Time After Time
A magical love story, inspired by the legend of a woman who vanished from Grand Central Terminal, sweeps readers from the 1920s to World War II and beyond, in the spirit of The Time Traveler’s Wife and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.On a clear December morning in 1937, at the famous gold clock in Grand Central Terminal, Joe Reynolds, a hardworking railroad man from Queens, meets a vibrant young woman who seems mysteriously out of place. Nora Lansing is a Manhattan socialite whose flapper clothing, pearl earrings, and talk of the Roaring Twenties don’t seem to match the bleak mood of Depression-era New York. Captivated by Nora from her first electric touch, Joe despairs when he tries to walk her home and she disappears. Finding her again—and again—will become the focus of his love and his life.Nora, an aspiring artist and fiercely independent, is shocked to find she’s somehow been trapped, her presence in the terminal governed by rules she cannot fathom. It isn’t until she meets Joe that she begins to understand the effect that time is having on her, and the possible connections to the workings of Grand Central and the solar phenomenon known as Manhattanhenge, when the sun rises or sets between the city’s skyscrapers, aligned perfectly with the streets below.As thousands of visitors pass under the famous celestial blue ceiling each day, Joe and Nora create a life unlike any they could have imagined. With infinite love in a finite space, they take full advantage of the “Terminal City” within a city, dining at the Oyster Bar, visiting the Whispering Gallery, and making a home at the Biltmore Hotel. But when the construction of another landmark threatens their future, Nora and Joe are forced to test the limits of freedom and love.Delving into Grand Central Terminal’s rich past, Lisa Grunwald crafts a masterful historical novel about a love affair that defies age, class, place, and even time.

Time After Time Details

TitleTime After Time
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 11th, 2019
PublisherRandom House
ISBN-139780812993431
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, Science Fiction, Time Travel, Fantasy, Romance

Time After Time Review

  • Fran
    January 1, 1970
    Mahattanhenge, a term popularized by astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, is a phenomenon occurring around the time of the summer and winter solstices. The rising or setting sun creates an amazing burst of light framed by Manhattan skyscrapers as the sun rises above or dips below the horizon.Weather permitting, the brilliant line of light entered the Main Concourse of Grand Central Terminal through three high arched windows yearly, on or about December 5. The terminal was crowded with onlookers a Mahattanhenge, a term popularized by astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, is a phenomenon occurring around the time of the summer and winter solstices. The rising or setting sun creates an amazing burst of light framed by Manhattan skyscrapers as the sun rises above or dips below the horizon.Weather permitting, the brilliant line of light entered the Main Concourse of Grand Central Terminal through three high arched windows yearly, on or about December 5. The terminal was crowded with onlookers and fellow travelers. Nora Lansing, twenty-three years old, looked overwhelmed and lost in Grand Central Station. No suitcase, no coat, wearing a smudged pale blue dress, she appeared waif-like. She carried French currency in her purse. A chance meeting occurred with Joe Reynolds, a thirty-two year old railroad employee. Joe thought she looked "vivid and exciting" and was thrilled to walk Nora home. Enroute, she disappeared. In 1938, one year later, they happened upon each other again in the terminal. Joe asked, "Don't you ever wear a coat? It was snowing today. And is that your only dress?" Nora said, "This is just my traveling dress. Where I'm traveling from is not important". Nora is a "woman of mystery". Joe is intrigued.Joe Reynold's world is centered around Grand Central Station. He works as a leverman, pushing and pulling levers connected by underground cables to guide incoming trains into the terminal. Money is tight. Joe lives at the E. 47 St. YMCA. "Everyone I know grew up the day the stock market crashed". Joe however, was a dreamer. He would spin a globe and visualize a trip to wherever his finger landed. One thing was for certain, Joe was smitten. Wanting Nora was"...a constant dominating ache...could be soothed only by her actual touch." How was it possible that she disappeared again?Joe was perplexed. He had met the love of his life yet he couldn't fathom her sudden appearances and disappearances. Was it possible that the day Joe thought of as the start of his real life was the day Nora's life ended? A visit to the New York Public Library revealed newspaper clippings of a subway accident on December 5, 1925. Eleanor Lansing had died, but had she? As Joe aged, Nora was unaffected by time. She was always twenty-three. Joe and Nora had an "infinite love in a finite space". If they truly loved each other, should they let each other go?"Time After Time" by Lisa Grunwald was an awesome fairy tale-like love story. The love Nora and Joe shared transcended time, age and social class. I was totally invested in the lives of Nora and Joe. I slept less and read more! This was a very captivating literary novel of historical fiction I highly recommend.Thank you Random House Publishing Group-Random House and Net Galley for the opportunity to read and review "Time After Time".
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  • Cheri
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 StarsWhen Joe first sees Nora standing in Grand Central Station, she has no suitcase, or coat even though it was early in the December morning of 1937, barely dawn. She seemed completely out of place, and her clothing seemed from another time. He approaches her, offering assistance, information, whatever help she needs. He’s intrigued. When she tells him where she’s trying to go, Turtle Bay Gardens, he recognizes the neighborhood, as it’s only a few blocks away from the YMCA where he lives, 3.5 StarsWhen Joe first sees Nora standing in Grand Central Station, she has no suitcase, or coat even though it was early in the December morning of 1937, barely dawn. She seemed completely out of place, and her clothing seemed from another time. He approaches her, offering assistance, information, whatever help she needs. He’s intrigued. When she tells him where she’s trying to go, Turtle Bay Gardens, he recognizes the neighborhood, as it’s only a few blocks away from the YMCA where he lives, as a significantly more posh area than his own humble dwellings. He offers to escort her home, and along the walk there, she vanishes. Joe is a leverman at this renowned terminal, and so when a year passes, and the solar event that occurs two mornings every year –where the rising sun lined up exactly with the east-west street grid of Manhattan – he is there to see her return. He’s more intrigued at first than smitten, but it isn’t long before he falls for Nora.Solving the dilemma of how to continue life this way is a matter of trying to avoid what has failed, and sticking to what they believe will keep Nora in the here and now (or then, as the case is), and with the Biltmore Hotel attached to the terminal, Nora can remain safely there, but there are family duties for Joe that pull him away periodically, and events that, ultimately, affect both of them.Since this is a book around a time-travel story, I wasn’t expecting everything to line up perfectly, but there were several things in this story that stood out to me and bothered me. Things that, for me, were somewhat blatant in not fitting in the era, and other things that were completely implausible, and not in a time-travel related way. For that reason this fell a bit short of ‘love’ for me, but I did enjoy this, overall. I just didn’t love it.The Winter Solstice event, Manhattanhenge, that used to occur in the morning hours and bathe Grand Central Station in its light on these fluctuating two mornings a year (weather permitting), is no longer visible in Grand Central Station. Progress - another building was built which blocks the sun’s rays from hitting the window from the east as it did before. And more’s the pity. The Summer Solstice event, Manhattanhenge, is still a significant draw for those looking for a more urban version of Stonehenge, and occurs as the sun sets over to the west. Of course other cities in other states and countries have similar times when the sun’s rays create magic, you just have to look for them. Pub Date: 11 Jun 2019Many thanks for the ARC provided by Random House Publishing Group / Random House
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  • Cindy Burnett
    January 1, 1970
    Time After Time has an interesting premise. Time travel set against the background of the Depression and then World War 2. However, the implementation of this idea fell flat for me. The characters did not feel well developed nor were they likable, and I had a hard time caring about them and their story lines. I particularly was not a fan of the ending. I think this was just not the book for me. I received this book to read and review.
