When I Arrived at the Castle
"A castle, a killer, and prey all bound and blurred by lust and blood."Like many before her that have never come back, she's made it to the Countess' castle determined to snuff out the horror, but she could never be prepared for what hides within its turrets; what unfurls under its fluttering flags. Emily Carroll has fashioned a rich gothic horror charged with eroticism that doesn't just make your skin crawl, it crawls into it.

When I Arrived at the Castle Details

TitleWhen I Arrived at the Castle
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 19th, 2019
PublisherKoyama Press
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Horror, Comics, Fantasy, LGBT, Fiction, Graphic Novels Comics

When I Arrived at the Castle Review

  • Sam Quixote
    January 1, 1970
    It was a dark and stormy night… … when a cat-like humanoid rocked up to the vampiric Countess’ castle to slay her. Yup, that old chestnut! But who is the predator and who is the prey? Emily Carroll’s When I Arrived at the Castle is a disappointingly weak and unmemorable lesbian/horror fairy tale, the kind of book I imagine Angela Carter would’ve produced if she’d made comics. Carroll mashes together elements of Dracula, Bluebeard and Beauty and the Beast into a barely coherent, rambling story wh It was a dark and stormy night… … when a cat-like humanoid rocked up to the vampiric Countess’ castle to slay her. Yup, that old chestnut! But who is the predator and who is the prey? Emily Carroll’s When I Arrived at the Castle is a disappointingly weak and unmemorable lesbian/horror fairy tale, the kind of book I imagine Angela Carter would’ve produced if she’d made comics. Carroll mashes together elements of Dracula, Bluebeard and Beauty and the Beast into a barely coherent, rambling story whose obliqueness leaves very little impression behind. Carroll’s art is utterly beautiful though. The splash-pages are intricate and imaginative dreamscapes gorgeously coloured in striking blacks, whites and reds and I loved the highly stylized, baroque designs of the castle. Her take on the Countess is interesting and the character was genuinely creepy with some actually shocking scenes (the keyhole!). Visually this is an appealing book but the dreamlike story is much less compelling to read. And, like a dream (or nightmare), not long after reading When I Arrived at the Castle I’d already forgotten most of it and moved on! If you’ve not read it I recommend Emily Carroll’s other, much better book, Through the Woods, instead.
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  • David Schaafsma
    January 1, 1970
    I am a huge fan of Emily Carroll, and very much like When I Arrived at the Castle, which might best be described as a lesbian horror fairy tale. Here’s a bit of what happens: A cat-eared human visits a Countess’ castle to kill her. We don’t know why, but she isn’t the first to try. She is surprised to find that the Countess is waiting for her. The cat-girl is led to a series of (red) doors, behind each a tragic fairy tale she must navigate to survive and remain sane. It’s an ode here to literatu I am a huge fan of Emily Carroll, and very much like When I Arrived at the Castle, which might best be described as a lesbian horror fairy tale. Here’s a bit of what happens: A cat-eared human visits a Countess’ castle to kill her. We don’t know why, but she isn’t the first to try. She is surprised to find that the Countess is waiting for her. The cat-girl is led to a series of (red) doors, behind each a tragic fairy tale she must navigate to survive and remain sane. It’s an ode here to literature, to fairy tales that scare and seduce us. What happens later is the sex part, which gets murky and complicated, as in dreams. The Countess is a vampire, a femme fatale, alluring and dangerous and creepy, the flame to the cat-girl’s moth. But how can we resist her attractions?! And she’s a shape-changer: one of the most alarming and amazing sequences happens as cat-girl watches the Countess at her dressing table. Successfully scary! So it’s dark erotic fantasy in Carroll’s signature black and white and (bloody) red. A touch of gothic, certainly. Decadent in the way of nineteenth century “decadent” art. A nod to things like Wuthering Heights and Jane Eyre, after which she takes off in a swirlingly dangerous and delicious direction the Bronte women could not have taken (but possibly allude to). And complicated, in the ways of the best of fantasy, which leave us some space to dream in our own heads and maybe leave us a bit confused if we try to explain it all. Which is to say it prioritizes atmosphere over plot. All about mysterious, intense feelings, in that Poe/Bronte romantic sense. At the intersection of violence and eroticism, which means it is not for kiddies. And the art style fits the open, reader-based narrative of fantasy; Carroll almost never uses a panel structure at all, favoring (bloody) splash pages in rhapsodic fashion. It’s a poetic structure that fits a “tale of mystery and imagination,” one that allows for the “grotesque.”Maybe for my tastes (ahem!) I like the more the (slightly) more conventional Through the Woods tales, but from light fantasy and YA (her illustrated Speak) to dark horror, Carroll can do it all, the best there is. And you can find her stuff, wonderful short shorts, on her website for free sampling, too.I guess I rate this as 4 stars because I think the degree of confusion I still have after two readings is greater than I prefer, but the art is 5 stars, for sure.
