Hellhole
A descent into terror.Legends tell of a hollow earth, a world beneath our own. A world filled with wonders... and danger. But what if the legends are true?Delve into dark worlds in HELLHOLE, where death lurks around every corner, and come face to face with creatures from your worst nightmares in this collection of dark thrillers. New York Times bestselling author Jonathan Maberry and Bram Stoker Award winner Rena Mason headline a cast of bestselling and award-winning authors.This collection includes:Introduction by James A. MooreAll the Devils are Here- A Joe Ledger/Lizzie Corbett Adventure by Jonathan MaberryThe Devil's Throat by Rena MasonA Plague of Locusts by Michael McBridePit of Ghosts by Kirsten CrossWhere the Sun Does Not Shine by Paul ManneringGuard Duty by SD PerryBlack Lung by Aaron SternsThe Offspring by J.H. MoncrieffGinormous Hell Snake by Jake BibleGhosts of Hyperia by Jessica McHughHe Who Fights by Sean EllisEdited by Lee Murray

Hellhole Details

TitleHellhole
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseDec 3rd, 2018
PublisherAdrenaline Press
Rating
GenreHorror

Hellhole Review

  • Lilyn G. | Sci-Fi & Scary
    January 1, 1970
    I want more anthologies curated by Lee Murray. I have issues with anthologies in general, and there’s only been a couple that I’ve truly liked. Most of them are too thick, the quality is too varied, and the tone wavers too much. That is not the case here. ‘Hellhole‘ feels like the emphasis was on quality over quantity, and each story was an enjoyable experience. There was only one story that I didn’t care for, and that was because it involved drugs. It wasn’t any less well-written than the other I want more anthologies curated by Lee Murray. I have issues with anthologies in general, and there’s only been a couple that I’ve truly liked. Most of them are too thick, the quality is too varied, and the tone wavers too much. That is not the case here. ‘Hellhole‘ feels like the emphasis was on quality over quantity, and each story was an enjoyable experience. There was only one story that I didn’t care for, and that was because it involved drugs. It wasn’t any less well-written than the others, it just wasn’t my bag. ‘Hellhole: An Anthology of Subterranean Terror‘ was a very well-curated read.Rather than talk about each story individually, I’m just going to hit my favorite ones briefly. This really is an anthology you will want to discover for yourself.My favorite story was the opening one – All the Devils are Here by Jonathan Maberry. No big surprise considering it’s a Joe Ledger story and I freaking love that series. It takes place after the end of ‘Deep Silence’, so there’s a minor spoiler mentioned at the beginning. It’s really not a big deal, though. Won’t affect your enjoyment of ‘Deep Silence’. In fact, it might make you even more eager to read it.The Devil’s Throat was a great follow-up. There was a scene in it which made me sit back in my chair and draw a breath in disgust. It wasn’t particularly unique, but she wrote it so well that I was there, seeing it myself. Definitely shudder-worthy. Actually, this whole story was just because of the creatures involved!SD Perry’s Guard Duty had an ending that caught me off guard. This one also contained my second favorite line in the whole book. I just can’t tell you what it is because of spoilers! (Sorry!) Guard Duty channels the Old Ones, so fans of Lovecraft’s sandbox will be delighted.…and, surprising absolutely no one who knows me, the final story I’m highlighting is Jake Bible’s Ginormous Hell Snake. Because you’ve got to love a story with that title. (And yes, it did include a ginormous hell snake.) The main characters had me laughing, the action had me disgusted… basically it was everything I’ve come to expect from a Jake Bible tale.As a side note: He Who Fights by Sean Ellis was a great choice to end on. While I didn’t love the story, I did like how nicely it complements the first story in ‘Hellhole‘. It felt like it closed a loop, and made for a satisfying ending.Overall, ‘Hellhole‘ is an excellent anthology filled with a wide range of characters and baddies. I thoroughly enjoyed it and highly recommend you pick it up and give it a go yourself.st wasn't my bag. Hellhole: An Anthology of Subterranean Terror was a very well-curated read.Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book free from the publisher for review consideration.
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  • Michael Hicks
    January 1, 1970
    Subterranean adventures are one of my favorite, must-read horror sub-genres (arctic terror is #1 and if anybody knows of any anthologies in this vein, or is planning on curating one, hit me up because I want to read the hell out of that!), so when New Zealand author Lee Murray announced she was editing Hellhole: An Anthology of Subterranean Terror and David Wood over at Adrenaline Press (and author of the Dane Maddock adventures) offered me an ARC, I immediately jumped at the opportunity to read Subterranean adventures are one of my favorite, must-read horror sub-genres (arctic terror is #1 and if anybody knows of any anthologies in this vein, or is planning on curating one, hit me up because I want to read the hell out of that!), so when New Zealand author Lee Murray announced she was editing Hellhole: An Anthology of Subterranean Terror and David Wood over at Adrenaline Press (and author of the Dane Maddock adventures) offered me an ARC, I immediately jumped at the opportunity to read this bad boy. A quick glance at the list of contributing authors lets you know straight away that you're in good, capable hands.As Christian Bentulan's cover art suggests, Hellhole is a