Pan's Labyrinth
Fans of dark fairy-tales like The Hazel Wood and The Cruel Prince will relish this atmospheric and absorbing book based on Guillermo del Toro’s critically acclaimed movie.Oscar winning writer-director Guillermo del Toro and New York Times bestselling author Cornelia Funke have come together to transform del Toro’s hit movie Pan’s Labyrinth into an epic and dark fantasy novel for readers of all ages, complete with haunting illustrations and enchanting short stories that flesh out the folklore of this fascinating world.This spellbinding tale takes readers to a sinister, magical, and war-torn world filled with richly drawn characters like trickster fauns, murderous soldiers, child-eating monsters, courageous rebels, and a long-lost princess hoping to be reunited with her family.A brilliant collaboration between masterful storytellers that’s not to be missed.“Perfectly unsettling and deeply felt, this reminded me of the best kind of fairytales wherein each chapter is a jewel that, when held up to the light, reframes how we see the world around us.” —Roshani Chokshi, New York Times bestselling author of The Star-Touched Queen and Aru Shah and the End of Time“A fearless and moving adaption of the film, and a gorgeously written, emotional, frightening parable about the courage of young women amid the brutality of war.” —Michael Grant, New York Times bestselling author of Gone

Pan's Labyrinth Details

TitlePan's Labyrinth
Author
ReleaseJul 2nd, 2019
PublisherKatherine Tegen Books
ISBN-139780062414465
Rating
GenreFantasy, Horror, Young Adult, Fiction

Pan's Labyrinth Review

  • Charlotte May
    January 1, 1970
    I can pick this up from the library. Repeat: I CAN NOW PICK THIS UP FROM THE LIBRARY!!!!!! *hyperventilates*1. I love Pan's Labyrinth2. I love Cornelia FunkeI NEED THIS BOOK LIKE AIR!!
  • Paromjit
    January 1, 1970
    This was a turn up for the books, a novel of the mesmerising and stunning 2006 film Pan's Labyrinth by Guillermo del Toro that I adored, written by the film director and Cornelia Funke, with details and analysis of the film. Reading this bought back the movie in much of its original glory, haunting, tragic, painful, the magical realism, the darkest of fairy tales, immersing me in all its vibrant intensity. There is the young girl, Ofelia, living in the brutality and terrors of the fascist Franco This was a turn up for the books, a novel of the mesmerising and stunning 2006 film Pan's Labyrinth by Guillermo del Toro that I adored, written by the film director and Cornelia Funke, with details and analysis of the film. Reading this bought back the movie in much of its original glory, haunting, tragic, painful, the magical realism, the darkest of fairy tales, immersing me in all its vibrant intensity. There is the young girl, Ofelia, living in the brutality and terrors of the fascist Franco's regime. Ofelia desperately longs for and dreams of a world free of the everyday nightmares of her life, finding herself in an alternative version of Alice, a labyrinth which is so much darker in its myths and magic, reflecting the realities of life, a war torn nation and fascism. This novel effortlessly captures so much of vitality of the film, reinforcing just how imaginative and beautiful it is, and the despair of this historical period in Spain with added information on the film. Many thanks to Bloomsbury for an ARC.
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  • Helena of Sparta ✰
    January 1, 1970
    "You're getting older, and you'll see that life isn't like your fairy tales. The world is a cruel place. And you'll learn that, even if it hurts."This was one odd and creepy story...but I liked it! I can see why it's a cult classic.RTC
  • Candace Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    Pan’s Labyrinth is one of my all time favorite movies, so if you love it you’ll definitely like this book! The descriptions were gorgeous and perfect. My only complaint is I hate seeing movies first and reading a book second!! Also, I seriously love Guillermo del Toro!!! ❤❤ Pan’s Labyrinth is one of my all time favorite movies, so if you love it you’ll definitely like this book! The descriptions were gorgeous and perfect. My only complaint is I hate seeing movies first and reading a book second!! Also, I seriously love Guillermo del Toro!!! ❤️❤️
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  • Emer (A Little Haze)
    January 1, 1970
    I have never wanted to see the film because I think it's the type of film that would unsettle me too much with its dark imagery, and yet as soon as I heard it was to be adapted and expanded upon for a novel I knew I wanted to read it! It's strange how I will read books that have darker themes but won't watch films...I think it's because when I read I don't necessarily clearly visualise the events of the book in my mind's eye but instead I experience these events in a much more abstract manner. A I have never wanted to see the film because I think it's the type of film that would unsettle me too much with its dark imagery, and yet as soon as I heard it was to be adapted and expanded upon for a novel I knew I wanted to read it! It's strange how I will read books that have darker themes but won't watch films...I think it's because when I read I don't necessarily clearly visualise the events of the book in my mind's eye but instead I experience these events in a much more abstract manner. ANYWHO!The book... I did really like it! It was very much an ode to Grimm style fairytales and the darker side of some of my favourite films from the 80s (Labyrinth, Return to Oz, Neverending Story). At times it felt almost middle grade but then at times it was 100% adult and I liked that juxtaposition of the two. It really calls to mind those same feelings I had as a child when I listened to ghost stories or got creeped out by monsters etc etc. Seeing as it was fairytale-esque the characters were all a bit on the stereotypical side but I don't think I would have liked them to be otherwise. I particularly liked how the book split itself between the folklore-style stories of how the underworld influenced ancient times, and the historical fiction narrative of civil war ravaged Spain. The book was also beautifully illustrated throughout which added to its charm. I definitely enjoyed this but my rating is somewhere around the 3.5 mark as I have preferred other fairytale-style adult books a lot more (John Connolly's The Book of Lost Things, Dale Bailey's In the Night Wood) For more reviews and book related chat check out my blog
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  • Nils | nilsreviewsit
    January 1, 1970
