When You Find My Body
When Geraldine "Gerry" Largay (AT trail name, Inchworm) first went missing on the Appalachian Trail in remote western Maine in 2013, the people of Maine were wrought with concern. When she was not found, the family, the wardens, and the Navy personnel who searched for her were devastated. The Maine Warden Service continued to follow leads for more than a year. They never completely gave up the search. Two years after her disappearance, her bones and scattered possessions were found by chance by two surveyors. She was on the U.S. Navy's SERE (Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape) School land, about 2,100 feet from the Appalachian Trail. This book tells the story of events preceding Geraldine Largay's vanishing in July 2013, while hiking the Appalachian Trail in Maine, what caused her to go astray, and the massive search and rescue operation that followed. Her disappearance sparked the largest lost-person search in Maine history, which culminated in her being presumed dead. She was never again seen alive. The author was one of the hundreds of volunteers who searched for her. Gerry's story is one of heartbreak, most assuredly, but is also one of perseverance, determination, and faith. For her family and the searchers, especially the Maine Warden Service, it is also a story of grave sorrow. Marrying the joys and hardship of life in the outdoors, as well as exploring the search & rescue community, When You Find My Body examines dying with grace and dignity. There are lessons in the story, both large and small. Lessons that may well save lives in the future.

When You Find My Body Details

TitleWhen You Find My Body
Author
ReleaseJun 1st, 2019
PublisherDown East Books
ISBN-139781608936908
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Travel, Environment, Nature

When You Find My Body Review

  • Valerity (Val)
    January 1, 1970
    Gerry Largay had a dream to hike the Appalachian Trail and at age sixty-six she was thrilled to finally be doing it. She’d started out hiking with her good friend Jane Lee, and Gerry’s husband George served as support crew. Part way through the journey Jane had a family emergency and had to return home. Gerry decided to hike on alone. She and George met and made friends with many hikers along the way, as George dropped her off and hiked in part way with her some mornings, and drove ahead to the Gerry Largay had a dream to hike the Appalachian Trail and at age sixty-six she was thrilled to finally be doing it. She’d started out hiking with her good friend Jane Lee, and Gerry’s husband George served as support crew. Part way through the journey Jane had a family emergency and had to return home. Gerry decided to hike on alone. She and George met and made friends with many hikers along the way, as George dropped her off and hiked in part way with her some mornings, and drove ahead to the next crossroad meeting spot then hiked in and met her.Then, there was the fateful day when Geraldine became lost along the trail and everything changed.I found this to be a very well written book and a very good read. Readers of Strayed’s ‘WILD’ would likely enjoy it, but the sad ending is obviously there. The book showed a great deal of research was involved and that made it very interesting to me, as I am happy as long as I’m learning new things. This had plenty of that in it on many subjects. Advance electronic review copy was provided by NetGalley, author D. Dauphinee, and the publisher.My BookZone blog:https://wordpress.com/post/bookblog20...
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  • Linda Strong
    January 1, 1970
    Geraldine Largay hiked the Appalachian Trail in 2013. That's where she disappeared. She was presumed dead after a year of searches produced no body, no clues to what happened. This case became the largest lost-person search in Maine history.Two years after her disappearance , her bones and scattered possessions were found by chance. She was on the U.S. Navy’s SERE (Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape) School land, about 2,100 feet from the Appalachian Trail.This author was one of the hundr Geraldine Largay hiked the Appalachian Trail in 2013. That's where she disappeared. She was presumed dead after a year of searches produced no body, no clues to what happened. This case became the largest lost-person search in Maine history.Two years after her disappearance , her bones and scattered possessions were found by chance. She was on the U.S. Navy’s SERE (Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape) School land, about 2,100 feet from the Appalachian Trail.This author was one of the hundreds of volunteers who searched for her.This book tells the story of events preceding Geraldine's vanishing, and what went wrong, and describes the massage search and rescue operation that followed her disappearance.This is a well-written account of not only the victim, but of the sorrow of an entire community, the saddened hearts of those who searched and searched and never gave up looking.Many thanks to the author / Rowman & Littlefield - Down East Books / Netgalley for the advanced digital copy of this Biography/Memoir. Opinions expressed here are unbiased and entirely my own.