militaristic anthology, and the stories collected within follow similar beats of a military unit or similar such government agency finding their way into the bowels of the earth and encountering things they previously only could have imagined. Jonathan Maberry kicks off Hellhole with a brand-new Joe Ledger novella set in the aftermath of his latest release, Deep Silence. I'm a late-comer to the Ledger series, but what I've read of it so far has made me a very quick convert and it's become a fast favorite of mine. "All The Devils Are Here" sets a damn high bar for the authors that follow and it's the perfect opener to this anthology (however, if, like me, you're not entirely caught up on Ledger's main book series, there is at least one big spoiler regarding a significant plot point from Deep Silence, so fair warning). Blessedly, the writers tasked with the unfortunate challenge of following in Maberry's footsteps are wholly up to the task. Michael McBride, a favorite of mine going back to his DarkFuse days with his two Snowblind novellas and, more recently, his Unit 51 series for Kensington, delivers a top-notch bio-thriller with his "A Plague of Locusts." I can always count on McBride to deliver the goods, and his weird science run amok story here is no exception. It's a Crichton-esque horror story that reaches back to the US’s biological and chemical weapons research during WWII, and it has a good bit of environmental commentary, too, as all that crap dumped into the earth wreaks havoc in the present day.Hellhole serves up a pretty wide variety of locales with the stories globe-hopping all over the place. J.H. Moncrieff takes us to Russia in "The Offspring," a short story nicely steeped in speculation over the Dyatlov legend, an incident that also served as inspiration for her Return to Dyatlov Pass creature-feature novel earlier this year. Aaron Sterns takes us into an underground Australian drug lab in "Black Lung," before Jake Bible takes us into the heart of the Amazon to fight a Ginormous Hell Snake. Paul Mannering's "Where The Sun Does Not Shine" provides a nice break from the book's predominately Earthly exploits by venturing into a hostile foreign world. It's not exactly a groundbreaking story (ha ha) with its highly familiar and obvious Aliens meets Tremors-inspired mashup, and is perhaps a bit too straight-forward of a run and gun adventure, but it sure is fun. And fun is the name of the game here! Lee Murray did a bang-up job assembling a broad range of talents well-known for their prowess in crafting smart, highly entertaining military horror thrillers and lets them off the hook to dig some deep, dark, dank holes to explore. The end result provides plenty of action, mayhem, and more than a few interesting creatures and speculative terrors. Hellhole is a remarkably strong anthology that hits the (under)ground running and doesn't let up. [Note: I received an advance reading copy of this title from the publisher, Adrenaline Press.]
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  • Steve Stred
    January 1, 1970
    ** Edited as Review is now live on Kendall Reviews**Strangely in 2018 I have read a fair number of single author collections yet not one multiple author anthology releases. Not sure how that even happened, but Hellhole finally ticked that box.The listing of included authors is impressive, but that can sometimes work as a detriment. Expectations can be too high going in, causing a let down by the material included.I can say easily, that is not the case here.Included within are short to border-lin ** Edited as Review is now live on Kendall Reviews**Strangely in 2018 I have read a fair number of single author collections yet not one multiple author anthology releases. Not sure how that even happened, but Hellhole finally ticked that box.The listing of included authors is impressive, but that can sometimes work as a detriment. Expectations can be too high going in, causing a let down by the material included.I can say easily, that is not the case here.Included within are short to border-line novella length stories from some of the best story tellers currently releasing stuff. Jonathan Mayberry, J.H. Moncrieff (who is easily tied as my favourite female author out there with someone named Ahlborn), Paul Mannering, Sean Ellis, Rena Mason, Michael McBride just to name a few.The interesting thing with this anthology is that while they all had a similar idea, the themes were so vast and different, I never once felt like I was reading the same tale over and over.That also brings me to the difficulty of picking a standout! I would personally choose The Offspring by J.H. Moncrieff simply because I loved Return to Dyatlov Pass and to keep this spoiler free, let’s just say if you have read that, you will love this.Michael McBride’s tale, Rena Mason’s story, Kristen Cross’s yarn and Paul Mannering’s offering all stack up so well together that it really makes for such a solid offering.One tale that will scream at you to read is Ginormous Hell Snake by Jake Bible. Seriously, that’s the title. The story is just as fantastic as it sounds.I personally have never read any of the Joe Ledger stories from Jonathan Mayberry, so I’m not sure if it offers anything more for fans of his, but it was a fun read to open the anthology with.This anthology works really well together and it definitely lived up to the billing.
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  • John R. Dailey Jr.
    January 1, 1970
    A BUNCH OF BIG NASTIES IT IS...Hello, this collection of tales had some real whoppers and some real weenie hut juniors. Most were real good. Thanks.
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