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  • Maine Colonial
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to the publisher for providing a free review copy via Netgalley.As with many other time travel romances, the central conflict is that the traveler doesn’t age the way the non-traveler does. Despite the repetition of that plot element, this is still a good story. Joe and Nora are engaging and believable characters, and it’s fascinating to see how cleverly they deal with the challenges of Nora apparently being confined to Grand Central Terminal. Most of the action takes place in the 1930s a Thanks to the publisher for providing a free review copy via Netgalley.As with many other time travel romances, the central conflict is that the traveler doesn’t age the way the non-traveler does. Despite the repetition of that plot element, this is still a good story. Joe and Nora are engaging and believable characters, and it’s fascinating to see how cleverly they deal with the challenges of Nora apparently being confined to Grand Central Terminal. Most of the action takes place in the 1930s and 1940s, a particularly vivid time in Grand Central history.For aficionados of time travel books, I should mention that this is not at all a science-bound time travel book. There are discoveries of a sort about what happened to cause Nora’s situation and what rules she is bound by, but you really don’t want to think too hard about them.I’m not going to say that this is a great work of literary fiction, but this book did remind me in a way of Amor Towles’s A Gentleman in Moscow. In both books, a character is forced to live for decades confined to one building. In both cases, it’s a large and many-faceted building, with workaday functions, hidden places and wonders, and its own regular cast of characters. The main character(s) make the building an entire world in itself, and the authors convey that in a way that makes the reader visualize a life in such a world. The story of Nora and Joe is a good one, but it’s the exploration of the world of Grand Central that takes this story into a magical realm.Be sure to read the author’s notes at the end of the book to learn about Grunwald’s two main inspirations for the book.
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  • Marjorie
    January 1, 1970
    In 1937 when Joe Reynolds first meets Nora Lansing in Grand Central Station, he’s not sure what to make of her. She’s dressed as a flapper and her clothing is looking quite shabby. She has no coat nor does she have any baggage. As he’s walking her home, Nora disappears but Joe will meet Nora again – time after time – for many years to come. Nora tells Joe that the last thing she can remember is returning from Paris in 1925 and being in a subway accident. They soon learn that Nora’s appearance in In 1937 when Joe Reynolds first meets Nora Lansing in Grand Central Station, he’s not sure what to make of her. She’s dressed as a flapper and her clothing is looking quite shabby. She has no coat nor does she have any baggage. As he’s walking her home, Nora disappears but Joe will meet Nora again – time after time – for many years to come. Nora tells Joe that the last thing she can remember is returning from Paris in 1925 and being in a subway accident. They soon learn that Nora’s appearance in Grand Central Station and hold on life is a tenuous one. Joe and Nora’s life together will be quite a unique one but always full of love.This is a beautifully told and enchanting love story. I loved being a part of Joe and Nora’s magical world. I would have liked it to have ended differently and felt that the author’s ending just didn’t feel believable although I could certainly understand the pressures this love affair was under. I most loved all of the historical references the author weaved into her story. Living just an hour away from Grand Central Station, I’m amazed that I never heard of Manhattanhenge. I immediately looked up some videos but I’m sure none of them did the sight justice. I’ll just have to go see it for myself one day.Recommended.This book was given to me by the publisher in return for an honest review.
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  • Milena
    January 1, 1970
    When I saw the description of Time After Time, I immediately wanted to read it. I love historical fiction, I love time travel, and I love books set in NYC, and this book has all these elements. The time travel aspect is quite different from what I expected, it's not exactly time travel and I can't really say what it is because of spoilers. I liked both Joe and Nora, and I loved their bitter-sweet love story. They are years and worlds apart but their connection and their love for each other is br When I saw the description of Time After Time, I immediately wanted to read it. I love historical fiction, I love time travel, and I love books set in NYC, and this book has all these elements. The time travel aspect is quite different from what I expected, it's not exactly time travel and I can't really say what it is because of spoilers. I liked both Joe and Nora, and I loved their bitter-sweet love story. They are years and worlds apart but their connection and their love for each other is breathtaking! I found the setting of Grand Central Station so interesting, I was fascinated by the description of all the behind the scenes. I've been to Grand Central lot's of times and always marveled at the beautiful architecture but never thought about what secrets could be hidden behind the walls and underneath the station. I also enjoyed historical aspects of the book and reading about life in NYC during the depression and in 1940s. Overall, I really enjoyed Time After Time and would recommend it to historical fiction and time travel fans. *ARC provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Bandit
    January 1, 1970
    I must say there was some initial reluctance going into this book. It sorta kinda sounded like women’s fiction, a very specific type of lachrymose sweeping romance. And wouldn’t you know, in the end it actually was a potentially tear inducing grand (Grand Central based) epic love story, but it was so, so good, I didn’t care. In fact, this book drew me in from the first few pages in a way few books do and managed to sustain that level of emotional engagement throughout its not inconsiderable girt I must say there was some initial reluctance going into this book. It sorta kinda sounded like women’s fiction, a very specific type of lachrymose sweeping romance. And wouldn’t you know, in the end it actually was a potentially tear inducing grand (Grand Central based) epic love story, but it was so, so good, I didn’t care. In fact, this book drew me in from the first few pages in a way few books do and managed to sustain that level of emotional engagement throughout its not inconsiderable girth. The description features literary comparisons to famous works (as these descriptions are won’t to do) and here they are actually not undeserved, although for me it was also very reminiscent of the movie Age of Adaline, mentioned nowhere, but a comparison in my opinion well deserved. Both tales of timeless women stuck in temporary challenged love stories are very lovely, albeit in their own ways. The lady that isn’t in a blue dress on the cover is Nora Lansing, a 23 year old spirited young woman who, due to a tragic and miraculous set of circumstances, gets stuck in the Grand Central in New York, her presence inextricably connected to a solar spectacle known as Manhattanhenge. There she meets and falls in love with a