    ‘Only books talked about all the things adults didn’t want you to ask about - Life. Death. Good and Evil. And what else truly mattered in life.’~Pan’s Labyrinth was originally a Spanish fantasy/horror film written and directed by Guillermo del Toro, that I believe was released in 2006. To say that I enjoyed the film would be such an understatement because to tell the truth, I absolutely adored it and still do. In my opinion it is one of the best fantasy films there is, and will always be special ‘Only books talked about all the things adults didn’t want you to ask about - Life. Death. Good and Evil. And what else truly mattered in life.’~Pan’s Labyrinth was originally a Spanish fantasy/horror film written and directed by Guillermo del Toro, that I believe was released in 2006. To say that I enjoyed the film would be such an understatement because to tell the truth, I absolutely adored it and still do. In my opinion it is one of the best fantasy films there is, and will always be special to me.Therefore, when I saw that Guillermo del Toro and Cornelia Funke (author of Inkheart) were collaborating and releasing a novelisation of Pan’s Labyrinth my excitement for this was through the roof! I’m delighted to say I wasn’t disappointed either, because this book was as enchanting, surreal and as captivating as I hoped it would be. I’d like to note that you do not need to have watched the film before reading this novel, in fact I’d personally suggest reading this one first. The story is set in a remote village in Spain, in 1944 after Franco's ascension to power and his dictatorship. A young girl called Ofelia is moving with her pregnant mother, after the death of her father, to live with her mother’s new husband - Vidal, who is a captain in Franco’s fascist army. What follows from there is the journey of Ofelia as she discovers a mysterious Labyrinth in the woods near her new home. Its a beautiful, luring place, but not without its dark side. She meets and a ghastly yet seemingly kindly faun called, Pan. However, the quests the faun sets her on are dangerous and filled with horror, and Ofelia soon questions whether she should trust Pan’s guidance. This book isn’t just a fairytale-esque adventure. Far from it actually, as the dark magical plot with Ofelia is set against the backdrop of a war torn Spain. Vidal, the Capitan, is as disturbing and dangerous as the fantastical creatures Ofelia meets. He is quick to temper, cruel, and has a rather sadistic side. There are resistance fighters hiding in the woods that are intent on liberating the rationed food and medicines they need. Vidal’s sole mission is to eradicate each one of them, which he relishes in doing. There are some quite violent scenes from him, that realistically show his psychopathic nature. He was one of those villains you could truly hate and wish for his comeuppance. Pan’s Labyrinth is most definitely multi layered and shows a stark and poignant portrayal of the horrors of warfare.I feel here that Del Toro and Funke both effectively illustrate to the reader that monsters come in all shapes and sizes. There are outright nightmarish monsters such as The Pale Man who eats children, then there are cruel, monstrous humans like Capitan Vidal, and there are also more subtle, manipulative beings like the Faun, who are just as perilous. I’m utterly awed by the amount of themes this beautiful short novel managed to pack in, and it just showed how perfect the fantasy genre is to reflect on so much.~‘Evil seldom takes shape immediately. It is often little more than a whisper at first. A glance. A betrayal. But then it grows and takes root, still invisible, unnoticed. Only fairytales give evil a proper shape. The big bad wolves, the evil kings, the demons and devils...’~The narrative also alternates between the past and the present, which I thoroughly enjoyed. Predominantly we follow Ofelia’s quest, and another main character, Mercedes, as she tries to protect her brother - a rebel resistance fighter. Then there were also many chapters that were seemingly separate short fairytales. These told stories of a princess who disappeared, a witch and a curse, a watchmaker, and so on, but these actually extremely cleverly intertwined with the main narrative. It was really gratifying picking up clues and discovering how all these narratives connected. The illustrations that accompanied the beginning of each of these tales were such a welcomed addition too as it truly enhanced the experience by seeing the visual representation of some scenes.I honestly feel that Pan’s Labyrinth is a ‘modern’ classic tale that pays homage to the style of the Brothers Grimm. Del Toro and Funke’s beautiful lyrical prose brings to life a story of loss, hardship, and ultimately of sacrifice. This is one novel I hope many will fall in love with, like I did. A huge thank you to Bloomsbury publishers for sending me a proof copy of Pan’s Labyrinth. This book is released on 2nd July 2019.All quotes used in this review are taken from an uncorrected proof and are subject to change upon publication.
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  • Hollis
    January 1, 1970
    So, I totally thought this was an MG story and hahahaha no.I don't know about the rest of you but when I think Pan's Labyrinth I think [insert creepy dude with eyes in the palms of his hands here]. I only saw the movie once, a million years ago, and I thought this was an extension of the story or just inspired by it. But from what I understand (because I sure don't remember enough to say for certain) is that this is an expanded, additionally layered, version of the movie itself.Which should tell So, I totally thought this was an MG story and hahahaha no.I don't know about the rest of you but when I think Pan's Labyrinth I think [insert creepy dude with eyes in the palms of his hands here]. I only saw the movie once, a million years ago, and I thought this was an extension of the story or just inspired by it. But from what I understand (because I sure don't remember enough to say for certain) is that this is an expanded, additionally layered, version of the movie itself.Which should tell you who should or should not be reading this.This is classified as YA I think but it is quite dark, if not considered outright horror, but it's not just the fantastical elements that are dark. It's the human elements, too. The brutalities done not only by bad men during times of war but bad men, period, who need no excuse.There is melancholy and bitterness and grief and loneliness and yet the enduring belief in magic, in fairytales, in hope, too. The story is both bleak and yet also whimsical, captivatingly creative and cringey creepy, and the illustrations were just gorgeous.This book consumed me and I loved every moment. ** I received an ARC from the publisher (thank you!) in exchange for an honest review. **---This review can also be found at A Take From Two Cities.