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  • Lizzy (Bent Bookworm)
    January 1, 1970
    When You Find My Body is the story of Geraldine (Gerry) Largay, an Appalachian Trail thru-hiker who disappeared in 2013. I was very excited to see this book is coming out, as my husband and I are avid hikers and I distinctly remember hearing about her disappearance and wondering if we would ever find out what happened to her.First of all: this book is being marketed as a thriller and or true crime. WHAT?!? It is neither of those, least of all true crime. There was no crime committed here! None! When You Find My Body is the story of Geraldine (Gerry) Largay, an Appalachian Trail thru-hiker who disappeared in 2013. I was very excited to see this book is coming out, as my husband and I are avid hikers and I distinctly remember hearing about her disappearance and wondering if we would ever find out what happened to her.First of all: this book is being marketed as a thriller and or true crime. WHAT?!? It is neither of those, least of all true crime. There was no crime committed here! None! Nothing at all! This is a complete misnomer and will undoubtedly lead to a LOT of disappointed readers. I went into this expecting something like an Ann Rule book, as I didn’t actually know what had happened to Gerry and it said true crime. I was at first very irritated, but decided that it probably isn’t the author’s fault and I really wanted to read Gerry’s story regardless. I’m glad I did, but just be forewarned. NOT A TRUE CRIME OR THRILLER.The author gives a lot of background information on Gerry, which I was very glad to read. It made her seem more like a real person and less like a statistic. It was also rather sad, as clearly her husband, children, and grandchildren miss her deeply. Gerry touched a lot of lives not only in her “regular” life but also in her life on the Appalachian Trail, where she was known as Inchworm. I loved that she clearly had a sense of humor and could laugh at herself, as she was one of the slower hikers on the trail.One thing that really was a drawback to this book was the amount of time the author spent on things that had very little relation to Gerry, her family, or her disastrous hike. In one case several pages are spent going over details about the Navy SERE school…totally unnecessary. There is also a lot of background on the AT itself and how it came to be, which might be considered unnecessary as well, but I think gives a really nice look into the history and motivations of people who hike the trail, both in the past and present.Gerry’s story in the end is a real tragedy, especially when reading how – if she had possibly been better prepared – it most likely would have been avoided all together. I’m sure the author and her family hope that from the writing of this book, people will go out better equipped for whatever adventures in the outdoors they might seek.3.5/5 stars.Many thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for providing an ARC in exchange for an honest review!Blog | Twitter | Bloglovin | Instagram |
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  • Sabine
    January 1, 1970
    This is a very good book that any hiker or person that enters the woods should read. Without being boring or lecturing the reader it makes very clear that basic skills like being able to use a compass and know how to start a fire etc can prevent a terrible outcome. Just following the one rule to not move as soon as you notice that you are lost, if you don't have survival skills, will most likely lead to a better ending.It tells the story of Gerry and George, a wonderful couple, that make her big This is a very good book that any hiker or person that enters the woods should read. Without being boring or lecturing the reader it makes very clear that basic skills like being able to use a compass and know how to start a fire etc can prevent a terrible outcome. Just following the one rule to not move as soon as you notice that you are lost, if you don't have survival skills, will most likely lead to a better ending.It tells the story of Gerry and George, a wonderful couple, that make her big dream of hiking the AT come true. The preparations, the hike, her getting lost, all the rescue attempts and emotions of some the unsuccessful rescue members. Without blaming her or other hikers it shows that basic survival knowledge is imperative for anyone exploring nature and that it can make all the difference.I was a bit disappointed that Gerry's family didn't seem to support this book as it is also a hommage to a wonderful woman.I requested this book from NetGalley and am thankful that Rowman & Littlefield and the author provided me with an advance copy.
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  • Sheri Joyce
    January 1, 1970
    Being unfamiliar with the story of Gerry Largay and the Appalachian Trail but a true crime and mystery fan, I was excited to read this book. This story is a sad one and a cautionary tale to hikers everywhere. Not being a hiker myself, I learned some interesting tidbits and was surprised at some of the statistics quoted on how people prepare before undertaking a challenging trail.The book is a quick read but I was mildly disappointed with the structure of the writing. I would have loved to have b Being unfamiliar with the story of Gerry Largay and the Appalachian Trail but a true crime and mystery fan, I was excited to read this book. This story is a sad one and a cautionary tale to hikers everywhere. Not being a hiker myself, I learned some interesting tidbits and was surprised at some of the statistics quoted on how people prepare before undertaking a challenging trail.The book is a quick read but I was mildly disappointed with the structure of the writing. I would have loved to have been drawn into more of a mystery but, truthfully, there wasn't much of one here and, with little to go on, leaves one to speculate, in the end. The structure and flow felt jerky at times but I kept reading because I was interested in the story.I do think those that partake in hiking will find this an interesting read and one that can benefit any who venture out into the forests of America. While not a gripping style, the story is one that serves to benefit other hikers, in the end.*I received this ebook from Netgalley.com in exchange for a fair and honest review.