leverman, a mad wild crazy passionate love affair circumscribed by the seemingly impossible geographical restrictions not to mention familial obligations and then a world war. I probably shouldn’t say much more here, the description says it all, in fact the description gives away too much as descriptions often tend to, I’m glad I didn’t read it prior to reading the book. I wanted to be surprised and I was, pleasantly surprised, delighted, charmed. Actually love, yeah, not too strong of a word, I loved this book, which made some of much frustrations with it all the more…well, frustrating. And please do not read the following if you haven’t read the book, it might give away too much. If you’ve read up to now, you already know I recommend you read this book, but now it’s time for me to vent out some thoughts, so here it goes…Yeah, not everyone gets to ride off into the sunset together, but that doesn’t mean we aalk off into the sun alone, does it? Seriously? Why? Whatever became of love conquers all? Omnia vincit amor my ass. For all its grand romance, this ended up very much being one of those loves that altered when it alteration found. I’m not sure why self sacrificial love is so de rigueur, but frankly it just didn’t seem necessary. Dramatic, yes. But not necessary. Surely there can be found a way for one person in a couple to travel solo and then return to their loved one. My fiancé has done it marvelously. To go through all that the main characters go through and then separate for what seemed like fairly trivial reasons…frustrating. Yes, she would have stayed young, but so what, she would have aged mentally. For a couple that starts off with a 10 year age difference to suddenly make a huge deal out of a 20 year age difference later on seems silly. Yes, that may have been before celebrities have made such thing ubiquitous, but even back in the day it wasn’t unheard of…Chaplin, anyone. Yes, they wouldn’t have had kids, but so what, there are plenty of childless happy couples out there. Plus if Nora was so concerned for her rapidly aging beloved…maybe he was aging out of kid having age anyway. For all the sweeping grand romance of it, for all the waiting and all the challenges and all that magic, for all of it to end over what it ended over seemed to have trivialized their love. In fact it just seemed like two people who have sorted out their priorities and decided to call it quits and for various reasons (mainly because it makes the best story) told themselves and each other it was for their partner’s own good. Which is fine, it’s realistic and there are plenty of stories like that, but this just didn’t seem like that kind of story. This seemed like it ought to rise above all the tedious triviality of life. I mean, it had magic, real freaking magic. So you would have expected more. Well, anyway I did. I expected more. I was so engaged with the characters and their story, I actually wished them a proper fairy tale ending or something like it. After all, Age of Adaline worked it out. Plus the author in her afterword said she based it on her own relationship, which despite its challenges did not in fact come undone, so it made it all the more unfair that it should work out that way for the couple in the book. I mean, what sort of a message is that? Vampire Bill had to die to free Sookie Stackhouse to love and breed in an ordinary way. Or, more recently and of a much higher quality of entertainment, Jackson Maine went and offed himself to give his wife a chance at musical success. All this self sacrificial (or as the case in book, faux self sacrificial) crap can be packaged and sold as romantic, sure. But for me personally it seems that the greater romance is one that conquers challenges and works despite them, not one where you can glamorously walk off into the sun. There is much to be said about the selfishness of selflessness, but then again this already might be my longest review ever, so I should probably wrap it up. If you read the entire thing…wow and thank you. May this rant have enlightened or at least entertained you. I did love this book, despite all this. Thanks Netgalley.
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  • Elaine
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for a Kindle ARC of Time After Time. I really enjoyed The Time Traveler's Wife so the premise of Time After Time intrigued me.** Minor spoilers ahead **Nora Lansing is a young woman who meets a young leverman named Joe Reynolds at Grand Central after the Great Depression. The two have an instant connection but Joe will soon discover that Nora is no ordinary lady.Their love will transcend time and boundaries but what do you do when love is not enough?Th Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for a Kindle ARC of Time After Time. I really enjoyed The Time Traveler's Wife so the premise of Time After Time intrigued me.** Minor spoilers ahead **Nora Lansing is a young woman who meets a young leverman named Joe Reynolds at Grand Central after the Great Depression. The two have an instant connection but Joe will soon discover that Nora is no ordinary lady.Their love will transcend time and boundaries but what do you do when love is not enough?There were many things I liked about Time After Time, including:1. The research that went into depicting Grand Central during the 1930s and how it grew into the central transportation hub it is now2. As a native New Yorker, I loved the depiction of New York during the Great Depression, how the community and families struggled to survive, war times and how it brought the community and people together3. I liked Nora and Joe, their chemistry and their unconventional love story. Who wants to be like everybody else?4. I really liked how the author used the science of Manhattanhenge and how it was the portal to Nora's existence5. A not quite there ghost story written with heart and warmth that is very easy to suspend disbelief forWhat I did not like:The cliche almost romance that developed between Joe and Faye, his brother Finn's wife, when Finn goes off to war after Pearl Harbor is bombed.Does every story that takes place around wartime have some kind of stereotypical romance with a sibling's spouse?I found this trope disrespectful to Nora, especially if Joe is the kind of decent, level headed guy he is depicted to be and who loves and cares about Nora so much, why would he be swayed by Faye so easily?Because she's alive and she's there? That's a poor excuse.And when he realizes he and Faye are not suited to each other, he pines for Nora once again. What is he, 16? I hated this part of the book and made me question Joe's integrity. He began as a mature, kind, responsible man but this act made him look like every other cliche dick I read about.Second, there was a bit too much filler such as when Nora takes up painting. I understand its a part of character development but there was just so much everyday routine that didn't sound monotonous and it can be tiresome.This was to be expected because Joe and Nora's life is restricted to Grand Central and the Biltmore because she is tied to the station. The book could use another edit to tighten the pacing. There were parts toward the end of the book that dragged the story down.I did enjoy the parts when Joe and Nora went apartment hunting or figuring out how Manhattanhenge was the cause of Nora's reappearance. These routine couple activities were a reminder that their relationship was anything but ordinary.Overall, I enjoyed this story, the setting of a post-Depression era New York City and Nora and Joe, likable, personable characters.
