The Turn of the Key
INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of In a Dark, Dark Wood, The Woman in Cabin 10, The Lying Game, and The Death of Mrs. Westaway comes Ruth Ware’s highly anticipated fifth novel.When she stumbles across the ad, she’s looking for something else completely. But it seems like too good an opportunity to miss—a live-in nannying post, with a staggeringly generous salary. And when Rowan Caine arrives at Heatherbrae House, she is smitten—by the luxurious “smart” home fitted out with all modern conveniences, by the beautiful Scottish Highlands, and by this picture-perfect family. What she doesn’t know is that she’s stepping into a nightmare—one that will end with a child dead and herself in prison awaiting trial for murder. Writing to her lawyer from prison, she struggles to explain the unravelling events that led to her incarceration. It wasn’t just the constant surveillance from the cameras installed around the house, or the malfunctioning technology that woke the household with booming music, or turned the lights off at the worst possible time. It wasn’t just the girls, who turned out to be a far cry from the immaculately behaved model children she met at her interview. It wasn’t even the way she was left alone for weeks at a time, with no adults around apart from the enigmatic handyman, Jack Grant. It was everything. She knows she’s made mistakes. She admits that she lied to obtain the post, and that her behavior toward the children wasn’t always ideal. She’s not innocent, by any means. But, she maintains, she’s not guilty—at least not of murder. Which means someone else is. Full of spellbinding menace and told in Ruth Ware’s signature suspenseful style, The Turn of the Key is an unputdownable thriller from the Agatha Christie of our time.

The Turn of the Key Details

TitleThe Turn of the Key
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 6th, 2019
PublisherGallery/Scout Press
ISBN-139781501188770
Rating
GenreMystery, Thriller, Fiction, Mystery Thriller, Audiobook

The Turn of the Key Review

  • Chelsea Humphrey
    January 1, 1970
    AUGUST 2019 BOTM SELECTION"Dear Mr. Wrexham,You have no idea how many times I have started this letter and screwed up the resulting mess, but I've realized there is no magic formula here. There is no way I can make you listen to my case. So I'm just going to have to do my best to set things out. However long it takes, however much I mess this up, I'm just going to keep going and tell the truth."And so begins our tale. I'm sure that, unless you've been walking around with your eyes closed and your ears plugged up, you've caught wiSELECTION"Dear AUGUST 2019 BOTM SELECTION"Dear Mr. Wrexham,You have no idea how many times I have started this letter and screwed up the resulting mess, but I've realized there is no magic formula here. There is no way I can make you listen to my case. So I'm just going to have to do my best to set things out. However long it takes, however much I mess this up, I'm just going to keep going and tell the truth."And so begins our tale. I'm sure that, unless you've been walking around with your eyes closed and your ears plugged up, you've caught wind of this upcoming release, but if not let me give you a brief introduction. The Turn of the Key is a compulsive tale of a nanny sitting in jail awaiting trial for the murder of one of her charges. The entire book is told through letters from said nanny to a potential solicitor, recalling the events leading up to her incarceration, along with a few surprise notes at the end. The basic jist of events is that we begin with Rowan answering an advertisement for a nannying position in the Scottish countryside. The catch is that this particular household has been through 4 nannies in less than a year, and the reasons behind this are murkily associated to legends of the estate being haunted. Shenanigans ensue, all hell breaks loose, and much havoc is played out over the course of the book. As someone who has taken time to warm to Ware's novels over the year, I think she's found her niche in the gothic suspense genre. I truly enjoyed Mrs. Westaway, and I believe The Turn of the Key is her best novel yet. The pacing was 100% what I was praying for, and the creepy elements, such as the locked closet, the poison garden, and the smart home with little to no privacy, were all excellent inclusions and flawlessly executed. I found that even the supporting characters, especially Jack and Jean, were just as intriguing as Rowan was. My only complaint was with the ending; it felt like a bit of a let down after such a large build up, and even though it worked, it felt like the easy ending to take. The twists may or may not surprise you; I felt that I had most of them figured out, but there were a few smaller twists that took me completely by surprise, which I wholly appreciated. If you're looking for a creepy, character driven psychological thriller that will keep you thrilled and chilled from beginning to end, definitely add The Turn of the Key to your late summer TBR! *Many thanks to the publisher for providing my review copy.
    more
  • Emily (Books with Emily Fox)
    January 1, 1970
    This is my third book by the author so by this point I know she's great at creating an atmosphere, a creepy ambiance.New nanny working for a family living in a remote house in Scotland. Past nannies leaving after the house seems haunted with its dark history and secrets... you get it. It was interesting, even a bit unique since the main character wasn't likeable and that the format is through letters she's writing to a lawyer from prison since she's accused of murdering one of the ch This is my third book by the author so by this point I know she's great at creating an atmosphere, a creepy ambiance.New nanny working for a family living in a remote house in Scotland. Past nannies leaving after the house seems haunted with its dark history and secrets... you get it. It was interesting, even a bit unique since the main character wasn't likeable and that the format is through letters she's writing to a lawyer from prison since she's accused of murdering one of the child in her care...The ending was a bit lukewarm in my opinion but I can't wait to see how others feel about it all!If you're looking for a quick read for the fall and have liked her other books, I would recommend. Thank you Simon & Schuster for this ARC!