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  • Jenny (Reading Envy)
    January 1, 1970
    This is just one story, but all in striking blacks, reds, and whites like her previous work. A woman arrives at a castle, but why is she there, and who is the person answering the door? Things are not what they seem.This is not for kids, as the eroticism and violence might be a bit much! Definitely a tale for adults.I received a copy of this from the publisher through Edelweiss. It came out April 16, 2019.
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    The once was a girl that lived in a deep and damp and dark celler...Caroll has crafted another beautifully atmospheric and decadent novel that skirts the line of horror and the gothic. A curious and courageous cat-eared girl braves the castle of a vampiric countess with plans to destroy her. Plans change and go pear-shaped when the strange catgirl instead finds that the countess is waiting for her. Soon, the girl is sent into a maze of tragic fairy tales and stories that she must claw her way th The once was a girl that lived in a deep and damp and dark celler...Caroll has crafted another beautifully atmospheric and decadent novel that skirts the line of horror and the gothic. A curious and courageous cat-eared girl braves the castle of a vampiric countess with plans to destroy her. Plans change and go pear-shaped when the strange catgirl instead finds that the countess is waiting for her. Soon, the girl is sent into a maze of tragic fairy tales and stories that she must claw her way through holding as best she can on to her purpose and sanity. The tales trapped behind red doors, the house, countess, and her; all is not what it seems.This story is a rich work that you need to read a few times to get all the meanings. It is beautifully executed, much is conveyed in the simple palette of three colors; bone white, black, and blood red. It is gothic; ornate when it needs to be and simple when it doesn't. The backgrounds are simple with repeating patterns, but still very useful. It is a hauntingly scary work for a short graphic novella much in the style of her other novels (Out of Skin, Through The Woods) and shouldn't be missed.
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  • Ilana
    January 1, 1970
    Gothic erotic violent bloody and disturbing, as one expects horror by Emily Carroll to be. A cat-like girl arrives at a castle out of the cold and rain and is greeted by a beautiful woman of seductive beauty. But others have been to the castle before and her arrival was expected. Nothing is what it seems and the beautiful woman is only a skin inhabited by a horrible vampiric beast. Somehow our girl must kill this demon who has slayed the other innocent girls who came to eliminate her before. The Gothic erotic violent bloody and disturbing, as one expects horror by Emily Carroll to be. A cat-like girl arrives at a castle out of the cold and rain and is greeted by a beautiful woman of seductive beauty. But others have been to the castle before and her arrival was expected. Nothing is what it seems and the beautiful woman is only a skin inhabited by a horrible vampiric beast. Somehow our girl must kill this demon who has slayed the other innocent girls who came to eliminate her before. The story seems mostly an excuse for Carroll’s gorgeous illustrations and is deliberately convoluted. Definitely not for children, with lesbian erotica and lots of disturbing bloody violence. David wrote an excellent review some hours back that had me thinking I shouldn’t even attempt my own review and should just post a link to his. Can’t do that on my phone but will provide when I am at my computer next.
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  • Rod Brown
    January 1, 1970
    The Cheshire Cat and the Queen of Hearts fistfight in hell in this unsettling and gory tone piece.
  • Sam Wescott
    January 1, 1970
    Omg, how gorgeous was this book? It's a gothic romance with a heaping spoonful of body horror and dark fairytale. It's spooky, it's erotic, and it's an absolutely engrossing read. The coloring is genius and the style is mesmerizing. Emily Carroll is an absolute master and she strung me along by the nose start to bloody finish.
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  • Marina
    January 1, 1970
    Emily Carroll es de esas autoras que te atrapan desde la página 1. Para mi es la Carter de los cómics y When arrived at the castle es un muy buen ejemplo de ello. Una historia violenta y sexy que se lee en nada y que deja un regustito a obras clásicas y cuentos de hadas macabros que personalmente, me flipan.