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  • Patricija - ReadOff
    January 1, 1970
    This was one of my most anticipated releases of the year, and I was NOT DISAPPOINTED. Cornelia Funke (+ Guillermo del Toro) did it again. This is dark, twisted, whimsical and I'd recommend it for Halloween, and definitely not for kids if they don't like scary stuff.So TGW: Abuse, war, gore, slaughter, torture, death and other.Eventhough in the synopsis, it says there are multiple stories (which there are), there are all connected and form one bigger story, and also, the main story is always in t This was one of my most anticipated releases of the year, and I was NOT DISAPPOINTED. Cornelia Funke (+ Guillermo del Toro) did it again. This is dark, twisted, whimsical and I'd recommend it for Halloween, and definitely not for kids if they don't like scary stuff.So TGW: Abuse, war, gore, slaughter, torture, death and other.Eventhough in the synopsis, it says there are multiple stories (which there are), there are all connected and form one bigger story, and also, the main story is always in the main focus so you can't read this as a short story collection.I loved all the creatures in this book, especially because in one point I wasn't sure if some of them are the good guys or bad guys which made me love the book even more. From all the characters, I loved Mercedes most due to how courageous she is and her role in the book.P.S I did not see the movie yet
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    It's been many many years since I've seen the film, and that doesn't matter at all. This book is a lush, immersive dark fairy tale about justice, honor, and doing what's right for human kind, no matter how dire the circumstances may be. Del Toro and Funke make an excellent pair, and this book allows a unique opportunity to really see Pan's world and the layers within it.I read an ARC and can't wait to peruse a finished copy. It's going to be beautiful, as the interior is highly designed.
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  • Celia McMahon
    January 1, 1970
    I'm watching Pan's Labyrinth as I write this review because it seems like the right thing to do. As one of my favorite movies of all time, I had to request this title from Edelweiss. I told them I would give them a leg to be able to review this title. Since they allowed me this honor, I think one of my legs now belongs to Katherine Tegen. This review may contain spoilers for those who have not seen the movie.When I first saw Pan's Labyrinth in the theater, I knew right away that it would cement I'm watching Pan's Labyrinth as I write this review because it seems like the right thing to do. As one of my favorite movies of all time, I had to request this title from Edelweiss. I told them I would give them a leg to be able to review this title. Since they allowed me this honor, I think one of my legs now belongs to Katherine Tegen. This review may contain spoilers for those who have not seen the movie.When I first saw Pan's Labyrinth in the theater, I knew right away that it would cement a place in my heart. Now only did it have the magic, it had the brutality of reality coexisting. Whether Ofelia truly saw all the things she did is up to interpretation. This book made clear some of those things but still left it up to you. It also went into detail some of the histories of the mill where Ofelia and her mother come to live, and tells some tales of Princess Moanna that we weren't quite aware of in the movie."It is said that, long, long ago, there lived a princess in an underground realm, where neither lies no pain exist, who dreamt of the human world."The story opens with the short tale of Princess Moanna, who wished to see the world above her own. But upon arriving above ground, she forgot who she was and wandered the world until she died. Knowing her spirit would never die, her father the king never gave up looking for her. Spain 1944. Thirteen-year-old Ofelia arrives at an old mill with her pregnant mother where they would come to live with Capitan Vidal, a sadist whose only goal is to kill the rebels and deliver a healthy son. Ofelia knows he's sour straight away, but avoids him for the sake of her mother. Vidal, to me, is one of the scariest villains I've ever seen on screen and he is no different in the book. Ofelia stumbles upon a labyrinth on the land where she meets Pan, a faun who tells her that she is the reincarnation of Princess Moanna, but to be sure, she must carry out three tasks. With each task, Ofelia tests the limits of bravery and will. In one of the tensest scenes in movie history, she meets The Pale Man (we find out about this monster's history in one of the chapters!) on one of these tasks and barely makes it out alive. Having made a grave mistake during her confrontation with the creature, Pan disavows Ofelia."Our worst fears are always underneath us, hidden, shaking the ground we wish to be firm and safe."All the while, one of the workers at the mill, Mercedes, is aiding the rebels. One of which is her brother. Along with her in betraying Vidal is Dr. Ferreira who works closely with Vidal and Carmen, Ofelia's mother during her difficult pregnancy. In them, we see another type of bravery, which is far greater than anything seeing who they answer to. Vidal is a monster and to betray such a man is risking your very life. The story comes together as Carmen dies giving birth, and Mercedes is discovered as a spy. Wrought with sadness, Pan comes to Ofelia, telling her he will allow her one last chance to prove herself. He tells her to bring her baby brother to the labyrinth. Meanwhile, Mercedes is captured and escapes by seriously injuring Vidal. Upon arriving at the labyrinth with her brother, Ofelia discovers that Pain wants her to spill a bit of his blood to open the portal back to their world. But Ofelia refuses to harm her brother. In response, the faun disappears, and Vidal comes to reclaim his son and shoots Ofelia. "In our choices, lies our fate."Mercedes and her brother Pedro await Vidal when he tries to exit the labyrinth and, only after taking the infant from him, shoot him dead, assuring him he would never know his son and his son would never know of him. Ofelia finds herself in a place where her mother and father are well and alive. As are the fairies she had lost to The Pale Man. Pan explains that she had completed the final task and had finally come home. This book does not gloss over the violent scenes that jarred us in the movie. I found myself skipping one particular. Let it be known that this is not a kid's story. It is brutal and emotional. To go into further detail of what was real and what was not, I tend to lean in the direction that everything Ofelia experienced was real and the books seem to elude to that, BUT different will see different things and may feel like it leaned more to that everything was in Ofelia's head. As a child of war, she is overcome by loss and worry. We see it all through her eyes, which is devastating to anyone. Guillermo, according to an article I once read, says that he hates words, but his collaboration with Funke tells a different story. Nothing can compare to the cinematic wonder that is one of his best works, but this book does a great job complimenting it. The violence of the real world echoes in the tasks Ofelia must complete. There are some great posts online detailing these so it would be good for those who are interested so my review doesn't get too long-winded. Part of me hopes, GDT reads this review. Since Katherine Tegen has lain claim to one of my legs, I might as well offer the other to know he's read this and knows that his movies (and books) have touched my life. I hope this one does the same for you, dear readers.