    more
  • Emily May
    January 1, 1970
    I am telling you the truth. The unvarnished, ugly truth. And it is all that. It is unpolished and unpleasant, and I don't pretend I acted like an angel. But I didn't kill anyone. I just fucking didn't. This wasn't bad, but it was nowhere near as good as I was expecting from an author like Ruth Ware. The protagonist, Rowan Caine, stumbles upon an opportunity that she considers amazing and I would consider an absolute nightmare-- a live-in nanny to four children, including one baby and one bratty teenag I am telling you the truth. The unvarnished, ugly truth. And it is all that. It is unpolished and unpleasant, and I don't pretend I acted like an angel. But I didn't kill anyone. I just fucking didn't. This wasn't bad, but it was nowhere near as good as I was expecting from an author like Ruth Ware. The protagonist, Rowan Caine, stumbles upon an opportunity that she considers amazing and I would consider an absolute nightmare-- a live-in nanny to four children, including one baby and one bratty teenager. On top of this, she's staying in the high-tech Heatherbrae House - a refurbished "smart" home with constant surveillance, voice-activated lights, and an app to go with it.Unlike Rowan, I think this sounds like a horror story. And, honestly, I found the book to be at its strongest when it is drawing on creepy horror tropes like creaking footsteps in the attic, objects going missing and reappearing where the MC knows she already looked, and freaky dolls. The atmosphere is quite good and it would make for a somewhat spooky Halloween read. The combination of nightmare children, a malfunctioning house that seems haunted, and the hunky but suspicious handyman kept me reading.I also liked how Ware framed the story within a letter to a solicitor. It worked so well that I'm surprised I haven't read books that have done this before (that I recall).But it just wasn't very strong as a mystery, in my opinion. The culprit can be guessed pretty easily (this really isn't a surprising reveal anymore) and it irked me how it doesn't make sense for Rowan to withhold the identity of the dead child, though of course she does so because once we know who it is, it removes any doubt as to who the killer must be. The author also dropped a lot of heavy-handed hints about (view spoiler)[Rowan not being who she says she is (hide spoiler)] so I even started to work out what was going on there. This part of the story frustrated me, actually, because it kind of changes the whole focus of the book from being about the potential horrors of a nanny living in a "smart" house to something else that didn't interest me half as much.The ending felt unfinished, too. I wanted more after becoming invested in the story. I won't rush out to recommend this one, but there are some Halloween-worthy chills to be had here. I'll still check out Ware's future books.Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube
    more
  • Nilufer Ozmekik
    January 1, 1970
    Four okay I loved it, it freaked me out, gave me enough chills, my all nails are shorter, oh wait a second I don’t have nails anymore and my arms are covered with stress bites, my hair is in the air, you made a great job Ruth Ware, I wanted to clap but my hands are still shaking stars!!! Lalalala here's my 200th book of this year! Look what we have on the menu:-A naïve nanny who has little secrets is now in the jail, waiting for murder trail.-Creepy Victorian haunte Four okay I loved it, it freaked me out, gave me enough chills, my all nails are shorter, oh wait a second I don’t have nails anymore and my arms are covered with stress bites, my hair is in the air, you made a great job Ruth Ware, I wanted to clap but my hands are still shaking stars!!! Lalalala here's my 200th book of this year! Look what we have on the menu:-A naïve nanny who has little secrets is now in the jail, waiting for murder trail.-Creepy Victorian haunted house: A big surrounded by an eerie, ominous secret garden which is full of poisonous flowers served with charming Scottish gardener/handyman Jack- Three problem children and a baby (like 80’s movie name, but please be sure this is not comedy): Maddie’s irritating behaviors stood between Regan from Exorcist acted like she’s embodied by devil( at least she didn’t do the terrifying head spinning) and Hereditary’s Charlie ( At least her head didn’t cut out of her body with a car accident)! Her little sister Ellie was not evil child but she was just annoying, spoiled, noisy meant she was regular 5 years old kid  Both of the girls come together, you hear the alarm bells ringing! - A sinister 14 year old sister joins the evil sisters club on the weekends: Another meaner member of awkward family. They start to resemble “Addams” right? Nope, Addams family members are cartoon characters when you compare them with these nerve-racking people.- A workaholic, snob, show-off mother and he’s flirty husband gives you his perverted looks! The bad apples didn’t fall from the tree. I still don’t know if the parents or the children were worse? PARENTS got the scores and won the game.-Creaking floors, secret attics, ghost stories, runaway nannies! And BAAMM: we have a death child.So before you order your book and feed yourself with the disturbing, riveting pages of the story, ask yourself, could you absorb all of these or could goose bumps on your arms and aching on your stomach force you to vomit because of too much pressure and stressful pages? If you say: “I’m in!” , I recommend you to consume it with lighter foods( greasy popcorn is not a good option especially at the parts you’re introduced porcelain version of Annabelle baby’s head who could cut and make you bleed!) non-alcoholic beverages( that was real challenge for me! But more Chardonnay meant lack of concentration. You need to be full alert to enjoy the story.) So it’s great combination of modern and gothic horror materials. There are too many disturbing characters but it worked perfectly with this well-rounded story telling.And the ending: It was nice touch! Every little detail in this book is important so you have to give full attention for great satisfaction! It’s fast pacing, one or two sit reading. Sip your soda (preferably didn’t contain any high fructose corn syrup), lay on your favorite couch, silence your loved ones and begin to enjoy this book! It’s one of the best thrillers of this year!