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  • tinabel
    January 1, 1970
    Feminist lesbian body horror at it's best!I’m a big fan of Emily Carroll’s work, namely Through the Woods and her prolific webcomics, which are absolutely amazing. With striking two-tone artwork and an enthralling, bloody, terrifically-paced narrative, When I Arrived at the Castle delivers.The best way I can describe it is this: Victorian Gothic, specifically Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s Carmilla meets the likes of Angela Carter or Karen Russell. Wonderfully nuanced and full of surprises.Thank you Feminist lesbian body horror at it's best!I’m a big fan of Emily Carroll’s work, namely Through the Woods and her prolific webcomics, which are absolutely amazing. With striking two-tone artwork and an enthralling, bloody, terrifically-paced narrative, When I Arrived at the Castle delivers.The best way I can describe it is this: Victorian Gothic, specifically Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s Carmilla meets the likes of Angela Carter or Karen Russell. Wonderfully nuanced and full of surprises.Thank you to Koyama Press for an advance reading copy.
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  • vostendrasamigosyotengolibros
    January 1, 1970
    WOW, simplemente anonadada, la obra de Emily por lo general es buena pero este libro se va al carajo de lo bueno, es osea realmente muy erótico, creo q me hizo mas gay de lo que ya soy, los dibujos son increíbles y la historia esta muy hermosamente contada, yo creo q si este libro no se transforma en un clásico no se me mato jajjaa ahre emocionada, no, de en serio es un buen libro, ignoren las reviews de onvrescis que seguramente les jodió por los cuerpos disidentes o simplemente comentan "titti WOW, simplemente anonadada, la obra de Emily por lo general es buena pero este libro se va al carajo de lo bueno, es osea realmente muy erótico, creo q me hizo mas gay de lo que ya soy, los dibujos son increíbles y la historia esta muy hermosamente contada, yo creo q si este libro no se transforma en un clásico no se me mato jajjaa ahre emocionada, no, de en serio es un buen libro, ignoren las reviews de onvrescis que seguramente les jodió por los cuerpos disidentes o simplemente comentan "titties" y aprecien la obra que es increíble.
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    Whaaaaaaaatttttt?!?!?!?!?This book is exactly like a nightmare; I've never seen anything capture how bad dreams look and feel and seem so effectively. Also, titties.
  • Jessica (Spooky KidLit & We Who Walk Here, Walk Alone)
    January 1, 1970
    A triumph of art, story, and design, When I Arrived at the Castle is an erotic, dreamlike graphic novel that combines gothic horror and fairy tales into an indefinable work of terror and beauty and the delicious fear that results when the two collide. The narrator, a cat-like young woman, arrives at a castle to kill the Countess, a vampiric monster who has been expecting the young woman’s arrival. Any further attempt to explain the plot would do very little to convey the eerie, transformative na A triumph of art, story, and design, When I Arrived at the Castle is an erotic, dreamlike graphic novel that combines gothic horror and fairy tales into an indefinable work of terror and beauty and the delicious fear that results when the two collide. The narrator, a cat-like young woman, arrives at a castle to kill the Countess, a vampiric monster who has been expecting the young woman’s arrival. Any further attempt to explain the plot would do very little to convey the eerie, transformative nature of this book…imagine a Hammer film starring only femmes fatales, directed by Clive Barker, with a script by Lewis Carroll (no relation). Surreal and sumptuous, this is Emily Carroll’s most innovative and breathtaking work to date.The interior of the castle is a marvel, a black, white, and blood-red maze that looks like M. C. Escher by way of Jim Steranko. The perspectives loom and disorient, pulling the reader in to the Countess’s seductive and terrifying game of cat-and-mouse. Just like the halls of the castle, reality loops back in on itself; Carroll layers stories on top of stories, leaving the reader no choice but to surrender themselves to the phantasmagorical narrative. This is a book you will re-read obsessively.The Countess is a remarkable character. She’s alluring and frightening in equal measure, constantly slipping out of and into different skins as the mood strikes her. In one particularly Eisner-worthy sequence, the unnamed narrator watches through a keyhole as the Countess sits at her dressing table. Initially the Countess appears as a beautiful human woman, pinning up her hair and regarding herself sensually in the mirror. What happens after she drops her human disguise is, simply put, horror at its finest.I’d like to continue waxing rhapsodic on this keyhole sequence, but I’m heading into spoiler territory, so consider yourselves warned: SPOILERS AHEAD. Please skip the paragraph below if you want to remain unspoiled.I read this on my laptop, flipping through pages individually rather than viewing the typical two-page spreads of a physical book, and for the first time in my life a comic book page made me jump out of my seat. Having seen the