Migrations
For readers of Station Eleven and Everything I Never Told You, a debut novel set on the brink of catastrophe, as a young woman chases the world’s last birds—and her own final chance for redemption. A will is a powerful thing, and mine has been called terrible. Franny Stone has always been a wanderer. By following the ocean’s tides and the birds that soar above, she can forget the losses that have haunted her life. But when the wild she so loves begins to disappear, Franny can no longer wander without a destination. She arrives in remote Greenland with one purpose: to find the world’s last flock of Arctic terns and follow them on their final migration. She convinces Ennis Malone, captain of the Saghani, to take her onboard, winning over his salty, eccentric crew with promises that the birds she is tracking will lead them to fish.As the Saghani fights its way south, Franny’s new shipmates begin to realize that the beguiling scientist in their midst is not who she seems. Battered by night terrors, accumulating a pile of letters to her husband, and dead set on following the terns at any cost, Franny is full of dark secrets. When the story of her past begins to unspool, Ennis and his crew must ask themselves what Franny is really running toward—and running from.Propelled by a narrator as fierce and fragile as the terns she is following, Migrations is a shatteringly beautiful ode to the wild places and creatures now threatened. But at its heart, it is about the lengths we will go, to the very edges of the world, for the people we love.

Migrations Details

TitleMigrations
Author
ReleaseAug 25th, 2020
PublisherFlatiron Books
ISBN-139781250204028
Rating
GenreFiction, Science Fiction, Adult, Novels

Migrations Review

  • Jill
    January 1, 1970
    WOW. Just wow. This is a melancholy, haunting, gut-punch of a book that shattered my heart into little pieces because of its many truths.Franny Stone is a self-destructive narrator who harbors dark secrets that are stingily revealed during the course of this book. Her life is a migration without a destination but eventually it brings her to Greenland. There she connects with a motley crew and a half-mad captain of the ship Saghani and wheedles herself aboard to follow the last journey of a flock WOW. Just wow. This is a melancholy, haunting, gut-punch of a book that shattered my heart into little pieces because of its many truths.Franny Stone is a self-destructive narrator who harbors dark secrets that are stingily revealed during the course of this book. Her life is a migration without a destination but eventually it brings her to Greenland. There she connects with a motley crew and a half-mad captain of the ship Saghani and wheedles herself aboard to follow the last journey of a flock of Arctic ferns.Just about all the rest of the avian population – in fact, 80% of the world’s wildlife – has become extinct as a result of human gluttony, greed, and selfishness. The “glorious winged beasts that roamed the sky world” have been violently and indiscriminately slaughtered because of human indifference. But Franny wants to chart their final migration and even though it puts her in danger, she is determined to see her way through.Gradually, we begin to glean some shadows of Franny’s life; for instance, she writes letters to her husband Niall who is far away. But most of all, we feel the pain that has grabbed hold of her and keeps her hostage despite the wandering nature that is in her DNA. The entire story doesn’t come out until the final pages but it doesn’t stop us from aching for her—and for the Arctic terns and indeed, for the senselessness that makes it so hard for us to share our planet.I read this book not long after reading Yoko Ogawa’s The Memory Police and Midge Raymond’s My Last Continent. Although vastly different from those two, the cautionary theme of the enormous loss we will experience if we don’t act responsibly towards the world are a true wake-up call.Migrations doesn’t preach nor does it allow its very important message to overshadow character development and plot. I loved this book and am very grateful to Flatiron Books for enabling me to be an advance reader in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Sage
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars — I have a lot of feelings about this book and I don’t even know where to start. I’m not giving it 5 stars because I was so meh about it at the beginning, but that’s only because it wasn’t the type of book I usually gravitate toward, I suppose. Migrations is about a deeply flawed, fucked up, selkie of a woman named Franny Stone who starts the book in Greenland, trying to get passage on a ship so that she can track the last of the Arctic Terns, in a world where birds and other animals 4.5 stars — I have a lot of feelings about this book and I don’t even know where to start. I’m not giving it 5 stars because I was so meh about it at the beginning, but that’s only because it wasn’t the type of book I usually gravitate toward, I suppose. Migrations is about a deeply flawed, fucked up, selkie of a woman named Franny Stone who starts the book in Greenland, trying to get passage on a ship so that she can track the last of the Arctic Terns, in a world where birds and other animals are rapidly becoming extinct due to climate change and humans being the worst™️She finds passage on a fishing vessel called the Saghani, and is reluctantly embraced (after a lot of doubt and annoyance) by the ship’s crew, who are baffled that their stalwart captain would allow a random, non-seafaring civilian on their fishing expedition. The book flashes back to different times in Franny’s life — her early childhood in Ireland with her mam, being raised by her grandmother in Australia, her first meetings and marriage to Professor Niall Lynch, and their experiences at wildlife sanctuaries, desperately trying to save dying species from extinction. I usually don’t like books that skip chronologically, I like things to be very in order and linear, and I find that skipping around is confusing. I’ll admit I was a little thrown off by the jumping around different years and places and characters, but by the end I totally saw how they all fit together. But this book was beautiful and heartbreaking and made me laugh out loud and gasp in shock and sadness and have a million other feelings in between. I just HAD to finish it so I could know what happened, so I ended up reading it in like 2 days, on my commutes to/from work hahaha