    more
  • Meredith
    January 1, 1970
    A nanny in jail accused of murdering one of the children in her care. This is her story. When Rowan, a young nanny who lives in London, comes across for an ad seeking a nanny to live in a remote area of Scotland, it sounds too good to be true. The pay is high, the house is beautiful, and the family seems lovely. She is warned that previous nannies have quit due to the house being haunted. Rowan doesn’t believe in ghosts, so she pays no heed to the warning. She is hired for the position and packs A nanny in jail accused of murdering one of the children in her care. This is her story. When Rowan, a young nanny who lives in London, comes across for an ad seeking a nanny to live in a remote area of Scotland, it sounds too good to be true. The pay is high, the house is beautiful, and the family seems lovely. She is warned that previous nannies have quit due to the house being haunted. Rowan doesn’t believe in ghosts, so she pays no heed to the warning. She is hired for the position and packs up her life in London and moves to remote Scotland. But what is beautiful on the surface is hiding deep dark secrets.One of my favorite things about The Turn of the Key is the house which is named Heatherbrae. Equipped with state of the art technology (the whole house runs off an app), it takes on a life of its own. Juxtaposed with Victorian architecture and Gothic feel, Heatherbrae adds another layer to The Turn of the Key.The Turn of the Key is told only through Rowan’s eyes, as she shares what led to her arrest through a series of letters to a solicitor. Rowan is an unreliable narrator and the reader must contend with a lot of telling. While this type of narrative style usually irks me, I found that it works in this case as Rowan provides a detailed account of her time at Heatherbrae. One just needs to continue to question whether or not her version of events is accurate.There are some twists as well some red herrings thrown in for good measure. I guessed many of the smaller twists, but I completely missed the most significant twist. And I was looking for it! Sadly, my detective skills failed. This twist added an additional layer and made me want to reread from the beginning. The ending felt a bit rushed and I could have done without the final letter. I would rather have been left guessing than be told a less than satisfying conclusion to Rowan’s story. Overall, this is an atmospheric, slower-paced psychological thriller with some intriguing twists and turns. I received an ARC of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Mary Beth *Traveling Sister*
    January 1, 1970
    In the beginning of the book, Rowan is writing a letter to Mr. Wexham, begging for him to help her. She tells him that she is innocent of a crime of murder that she did not commit and that she needs his assistance with her trial that is coming up soon. He is a lawyer and she wants him to prove her innocence.There is an old house located in a remote area in the middle of nowhere in the Scottish Highlands. Rowan becomes a nanny for a family of three children in this creepy estate. The In the beginning of the book, Rowan is writing a letter to Mr. Wexham, begging for him to help her. She tells him that she is innocent of a crime of murder that she did not commit and that she needs his assistance with her trial that is coming up soon. He is a lawyer and she wants him to prove her innocence.There is an old house located in a remote area in the middle of nowhere in the Scottish Highlands. Rowan becomes a nanny for a family of three children in this creepy estate. The house has a haunted past. Other nannies left and the family has a hard time keeping nannies. The house has everything that you can imagine and Rowan is getting paid very well. It is a smart house with different technology and it has creepy noises in the night. Dark and disturbing events happen in this house. The parents leave Rowan alone with their children in this estate. What Rowan doesn't know is that she is stepping into a nightmare. There are cameras installed in the house and she is having a difficult time and she knows that she has made some mistakes. There is something about a Ruth Ware book that makes me excited to read it. I loved The Death of Mrs. Castaway and I knew that I would love this one once I opened the book. This is gothic suspense, a mystery, and a thriller. It is so creepy. I loved the gothic atmosphere and it's elements. The book was quite addicting. It was totally gripping, especially if you like gothic suspense like me. It is so haunting. I didn't see the twists coming and it had a couple of jaw dropping moments and I loved them. I kept guessing till the very end. I thought the characters were developed well and it was very well written. The ending was so surprising. This was a Traveling Sister read. I want to thank Edelweiss, Simon & Schuster and Ruth Ware for the ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    wow she really bamboozled me... twice. we stan. <3 Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Tumblr | Youtube | Twitch
  • Paromjit
    January 1, 1970
    This is Ruth Ware's latest offering, a chiller of a psychological thriller with its central protagonist, 24 year old Rowan Caine working in childcare in London. She is looking for another post when she come across an incredible job as a live in Nanny for the Elincourt family, the parents Bill and Sandra are architects, living in the remote Scottish Highlands, and the pay for the post is unbelievable. If there is one thing you should beware of, it is that if a job sounds to be too good to be true This is Ruth Ware's latest offering, a chiller of a psychological thriller with its central protagonist, 24 year old Rowan Caine working in childcare in London. She is looking for another post when she come across an incredible job as a live in Nanny for the Elincourt family, the parents Bill and Sandra are architects, living in the remote Scottish Highlands, and the pay for the post is unbelievable. If there is one thing you should beware of, it is that if a job sounds to be too good to be true, then it is, something Rowan is to discover to her cost. At her weekend interview, young Maddie warns Rowan to not take the job, and it seems other nannies employed have left abruptly. The Elincourts have four children from 18 months to 14 years old, a heavy burden of responsibility for Rowan, especially as she is left almost immediately as their sole carer with the parents travelling so often, and it is no exaggeration to say that they are a real handful.Heatherbrae House itself is a jarring blend of Victorian with all the tech that makes it a smart home, with cameras everywhere and a handy man, Jack, is employed. Strange and eerie happenings create a creepy, menacing and ghostly atmosphere within Heatherbrae, and a litany of incidents culminate in the murder of a child. Rowan is languishing in prison awaiting her trial for the murder, concerned with her legal representation, and writing a letter to a solicitor, Mr Wrexham, proclaiming her innocence of the crime she has been charged with and laying out the circumstances which have led to her present ghastly predicament. She admits to not always being the perfect nanny and true to form with this genre, she is an unreliable narrator and the characters are almost universally dislikeable. This is an intense story of many twists, small and big, slow in pace, and where you are going to have to suspend your sense of disbelief on occasion. The premise of the novel held my interest, although this is far from my favourite Ware book. Many thanks to Random House Vintage for an ARC.