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  • Seema Rao
    January 1, 1970
    Poignant ~ Enchanting ~ Sweettl;dr : Death doesn't stop love. This is a non-traditional romance novel, if there is one. It is a really sweet tale about love during the Depression (and later) in New York City. The writing has a gentleness that is appealing. The well-crafted characters feel so real that their struggles pull at the reader's heart-strings. I don't want to share the secrets of the story, but I promise this isn't a scary book. It's just a sweet story of love and how "working out" can Poignant ~ Enchanting ~ Sweettl;dr : Death doesn't stop love. This is a non-traditional romance novel, if there is one. It is a really sweet tale about love during the Depression (and later) in New York City. The writing has a gentleness that is appealing. The well-crafted characters feel so real that their struggles pull at the reader's heart-strings. I don't want to share the secrets of the story, but I promise this isn't a scary book. It's just a sweet story of love and how "working out" can be subjective. This would be a great read for romance lovers and for historical romance lovers. Wonderful read. Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review. Seema Rao Write : Instagram| Blog| Twitter|
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  • Karen Kay
    January 1, 1970
    I received this from Netgalley.com for a review. December 1937, Joe meets Nora in Grand Central Terminal. She seems slightly out of place and off kilter. Joe is captivated by Nora from her first electric touch and he despairs when he tries to walk her home and she disappears. I suppose being stuck in time would create some déjà vu situations, but I got rather bored with Joe and Nora's cliche romance. 2.75 ☆
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  • Ariel
    January 1, 1970
    Lisa Grunwald has written my favorite kind of novel. Set within the wondrous boundaries of Grand Central Terminal, Time After Time is the story of Joe and Nora, the love they find amidst impossible circumstances, their fight to stay together, and the great sacrifices they make along the way. I utterly loved this clever, charming, hopeful tale of true love against all odds.True story: a friend got an early copy of this book and passed it on to me knowing that I'm a sucker for time travel stories. Lisa Grunwald has written my favorite kind of novel. Set within the wondrous boundaries of Grand Central Terminal, Time After Time is the story of Joe and Nora, the love they find amidst impossible circumstances, their fight to stay together, and the great sacrifices they make along the way. I utterly loved this clever, charming, hopeful tale of true love against all odds.True story: a friend got an early copy of this book and passed it on to me knowing that I'm a sucker for time travel stories. Not only did I love the book, I loved it SO much that I sent an unsolicited endorsement to the publisher and they ended up using the above quote on the cover. So there you have it. Serendipity for the win!
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  • Peg
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to the publisher, Random House, for an Advance Uncorrected Proof, in exchange for my honest opinion.If you are a fan of time travel, you'll enjoy this historical romance by Lisa Grunwald. It's set in the 1930s (think The Great Depression) and 1940s (think World War II) at Grand Central Station (GCS) in New York City. It's based on a legendary story about a young woman who was killed in a gas explosion at GCS but reappeared below the gold clock every year. The author has done a fantastic j Thanks to the publisher, Random House, for an Advance Uncorrected Proof, in exchange for my honest opinion.If you are a fan of time travel, you'll enjoy this historical romance by Lisa Grunwald. It's set in the 1930s (think The Great Depression) and 1940s (think World War II) at Grand Central Station (GCS) in New York City. It's based on a legendary story about a young woman who was killed in a gas explosion at GCS but reappeared below the gold clock every year. The author has done a fantastic job of incorporating Manhattanhenge, the solar spectacle that occurs when the sun aligns perfectly centered between buildings along the east-west streets in Manhattan. This is fascinating stuff to learn.The protagonists are Nora, a 23-year-old artist who does not age, and Joe, a leverman at GCS who is 10 years older than Nora at the beginning of their unusual love story. Nora and Joe find and lose each other throughout the novel but when Nora is present, she is restricted to within 700 feet of GCS because when she goes beyond that, she "flickers" away. Since most of this novel takes place within GCS, the author had to have done a tremendous amount of research to depict the scenes so vividly. It was so easy to imagine the activities, clothing worn, and atmosphere.I knew very little about this novel and I think that's why I was pleasantly surprised, so I suggest that you do not read too many reviews or descriptions. A Q&A with Lisa Grunwald is at the end of this book and I recommend her comments about her main incentives in writing this novel.
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  • Ashley
    January 1, 1970
    Many thanks to Netgalley and Random House for the chance to read this novel.I immediately had to request this book when I saw a review on Instagram from Top Shelf Book Reviews. This book sounded like it would be right up my alley, especially since The Time Traveler's Wife and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button are two of my very favorite stories ever. I can't even explain my excitement when I was accepted for this book - I immediately dropped everything and started reading. It featured everythi Many thanks to Netgalley and Random House for the chance to read this novel.I immediately had to request this book when I saw a review on Instagram from Top Shelf Book Reviews. This book sounded like it would be right up my alley, especially since The Time Traveler's Wife and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button are two of my very favorite stories ever. I can't even explain my excitement when I was accepted for this book - I immediately dropped everything and started reading. It featured everything I love, from a World War II time period to interesting historical facts and a unique love story. Unfortunately, at about 35% through this story, I had to take a break. I needed to catch up on ARCs that were publishing soon and this book was slow going for me. I would read for a bit and be intrigued and then the story would slowly lose my attention again thereafter. There was just something missing, not allowing the story to capture my full concentration.Finally, as April was ending, I decided to pick this book back up and see if I could fall in love with this story. As much as hoped, there was still something missing from the reading experience for me. I liked the characters well enough, I thought the idea for the plot was interesting and was anxious to see what would happen. However, there were too many time jumps, too many insignificant secondary characters, and an overall disjointed feel that kept this book from being everything I needed it to be. I often find the books with the most unique plots are victims of poor execution. In this case, I didn't feel the sweeping romance I hoped I would be caught up in. This was supposed to be an epic love story, one that defies the laws of time and age. Yet I didn't feel that connection between the characters in the way that was needed, which left me feeling utterly disappointed.I thoroughly enjoyed the historical aspect of this story and the chance to learn things about Grand Central Station I didn't know about prior to reading. I also loved the significance of Manhattanhenge, something else that has somehow escaped my knowledge all of these years as well. Overall, this story had some very interesting attributes but I was hoping for better. It seems this book already has quite mixed reviews. I recommend giving it a try for yourself if it sounds like something you'd enjoy. Pick up your copy on June 11th.