layout of the physical book, though, I can safely say that I would have jumped just as high while reading a “real” book as I did while reading my eARC. Carroll plays with reader expectations and crafts an impeccably-timed jump scare that is organic to the story and gorgeously illustrated. (Jump scares may be looked down upon by some horror fans, but I maintain that when they’re done well, they’re brilliant examples of what makes horror great. This six-page sequence from Emily Carroll is one such example of what makes horror great.)YOU ARE HEREBY MARKED SAFE FROM SPOILERS.This haunting, surreal graphic novel further demonstrates what Emily Carroll’s fans have known for years — that she is one of the most talented and intriguing creators in horror comics. With When I Arrived at the Castle, she reaches new heights of terror and artistic achievement. Her hypnotic illustrations and eerie, poetic storytelling ensnare the reader in a labyrinthine fairy tale that they’ll never want to escape.My thanks to Koyama Press and Edelweiss+ for providing an advance copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Eleanore
    January 1, 1970
    Every work of Emily Carroll's I've seen is just magnificent. I still don't quite know how she does it; I honestly don't believe I'm a skilled enough artist to fully grasp it.Her horror reads like poetry, Poe-like and deeply evocative, rhythmic and hypnotic. Her imagery is so delightfully drippy (typically with blood), oozing with just the right amount of gore, full of crazed eyes, flowing fabrics, ghostly hands and fingers, looming darkness and jarring swatches of light. Her characteristically l Every work of Emily Carroll's I've seen is just magnificent. I still don't quite know how she does it; I honestly don't believe I'm a skilled enough artist to fully grasp it.Her horror reads like poetry, Poe-like and deeply evocative, rhythmic and hypnotic. Her imagery is so delightfully drippy (typically with blood), oozing with just the right amount of gore, full of crazed eyes, flowing fabrics, ghostly hands and fingers, looming darkness and jarring swatches of light. Her characteristically limited palette (black, red, and white) always serves her well, and no line is ever wasted.I also found myself appreciating more than ever, reading this latest -- which I'd been waiting on the release of for months, then had to spend at least a good 20-30 minutes savoring -- how her images progress. They coincide just right with the way her words are read, somehow knowing just how to best match reading rhythm to the intake of the visuals. She does not really ever do traditional panels, nor does she have to; she has incredible skill for laying out each page (and this includes two-page full spreads) in such a way that your eye is always drawn where it needs to go, even if it needs to move in a way it might not naturally do. This is an easy gift to miss if you don't know to look for it, because when something like this is done so well, the entire point is that your mind does NOT see it.There is always at least one slight twist of character or plot, even in her shortest stories, that drops my mouth open to just the right degree of delicious horror. All of these things and more are why I feel there is no one better making horror graphic novels today. Her work is unmistakable, distinctive, hugely effective, and eerily beautiful. I want to re-read and stare at it for hours, and ultimately probably will, I'm sure.
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  • Kyle Dinges
    January 1, 1970
    When I Arrived at the Castle is a pretty good encapsulation of what you'll get in a typical Emily Carroll story. It's got horror, gore, sensuality, and little bit of nudity. This is the longest single story I've read from Carroll, as Through the Woods was a collection. It is fairly short for a graphic novel.I'd probably describe this book more as a long form poem than anything else. It doesn't follow the same structure you might expect from a typical graphic novel, mostly eschewing panels for sp When I Arrived at the Castle is a pretty good encapsulation of what you'll get in a typical Emily Carroll story. It's got horror, gore, sensuality, and little bit of nudity. This is the longest single story I've read from Carroll, as Through the Woods was a collection. It is fairly short for a graphic novel.I'd probably describe this book more as a long form poem than anything else. It doesn't follow the same structure you might expect from a typical graphic novel, mostly eschewing panels for splash pages and breaking dialogue in rhythmic chunks. I think it's partly due to that poetic structure that I ended up being lost a lot of the time. It clears up a bit by the end, but it still didn't make a ton of sense to me, which, to be fair, I think was the desired effect.More importantly, this is visually striking, like all of Carroll's work. Her line work is beautiful, but it's her use of colors that make her works stand apart. She establishes better ambiance and feel with black, white, and red than most books manage to with a full pallet. The splash pages also serve to highlight the most dramatic moments in a smart way.I'm not sure I'd know what was happening no matter how many times I read this, but the artwork alone is worth the price of admission.