    more
  • Norma * Traveling Sister * On hiatus due to health
    January 1, 1970
    Creepy, suspenseful, & mysterious!THE TURN OF THE KEY by RUTH WARE is a compelling, dark, twisted, and haunting mystery thriller that immediately sucked me in and had me totally absorbed within this tale.Right from the very start there is this intense sense of foreboding that definitely makes this quite the gripping book to read.....it is a slow-burn and the intensity level slowly increases as the story progresses. I absolutely loved the creepy modern gothic vibe going on here and Creepy, suspenseful, & mysterious!THE TURN OF THE KEY by RUTH WARE is a compelling, dark, twisted, and haunting mystery thriller that immediately sucked me in and had me totally absorbed within this tale.Right from the very start there is this intense sense of foreboding that definitely makes this quite the gripping book to read.....it is a slow-burn and the intensity level slowly increases as the story progresses. I absolutely loved the creepy modern gothic vibe going on here and RUTH WARE definitely knows how to deliver an atmospheric, vivid, and hair-raising suspenseful novel that I found to be quite appealing, enjoyable and entertaining.My only real gripe here that I have though is that I don't always feel that she follows through with some aspects to the storyline. Not sure if she knowingly doesn't follow through with some things or if it is part of her signature technique to be a little bit vague. I've noticed this style of writing in almost all of her books and sometimes it has bothered me and others not so much. This one it didn't bother me as much.I absolutely loved the format of this novel which was written in an epistolary format (letters). The tone was set right at the very beginning and I thought it followed through right to the very end. I also thought RUTH WARE did a fabulous job with the creepy sounds and the ominous atmosphere with the setting of Heatherbrae House. I was a little bit freaked out and scared which definitely left me a little on edge while I was reading certain scenes. Norma’s Stats:Cover: Intriguing, ghostly, suspenseful, ominous and an extremely fitting representation to storyline. I have an absolute love for Ruth Ware cover designs!Title: I was immediately intrigued by the title of this book and definitely enticed me to read this book. Writing/Prose: Haunting, engaging, vividly descriptive, and readable.Plot: Suspenseful, appealing, eerie, menacing, gripping, perfectly-paced, absorbing, ominous, enjoyable and entertaining.Ending: A cryptic and satisfying resolution. Overall: I was immediately interested in this tale and thoroughly enjoyed the unraveling of the mystery, the characters and the storyline. Would recommend!Thank you so much to Simon & Schuster Canada and Ruth Ware for gifting me an advance copy of this book.This review can also be found on our Two Sisters Lost in a Coulee Reading book blog:https://twosisterslostinacoulee.com/2...
    more
  • Chelsea (chelseadolling reads)
    January 1, 1970
    I had low expectations for this because I had heard such mixed things about Ruth Ware, but this was SO GOOD. It took so many of the classic thriller components but made them feel fresh and new and I'm a big fan. I cannot wait to see what Ruth comes up with next.
    more
  • jessica
    January 1, 1970
    i absolutely despised ruth wares 'the woman in cabin 10' and completely swore her off as an author because of it. so no one is more surprised than me that i enjoyed this, let alone picked it up. you guys seriously have some major persuasive talent going, because its your good reviews that got me to give RW a second chance.i think the unique formatting is a tremendous asset to the story. told through letters written by rowan to a potential solicitor as she sits in prison, the story is a i absolutely despised ruth wares 'the woman in cabin 10' and completely swore her off as an author because of it. so no one is more surprised than me that i enjoyed this, let alone picked it up. you guys seriously have some major persuasive talent going, because its your good reviews that got me to give RW a second chance.i think the unique formatting is a tremendous asset to the story. told through letters written by rowan to a potential solicitor as she sits in prison, the story is a last minute effort to plead her innocence. it feels as if rowan is not only trying to convince the lawyer to take her side, but also the reader. and i liked that. it made me feel more invested in what rowan has to say. i will admit that there are some slow parts and the ending didnt really make me gasp in surprise like i thought it would, but still, this is highly entertaining and i was 100% focused the entire book. not sure RW is off my blacklist yet, as im still unconvinced that liking this book wasnt a total fluke, but i may be willing to put her on probation for the time being. lol.↠ 4 stars
    more
  • Peter
    January 1, 1970
    DisconcertingTurn of the Key is an unnerving story told by a murder suspect as she recounts the background and incidents leading to the death of a child while she was its nanny. Rowan Caine is the nanny and she is writing the story in the form of a letter to a solicitor, Mr Wrexham, requesting his services to defend her. Within the story, there are periodic passages where she speaks directly to Mr Wrexham outlining how her story may be considered and continuously stating her innocence, no matter how the evidence l/>Turn DisconcertingTurn of the Key is an unnerving story told by a murder suspect as she recounts the background and incidents leading to the death of a child while she was its nanny. Rowan Caine is the nanny and she is writing the story in the form of a letter to a solicitor, Mr Wrexham, requesting his services to defend her. Within the story, there are periodic passages where she speaks directly to Mr Wrexham outlining how her story may be considered and continuously stating her innocence, no matter how the evidence looks. As a technique, it was used to remind the reader that this is only one account and perhaps a very unbalanced and disconcerting version, but I felt it slightly distracting on more than one occasion.Rowan applies for the nanny position with Sandra and Bill Elincourt, and their 4 daughters ranging from 18 months to 14 years old. The family live in a remote part of Scotland in a house that jolts between new and old. The Victorian architecture of the building clashes abruptly with the high-tech sensor and communication technology that controls features throughout the house. Door access, lighting, heating, curtains, music and room-to-room communications all offer an opportunity to mix faulty operation, malicious intent and/or paranormal interference. Before Rowan has