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  • Sarah Ames-Foley
    January 1, 1970
    This review can also be found on my blog.When You Find My Body is a nonfiction account of the last months of Gerry Largay’s life. Gerry went missing on the Appalachian Trail in 2013, her remains found approximately two years later. The book spans from the time Gerry spent preparing to hike the trail through the aftermath of her final campsite being found. Dauphinee interviews some of Gerry’s trail friends as well as wardens who were involved in her search. He examines every aspect of her hike in This review can also be found on my blog.When You Find My Body is a nonfiction account of the last months of Gerry Largay’s life. Gerry went missing on the Appalachian Trail in 2013, her remains found approximately two years later. The book spans from the time Gerry spent preparing to hike the trail through the aftermath of her final campsite being found. Dauphinee interviews some of Gerry’s trail friends as well as wardens who were involved in her search. He examines every aspect of her hike in the interest of providing as many answers as possible to readers.While it’s obvious that Dauphinee is a good writer, he is not without his faults. Most notably, I found myself distracted by his unnecessarily gendered writing. He talked about “farm boys” who were “able to experience the exotic and beautiful unshaved, makeupless women”; how he has “seen men in kilts, which is always okay, but [has] also seen men in skirts”; and in one sentence is able to discuss how some people lose skin and toenails, but describes women as dealing with “feminine issues” instead of using the dreaded word “menstruation.” While clearly not intended to be harmful, I still found myself rolling my eyes and frustrated by it all nonetheless.While the novel is relatively short, I’d argue it could have been cut down more. There is a lot of repetition, mostly when it comes to discussing Gerry’s life and her impact on those she knew. While I understand the point Dauphinee was trying to make, that she was a beloved woman who would be deeply missed by many, he hammered it in incessantly. There is also a wealth of information about how the AT originated and while some of it made sense to include, I also just didn’t find myself very interested in most of it.Finally, I just had to wonder whether Gerry’s family gave her blessing for this book to be written. I felt uncomfortable reading this and not knowing whether anyone, her husband George in particular, had given the okay for what were potentially the hardest days of their lives to be laid out on display like this. Portions of Gerry’s diary (already made public) were shared, as well as email newsletters she had written for friends and family. It made me squirm to think there was a possibility that I was privy to something I shouldn’t be reading. I wish Dauphinee had been upfront about this.Criticisms aside, it’s a good book. I enjoyed reading it, as much as someone can enjoy reading about a tragedy like this. It was clear Dauphinee did his research and reached out to as many different people as possible, and his writing really pulls you in. I’ll probably be recommending this to nonfiction lovers and hiker buffs.
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  • Jill
    January 1, 1970
    5 starsWhen You Find My BodyThe Disappearance of Geraldine Largay on the Appalachian TrailBy D. DauphineeThis book covers the fascinating and completely tragic tale of “Inchworm” Gerry Largay’s trek across the Appalachian Trail and her death.Being from the Midwest, I have heard of the AT but certainly did not know any intimate details regarding it. I enjoyed so much of this book. I realized how unprepared so many people are for attempting a thru-hike. I was truly astonished at how hard a rescue 5 starsWhen You Find My BodyThe Disappearance of Geraldine Largay on the Appalachian TrailBy D. DauphineeThis book covers the fascinating and completely tragic tale of “Inchworm” Gerry Largay’s trek across the Appalachian Trail and her death.Being from the Midwest, I have heard of the AT but certainly did not know any intimate details regarding it. I enjoyed so much of this book. I realized how unprepared so many people are for attempting a thru-hike. I was truly astonished at how hard a rescue effort is in an environment like the Maine section of the AT.Dauphinee thoroughly explores the history and building of the trail; as well as the many dangers associated with attempting a thru-hike.I felt the love Gerry showed her family, friends and every person she ever met. This is just an incredible story that is extremely well-written. I so very highly recommend it. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher and NetGalley. The views given are my own. #WHenYouFIndMyBody #NetGalley
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  • Marisa
    January 1, 1970
    What a heartbreaking story. I’m intensely fascinated by people who tackle the AT, and over the past couple of years, I’ve gotten more and more interested in different people’s stories about their time on the AT, but this one is probably the saddest of all, though I’m trying not to be TOO sad over it since Gerry’s story deserves to be known as something more than what happened to her in death.The author clearly cares a lot about multiple aspects of this book, most of all Gerry herself. His emotio What a heartbreaking story. I’m intensely fascinated by people who tackle the AT, and over the past couple of years, I’ve gotten more and more interested in different people’s stories about their time on the AT, but this one is probably the saddest of all, though I’m trying not to be TOO sad over it since Gerry’s story deserves to be known as something more than what happened to her in death.The author clearly cares a lot about multiple aspects of this book, most of all Gerry herself. His emotion as well as his own experience add a much more personal look into Gerry’s life and also the SAR process, which I knew nothing about. His writing style is just ok, and sometimes he borders on melodrama, but he succeeds at making the reader care about his topic, and really, that’s the most important thing of all.