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  • Dana Blazsek
    January 1, 1970
    ⭐⭐⭐.75 stars— Time After Time by Lisa Grunwald•Thank you to Random House and Netgalley for a copy of this book! ❤•One day Nora appears at Grand Central where Joe works. And after talking with her she disappears. This happens each year at the same time. Nora died in 1925 yet here she is in the 1930s. How did she get here and how can Joe keep her here so they can be together?•What I loved: I really loved the characters (except Faye). Joe and his love for Nora was deep and real and made me emotiona ⭐️⭐️⭐️.75 stars— Time After Time by Lisa Grunwald•Thank you to Random House and Netgalley for a copy of this book! ❤️•One day Nora appears at Grand Central where Joe works. And after talking with her she disappears. This happens each year at the same time. Nora died in 1925 yet here she is in the 1930s. How did she get here and how can Joe keep her here so they can be together?•What I loved: I really loved the characters (except Faye). Joe and his love for Nora was deep and real and made me emotional times. Nora’s love for Joe and understanding of what he needed made me extremely emotional at times. I loved how Grundwald carried out the plot because I found it to be original and loved how it tied into history! But that ending. That’s all I’ll say!•What I didn’t: I know Faye’s role in this story but I did not like her at all. Also, what put this below four stars for me was the slowness of the plot movement at times. Parts 2& 3 felt like an absolute eternity and I felt myself putting the book down. Parts 4 & 5 made up for that small blemish whole heartedly.•Recommend for anyone who loves historical fiction love stories and slight magic in their story!•#Bookstagram #booksofinstagram #bookshelf #booklover #bookreview #bookworm #booknerd #bookcover #bookish #bibliophile #booklife #bookstagrammer #bookaddict #pagestoreadfl #bookaholic #bookblogger #bookreviewer #bookrecommendations #igreads #bookaholic #ilovebooks #booklove #teachersofinstagram #bookshark
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  • Lolly K Dandeneau
    January 1, 1970
    via my blog: https://bookstalkerblog.wordpress.com/'What Nora had never shaken was the memory of fighting to come out of the ether.'Nora Lansing knows where she wants to go, just not how to get there. She is young, ‘out of place’ and railroad worker (leverman) Joe Reynolds is captivated watching the confusion flit across her face in Grand Central Terminal. “She made him think of the cats in the tunnels far beneath the concourse: coiled up and waiting, all energy, no telling what they were going via my blog: https://bookstalkerblog.wordpress.com/'What Nora had never shaken was the memory of fighting to come out of the ether.'Nora Lansing knows where she wants to go, just not how to get there. She is young, ‘out of place’ and railroad worker (leverman) Joe Reynolds is captivated watching the confusion flit across her face in Grand Central Terminal. “She made him think of the cats in the tunnels far beneath the concourse: coiled up and waiting, all energy, no telling what they were going to do.” A funny word that, ‘energy’. For what else can drive her? This ‘old fashioned woman’, so charming in dark times is all brightness, but something doesn’t fit. He doesn’t yet know that she is not just as graceful but as mysterious as a feline too. Her clothes really are out of date, though they do tell of wealth, maybe it’s a costume? What does he know of fashion anyway? It is 1937, it is their first encounter but will not be the last.Joe’s desire to see Stonehenge makes the beauty of Manhattanhenge (or the Manhattan Solstice) nearly as awe inspiring. For Nora, it could well be the source of the strange turn her life has taken. What could the alignment of sunrise and sunset over Manhattan’s street grid have to do with her being trapped in time and place? Is she a ghost? No, she can’t have this much life in her and be dead. Ghosts can’t share a meal with a man in a coffee shop, exactly a year after meeting him. It’s not her beloved Paris where she had her first taste of freedom, but the grilled cheese and the company is delightful! Joe may well be the first man to really see Nora, to wonder at her very existence. With her laughter dancing through his ears, he is falling in love. Just when he plays protector, she disappears on him. Then, a phone call he makes to Nora turns his life upside down.People have seen her, he’s one of many, the first week of December always, the same place where he first set eyes upon her. She never stays. The reason is unfathomable, impossible!1924 Nora is happy to be on her own in Paris, where being lost is a pleasure. An artist whose lucky day leads her to work as an assistant to the owner of a small art gallery, finding undiscovered talent, Paris is full of promise. There is no better place to be than Paris to hone her skills, where the light is best, where everywhere the eye settles it is like a painting, beauty abounds. It doesn’t hurt that she is a socialite, and has the means for such adventures but it isn’t to last, for home is calling to her and she must return to her beloved father. As soon as she arrives upon the ocean liner, she rushes to her father in hospital. Seeing him solidifies her need to be home.Forced to take the subway after, when cabs are nowhere in sight, there is an accident, the train isn’t the only thing that derails. The delay takes years. When Nora opens her eyes, she immediately wants to contact her mother, but is met with the dreadful reality that there is no place for her in the world anymore, and time has moved on without her. This is a love story, certainly, but for me it related a horror, what is worse than being locked out of time, than having to prove who you are? Waiting for salvation that may never come? What would be more heartbreaking to a mother? Seriously, I had a lump in my throat when Nora is trying to contact her mom. If Nora gives Joe’s life meaning, he is the sole spot of joy she can look forward to upon every return, after so much hope seemed lost.Nora’s unbelievable story opens before Joe’s eyes. With the World Fair being hosted in New York, focused on the future “the world of tomorrow” it’s strange to be stuck in the yesterday and wrapped up in Nora. Once happy to wait for life to unfold, Nora has changed everything. The waiting is torture, time crawls when he waits for her to come back. No one has answers, not even an old Jewish woman who plays at being a gypsy. Of course they find each other again, and they steal as much time as they can. The fear is always there, what if she disappears again? They figure out a way to keep Nora anchored, living in the Biltmore hotel but life can’t be confined within a set distance for any of us. Naturally the best laid plans go awry when you take into account the rest of the world, Joe’s family, the fate of the city, war. Nothing remains stationary! Would that we could protect our love, whether we’re haunted or not. Can Joe and Nora truly live like this and what happens if she never ages? What are the choices we have to make, the things we must give up in order to embrace our fate?A haunting of the heart.Publication Date: June 11, 2019Random House
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  • Jane
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to the author, LibraryThing and Random House.I love historical books especially set in the 1930s and 1940s. I loved this book so much. I can't recall a time I've ever read a supernatural book or a love story like this. This book is the best as a love story between Nora and Joe starting when Joe was working at the Grand Central Terminal as a lineman underground when he met Nora and when he tries to walk her home she just disappears. Come to find out that she's living sort of in between liv Thanks to the author, LibraryThing and Random House.I love historical books especially set in the 1930s and 1940s. I loved this book so much. I can't recall a time I've ever read a supernatural book or a love story like this. This book is the best as a love story between Nora and Joe starting when Joe was working at the Grand Central Terminal as a lineman underground when he met Nora and when he tries to walk her home she just disappears. Come to find out that she's living sort of in between living and dying due to a train fire in 1925 at Grand Central Terminal. When he tries to walk her home, she walks into the sunlight after a certain amount of space, she disappears. Time passes and years go by, and she comes to life once again due to a special sunrise. She comes back to Joe time after time and they live their life together until she disappears again finally for good telling him it's for his own good and he should live a life the way he should be since he's never traveled anywhere in his lifetime. The ending was sad and I had to stop a few times to dry my tears.