even taken up the position, young Maddie warns her not to come as the “Ghosts wouldn’t like it.” There is a theme of uncertainty littered throughout the story, from the reliability of the accused’s narration to the contrary characters and the split personality of the house itself. Everything that happens is projected through the house and so many nannies have previously left feeling threatened as the house could be harbouring something sinister. With so many flawed characters it often adds to more realistic personalities and relationships, but in this case, I found it difficult to empathise and connect with any character as their personalities were all disagreeable and distant.Sandra and Bill are partners in their own architectural business and constantly travel. In fact, they first leave Rowan alone with the children only 2 days after she starts. Rowan has at best embellished her CV and feels the struggle to maintain the professional image she created and wrestles with bubbling anger that threatens to spill over into how she deals with the children, especially as they continuously test her resolve. “I hate you too! I wanted to scream after their retreating backs, as they padded quietly away into the media room to fire up Netflix. I hate you too, you vile, creepy little shits!” The plot sets up various possible routes and each offers equal plausibility and opportunity. There is a final twist that I didn’t expect and that deserves a lot of credit as it wasn’t even on my radar.The Victorian Smart house, mixed with a dark history, provides a unique canvas to play out a family constantly in flux as nannies are forced to leave until one nanny puts up a battle and a child dies. I felt the pace of the book was slow but the main disappointment was that the characters didn’t cry out to be championed. I would rate 3.5 stars but still recommend the book and I’d like to thank Gallery/Scout Press and NetGalley for providing me with an ARC copy in return for an honest review.
    more
  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware is a 2019 Gallery/Scout Press publication. Ware is back on track in this tense tale of suspense!! I have loved Ruth Ware since I read ‘In a Dark, Dark Wood’, yet, I really struggled with her previous book. I didn’t lose my confidence in Ware, however, and eagerly jumped into this, her latest effort, with gusto- and I was not disappointed!! As the story opens it becomes clear that Rowan Caine, a former nanny, is sitting in prison accused of having killed a child in her care Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware is a 2019 Gallery/Scout Press publication. Ware is back on track in this tense tale of suspense!! I have loved Ruth Ware since I read ‘In a Dark, Dark Wood’, yet, I really struggled with her previous book. I didn’t lose my confidence in Ware, however, and eagerly jumped into this, her latest effort, with gusto- and I was not disappointed!! As the story opens it becomes clear that Rowan Caine, a former nanny, is sitting in prison accused of having killed a child in her care. Through the letters Rowan has written to a prospective attorney, she explains how she came to be there, taking us all the way back to the moment she answered a classified ad for what Rowan would consider a dream job in her chosen field of childcare. Rowan seems thrilled to be considered for such a great opportunity and is genuinely nervous and excited when she is given the job. The technologically advanced smart home Rowan gets to live in is fancy and modern, especially the state of the art kitchen, but the enormous venom thrown at her by one of her charges, coupled with a host of strange noises and occurrences, keeps Rowan on edge day and night, turning her dream job into the stuff nightmares are made of… I think Ware’s most prominent asset, is her ability to quickly create a mood or atmosphere which sneakily draws readers into her well-constructed web. Once ensnared readers soon find themselves trapped, unable to escape until the very last sentence of the book has been read. This story is hypnotizing, and Ware kept me off guard from start to finish…. And what a finish!! While I had some suspicions, I was mostly caught off guard by the twists and although the ending is a bit ambiguous, I liked it!! I have my own theories, and others will have theirs, making this a fun book to discuss, debate and dissect. The author is gifted at dropping clues and hiding little Easter eggs within the story, but I was so distracted by the mind games I didn’t pick up on them until after I’d finished reading the book. Very, very sneaky and clever of Ms. Ware! Well done! I thoroughly enjoyed this one and of course am eagerly anticipating her next release!
    more
  • Holly B
    January 1, 1970
    The new nanny, Rowan Caine, has her hands full at Heatherbrae House. This was my fourth novel by the author and I had to see how this one would compare.I've read several "nanny" stories and find myself drawn to the whole idea of having someone live in your home and act as a child minder. Rowan gets this "dream" nanny job and finds out that the last several nannies didn't work out.The house was probably my favorite aspect of the story. It was renovated to be a "smart" home and the owners could spy on allnannies didn'thas The new nanny, Rowan Caine, has her hands full at Heatherbrae House. This was my fourth novel by the author and I had to see how this one would compare.I've read several "nanny" stories and find myself drawn to the whole idea of having someone live in your home and act as a child minder. Rowan gets this "dream" nanny job and finds out that the last several nannies didn't work out.The house was probably my favorite aspect of the story. It was renovated to be a "smart" home and the owners could spy on all the goings on, turn lights on/off and even ask it to launch an audio book for the children. I kept thinking Alexa controls the day ( no thank you!)  Really creepy vibes for sure.The build-up was quite slow and I wanted more showing than telling and some better developed characters. There is a twist ( and lots of nanny tips), but it really didn't surprise me much at all. The ending was just too rushed with so many loose ends.I did read it quickly and there is suspense that kept me entertained, so I give this a 3 STAR rating.Thanks to NG / Gallery for my copy in exchange for an honest review. Out August 2019
    more
  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    A child is dead and a nanny is in prison while her trial is pending. This novel consists of a letter she is writing to a lawyer explaining her innocence of the murder and how she wound up incarcerated. The thing is she is not entirely blameless. One thing is certain: “if it sounds to good to be true, it probably is.”