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  • Kyle
    January 1, 1970
    I’m so ready to be awe-struck and heartbroken all over again.
  • Misstdennis
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsThis book is something special and I really enjoyed my time while reading this.I absolutely loved the movie and when I saw that this book had been published in honour of the film, I just had to get my hands on it.Pan's Labyrinth: The Labyrinth of the Faun has such a beautiful and moody setting and you couldn’t help but feel like you’re reading a dark fairytale. As I saw the film, I knew the plot and what happens, however I still felt enchanted and felt like I couldn’t put this down. Not 4.5 starsThis book is something special and I really enjoyed my time while reading this.I absolutely loved the movie and when I saw that this book had been published in honour of the film, I just had to get my hands on it.Pan's Labyrinth: The Labyrinth of the Faun has such a beautiful and moody setting and you couldn’t help but feel like you’re reading a dark fairytale. As I saw the film, I knew the plot and what happens, however I still felt enchanted and felt like I couldn’t put this down. Not only was the story captivating, the illustrations in this book are just so beautiful and really made this story come to life.”The moon will be full in three days. Your spirit shall forever remain among the humans. You shall age like them, you shall die like them, and all memory of you shall fade in time. And we'll vanish along with it. You will never see us again.” I urge anyone to pick this up. It’s just so lovely, heartbreaking and whimsical.
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  • Stephanie Jane (Literary Flits)
    January 1, 1970
    See more of my book reviews on my blog, Literary FlitsI'm not a great fan of film versions of books so I wasn't sure how I would get on with a book version of a film. However I am such a fan of del Toro's work that, when I spotted Pan's Labyrinth on NetGalley, I knew I had to give this a try. I'm so glad I did because I absolutely loved losing myself in this story. The novelisation does, obviously, follow the film's storyline, but reading it never felt as though Funke was just recreating the fil See more of my book reviews on my blog, Literary FlitsI'm not a great fan of film versions of books so I wasn't sure how I would get on with a book version of a film. However I am such a fan of del Toro's work that, when I spotted Pan's Labyrinth on NetGalley, I knew I had to give this a try. I'm so glad I did because I absolutely loved losing myself in this story. The novelisation does, obviously, follow the film's storyline, but reading it never felt as though Funke was just recreating the film in prose. Instead this is a wonderfully dark adult fairytale creation in its own right. The melding of callous wartime violence with fantasy themes works brilliantly well. The most evil actions here are certainly carried out by humans although I don't think anyone can be said to be completely evil or completely good. I loved the emotional depth achieved which is unusual for a fairytale-style narrative, and the setting portrayals are superbly atmospheric. I don't know if I could say that I now prefer the book to the film, but Pan's Labyrinth will certainly be a contender for my Book of the Month!
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  • Lost
    January 1, 1970
    One of my most vivid memories of GCSE Spanish is watching in mute horror as the Pale Man bit a faerie in half.Pan’s Labyrinth inspired a fear in me that I don’t think I’ve come across in a film since. It’s fantasy, but it’s dark. It’s twisted. There is only the tiniest sliver of hope woven through the entire thing.That is precisely what this book is built upon. It’s a faithful adaptation of the film, with beautiful imagery that adds to the fantasy. You really get the sense of a faerytale come to One of my most vivid memories of GCSE Spanish is watching in mute horror as the Pale Man bit a faerie in half.Pan’s Labyrinth inspired a fear in me that I don’t think I’ve come across in a film since. It’s fantasy, but it’s dark. It’s twisted. There is only the tiniest sliver of hope woven through the entire thing.That is precisely what this book is built upon. It’s a faithful adaptation of the film, with beautiful imagery that adds to the fantasy. You really get the sense of a faerytale come to life with this – of course Ofelia is the princess. How could she not be? Vidal is every inch the Wolf, hunting his prey through the pages, right to the very last. It’s actually (somehow!) darker than I remember – this isn’t a children’s book, and you could just barely justify it as YA.I’m a huge fan of this being an adult fantasy with a child protagonist – it takes me right back to when I was a kid, reading fantasy to escape from my world, but has the darker tone that I’ve come to appreciate from more “grown-up” works. The whole theme of reality being as dangerous (if not more so!) than fantasy is captivating; as an adult I think I get that more than when I watched the film.To go back to Vidal for second – I think he’s probably one of my favourite antagonists, because he’s such a bastard. He’s razor sharp, Ofelia labels him a wolf, but he’s still human, and we all know that humans are the scariest monsters of all. I think the most terrifying thing is that everyone knows someone like this. We all know someone who refuses to acknowledge when they’re wrong, who acts only in their own self-interests, and the fact that they can so easily become a villain is horrific.Mercedes, on the other hand, is my hero. She’s truly one of the strongest, bravest, most loving female characters I’ve ever come across and lemme tell you something – she is badass. There were a couple of scenes that had me quietly cheering alone in my room, and honestly, just pick this up for her alone.Something I LOVED was the inclusion of the older “faerytales”, the myths that build up the world that Ofelia is just now stepping into. The serve to enrich the narrative, adding a whole other layer of depth to the legend of the labyrinth. I think I perhaps need to reread this one to properly appreciate just how seamlessly everything slots together; as it is, I kinda raced through the novel because it was just so. damn. good.Pan’s character has also always confused me a little. I’m never really sure on what his relationship with Ofelia is, and that isn’t really cleared up in this novel. However, I think the mystery is a part of the story, so I’m not going to complain too much – the human characters make up most of the story anyway.(view spoiler)[The ending is rather bittersweet; my feelings toward it remain the same as they were when I first watched it. I’m always slightly disappointed, as I expected Ofelia to find her “true” happy ending with Mercedes. Of course she deserves the happy ending she gets – that’s what the entire novel is about, after all. I just feel that the totally separate land she goes to betrays the bond she forms with Mercedes and her baby brother.Maybe that’s the point, though: fantasy has no place in this reality. Despite all the tales interwoven throughout the book suggesting otherwise, it does seem that magic in our world is dead. To experience true happiness, you must leave this world – all it can offer is pain and suffering, and the inevitable marching of time that means you’ll one day be forgotten. (hide spoiler)]I’ve gone into Lit student mode with that analysis, I am now realising, and it’s really rather bleak. So, in an effort to make this a smidge more cheerful, I will reiterate the fact that this book has magic!! And a happy ending!! And faeries!!It’s a wonderful novel which I read largely over the course of one day – if you’re a fan of the film (or fantasy in general) then what are you waiting for? Go get your mitts on a copy of this!!