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  • Lara
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 I was happy to find this WAS NOT a thriller book. The author includes a wide array of information about the trail and surroundings, trail etiquette and survival. I enjoyed the writing style and felt it was well polished. thanks to #Galleymatch from Book Club Cookbook for this ARC
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  • Heather Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    Are you thinking about hiking the Appalachian Trail- read this book. Do you wish hiking the AT was something you could do- read this book. Do you enjoy hearing about empowering women who hike the trail - read this book! This book absolutely brought a few ACTUAL tears to my eyes. But in the same tears - how lucky Inchworm was able to do something she had always wanted - how many of us can say that!
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  • gnarlyhiker
    January 1, 1970
    A family member, preferably her husband, should have written about the disappearance of Geraldine Largay. It is interesting to note that her family did not participate in this book. A good portion of the topics in this book was unnecessary. Just two examples: the numerous calls from psychics, what they said and how wrong they were, and pointing the blame for her disappearance at her husband: pointless and tacky. But let’s add insult to injury, Mrs. Largay’s getting lost and being lost boils down A family member, preferably her husband, should have written about the disappearance of Geraldine Largay. It is interesting to note that her family did not participate in this book. A good portion of the topics in this book was unnecessary. Just two examples: the numerous calls from psychics, what they said and how wrong they were, and pointing the blame for her disappearance at her husband: pointless and tacky. But let’s add insult to injury, Mrs. Largay’s getting lost and being lost boils down to the fact that she didn’t have a compass and had no sense of direction, and she didn’t carry her SPOT Satellite because it was too heavy and she really didn’t know how to use it. This last bit would have been best related from her husband, because at this point it’s all pure speculation.good luck**ARC/Netgalley
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  • G
    January 1, 1970
    In April of 2013, Geraldine ‘Gerry’ Largay set out to hike the Appalachian Trail. She was a ‘well-equipped, capable hiker who was mentally well-prepared’ and who had planned her hike meticulously. She was supported by her husband, who met Gerry every few days with supplies and a ride to a town for a night in a motel and food. She began the hike with a friend. In short, she was well-prepared for the trail.In fact, she successfully made progress on the trail for 87 days.However, on July 21 she was In April of 2013, Geraldine ‘Gerry’ Largay set out to hike the Appalachian Trail. She was a ‘well-equipped, capable hiker who was mentally well-prepared’ and who had planned her hike meticulously. She was supported by her husband, who met Gerry every few days with supplies and a ride to a town for a night in a motel and food. She began the hike with a friend. In short, she was well-prepared for the trail.In fact, she successfully made progress on the trail for 87 days.However, on July 21 she was seen alive for the last time. She left the trail to relieve herself, became disoriented, and never regained the trail. Eventually running out of food, she perished sometime in August. Despite an intensive search and rescue operation, she was not found. Her body and final campsite was finally located two years later, in October 2015.Gerry kept a trail journal and continued to add to it while she was lost. While most of the journal has not been shared publicly, there is enough to fill out the general progression of steps and decisions she made after getting lost. As prepared as she was for the trail, she was literally and figuratively lost once she was off the trail. Despite her preparation, she didn’t have adequate backcountry survival skills and did not have the knowledge of what to do in order to help in her own self-rescue.Sadly, Gerry is not alone. Nearly thirty people per year go missing while hiking the Appalachian trail alone, and similar backcountry trails (like the Pacific Crest trail) report increasing number of search and rescue operations. While 97% of Appalachian Trail missing hikers are found within 24 hours, it’s essential that they know what to do in order to increase their chances of being found.In ‘When you find my body’, Dee Dauphinee’s premise is that it is not enough to be prepared for the trail. A hiker must also know what do when lost. He writes, ‘hardly anyone who thru-hikes the Appalachian Trail learns survival skills’.Dauphinee has years of search and rescue, medical, wilderness, and expedition experience. He knows about wilderness preparation and survival. He interviewed members of the search and rescue teams who looked for Largay, and he spoke with Largay’s family and friends – including hikers who crossed paths with Gerry during the hike.While Largay’s ultimate fate is made clear in the opening pages, Dauphinee’s book is hard to put down. I read through it in just a few sittings. He tells her personal story with compassion and empathy while also presenting a well-researched discussion of how Search and Rescue teams operate, and about how these teams have developed an expertise in predicting lost persons behavior.The greatest service, though, is his practical tips and advice on becoming more prepared. As he writes towards the end of his sobering book, “If a single person reads Gerry’s story, and if it helps them should they become lost in the woods, I believe I know what [Largay] would say: That’s brilliant!’Thanks to Netgalley and Rowman & Littlefield for providing me a free copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jessica (RomancingtheBookworm)