    more
  • Katie B
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsOut of the four Ruth Ware novels I have read (still need to get to The Lying Game), this one is my favorite. While I liked her other books, either my interest would wane a bit and/or I had an idea or two about the ending. With this book, my eyes were practically glued to the pages because I really had no clue where the author was going to go with the story. This was a fun read for me which is all I really wanted when I picked up the book.A nanny is in prison awai 4.5 starsOut of the four Ruth Ware novels I have read (still need to get to The Lying Game), this one is my favorite. While I liked her other books, either my interest would wane a bit and/or I had an idea or two about the ending. With this book, my eyes were practically glued to the pages because I really had no clue where the author was going to go with the story. This was a fun read for me which is all I really wanted when I picked up the book.A nanny is in prison awaiting trial for murder. She knows she has made mistakes but she did not kill that child. She is concerned her current lawyer doesn't believe her so she begins writing letters to another attorney, Mr. Wrexham, with the hope he will see she is innocent of the crime. She explains how she got the job as nanny to the family living in Heatherbrae House, and how everything went so horribly wrong. If she tells the truth, the whole truth, will Mr. Wrexham believe her? Will anyone?From the get go you know someone has been murdered and over the course of the story it is slowly revealed everything that led up to it. The house is basically a character itself and really contributes quite nicely to this creepy, horror style vibe. I loved how the technology features of the home actually made me tense and allowed me to really feel like I was in the main character's shoes. This was one of those rare times I didn't even have a decent theory floating around in my head about what was going on and that just made reading all the more fun. It's like I could just sit back and enjoy the ride. Now when it comes to the big reveal or whatever you might call it, I would not say I found it extremely disappointing, more like it wasn't 100% satisfying. I feel like there was so much build up to the moment and I needed more as in some ways it felt anti-climatic. Overall though this was a great read for me and I highly recommend checking this one out especially if you have enjoyed other books by the author.Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for providing me with an advance digital copy in exchange for an honest review!
    more
  • Effy
    January 1, 1970
    The Turn of the Key was the first book I read from Ruth Ware and it will definitely not be the last!The book is a psychological thriller infused with Gothic and Victorian elements. The story is unfolded in the form of letters written by Rowan Caine while she is in prison and addressed to a potential solicitor, narrating the events that led to her incarceration. Rowan is accused of murdering a child she was looking after and is resolved on unraveling her unspeakable truth that will set her free.This book was so enthralling and riveting that it instilled an in/>This/>The The Turn of the Key was the first book I read from Ruth Ware and it will definitely not be the last!The book is a psychological thriller infused with Gothic and Victorian elements. The story is unfolded in the form of letters written by Rowan Caine while she is in prison and addressed to a potential solicitor, narrating the events that led to her incarceration. Rowan is accused of murdering a child she was looking after and is resolved on unraveling her unspeakable truth that will set her free.This book was so enthralling and riveting that it instilled an ineffable sense of trepidation in me and made my heart beat fast in my chest. Given that I read this at night, alone in the house, the ceaseless sounds of doors squeaking, windows creaking and footsteps silently pacing in the attic made my heart palpitate with fear. The state-of-the-art Heatherbrae House which was equipped with surveillance cameras and ran on an app took on a life of its own and became a 'character' haunting the protagonist. The atmospheric ambiance of the book set the scene for unfathomable, inscrutable things happening and wreaked havoc.Rowan was an unreliable narrator since she made a secret of her identity and was not completely to be relied on. There was a number of plot twists I could not have possibly seen coming. The only thing that vexed me about this book was the anticlimactic ending. So much effort was made to build up mystery and raise a baffling conundrum only to come to such an underwhelming ending. I would also like to know whether or not those letters saw the light of day and extenuated Rowan's case.If you are a fan of suspenseful thrillers and enigmatic riddles this book may be worth reading.
    more
  • karen
    January 1, 1970
    oooh, goodreads choice awards nominee for BEST MYSTERY/THRILLER 2019! what will happen?i have reviewed this for l.a. review of books, scheduled to run 8/20.TODAY IS 8/20!! review is posted here!!!come to my blog!