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  • Sha
    January 1, 1970
    i can't wait to read this book. Pan's Labyrinth is a hugeee movie fave of mine (fantasy/soft-horror on the screen and my heart is screaming) nd having del Toro himself co-author the novelization with magical realism QUEEN Cornelia Funke?*clutches pearls*i'm n o t r e a d y UPDATEDisclaimer: I received this ARC courtesy of HCC Frenzy through direct request. I am grateful for the opportunity to review an ARC for my readers, but this will not influence my final rating. All opinions expressed i i can't wait to read this book. Pan's Labyrinth is a hugeee movie fave of mine (fantasy/soft-horror on the screen and my heart is screaming) nd having del Toro himself co-author the novelization with magical realism QUEEN Cornelia Funke?*clutches pearls*i'm n o t r e a d y UPDATEDisclaimer: I received this ARC courtesy of HCC Frenzy through direct request. I am grateful for the opportunity to review an ARC for my readers, but this will not influence my final rating. All opinions expressed in this review are my own and based solely on the book. I won’t spend several paragraphs gushing about my love for the original Pan’s Labyrinth, although yes that passion exists and yes that is what drew me to the book edition in the first place. My first assumption of the book, on seeing the cover, was that it was a graphic novel adaptation. I was wrong, this is in truth a movie novelization, but there are original stories and illustrations included. So, yes, a mistake, but let me just tell you why I ended up happier with the novelization.(i) it’s a retelling. why shouldn’t i just watch the movie?Pan’s Labyrinth was greatly written and immediately drew me into the world of Ofelia, the Faun, and the vicious Captain. Because I’ve already seen the movie, reading the book now enriched my knowledge of the characters. I gained insight into motivations, into dreams that were never spoken. More than once I found myself “omg!”-ing aloud when secret looks in the movie suddenly gained context. Not going to lie, I felt like someone was whispering classified PL secrets to me the whole time.Had I done the two in reverse order, the film’s stunning costumes, scenery, and acting would have brought magic to life in front of my eyes. In my opinion, there is no wrong way to take in the book and movie duo—although I can vouch that reading the book second (in this case!) worked amazing for me.(ii) you said something about illustrations? I cannot get over how absolutely beautiful this book is. Every single page has an illustration of a tree along the side, with creatures peering out of the darkness in a knot in the bark. Such a tiny detail added to the atmosphere throughout my reading.(can more books be this effortlessly gorgeous, please?)Also, as if this wasn’t enough, every few chapters there was a full page illustration depicting a scene from the movie. I don’t know if I’m happy or creeped out (okay, I’m happy) that there was a detailed drawing of the Pale Man. Also known as the eyeless creature that eats children.man GIF*ahem*(iii) i’m still wondering why i need a book version of the movie though?My favourite, absolutely favourite part of Pan’s Labyrinth (the book) were all the original short stories included in the book. I learned the backstories to a few of the characters of the film, as well as more on some mythical characters mentioned in passing. In these short stories, the writing really shone. I felt swept off into a place where people could be both mothers and witches, where a labyrinth could grow to inspire and haunt and welcome back its princess.(iv) i still don’t know. maybe i should read another book altogether.Okay. There’s one last thing I can try. Telling you about the Actual Story. Who is this Ofelia? What is a Faun and what does it have to do with a princess and oh, um, a war?The book begins quite simply with young Ofelia and her pregnant mother heading to a mill in Spain, where Ofelia’s mother will join her new husband. This man is the Captain, leading the hunt against republican rebels. The beauty of this story is its ability to work on two levels: to show the brutality of the Captain’s war against the rebel fighters while also showing Ofelia’s purity of spirit as she escapes into her fairy tales. These two worlds are not entirely separate! The way they weave together is altogether fascinating.(v) okay. i think you sold me on this. This is not a book you’ll regret picking up. The more I think about it, I’m realizing you’re getting a two-for-one with it. Both the book and the movie offer a glimpse into each other … and both are simply amazing to enjoy. Read the book, get into the movie. Or watch the movie, get into the book. Do them at the same time!rating: This book gets a Tiana rating because it is so atmospheric. Magic and mystery ooze from the page thanks to the authors’ prose and the well-crafted illustrations. representation: this book takes place in Spain, with characters of presumably Spanish descentcontent warnings: murder, death of a principal character, descriptions of torture, mass death
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  • Sara Saif
    January 1, 1970
    I can't believe I actually got to read this. Like a million others, this film is one of my absolute favorites. I watched it first in 2011. It was horrifying and tragic, hauntingly beautiful and sad. I made sure my nephews watched the Pale Man scene a couple of times.The book follows the movie word for word but it also expands the story in the form of short tales interspersed within. It was nothing short of brilliant.There was one story that confused me though.(view spoiler)[In one of the stories I can't believe I actually got to read this. Like a million others, this film is one of my absolute favorites. I watched it first in 2011. It was horrifying and tragic, hauntingly beautiful and sad. I made sure my nephews watched the Pale Man scene a couple of times.The book follows the movie word for word but it also expands the story in the form of short tales interspersed within. It was nothing short of brilliant.There was one story that confused me though.(view spoiler)[In one of the stories that takes place years and years before, a prince is searching for his mother's true identity. We're told that his mother would enter the same labyrinth that he entered years later as Ofelia. How can she be his mother if she went back to her Underground Kingdom and chronologically it doesn't even make any sense? (hide spoiler)] I was also super interested in knowing what happened to the Faun's child.I think it was a bewitching book and I'm glad I got to revisit the story again after so many years.