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  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    Really enjoyed this story! !The story reminded me a bit of "Us" in that bodies were switched(cat and girl) and the other wants revenge for the outcome from the switch (girl left waiting in the cupboard). Whereas in the movie "Us" they are doubles, this story depicts a woman and a feline/human. The woman (if I am to understand the story) is really the cat but the woman is also a vampire. The feline/human is actually the girl that eventually broke out of the cupboard to get revenge.The artwork rem Really enjoyed this story! !The story reminded me a bit of "Us" in that bodies were switched(cat and girl) and the other wants revenge for the outcome from the switch (girl left waiting in the cupboard). Whereas in the movie "Us" they are doubles, this story depicts a woman and a feline/human. The woman (if I am to understand the story) is really the cat but the woman is also a vampire. The feline/human is actually the girl that eventually broke out of the cupboard to get revenge.The artwork reminded me of Moto Hagio and a combination of Hideshi Hino & Junji Ito (when the body pops out of the skin and peeps through the peephole!!!). It's like this poor unfortunate anime character stumbled into Castlevania and wrecks house!
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    The art work was gorgeous and the story was very compelling, but I'm not sure I completely understood everything that happened. I might have to give it a re-read to see if I can pick up on more of what was going on.
  • Jacob Kolody
    January 1, 1970
    For some reason, I found this harder to follow than Emily Carroll’s other graphic novel “Through The Woods.” I also found the illustrations in “Through The Woods” much more beautiful. I’ll definitely re-read this eventually and try to get a better grasp of the story but I guess I just prefer her shorts to her full length stories.
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  • kit
    January 1, 1970
    lesbian day of visibility babey!! 🧛🏼♀ ⚢ lesbian day of visibility babey!! 🧛🏼‍♀️ ⚢
  • Miquel Rodriguez
    January 1, 1970
    Horny and spooky as usual, this new story somewhat touched me deeper than her previous work. A truly brilliant book.
  • Tony McMillen
    January 1, 1970
    Sensual and mythic, the story feels like an ether rag revelry scribbled into the iconography of some bent, new religion.
  • emma
    January 1, 1970
    Beautifully dark and gorey. exactly what i expect of emily carroll, tho more unclear than i’d have liked.
  • Madison
    January 1, 1970
    I mean, it’s Emily Carroll. Everything she’s ever done is incredible. I will say that this one was a bit harder to follow than her other work, but it’s the sort of thing you can read over and over to catch new details and explanations.
  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    This one just didn't do it for me. I like dark and I like fairy tales, but it was too gory for my tastes and the story didn't quite click.
  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    Emily Carroll reminds me of Angela Carter if her works were also told through pictures. Twisty and dark and creepy as heck (with hints of “wtf just happened”). Definitely not a graphic novel for people new to the format.
  • dg
    January 1, 1970
    HELL YEAH FUCK YEAH ALL RIGHT
  • Gabriel
    January 1, 1970
    This is like one of the decent/less memorable offerings from Through the Woods - such that I’m not totally sure why it’s its own book, save to compensate artist for craft more specifically, which I’m more than happy to do through this purchase. Aside from that, it’s all right. There’s nothing specifically wrong with it, nothing I could point to as the unwanted element in the story, aside from I guess a generalized lack of commitment in some respects.On second thought, I think it was missing a li This is like one of the decent/less memorable offerings from Through the Woods - such that I’m not totally sure why it’s its own book, save to compensate artist for craft more specifically, which I’m more than happy to do through this purchase. Aside from that, it’s all right. There’s nothing specifically wrong with it, nothing I could point to as the unwanted element in the story, aside from I guess a generalized lack of commitment in some respects.On second thought, I think it was missing a little more grounding in physical space - my favorites of Carroll’s work have a heavy presence of unreality and uncertainty but a very realized physical setting, and this one was sort of like a first-person short story that lapses into all commentary, no description.Still Carroll though, still worth looking at.