    January 1, 1970
    When I heard that Dauphinee was coming out with WHEN YOU FIND MY BODY, I immediately added it to my summer reading list.. Because, though I never had the pleasure of meeting Geraldine Largay, her disappearance up in the Western Mountains struck everyone in the region in an intensely personal way. We can never grieve for her with as much depth as those who knew her, or the family that lost her, but those of us who grew up with those mountains, and in the north woods, have learned form childhood t When I heard that Dauphinee was coming out with WHEN YOU FIND MY BODY, I immediately added it to my summer reading list.. Because, though I never had the pleasure of meeting Geraldine Largay, her disappearance up in the Western Mountains struck everyone in the region in an intensely personal way. We can never grieve for her with as much depth as those who knew her, or the family that lost her, but those of us who grew up with those mountains, and in the north woods, have learned form childhood that they are as frightening and deep as they are magnificent. All too often they swallow people up, and refuse to let them go. The suddenness of Largay's disappearance, and the prolonged mystery of it, culminating in her discovery two years later, sticks in the mind. The tragedy of her last few weeks of life, lost and alone, writing letters to her loved ones, will remain with us even as her vivacity, her goodness, and her passion for life inspire us even after her death. Dauphinee has done an excellent job of making sure that Largay is remembered as more than just that woman who got lost in the woods - he has created a living memory of "Inchworm", and the woman she was, to remind us always that she is defined not by her death but by how she lived her life. I admit I had some trepidation going into WHEN YOU FIND MY BODY. The discovery of Largay's body was some three years ago but I was surprised how touchy the subject still seemed, and was concerned the book would be sensationalized or exploitative. But Dauphinee's treatment of Largey's life and disappearance - particularly with regards to the sensitive matter of her final days - was delicate but thorough. Though at times he did speculate as to Largay's thoughts and actions after her disappearance, he never crossed the line into presumption or melodrama, basing his speculation solely on what he had learned of her from her family and friends.I was beyond impressed with WHEN YOU FIND MY BODY. In the end this book about a tragedy ended up being as much about hope, perseverance, and finding peace as it was about loss. The woods are deep up in northern Maine, and they can be unforgiving. Dauphinee reiterates again and again the need for hikers to be prepared and for them to, above all, respect their surroundings. But he never made the woods something to fear, or to avoid. This book is a celebration of hiking, which I can't help but think is what Geraldine "Inchworm" Largay would have wanted.
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  • Duncan MacDonald
    January 1, 1970
    When You Find My Body (Book Review).I absolutely loved this book! I’d read one other book by this author, ‘Highlanders Without Kilts’ (2015), and thoroughly enjoyed it. It held a personal interest for me as my Grand Uncle had served with the 85th Nova Scotia Highlanders in WWI. D. Dauphinee’s latest book also reminds me of a personal story.I, along with my brother and a friend, went astray in the woods of northern Cape Breton, Nova Scotia in 1972. I was 10, and the oldest of the three lost for a When You Find My Body (Book Review).I absolutely loved this book! I’d read one other book by this author, ‘Highlanders Without Kilts’ (2015), and thoroughly enjoyed it. It held a personal interest for me as my Grand Uncle had served with the 85th Nova Scotia Highlanders in WWI. D. Dauphinee’s latest book also reminds me of a personal story.I, along with my brother and a friend, went astray in the woods of northern Cape Breton, Nova Scotia in 1972. I was 10, and the oldest of the three lost for a whole day. My Kindergarten teacher,Sister Mary MacLean, once said to follow a brook downstream if you got lost. We did, and came out alright.This book tells the story of events preceding hiker Geraldine Largay’s vanishing in July 2013, while hiking the Appalachian Trail in Maine, what caused her to go astray, and the massive search and rescue operation that followed. Her disappearance sparked the largest lost-person search in Maine history, which culminated in her being presumed dead. She was never again seen alive. The author was one of the hundreds of volunteers who searched for her. This interesting and well written story is one of heartbreak, perseverance, determination, faith and sorrow.There are lessons in the story, both large and small. That lesson that Sister Mary taught us may very well have saved our lives that day in June of 1972. The searchers that had eventually assembled might not have found us. We got lucky with some help from a kind nun. Lessons, when they are adhered to, save lives. There are lessons in Mr.,Dauphinee’s book, both large and mall. Lessons that may well save lives in the future.I highly recommend this book and give it a five star, two thumbs up rating. Many thanks to the publisher for providing an Advanced Reading Copy to read and review. It was a pleasure.