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  • Becca (Horners_book_corner)
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you NetGalley and Bloomsbury publishing for providing an ARC of Pan's Labyrinth one exchange for an honest review. I have not see the film version of this story however, I did have preconceptions about it possibly being creepy/scary in nature I felt that the world building was well done and very atmospheric. It was written at a much more young adult level than I was expecting and so the scarier/creepier scenes were completely OK and not too dark for me. It felt like a modern-eque fairytale Thank you NetGalley and Bloomsbury publishing for providing an ARC of Pan's Labyrinth one exchange for an honest review. I have not see the film version of this story however, I did have preconceptions about it possibly being creepy/scary in nature I felt that the world building was well done and very atmospheric. It was written at a much more young adult level than I was expecting and so the scarier/creepier scenes were completely OK and not too dark for me. It felt like a modern-eque fairytale and had a nice twist at the end that I wasn't expecting. The book had gorgeous illustrations with most chapters which really added to the experience. I would recommend this as something a little different to while away a few hours.
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  • K.S. Marsden
    January 1, 1970
    When Ofelia and her mother move to a remote village in Spain, a fairytale is about to come to life.I received a free copy from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.This was a beautiful dark story, and everything I hoped for.Ofelia is just a simple girl. She is the daughter of a tailor; misses her dear, late-father; and distrusts the wolf that her mother has married. Oh, and she happens to be young and innocent enough that she does not blind herself to the magic in the world, like the grown When Ofelia and her mother move to a remote village in Spain, a fairytale is about to come to life.I received a free copy from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.This was a beautiful dark story, and everything I hoped for.Ofelia is just a simple girl. She is the daughter of a tailor; misses her dear, late-father; and distrusts the wolf that her mother has married. Oh, and she happens to be young and innocent enough that she does not blind herself to the magic in the world, like the grown-ups who surround her. When Ofelia arrives at their new home, with the mysterious Labyrinth outside, she finds out that fairytales are real, and she is a part of them.Meanwhile, Capitan Vidal is hunting down the resistance fighters, unaware that some in his employ are helping them.Mercedes is just a woman who works in the house, there is nothing special about her. Except her bravery and good heart. As a mere woman, Mercedes is used to being invisible; and now she will use it to aid all the good men fighting and dying for freedom.Stories from the Underground Kingdom are woven alongside Ofelia's and Mercedes' battles. Times are dark and dangerous, and heroes aren't guaranteed happy endings.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    **I received a digital ARC of this title to review**As a huge fan of del Toro's work and of the movie version, I was extremely excited to get my hands on this title. The illustrations are so gorgeous and I absolutely love the cover design. The story is broken up into simple and easy to read chapters that make it easy to fly through the book. The chapters sizes are also nice if you're a lunch break reader or a child reading during designated times, you don't feel like you're going to get stuck in **I received a digital ARC of this title to review**As a huge fan of del Toro's work and of the movie version, I was extremely excited to get my hands on this title. The illustrations are so gorgeous and I absolutely love the cover design. The story is broken up into simple and easy to read chapters that make it easy to fly through the book. The chapters sizes are also nice if you're a lunch break reader or a child reading during designated times, you don't feel like you're going to get stuck in the middle of a great chapter. I loved being able to get a more fleshed out version of the tale than you got in the movie. In books, you can afford to add everyone's thoughts in more detail without ruining the artistic nature of them--if you're a good writer that is. Definitely a book I will be recommending to my fantasy mad patrons at the library.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Firstly I would like to thank Bloomsbury for sending me an ARC of this book. All the reviews and opinions discussed are my own. It is said that long, long ago, there lived a princess in an underground realm, where neither lies nor pain exist, who dreamt of the human world" What a book. I am honestly not sure how to put into words how much I adored this book. I was utterly gripped by the first line and this didn't change until the last page and the book ended. Based upon Guillermo del Toro's 200 Firstly I would like to thank Bloomsbury for sending me an ARC of this book. All the reviews and opinions discussed are my own. It is said that long, long ago, there lived a princess in an underground realm, where neither lies nor pain exist, who dreamt of the human world" What a book. I am honestly not sure how to put into words how much I adored this book. I was utterly gripped by the first line and this didn't change until the last page and the book ended. Based upon Guillermo del Toro's 2006 film Cornelia Funke brings the film to life through pages and beautiful imagery that works to haunt and ensnare the reader. I have watched the film a very long time ago and the only part I recall is the incredibly creepy Pale Man and he is just as creepy within this book; I honestly had nightmares about him as a child. The story is a well-balanced mix of fairy-tale adventure and historic Spain; we follow a young girl Ofelia who is moving with her pregnant mother, to live with her mother's new husband - Vidal, who is a captain in the fascist army. Ofelia's father has recently passed away and she is struggling with the loss and reality of her life. Whilst en-route to her new home the family stop of and Ofelia finds a mysterious stone eye that she sets back into a statue, awakening the Faun. The Faun follows Ofelia to her new home, believing her to be a part of his story, and sets her on three mysterious and increasingly horrifying tasks. The story alternates views between Ofelia's experiences, and short fairyale-esque chapters which see unrelated but as the story progresses you realise they interlink with each other, and with Ofelia's lifetime. "Ofelia didn't remind her that for her, there was nothing better than a book. Her mother wouldn't understand" Funke does an amazing job of depicting this story; it is brutal and emotional and it sucks you in right from the get go. My heart leapt for Ofelia and dashed as her hopes and dreams rose and fell throughout the story. I was gripped to her character arc and I feel that this was all through Funke's writing style. What really helps this book is that the chapters are short and to the point. Each tells a specific story, and doesn't drag on at any point. The reader won't get bored reading this story that is for sure. I feel that Funke does a really good job of showing the magical horrors alongside the human horrors of revolution, poverty and tyrants. I am in awe of how this story was weaved together and feel so compelled to go and watch the film again. I am definitely going to buy the finished copy of the book when it is released. It's always just a few who know where to look and how to listen, that is true. But for the best stories, a few are just enough"