  • NZLisaM
    January 1, 1970
    ‘WANTED: Large family seeks experienced live-in nanny.' When childcare worker, Rowan Caine, stumbled across the advert she couldn't believe her luck. It's the opportunity she'd been waiting for.But mere months later she’s sitting on remand in a Scottish prison, accused of killing one of the children in her charge. Furiously scribbling letters to a top advocate (barrister under British law), she pleads with him to take her case. ‘”I didn't kill that child. Which means someone el ‘WANTED: Large family seeks experienced live-in nanny.' When childcare worker, Rowan Caine, stumbled across the advert she couldn't believe her luck. It's the opportunity she'd been waiting for.But mere months later she’s sitting on remand in a Scottish prison, accused of killing one of the children in her charge. Furiously scribbling letters to a top advocate (barrister under British law), she pleads with him to take her case. ‘”I didn't kill that child. Which means someone else did. And they are out there. While I'm in here, rotting.”’ This was definitely the right book for me. As a former sole-charge nanny (both live-in and live-out), and in more recent years, regular pet-sitter, house-sitter, I've spent a significant amount of time in other people's houses, largely with only children and/or pets for company, so I found the subject matter in this book hugely relatable. I could feel Rowan's frustration as she struggled to grasp the smart house's various control panels, apps, and features, and as someone who once stayed in a property where during a nighttime power cut all the doors unlocked, because the battery on the back-up generator was flat, I know the feeling of being in a strange house with malfunctioning technology, and not being entirely sure what to do. Rowan's first day, the two older children disappear on her, playing/hiding in the expansive grounds, and she's frantically searching for them while trying to juggle a fretful baby. Again, I've totally been there, more than once. There were many other instances I could mention, but I've bored you enough with details of my life.However, even though I enjoyed the day-to-day routine of Rowan settling into her nanny position, I'm not entirely certain other readers will feel the same way. And a large portion of the book was devoted to this. It's a slow burn, alright! But, the more I think on it, the more convinced I am that I would've enjoyed it regardless, as you get to experience exactly what Rowan went through from the moment she arrived until the tragic end. You get to know the lay of the land so to speak, and feel Rowan's mounting uncertainty and fear, her slow realisation that something’s not right with the place.Strange occurrences in the night – creaking, footsteps, cold spots, missing keys, etc – beginning the moment Rowan arrived, also assisted in moving the plot forward, and upping the creepy ante. Technology played a big part in the ‘hautings' making this a bit different from usual. The house itself was part restored Victorian/modern architecture which I found as unsettling as Rowan did. The wild, overgrown, neglected gardens, so different from the interior, heightened this feeling. Being an old house it did of course have an ominous history, and was rumored to be haunted, which as some of you know are two of my favourite gothic elements. The four children (aged 14, 8, 5, and 1) had complex, age appropriate personalities and behaviours. Ruth Ware even included Scottish dialogue, which I thought was a nice touch. Even though the entire book was written as a series of letters, it quickly morphed into present tense, with the protagonist occasionally pausing to address the recipient. I for one was grateful for this, as I wasn't fond of the beginning letter format as it was all ‘tell' and no ‘show’. It was an original set-up though, and the way it all came together in the end cemented this novel's 5 star rating for me.My favourite Ruth Ware crime/mystery by far.I'd like to thank Netgalley, Random House UK – Vintage Publishing, and Ruth Ware for the e-ARC.US Release Date: 6th August, 2019.UK Release Date: 8th August, 2019.
    more
  • Book of Secrets
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved it! THE TURN OF THE KEY is creepy, twisted, and disturbing, and totally absorbing — a modern-day The Turn of the Screw, but far more entertaining.Rowan Caine’s new dream job as nanny for the seemingly perfect Elincourt family quickly turned into her worst nightmare. Their remote home in the Scottish Highlands called Heatherbrae House was an unusual hybrid of modern “smart” design and spooky Gothic Victorian. Inside its walls, cameras were watching, machines were li I absolutely loved it! THE TURN OF THE KEY is creepy, twisted, and disturbing, and totally absorbing — a modern-day The Turn of the Screw, but far more entertaining.Rowan Caine’s new dream job as nanny for the seemingly perfect Elincourt family quickly turned into her worst nightmare. Their remote home in the Scottish Highlands called Heatherbrae House was an unusual hybrid of modern “smart” design and spooky Gothic Victorian. Inside its walls, cameras were watching, machines were listening for your next command, and Rowan was isolated with four young girls and whatever was causing the disturbances at night…I enjoyed that this book was written in epistolary format, as desperate letters written by Rowan to a lawyer as she’s in prison awaiting trial for murder. The build up of suspense was fantastic, and the ominous atmosphere of Heatherbrae House kept me on edge. Had I been in Rowan’s situation, I would have been scared witless!THE TURN OF THE KEY is another excellent thriller from Ruth Ware. Highly recommended to fans of eerie modern Gothics.Disclosure: I received a copy of this book from the publisher through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • marilyn
    January 1, 1970
    This is my first Ruth Ware book and I plan to read more because of the good things I've read about her books. The Turn of the Key takes place in an old home, Heatherbrae House, that has been restored faithfully in parts of it while other parts have been gutted and transformed into the most modern of homes. The entire home has "smart home" features which seem to have been set to an overly intrusive level. Not only that, the features don't always work as intended or don't work at all, making the h This is my first Ruth Ware book and I plan to read more because of the good things I've read about her books. The Turn of the Key takes place in an old home, Heatherbrae House, that has been restored faithfully in parts of it while other parts have been gutted and transformed into the most modern of homes. The entire home has "smart home" features which seem to have been set to an overly intrusive level. Not only that, the features don't always work as intended or don't work at all, making the home seem like it's gone rogue. All this in a very remote setting in the Scottish Highlands. Rowan Caine stumbles on an ad to hire a nanny for the four children that live in Heatherbrae House. The salary for the live in, full time position, is unbelievably generous and Rowan is more than ready to leave her job at a daycare center. Feeling the need to make sure she gets the job, Rowan's resume is less than truthful although she does have the basic requirements for the job. Once Rowan sees the house in person, she is determined to be sure she is the perfect fit for the family and the position. She gets the job and has to begin within a short time, arriving at the house the day before the parents leave for a week or two of work away from home. From the beginning of the book we know that Rowan is writing to a lawyer to see if he will defend her murder case. The book is actually a letter to that lawyer, a very long, book length letter, which felt clunky to me at first, until I just set aside that this woman was writing the longest letter I've ever read. Because Rowan is relating her version of what happened at the house, the events of story have already taken place. Rowan is not going to get to the point quickly, she's not going to make a long story short, in her telling, she's going to give her details of her thoughts and feelings throughout the events. Once I got over the method of telling the story and faced that Rowan was going to take a long time in telling it, I began to enjoy the story more the farther we got into it. Even though Rowan really is a nanny, she is playing a role at Heatherbrae House of being a perfect nanny, rather than her usual quick to anger, quick to slap or grab, messy, sometimes unreliable self. Things at the house, with the house, begin to go lopsided quickly, with strange noises, doors and windows opened, closed, locked, unlocked with no explanation. Cameras are everywhere and the mother of the children will pop in on loudspeaker, from her far away location, to discuss things with Rowan, giving the atmosphere an even more eerie and intrusive feel. Then there is the angry, belligerent eight year old, scared five year old, and the needy baby with a new nanny who is very ill suited for the job. Add in the fourteen year old, who comes home from boarding school, totally out of control and threatening to tell secrets about Rowan and things go downhill from there. A child dies and Rowan is blamed, thus her letter searching for a lawyer who is willing to believe her and help her. I guessed what was happening at almost every turn but still, I wanted to know why it was happening and how it was happening and enjoyed learning those things. What I really liked was the very last letter that was written and the final reveal at the end of the book. Now I look forward to reading more Ruth Ware books. Thank you to Gallery/Scout Press/Simon & Schuster and Edelweiss for this ARC.