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  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    Not every author can write a time-travel book that leaves you wondering "how did she do that?" Lisa Grunwald just did. In the aftermath of a train wreck at Grand Central Station, Nora Lansing finds herself stuck in time - unable to die from her injuries, unable to live more than a few minutes after she resurfaces, fully alive, seen by railroad worker Joe Reynolds one day before she vanishes from the platform. The mystery of this beautiful flapper-clad woman in Depression-era New York haunts him, Not every author can write a time-travel book that leaves you wondering "how did she do that?" Lisa Grunwald just did. In the aftermath of a train wreck at Grand Central Station, Nora Lansing finds herself stuck in time - unable to die from her injuries, unable to live more than a few minutes after she resurfaces, fully alive, seen by railroad worker Joe Reynolds one day before she vanishes from the platform. The mystery of this beautiful flapper-clad woman in Depression-era New York haunts him, and he resolves to find her.How he does, how they develop a life together that is dependent on place and circumstance, and the true phenomenon of Manhattanhenge, combine in this shimmering romance. Historical and cultural details about Grand Central Station add to the wonder and beauty. Highly recommended. Thanks to NetGalley for allowing me to review this book as an ARC.
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  • Cynthia
    January 1, 1970
    This was a really good book. I enjoyed it. It's the most believable ghost story I've ever read. A woman killed in a subway accident keeps returning to Grand Central Station. Great details about the history and architecture of the station.
  • Donna
    January 1, 1970
    A story of an improbable love, touched with the magic of Manhattanhenge at Grand Central station in New York. The love between Nora and Joe transcends time and spans decades. It is historical fiction, touching on the major events of both WWI and WWII, and the everyday life of those times. It is also a story of true love and sacrifices made for your true love. I thoroughly enjoyed the book, and its unusual concept, and its memorable characters. It was beautifully written! Thanks to the publisher A story of an improbable love, touched with the magic of Manhattanhenge at Grand Central station in New York. The love between Nora and Joe transcends time and spans decades. It is historical fiction, touching on the major events of both WWI and WWII, and the everyday life of those times. It is also a story of true love and sacrifices made for your true love. I thoroughly enjoyed the book, and its unusual concept, and its memorable characters. It was beautifully written! Thanks to the publisher for my ARC. (and I had never before heard of Manhattanhenge-fascinating)
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  • Lindsey
    January 1, 1970
    I was initially drawn in by the cover of this book (covers matter, y'all!!), and then the tagline snagged me for real: "A magical love story, inspired by the legend of a woman who vanished from Grand Central Terminal, sweeps readers from the 1920s to World War II and beyond, in the spirit of The Time Traveler’s Wife and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button."I MEAN. HELLO.This book delivered on everything it promised and more - I was totally spellbound from almost the very first sentence and there I was initially drawn in by the cover of this book (covers matter, y'all!!), and then the tagline snagged me for real: "A magical love story, inspired by the legend of a woman who vanished from Grand Central Terminal, sweeps readers from the 1920s to World War II and beyond, in the spirit of The Time Traveler’s Wife and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button."I MEAN. HELLO.This book delivered on everything it promised and more - I was totally spellbound from almost the very first sentence and there wasn't a single chapter of this book that I wanted to end. If anything, I had to force myself to read slower because the details of the book were so beautiful when you really stopped to savor them. My absolute favorite thing, even more than the wonderful love story of Nora & Joe, was everything Grand Central. I love that the author was able to make the setting a character in it's own right, and I was fascinated at all of the information she was able to share about GCT without it ever feeling like an info dump of "Super Interesting Factoids About The Grand Central Terminal." The history of the terminal itself is so much more rich and nuanced than I knew - I did not know that you could reach the Biltmore Hotel from the terminal, nor did I know that there used to be a 242 seat theater that, for over 30 years (!), showed newsreels, short films, and cartoons. The information about Manhattanhenge, or the Manhattan Solstice, and how it briefly connected so beautifully and meaningfully to Grand Central Terminal's arched windows, was also so interesting - I wish I could have seen that aspect of the phenomenon!I had such an affection for both Joe and Nora, and their story was so great to read. For as complicated as their love was, they communicated well and often, and were open with one another about their worries, hopes, dreams, and wishes (which is always refreshing!). The magic and mystery surrounding Nora's sudden appearance was done SO WELL, I found myself going back and reading previous parts of the book to see if there were any small Easter Eggs that I had missed (and maybe just wanting the book to last a little longer). Also, it's important to note that Nora is probably one of my new favorite heroines: brash, feisty, loving, passionate, stubborn, fierce, independent, smart, and vulnerable. She was such a well drawn out character, and I was never ready to leave her POV. (Joe's pretty great, too.)I'm not sure exactly what you would call this book if you were to classify it - there's definitely bits of historical fiction in here, but there's also a bit of maybe, magical realism? or Science Fiction? or Fantasy? I could see arguments for any of these, but I think I would have to call it a Magical Realism Historical Fiction. Sure. That's what I'm going with. But however you define it, it's 100% worth the read. (Also, I think this would make an excellent book club pick - so much to unpack here! Especially the ending. Yowza.)
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  • Jan
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book free from Netgalley in return for an unbiased review. There was a lot for me to like in this book. In the first place, it is a historical novel, set during the last years of the Great War. Almost all of the action takes place inside Grand Central Terminal and the author does a wonderful job of painting the details of that location for us - the busyness of the place, the characters, the sounds and the general atmosphere. It is the terminal on a clear cold morning in 1937 that I received this book free from Netgalley in return for an unbiased review. There was a lot for me to like in this book. In the first place, it is a historical novel, set during the last years of the Great War. Almost all of the action takes place inside Grand Central Terminal and the author does a wonderful job of painting the details of that location for us - the busyness of the place, the characters, the sounds and the general atmosphere. It is the terminal on a clear cold morning in 1937 that Joe Reynolds, a lever-man responsible for ensuring the trains arrive at the massive station on the correct tracks, meets Nora Lansing. She looks slightly out of place, and Nora immediately captures Joe's attention. Significantly it is the morning of 'Manhattenhenge' when the sun rises in perfect alignment with the skyscrapers and buildings of New York city. Within a short time of the meeting, Nora disappears leaving Joe wondering about her. Fast forward two years, and Joe again meets Nora at the same place and time on the morning of Manhattenhenge. This leads me to the second thing I really enjoyed in this book - the concept of time and how it affects the characters in this book. Joe and Nora meet and part several times over several years, and together they work to understand Nora's connection to the Terminal, to Manhattenhenge and why she appears trapped in between time at the terminal. They live together for a time at the terminal, using the place as a city with its restaurants, lounges and facilities. They discover the limitations and boundaries placed on Nora, and how she came to be there. The path of true love doesn't always run straight in this novel, and the arrival of the second world war changes Joe and Nora's relationship dramatically. We get to understand what you must do if you really love someone. I also loved the way science was used to try and explain what was going on. I found the book very enjoyable - I didn't want to put it down and felt invested in the characters. A great read.