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  • Rain
    January 1, 1970
    I think I'm the only one who hasn't seen Pan's Labyrinth yet. I KNOW, I HAVE COMPLETELY FAILED IN THIS LIFE. However, I'm glad that I read the book first because I was able to know all the characters' insights that I otherwise wouldn't have seen in the movie. Anyway, allow me to say that this story is one of the most captivating tales I have ever read. THIS IS PURE DARK GENIUS, OKAY??? I love the magic to it all that is further highlighted by the atmospheric writing. Ofelia may be one of my most I think I'm the only one who hasn't seen Pan's Labyrinth yet. I KNOW, I HAVE COMPLETELY FAILED IN THIS LIFE. However, I'm glad that I read the book first because I was able to know all the characters' insights that I otherwise wouldn't have seen in the movie. Anyway, allow me to say that this story is one of the most captivating tales I have ever read. THIS IS PURE DARK GENIUS, OKAY??? I love the magic to it all that is further highlighted by the atmospheric writing. Ofelia may be one of my most favorite protagonists of all time with her courageous bookdragon heart. I admire Mercedes' bravery and compassion as well. Then there's Vidal who is such a fleshed-out antagonist that even I feared for the characters who he has no qualms about killing. Pan's Labyrinth has this fairytale vibe that will make you forget about the present because it will suck you in like a void. This is the dark fantasy we deserve to consume in all forms of media. MY HANDS ARE NOW RED FROM CLAPPING SO HARD BECAUSE OF THIS STORY'S BRILLIANCE. Highly highly recommended.
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  • Becca (Horners_book_corner)
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you NetGalley and Bloomsbury publishing for providing an ARC of Pan's Labyrinth in exchange for an honest review. I have not see the film version of this story however, I did have preconceptions about it possibly being creepy/scary in nature. I felt that the world building was well done and very atmospheric. It was written at a much more young adult level than I was expecting and so the scarier/creepier scenes were completely OK and not too dark for me. It felt like a modern-esque fairytal Thank you NetGalley and Bloomsbury publishing for providing an ARC of Pan's Labyrinth in exchange for an honest review. I have not see the film version of this story however, I did have preconceptions about it possibly being creepy/scary in nature. I felt that the world building was well done and very atmospheric. It was written at a much more young adult level than I was expecting and so the scarier/creepier scenes were completely OK and not too dark for me. It felt like a modern-esque fairytale and had a nice twist at the end that I wasn't expecting. The book had gorgeous illustrations at the start of most chapters which really added to the experience. I would recommend this as something a little different to while away a few hours.
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  • David
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come.
  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Omg this has got to be my most wanted book for this year!!Hurry up July because I NEED this!!
  • Carolyn
    January 1, 1970
    Pan's Labyrinth: The Labyrinth of the Faun by Guillermo del Toro and Cornelia Funke is as beautiful and as haunting as the eponymous film.This is absolutely worth reading even if you are already very familiar with the story. The novel covers the source material accurately, wrapping it in Funke's wonderful and magical writing. Every scene is brought to life as vivid as the film and many scenes give insight to the internal monologue of our favourite heroes and villains of the tale. I recommend lis Pan's Labyrinth: The Labyrinth of the Faun by Guillermo del Toro and Cornelia Funke is as beautiful and as haunting as the eponymous film.This is absolutely worth reading even if you are already very familiar with the story. The novel covers the source material accurately, wrapping it in Funke's wonderful and magical writing. Every scene is brought to life as vivid as the film and many scenes give insight to the internal monologue of our favourite heroes and villains of the tale. I recommend listening to the soundtrack while reading; you'll be transported. Ever wondered what Vidal was thinking when he looked at Mercedes? This novel explores that and the story is more rich because of it. There are also new layers in the novel unseen in the movie. Folklore of the region and the origin of the labyrinth are slotted in between chapters and they enhance the whole experience with illustrations too. My one gripe was that they took me out of the main story and I craved a return to Ophelia and the Labyrinth while I read these short stories. For newbies to Pan's Labyrinth, I'm not sure you should read this before watching the film. There, you will meet the most evil of villains and heroes who rebel against injustice with fervour. Ancient labyrinths, a child-eating monster, a princess, and a sly Faun set in the forefront of Franco's fascist Spain and his cruel militant followers. But once you've seen the cult classic, please return for this treasure of an homage.The star is the marriage of del Toro's eerie and dark fairy tale with Funke's masterful skill of prose. Pan's Labyrinth: The Labyrinth of the Faun is a true treat for both loyal fans and for fantasy lovers who haven't seen the film. I'd recommend this book for fans of Uprooted by Naomi Novik, Deathless by Catherynne M Valente, The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman, and The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden.Trigger warnings for graphic descriptions of violence to men, women, and children, death, war, child endangerment, and rare mentions of sexual violence.