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  • Sarah Davis
    January 1, 1970
    I really looked forward to this new release by one of my favorite graphic novelists, Emily Carroll. The art was absolutely incredible, a real treat for horror fans, like a rapturous nightmare that consumes you while you read. However, I did find the story lacking any kind of solid narrative. At times it approaches a dreamlike surreal, but more often than not, I was just confused. I don’t think the ambiguity works here or justifies the mystery. The ending hinted at some kind of overall direction, I really looked forward to this new release by one of my favorite graphic novelists, Emily Carroll. The art was absolutely incredible, a real treat for horror fans, like a rapturous nightmare that consumes you while you read. However, I did find the story lacking any kind of solid narrative. At times it approaches a dreamlike surreal, but more often than not, I was just confused. I don’t think the ambiguity works here or justifies the mystery. The ending hinted at some kind of overall direction, but I don’t think it serves any story to bury the motivation at the end.
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  • Lisa Marie
    January 1, 1970
    Extremely disappointing. Especially when I gave Through the Woods a rare 5 stars.
  • Carmen Harris
    January 1, 1970
    I was highly disappointed with this comic. I bought it without even really taking a peek in it just because it was Emily Carroll and I loved Through the Woods. The writing here is sloppy and weak. The best part is, of course, her art style. Moreover, I do love the little fairy-tales woven within, and I think that is why I have given this book two stars instead of one. Because Emily Carroll has a great sense of art presence and style, often giving you hazy, dream-like atmospheres, which often com I was highly disappointed with this comic. I bought it without even really taking a peek in it just because it was Emily Carroll and I loved Through the Woods. The writing here is sloppy and weak. The best part is, of course, her art style. Moreover, I do love the little fairy-tales woven within, and I think that is why I have given this book two stars instead of one. Because Emily Carroll has a great sense of art presence and style, often giving you hazy, dream-like atmospheres, which often compliment her work well.I felt like this book was trying too hard to flash me boobs when it was unnecessary; it was clearly trying to be "sexy" or "erotic" but it just came off as silly and meh. (At some point I was laughing about it because it was just border-line ridiculous in some scenes.) Also, the "jump scare" in this added to the stupidness of the story. (Others might love this, find it scary, or even grotesque--I am not one of these people.) It was like a terrible horror movie that was trying to be "edgy" and "different" while still making you "feel things." I ended up just rolling my eyes because it was trying too hard and failing at telling an actual story just so it could throw in a "scare" or be sexy. I think Carroll got caught up in the wrong things with this tale, which really disappoints me since she can have some brilliant writing, which shows in many of her Through The Woods comics. Unless you're morbidly curious, I'd give this one a hard pass because it will just make you feel like you wasted your time on a dumb "horror movie" that you never wanted. However, I highly recommend Throug the Woods to see what Carroll is really capable of.
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  • Furiously Reading
    January 1, 1970
    Emily Carroll, horror comic extraordinaire, brings her readers yet another scintillating tale. When I Arrived At The Castle is a painfully too short gothic horror that begins on a rainy night with a half-cat, half-girl knocking on the castle door of a vampiress aptly named, The Countess. Cat girl’s mission is revealed as you read and flip through the gorgeous artwork. The trio of red, black and white creates a macabre setting tinged with raw sexual energy. The keyhole scene of The Countess is es Emily Carroll, horror comic extraordinaire, brings her readers yet another scintillating tale. When I Arrived At The Castle is a painfully too short gothic horror that begins on a rainy night with a half-cat, half-girl knocking on the castle door of a vampiress aptly named, The Countess. Cat girl’s mission is revealed as you read and flip through the gorgeous artwork. The trio of red, black and white creates a macabre setting tinged with raw sexual energy. The keyhole scene of The Countess is especially shocking. Emily Carroll does an amazing job at creating an ambiance and story with so few words. At times the pages are filled to the brim with artwork and images that make you think The Countess lives in a horrible funhouse. I can envision Tim Burton going ham bringing this graphic novel to the big screen. Like I said before, the story could have been twice as long and it would have felt more done - at least to my taste. The story feels like a first draft, there could have been so much more. At a price point of $15 ($19 CAD), there should be more than 15 minutes worth of story especially when the story feels so incomplete. Bundling this with a few others into a horror anthology would be more appropriate.An ARC was provided by Edelweiss and Koyama Press
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