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  • Nic
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you Netgalley and Down East Books for providing me with an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.D. Dauphine does an exceptional job of telling the sad, tragic tale of hiker Geraldine “Gerry” Largey, who went missing from a Maine section of the Appalachian Trail in July 2013. I was drawn to this book because I remembered the episode of North Woods Law when Maine wardens tried for weeks to find the missing woman. I knew that years later her body was found, but Dauphine fills in Thank you Netgalley and Down East Books for providing me with an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.D. Dauphine does an exceptional job of telling the sad, tragic tale of hiker Geraldine “Gerry” Largey, who went missing from a Maine section of the Appalachian Trail in July 2013. I was drawn to this book because I remembered the episode of North Woods Law when Maine wardens tried for weeks to find the missing woman. I knew that years later her body was found, but Dauphine fills in all the missing information. With histories of the creation of the Appalachian Trail, the purpose of the Navy’s SERE school, and historical examples of what happens to the psyche and one’s physical health when lost, When You Find My Body is a well-rounded and complete tale of the difficulties and dangers of hiking the Appalachian Trail. The author has input from so many sources: Navy SERE instructors, lifelong friends of Geraldine, hikers she met along the trail, and many involved in the search. The book is a wealth of knowledge, not only about Geraldine’s tragic death, but also about what to do and not to do if one becomes lost in the woods. From the opinions of several experienced hikers and search and rescue personnel, it’s clear that with some training and more knowledge, Gerry most likely would have survived her ordeal. If she’d been trained to use a compass or known to follow a water source downhill, she could have made it out of the woods. I would recommend anyone who is considering hiking the Appalachian Trail to read this book. Aside from being well-researched, well-written, and engaging, it just might save your life in the event you too become lost in the woods.https://opinionatedreviewer.wordpress...
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  • HeidiLynns BookReviews
    January 1, 1970
    First, I want to thank D. Dauphinee, Down East Books and NetGalley for providing me with this book so I may bring you this review. If you enjoy learning about all aspects of the Appalachian Trail in Maine, an avid hiker, or enjoy a good missing person story then When You Find My Body by D. Duauphine is for you. This is the story of the disappearance of Geraldine Largay on the Appalachian Trail. What drew me to this book was the cover and the title of the book. Kudos to the graphic artist who nai First, I want to thank D. Dauphinee, Down East Books and NetGalley for providing me with this book so I may bring you this review. If you enjoy learning about all aspects of the Appalachian Trail in Maine, an avid hiker, or enjoy a good missing person story then When You Find My Body by D. Duauphine is for you. This is the story of the disappearance of Geraldine Largay on the Appalachian Trail. What drew me to this book was the cover and the title of the book. Kudos to the graphic artist who nailed the cover work spot on and grasped the concept of the book. As stated in the author note this book is more of a reporting of what happened to Geraldine and not a biography of what happened to her on the trail. This book is to not only to celebrate Gerry’s life but also her spirit of adventure, her yearning for lifelong scholarship, and her will to pursue her dreams and her faith. My heart ached for Gerry who became lost in the woods for months on end and for the loved ones she left behind. I can’t imagine what it must have been like for Gerry trying to survive. Let alone her loved ones worrying and searching for her. My heart goes out to the family and their loved ones. This book is dedicated to Raymond Dauphinee Sr. who taught D. Dauphinee what to do if he were to ever be lost in the woods. D. Dauphinee did a lot of research and shared a lot of educational information on the Appalachian Trail. For those who enjoy learning about history and the trails they hike on this would also be a perfect book for you. .