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  • Anuja
    January 1, 1970
    "It’s always just a few who know where to look and how to listen, that is true. But for the best stories, a few are just enough."This is a creepy and dark fairy tale definitely not for the weak of heart. It tells about the existence of magic alongside the brutality of men, war and suffering. I haven't watched the movie yet, I guess I will have to do it now. It was so hard putting this book down once I had started reading. This is a gripping tale of young Ofelia who finds herself trapped between "It’s always just a few who know where to look and how to listen, that is true. But for the best stories, a few are just enough."This is a creepy and dark fairy tale definitely not for the weak of heart. It tells about the existence of magic alongside the brutality of men, war and suffering. I haven't watched the movie yet, I guess I will have to do it now. It was so hard putting this book down once I had started reading. This is a gripping tale of young Ofelia who finds herself trapped between two very different worlds. She has to save her mother from the cruel Capitán Vidal, while she completes the Faun's task so that she can return to the world she came from. It is like Alice in Wonderland gone wrong.
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  • Jemima Pett
    January 1, 1970
    I heard a great deal about the film, and started to watch it on tv once, but only lasted ten minutes, if that.  Too scary.The book is also scary, but in a different way.  I felt I knew what was going on, most of the time, even when I didn't like it.  I was scared for the characters, not what was going to happen on screen next.This book is wonderful. It has del Toro's magic and Funke's amazing turn of phrase. There have been times when I found Funke's heritage from the Brothers Grimm too nasty to I heard a great deal about the film, and started to watch it on tv once, but only lasted ten minutes, if that.  Too scary.The book is also scary, but in a different way.  I felt I knew what was going on, most of the time, even when I didn't like it.  I was scared for the characters, not what was going to happen on screen next.This book is wonderful. It has del Toro's magic and Funke's amazing turn of phrase. There have been times when I found Funke's heritage from the Brothers Grimm too nasty to consider suitable for children. I don't think Pan's Labyrinth is intended as a children's book. It is too violent, with the violence of war, when terrible things happen: men become monsters just as monsters become... less monstrous.The captain that Ofelia's mother has married is a monster of his own making, although the way this book is told suggests it might be as much fate as self-determination.  The magic of the book is the way the narrative of Ofelia's adventure in civil-war-torn Galicia is interspersed with legends, or fairy stories, of witches and magic events.  They start as something unrelated, and steadily turn into suggestions of past wickedness where curses have formed the people in the narrative itself. It's as twisted as the labyrinth the Faun, or is it his Fairy, persuade Ofelia to enter.Despite it tearing at my feelings and making me feel sick at some of the violence inflicted on innocent people, I couldn't put it down. I may not like it, but it's sensational, and I might even read it again.  Brilliant.
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  • Jamie (TheRebelliousReader)
    January 1, 1970
    "Sometimes we need to see what we feel so we can know about it." 5 stars. Pan's Labyrinth is one of my favorite movies of all time so of course I had to read this. And let me tell you, I cried just as hard reading it as I do whenever I watch the film. The writing is beautiful and the illustrations throughout really enhance the story. This is a very dark, creepy and tragic story that really hits home on so many different aspects. It leaves such a mark. It's a mature story from the point of view "Sometimes we need to see what we feel so we can know about it." 5 stars. Pan's Labyrinth is one of my favorite movies of all time so of course I had to read this. And let me tell you, I cried just as hard reading it as I do whenever I watch the film. The writing is beautiful and the illustrations throughout really enhance the story. This is a very dark, creepy and tragic story that really hits home on so many different aspects. It leaves such a mark. It's a mature story from the point of view of a child and it's handled beautifully.I cannot recommend this film enough and the book is great as well. It's definitely one of those stories that stays with you.
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  • Devann
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC copy of this book from Edelweissactual rating: 3.5This was a good book, but I think that I personally had trouble with it at times because I haven't seen the movie since around the time it first came and therefore kept trying to compare the two but couldn't really remember enough of the movie to do so properly. I guess I really shouldn't compare them anyway since they are two different mediums, but I think it's a natural response. Because of this I did get knocked out of the st I received an ARC copy of this book from Edelweissactual rating: 3.5This was a good book, but I think that I personally had trouble with it at times because I haven't seen the movie since around the time it first came and therefore kept trying to compare the two but couldn't really remember enough of the movie to do so properly. I guess I really shouldn't compare them anyway since they are two different mediums, but I think it's a natural response. Because of this I did get knocked out of the story periodically as I would half remember a scene from the movie and get sidetracked trying to remember it, but overall it was a very enjoyable dark fairy tale book. I liked the illustrations as well but wished there were more of them.
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  • ♠️ TABI ♠️
    January 1, 1970
    I will read literally anything that has Cornelia's name on it okay
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