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    I was trying to figure out why it was taking me a little longer than usual to get through this novel. In the end, I think I was savoring not just the language but the melancholy. There is something deeply satisfying in a story told slowly and deliberately and I came to understand that this was exactly the right pace for this novel. This is the story of migration and movement and the natural course of things. It's about the pain we carry and the burden of deep empathy by some and abject neglect I was trying to figure out why it was taking me a little longer than usual to get through this novel. In the end, I think I was savoring not just the language but the melancholy. There is something deeply satisfying in a story told slowly and deliberately and I came to understand that this was exactly the right pace for this novel. This is the story of migration and movement and the natural course of things. It's about the pain we carry and the burden of deep empathy by some and abject neglect by others. The novel takes place at a time when animals are dying out and comes at the right time for us now, as we see the effects of extreme weather endangering and killing off one species after the next. I was struck reading Franny's story of grief, thinking about the precarious nature of life and death. McConaghy writes that "in our self-importance, in our strive for meaning, we have forgotten to share the planet that gave us life." I wonder what animal it is for me—or for you, reader-of-this-review—that would have to die out to spark me to action and whether that action would be much too little or much too late. I wonder if we are already too late.
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  • Sudalu
    January 1, 1970
    No book has captured me quite like this. Family, wildlife, science, romance and hope are interwoven in this seamless and beautiful novel by Charlotte McConaghy. The main character is such a strong, shattered, lost soul on a mission that you will make you cheer her on as you want to envelope in a big hug. The romance she has with her orintoligist husband is one you will envy. The mystery surrounding her Mam and Da will possess you to flip the pages well into the night. The plight of the last No book has captured me quite like this. Family, wildlife, science, romance and hope are interwoven in this seamless and beautiful novel by Charlotte McConaghy. The main character is such a strong, shattered, lost soul on a mission that you will make you cheer her on as you want to envelope in a big hug. The romance she has with her orintoligist husband is one you will envy. The mystery surrounding her Mam and Da will possess you to flip the pages well into the night. The plight of the last birds, The Arctic Terns, will leave you ready to take on the fight to save the creatures being lost by our never ending appetites for comfort and food. There is also a sense of folklore and hope. For fans of Barbara Kingsolver. Cannot wait to talk about this with someone.
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  • Audrey
    January 1, 1970
    An effortlessly beautifully tale about a woman following the migration of the last arctic terns from Greenland to Antarctica. Most wildlife is now extinct, including most fish and birds, Franny talks her way onto a fishing boat to follow these precious birds to fishing grounds. Her past slowly unfolds as does the hardship of the fishing life. And the consequences of humankind’s thoughtless actions on our world. This book grabbed my heart from the first sentence and didn’t let go until I reached An effortlessly beautifully tale about a woman following the migration of the last arctic terns from Greenland to Antarctica. Most wildlife is now extinct, including most fish and birds, Franny talks her way onto a fishing boat to follow these precious birds to fishing grounds. Her past slowly unfolds as does the hardship of the fishing life. And the consequences of humankind’s thoughtless actions on our world. This book grabbed my heart from the first sentence and didn’t let go until I reached the end. I received an arc from the publisher but all opinions are my own.
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  • Sara Murphy
    January 1, 1970
    Equally beautiful and gripping. A love letter to the other species who share our planet -- to their pure wildness, to the miracle of their existence and the brutality of their loss in the face of human selfishness. Franny's own internal wildness makes her sharp, vulnerable, and fascinating all at once. I still feel stunned after finishing the final page.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    First, thank you to Goodreads for the ARC of this wonderful book. What a stunning, melancholy, visceral book. A young woman, with a wandering soul in search of meaning in her life coincides with her study of the migration of the Arctic tern. The atmospheric writing is amazing and there is enough unspoken secrets to keep you immersed. This book will touch your soul.