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  • Mary Garrett
    January 1, 1970
    Lisa Grunwald's TIME AFTER TIME is an intriguing and well-written historical, other-worldly romance, full of questions and mysteries, impossible, but in the context of this story, believable and real. Could Nora’s return from the dead, limited as it is, be called truly living? Is Joe sacrificing too much of life to be with her? Don’t all couples give up other possibilities, other lives, to be together? I found myself wanting to visit Grand Central Station, to view the East/West alignment of the Lisa Grunwald's TIME AFTER TIME is an intriguing and well-written historical, other-worldly romance, full of questions and mysteries, impossible, but in the context of this story, believable and real. Could Nora’s return from the dead, limited as it is, be called truly living? Is Joe sacrificing too much of life to be with her? Don’t all couples give up other possibilities, other lives, to be together? I found myself wanting to visit Grand Central Station, to view the East/West alignment of the sun nicknamed Manhattanhenge, and I did not want to put this book down. Insights into the work and technology for keeping the trains running were fascinating, as was the description of the many shops and businesses within the Grand Central buildings, like a city within itself. The efforts to care for the soldiers coming through were heart-warming, as was the rationale of Victory Gardens, to feed civilians so farm-grown food could more sufficiently feed the soldiers. My heart went out to Joe’s mother, telling her boys that war is not a game, a truth they had to learn for themselves through their own losses, a truth we perhaps still need to learn.The Q&A at the end of the book adds further insights into the background and process, enhancing an already wonderful book. Brava!
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  • Lorna
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars! A romance, magic, and a story centered around Grand Central Station in the 1930's and 1940's all combined together to tell a bittersweet story. Add in almost love at first sight and a tragedy and I was hooked. 3.5 Stars!I'm a sucker for books that feature a magical element so as soon as I read the blurb for this book, I knew I wanted to read it. It's going to be hard to review this without spoilers, but I will try my best. Joe works at Grand Central Station in New York City. He's a le 3.5 stars! A romance, magic, and a story centered around Grand Central Station in the 1930's and 1940's all combined together to tell a bittersweet story. Add in almost love at first sight and a tragedy and I was hooked. 3.5 Stars!I'm a sucker for books that feature a magical element so as soon as I read the blurb for this book, I knew I wanted to read it. It's going to be hard to review this without spoilers, but I will try my best. Joe works at Grand Central Station in New York City. He's a leverman, otherwise known as one of the many men it took back then to keep all the trains on the correct tracks. It's not an easy job, but it's 1937 and it's good work for that time period as America is still dealing with the depression. One December day he sees a beautiful young woman alone in the station at daybreak. She's not wearing a coat and seems a bit lost. Joe is a good guy and he approaches her to try and help. The station is not a great place for unaccompanied young women. Nora has a huge secret. When she meets Joe, she has a hard time talking to the personable, helpful man. She really can't answer most of his questions. Her life is pretty mysterious to even her. He has to leave her to go to work and doesn't see her again for another year. Both had never forgotten each other and their previous meeting. There's definitely an attraction going on.I enjoyed Joe and Nora as characters. The author is very true to the time period right down to the words used back then, like calling someone swell if you liked them. The style of dress was also addressed for the period. Nora has been raised in the upper crust of society in the city, while Joe was from Queens. She's twenty two and a college graduate just home from months spent in Paris, while he is thirty two and has never been farther than some of the NYC suburbs. None of that even mattered to them. The main side character would have to be Grand Central Station itself. I really had no idea how huge the station is and had even less of an idea about all the history surrounding the structure. Of course, I have seen movies that have scenes that take place there, but that is just scratching the surface. To make it even more interesting, we as readers learn about the workings of the station from an historical point of view. I'm sure a lot is different now.I've got to hand it to the author. The sheer amount of research that she had to have done to take this story from the thirty's to the forty's, to the station back then, World War II when it happens and all the changes that the station incurs because of that, played a big part as well. The premise was well thought out and for the most part well executed, but not without problems. What started as a book I thought I was going to adore, became a pretty slow read for me and I kept putting it down. Don't get me wrong, it was well written, but had a bit too much of the backstory of the station and the war so it lagged for me. It was interesting, but maybe a bit too much for what I had hoped to be a romantic story.I've kept the story details mysterious and I hope if you decide to read this that you don't read any spoilers. To me, my favorite part was finding out about the magic and the mystery. I also enjoyed the romance to a point. Enough said about that.Recommended to women's fiction and adult romance readers that enjoy magical elements in their stories. I don't think I will be forgetting this one anytime soon. I received a copy of this book from Net Galley in return for a fair and honest review
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  • Chrissie
    January 1, 1970
    A classically sweet tale of love under circumstances out of the ordinary, Time After Time creates a story both simple and anything but. A story that could’ve starred Judy Garland and Robert Taylor back in the glory days of cinema following WWII.Grunwald has crafted two lead characters who have endearingly remarkable chemistry. From the first time Joe Reynolds and Nora Lansing meet up, you can’t help but cheer for them to get together.The obstacle keeping them apart isn’t the typical one, and it A classically sweet tale of love under circumstances out of the ordinary, Time After Time creates a story both simple and anything but. A story that could’ve starred Judy Garland and Robert Taylor back in the glory days of cinema following WWII.Grunwald has crafted two lead characters who have endearingly remarkable chemistry. From the first time Joe Reynolds and Nora Lansing meet up, you can’t help but cheer for them to get together.The obstacle keeping them apart isn’t the typical one, and it isn’t even the larger issues happening around them—the Great Depression and World War II feature as backdrops to this heartwarming tale that stays, not only stateside, but grounded in New York’s famous Grand Central Terminal. The hurdle that Joe and Nora must overcome is the distance created between them by the same phenomenon that allows her to remain corporeal, despite her death years before their 1937 meeting.Grunwald clearly did excellent research in order to create the atmosphere for the 1930’s and 1940’s Grand Central Terminal. In that way, this story overlaps nicely with what I imagined of GCT from reading The Masterpiece by Fiona Davis. Also included is a phenomenon called Manhattanhenge—a time when the setting or rising sun aligns perfectly with the grid pattern of streets and buildings in New York City for the summer and winter solstices, respectfully (similar in the way it does for Stonehenge, hence its name).Which actually leads me to a bit of a beef I have with