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  • Clark
    January 1, 1970
    WHEN YOU FIND MY BODY by Denis “Dee” Dauphinee is about more than just a hiker trekking the Appalachian Trail and becoming lost in the process. Geraldine “Gerry” Largay had a dream. which she put into motion with a clear and disciplined intent on fulfilling it. We the readers hold our own personal dreams, some of which we may act upon. In the blink of an eye, Gerry’s story could be our story. Without ever having met Gerry “Inchworm” Largay, Dauphinee paints a strong vivid and vibrant picture of WHEN YOU FIND MY BODY by Denis “Dee” Dauphinee is about more than just a hiker trekking the Appalachian Trail and becoming lost in the process. Geraldine “Gerry” Largay had a dream. which she put into motion with a clear and disciplined intent on fulfilling it. We the readers hold our own personal dreams, some of which we may act upon. In the blink of an eye, Gerry’s story could be our story. Without ever having met Gerry “Inchworm” Largay, Dauphinee paints a strong vivid and vibrant picture of her and her journey drawing upon his own wealth of knowledge and experience in mountaineering, search and rescue, medicine and woodscraft. He writes with an open heart about her fortitude, determination and perseverance, and suggests how the gifts of her faith and love of friends, family and strangers alike endow her legacy.Dauphinee also reveals the depth of care, concern and long-term discipline possessed by the professionals, AT community, and volunteers, some well-known and others anonymous, all of whom dedicated a part of their lives to finding “Inchworm”. This expression of humanity is a powerful and moving force which changed lives.WHEN YOU FIND MY BODY gives a new perspective to “Being Lost” and what we can do about it. Certainly, our future walks and hikes in the woods will never be the same.D. Dauphinee
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  • Courtney
    January 1, 1970
    This book is marked as a true crime and that is not at all what this book is. I am a big true crime fan and as I started reading this, it was apparent that I had been deceived. One-fourth of the way through the book I considered quitting. This was just going to be a story of a lost hiker and the beginning had a lot of trail history which I have no interest in. Luckily, the book turned into a survival story and there was a lot of information on the psychology of being lost and how to survive. Now This book is marked as a true crime and that is not at all what this book is. I am a big true crime fan and as I started reading this, it was apparent that I had been deceived. One-fourth of the way through the book I considered quitting. This was just going to be a story of a lost hiker and the beginning had a lot of trail history which I have no interest in. Luckily, the book turned into a survival story and there was a lot of information on the psychology of being lost and how to survive. Now these topics I am interested in. The rest of the book was enjoyable with only a few boring parts. The biggest problem with the book is that I am told what happens to Gerry in the first few pages. That means that there is no suspense in the book and if I do quit, I didn't miss out on anything. I know that I could read about the story online and see what happened, but if I picked up this book, I don't want to search online. I want the book to lead me to the reveal of how or if Gerry was found. I didn't have any of that and this book read more like an assigned school read. I also would have loved some pictures, especially a map of the area that she went missing in, so that I could see exactly the path she took from the trail.
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  • Patricia Lane
    January 1, 1970
    Well, well, well, I have been waiting for this book to be out and as soon as I received it I sat down to learn about Geraldine Largay and what happened to her. I had prayed for her every day that she was lost. I can honestly say the author of this book did a wonderful job in helping us understand how this happened and what could have saved her. She was obviously a remarkable woman and I wish I'd met her in this life. The author also shed a lot of light on what to do and not do when hiking anywhe Well, well, well, I have been waiting for this book to be out and as soon as I received it I sat down to learn about Geraldine Largay and what happened to her. I had prayed for her every day that she was lost. I can honestly say the author of this book did a wonderful job in helping us understand how this happened and what could have saved her. She was obviously a remarkable woman and I wish I'd met her in this life. The author also shed a lot of light on what to do and not do when hiking anywhere, let alone a wilderness. I think Mrs. Largay would have loved to sit down with him and talk. In truth, I had to set the book down before I could finish the last couple of chapters. It was emotional. When I finished the book I had some tears for her and what she must have endured. I also seriously decided I will buy a reliable compass for my family members who love the outdoors and they will learn how to use it properly. This book taught me a good deal about living, dying and human nature. Excellent job D. Dauphinee!
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  • Ruth Woodman York
    January 1, 1970
    As soon as I knew this book was coming out, I knew I'd be reading it. I remember when "Inchworm" went missing, and following the search reports, hoping and praying she would be found. I've hiked a lot myself, including the norther terminus of the AT, the Hunt Trail on Mt. Katahdin. So it felt like a member of my own family was missing in a way. This book was well researched, in the interviews with those who hiked with Gerry at various points on the trail. While I could have done without the hist As soon as I knew this book was coming out, I knew I'd be reading it. I remember when "Inchworm" went missing, and following the search reports, hoping and praying she would be found. I've hiked a lot myself, including the norther terminus of the AT, the Hunt Trail on Mt. Katahdin. So it felt like a member of my own family was missing in a way. This book was well researched, in the interviews with those who hiked with Gerry at various points on the trail. While I could have done without the history of the AT (I've read it several times in other books), it was good information for those who may not know about it. This sad and tragic story is a legacy to Gerry, and hopefully it will help others who may decide to take to the woods for a hike. It also is a testament to those who help out during search and rescue operations: They feel each loss nearly as much as the families of the missing do.