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  • Dulcey Heller
    January 1, 1970
    Devoured in an evening. This is one of those rare books that continues to expand within you as you read, both breaking and filling your heart.
  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely brilliant. A warning, a struggle for survival warring against the urge to give in, give up. An incredible book.
  • Simon
    January 1, 1970
    It's just a shame that this book doesn't come out until August 2020, because it needs to be read, and I can't wait to recommend it to our customers at Page 1 Books. This beautifully told, cleverly constructed story of extinction, redemption, and last chances very nearly broke my heart. Neither we nor our world has ever felt as fragile as it does here, but I closed it inspired and determined
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  • Eric
    January 1, 1970
    A haunting but beautiful love letter to the natural world and everything that resides in it. With prose that beg to be read over and over. This book came out of nowhere and left me stunned.
  • Jody Yarnall
    January 1, 1970
    This book was wonderful, full of emotion, fear, turmoil, love, life, and death. It’s the end of the world and greed has won. Its the end of life as we know it. Of hard salty folk who don’t know how to stop. It’s a sad story of what will come if humans don’t change their ways, love for the earth and all its inhabitants. Sad, hurt people who see a light, a chance for redemption. This story is our story, our end, but it offers hope, and the magnification ending made me cry.
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  • Craig Lister
    January 1, 1970
    The Last Migration is a wonderfully written book. This story focuses on Franny Stone, who is a deeply flawed and self-destructive woman with a dark past. The novel is written in the first-person perspective, which is one of my favourites style of books, and because of that, I feel the characters are the most substantial aspect of this book. I feel I need to clear up some things. Some misconceptions I had before reading this book, and I want to tell future readers that might have the same The Last Migration is a wonderfully written book. This story focuses on Franny Stone, who is a deeply flawed and self-destructive woman with a dark past. The novel is written in the first-person perspective, which is one of my favourites style of books, and because of that, I feel the characters are the most substantial aspect of this book. I feel I need to clear up some things. Some misconceptions I had before reading this book, and I want to tell future readers that might have the same misconceptions I had for this book. If you're looking for an actioned packed book, then you're going to be disappointed. This is a character piece set against a world where wildlife is mostly extinct. If you're hoping for some powerful social message about the mistreatment of our planet, then you're going to be disappointed. The Last Migration is about its characters, and in my opinion, the story is a much richer experience because of it. I give this story 7/10.
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  • Noreen
    January 1, 1970
    This will be an important book in 2020. It was a dark and disturbing tale about a possible future where our birds, fish, and animals are barely surviving on this earth. A woman with her own issues sets out to follow the migration of the lastArctic terns.
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  • Carolyn
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advance copy from Flatiron Books, thank you very much.I really enjoyed this book, which surprised me a little, because when I read the description before starting, I had my doubts. The story centers around Franny Stone. The story shifts between her current quest and her past and what has brought her to this point. She is in Greenland, desperately trying to convince any fisherman to take her along so that she can follow the last migration of the Artic Terns. She fears that climate I received an advance copy from Flatiron Books, thank you very much.I really enjoyed this book, which surprised me a little, because when I read the description before starting, I had my doubts. The story centers around Franny Stone. The story shifts between her current quest and her past and what has brought her to this point. She is in Greenland, desperately trying to convince any fisherman to take her along so that she can follow the last migration of the Artic Terns. She fears that climate change and over fishing have weakened the population so much, that this could be their last migration. While she knows that over fishing is one of the reasons their population is shrinking, she tries to sell the journey to Fisherman by explaining that the Terns will take them to the fish. She finally convinces Ennis Malone and his band of misfit mates to take the journey and go further than they have every fished before past the equator to Antarica. Alternating chapters go back in Franny's past. She describes herself as a restless wanderer, from a family of wanderers. She didn't know her father, her mother disappeared when she was a child. She lived in Ireland and Australia, she lived with her grandmother who was harsh, and she found her true love in her husband Niall Lynch, and eventually goes to Greenland. Niall is a professor and passionate about how quickly birds are being threatened by extinction. Under his wing, this becomes her passion also. It becomes clear that there is something broken in her and something much deeper drawing her to this journey. The descriptions throughout this book are wonderful and really make you feel like you're right there with her I won't spoil be adding more.
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  • Ampersand Inc.
    January 1, 1970
    This book was really wonderful. It’s so hard to come up with an elevator pitch for, but the writing was really lovely, and the story had me in its grips immediately.
  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars
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