this book. A quick internet search for this term (doesn’t everyone look up interesting facts and tidbits when reading?) shows me that this is a term coined by astrophysicist, Neil deGrasse Tyson. Meaning this couldn’t logically have been used some 60-70 years beforehand. While I might allow a little leeway for the author, it’s really hard here because the naming of it and apparent popularity only seems to be after the turn of the most recent century. I’m not saying no one noticed this lovely sight before the year 2000, but I am saying that the casual way Joe Reynolds throws this term around really seems to be a leap here.Despite that science snafu, Time After Time did bring a nice element of discovery and investigation as Joe and Nora work to understand what allows her to stay, what makes her suddenly disappear, and how she became trapped in the first place. With Joe pitting scientific applications against his religious background in order to explain the unexplained provided some of the deeper thoughts from this book. And once the pair of them established a working perimeter for Nora to stay bound within, the story itself became more grounded and steadied.The book’s blurb totes this as being, “in the spirit of The Time Traveler's Wife and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button and Six Other Stories,” I’m not sure I agree with that categorization. While both of those feature a character sort of out of their time, The Time Traveler’s Wife is literally about time travel, and Benjamin Button is about a man who ages backwards through his lifetime. Whereas Time After Time is quite simply a ghost story with a bit of the added element of Nora being out of her time.What Time After Time could’ve used a bit more of was more in-depth characterizations. There were many instances when both Nora and Joe felt more fleshed out than others. For instance, Grunwald states in her Author’s Note that the times when she is housebound because of her multiple sclerosis, her home feels more like a safe zone rather than a cage. That moment felt fully translated for Nora and her situation, and helped really finished that element of her character. It felt true to life because it is and it was a moment for the book when Grunwald was showing more than telling. This was a problem (inconsistently so) over a good bit of the book. I also had a problem with many of her tertiary characters—particularly those who fill the pages from the Grand Central Terminal. Many of these characters, from the preacher to the café owner to the fortune teller, seemed to serve merely as bodies with which to interact during the many comings, goings, and doings of Joe and Nora.Despite its flaws, Time After Time was a darling and charming story with an interesting premise and great atmosphere. A transportive and timeless ghost story, taking the reader back to the Grand Central Terminal of the 1930’s and 1940’s, along with a dash of 1920’s Paris to boot.I received this book for free from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This affected neither my opinion of the book, nor the content of my review.
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  • Marie Aitchison
    January 1, 1970
    Time After Time is a sweet love story that stuck with me long after completing the book. I never realized a tale about a ghost could be so romantic. I’m a fan of historical fiction but have never read anything about the New York Grand Central Terminal station prior to this book. I found it to be so original and refreshing. After reading this, I had to look up all the ghost stories involving the train station and there are actually quite a bit! It was fascinating to read about. However, the story Time After Time is a sweet love story that stuck with me long after completing the book. I never realized a tale about a ghost could be so romantic. I’m a fan of historical fiction but have never read anything about the New York Grand Central Terminal station prior to this book. I found it to be so original and refreshing. After reading this, I had to look up all the ghost stories involving the train station and there are actually quite a bit! It was fascinating to read about. However, the story itself it not really about ghosts. It’s a love story through and through; one that transcends the rules of time. Breathtaking.
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of the novel from NetGalley in exchange for my honest review. I've been so excited for this novel from the first time I heard about it and it did not disappoint. This novel was so different, in a good way. It revolved around Joe, an everyday, normal man, who meets and falls in love with Nora, a rich, exotic beauty. Then, she disappears. However, that's just the tip of this story. This novel was equal parts historical romance, fantasy, and pondering life's big questions. Re I received a free copy of the novel from NetGalley in exchange for my honest review. I've been so excited for this novel from the first time I heard about it and it did not disappoint. This novel was so different, in a good way. It revolved around Joe, an everyday, normal man, who meets and falls in love with Nora, a rich, exotic beauty. Then, she disappears. However, that's just the tip of this story. This novel was equal parts historical romance, fantasy, and pondering life's big questions. Reading this novel made me long for the past and made my heart break. The novel proves that there are no perfectly right choices in life, just the ones that will do the least damage or make the most people happy. It was well paced and perfectly timed. It shows that we are all human and no one person is truly perfect. It also examines our nation during one of our darkest times, World War II, and how we survive while the world is in peril. For anyone who is searching for meaning in the world, or what love truly is, or how a life is built and sustains, I highly recommend this novel.
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  • Krissa
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this beautiful love story between Joe and Nora stretched across time in 1920s-1940s NYC's Grand Central Station. This was an enchanting story and I especially loved the historical aspect and getting to feel like I was transported back in time and able to experience Grand Central Station during this historically significant time. I highly recommend if you love historical fiction and novels with a strong sense of place, or if you just enjoy a good love story.Thank you Net Galley f I really enjoyed this beautiful love story between Joe and Nora stretched across time in 1920s-1940s NYC's Grand Central Station. This was an enchanting story and I especially loved the historical aspect and getting to feel like I was transported back in time and able to experience Grand Central Station during this historically significant time. I highly recommend if you love historical fiction and novels with a strong sense of place, or if you just enjoy a good love story.Thank you Net Galley for the opportunity to read and review "Time After Time".
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  • Sheena
    January 1, 1970
    I won an arc of this from a Goodreads giveaway.Oh, my heart. This book beautifully portrays a couple as they struggle to overcome otherworldly circumstances and live as happily as they can, despite looming uncertainties and the tragedies of wartime. I didn’t know what to expect going into this one, but I really enjoyed it.
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  • Laurice
    January 1, 1970
    This is a very good concept for a story! Ive never read anything with a similar story line. I enjoyed it immensely even though the ending left me with a melancholy feeling.
  • Elaine
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you net galley for the advance read copy of this novel. I enjoyed this time travel novel that has lots of historic tidbits along the way. This was a fairly quick read and would recommend.
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