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  • Dianna Weigel
    January 1, 1970
    This is an excellent account of the events leading up to the disappearance of Appalachian Trail hiker Geraldine Largay and the subsequent two-year search efforts by Maine officials, rescue teams, volunteers and the trail community to locate her. The author, Mr. Dauphinee, clearly presents the facts, provides insight from members of the search teams, other AT hikers and Geraldine’s friends. Dauphinee, an accomplished outdoorsman himself, walks the reader through what Geraldine’s last days may hav This is an excellent account of the events leading up to the disappearance of Appalachian Trail hiker Geraldine Largay and the subsequent two-year search efforts by Maine officials, rescue teams, volunteers and the trail community to locate her. The author, Mr. Dauphinee, clearly presents the facts, provides insight from members of the search teams, other AT hikers and Geraldine’s friends. Dauphinee, an accomplished outdoorsman himself, walks the reader through what Geraldine’s last days may have been like and what efforts she may have made to rescue herself. This is a compassionate and respectful accounting of how one woman’s tragic end brought together a community. I read this in one sitting. I could not stop reading.
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  • Amy Wels
    January 1, 1970
    True story of Gerry, who died on the Appalachian Trail after becoming lost, attempting to complete her "adventure of a lifetime." An interesting story of the culture of the trail and those who hike it, many interviews of those who met Gerry and those who searched for her. The author does a great job describing Gerry's passion for the outdoors and her impact on those around her. Sadly, Gerry did not have the survival skills/tools that could have saved her life. Biggest takeaway, always carry a ma True story of Gerry, who died on the Appalachian Trail after becoming lost, attempting to complete her "adventure of a lifetime." An interesting story of the culture of the trail and those who hike it, many interviews of those who met Gerry and those who searched for her. The author does a great job describing Gerry's passion for the outdoors and her impact on those around her. Sadly, Gerry did not have the survival skills/tools that could have saved her life. Biggest takeaway, always carry a map of the area and a compass (that you know how to use) when out in the wilderness.
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  • Janilyn Kocher
    January 1, 1970
    When You Find My Body is a sad, heartbreaking tale. It's about a hiker, Gerry, on the Appalachian Trail who wandered off and died from starvation, it's actually a horrific story, reliving how this poor woman died from starvation as rescuers were so close, yet so far away. Dauphinee details a thoughtful recreation of her journey, although sometimes I felt he extrapolated too much about certain things he could not have known. He does proffer practical advice for hikers that anyone who embarks on a When You Find My Body is a sad, heartbreaking tale. It's about a hiker, Gerry, on the Appalachian Trail who wandered off and died from starvation, it's actually a horrific story, reliving how this poor woman died from starvation as rescuers were so close, yet so far away. Dauphinee details a thoughtful recreation of her journey, although sometimes I felt he extrapolated too much about certain things he could not have known. He does proffer practical advice for hikers that anyone who embarks on an arduous hike. Thanks to NetGalley for the advance read.
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  • Lorrie McCullers
    January 1, 1970
    Such a good, but sad read. This true story of Geraldine Largay, a hiker who went missing on the AT, is an interesting look at the culture of hiking the Appalachian Trail. It also gives insight to the search and rescue teams who search for missing hikers and what they go through. I really enjoyed this book, even though the outcome was so sad.
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  • Maddie Carr
    January 1, 1970
    "When You Find My Body" was written with care and sensitivity about G. Largay, while honoring her family and her legacy. It was difficult to read in places because of the heart-felt sorrow of her demise. D. Dauphinee has extensive experience (and a love for) the outdoors. His research is in depth, leaving no stone unturned. As a hiker, I learned a lot about self-rescue, basics I hadn't known.
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  • Ranae Ziwiski
    January 1, 1970
    Wasn't sure I would like this book as I am not typically fond of biographies. However, I was pleasantly surprised. I found this book to be equal parts Gerry's story, AT knowledge, human interest and expectation. The outcome is known when you start the book, but the process to get there and the people involved were a good read.
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  • Rachel Stansel
    January 1, 1970
    As an AT section hiker, I was aware of Inchworm's story. I appreciate the author's details about the search and about who Gerry was. She was clearly well loved and her death a huge loss. I am touched by her story and will think of her and carry her with me as I hike.Full disclosure- I received a copy of the book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Sterling Williamson
    January 1, 1970
    How can a hiker get lost on the Appalachian Trail and not be found? D. Dauphinee addresses this question in detail, and from many perspectives. The book was captivating and well written and may help prevent similar tragedies from happening in the future. I highly recommend this book.
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    This book was a galley match for our book club! Good book with perspective of hikers and their interactions on the AT Gerry made readers aware of the necessities & knowledge needed for any hiking trip!
  • Melinda
    January 1, 1970
    A really compelling story, but a weird combo of occasionally melodramatic writing and nonlinear storytelling made this book a bit of a slog in parts.
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