy reading it. The protagonist was so bland and tired (tough yet vulnerable woman is thrust into supernatural affairs she doesn't quite understand but is somehow the key to), I found most of the secondary characters more interesting (Trager, Alondra) and wanted to know more about their lives than that of our Cait. A few too many encounters ended with Cait passing out/waking up somewhere after not intentionally going to sleep. This happene I really liked the premise of this book, I just didn't enjoy reading it. The protagonist was so bland and tired (tough yet vulnerable woman is thrust into supernatural affairs she doesn't quite understand but is somehow the key to), I found most of the secondary characters more interesting (Trager, Alondra) and wanted to know more about their lives than that of our Cait. A few too many encounters ended with Cait passing out/waking up somewhere after not intentionally going to sleep. This happened at least 3 times, which came across as lazy and unimaginative. I agree with what another reviewer said, the descriptions of actions and scenes was often quite poor and at times it was impossible to picture what was happening.
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  • Valerie
    January 1, 1970
    The idea behind this book is great! Loved that it focused around a book! The only thing that troubled me was the description of certain scenes. They were very hard to understand or visualize what was happening. When a scene is written about or described in a book I try to picture that scene in my mind, with this book I had a real hard time doing that throughout the book. That’s my opinion....
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  • Lilyn G. | Sci-Fi & Scary
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come closer to release date.Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publisher for review consideration.
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