    more
  • Jasmine from How Useful It Is
    January 1, 1970
    A good read, though more towards the end than the beginning. The beginning had me wondering if it was the author’s writing that doesn’t make sense or the character that the author tried to create. Though the author has published many books, it’s my first time to read from this author and I don’t know what to expect. It was hard for me to get into the story with the character being all over the places and not making much sense. Furthermore, all that smart house and interior designs talk is a bit A good read, though more towards the end than the beginning. The beginning had me wondering if it was the author’s writing that doesn’t make sense or the character that the author tried to create. Though the author has published many books, it’s my first time to read from this author and I don’t know what to expect. It was hard for me to get into the story with the character being all over the places and not making much sense. Furthermore, all that smart house and interior designs talk is a bit dull to read. However, I like it when the first twist came to life and then the second and finally the ending. I didn’t see that coming and it was a good change.This book is told in the first person point of view following Rowan, a nanny claiming that she’s innocent. She’s currently in jail awaiting trial and is writing to Mr. Wrexham, a potential lawyer to defend her because she doesn’t like Mr. Grant, who was appointed to her. This story is told in a letter format from Rowan to a potential lawyer so there’s no chapter title. Rowan explained how she saw an ad for a nanny position and applied. Went to the house to interview and got warned by an older daughter, Maddie, to stay away. Rowan is made to believe the house was haunted and learned that there were other nannies that came and went before her. What Rowan discovered for herself is beyond the warnings she received.The Turn of the Key is a bit of a ghost story read and it got me scared a bit here and there. Majority, I don’t really like the main character, Rowan, much but at other times I like her for being brave and how her anger gives her the strengths to face her fears. I like Ellie and that acorn technology that she uses but as for the technology for the house, not so much. I’m glad for the few twists near the end otherwise this book will have a tough time holding my attention. Reading this book is another realization of how tough being a live-in nanny is, especially to 4 kids far apart in age and 2 dogs. If you enjoy a slow paced mystery, I do recommend you to read this book because the twists are well worth the wait.Pro: live-in nanny, twists, secrets, sisters, parenting, ghost storyCon: slow pacedI rate it 4 stars!***Disclaimer: Many thanks to Scout Press Books/Gallery Books for the opportunity to read and review. Please be assured that my opinions are honest.xoxo,Jasmine at www.howusefulitis.wordpress.com for more details
    more
  • Brenda -Traveling Sister host of The Traveling Friends
    January 1, 1970
    The Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware was a highly anticipated book for The Traveling Sisters and was one of our more lengthy group reads we have had. Some of us couldn’t wait to get their hands on this one and start reading it right away while others took a bit before diving in. This lead to such a fun discussion as we all added in our thoughts as we read it. So did it live up to our anticipation? YES!! We highly recommend!!!Yey Happy! Tell me a story!!I am sure I have alread The Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware was a highly anticipated book for The Traveling Sisters and was one of our more lengthy group reads we have had. Some of us couldn’t wait to get their hands on this one and start reading it right away while others took a bit before diving in. This lead to such a fun discussion as we all added in our thoughts as we read it. So did it live up to our anticipation? YES!! We highly recommend!!!Yey Happy! Tell me a story!!I am sure I have already told you!!Unlock Happy, turn the key, isolate yourself and let this creepy and smart house entertain you for for a few hours. Happy the home app that families can’t live without creates a unique setting here with an isolated Gothic estate turned luxury smart house.Ruth Ware creates quite the entertaining gripping page-turner while building suspense and weaving in some dark history to the estate with modern conveniences. She kept us on our toes, trying to figure out if new technology was good or evil here. Something sinister was going on for sure and I enjoyed this one from start to finish. I received a print copy from the publisher For more thoughts from The Traveling Sisters https://twosisterslostinacoulee.com/2...
    more
  • Carole
    January 1, 1970
    The Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware is my favorite thriller so far this year. Ruth Ware, often referred to as the Agatha Christie of our time, has penned her best yet. Rowan, a child-care worker, unexpectedly comes across an online ad for a nanny position in Scotland. It's one of those opportunities that seems too good to be true: a job taking care of children in a high-tech mansion in the Scottish Highlands with an income that can't be matched. To her surprise, Rowan gets the position to care for The Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware is my favorite thriller so far this year. Ruth Ware, often referred to as the Agatha Christie of our time, has penned her best yet. Rowan, a child-care worker, unexpectedly comes across an online ad for a nanny position in Scotland. It's one of those opportunities that seems too good to be true: a job taking care of children in a high-tech mansion in the Scottish Highlands with an income that can't be matched. To her surprise, Rowan gets the position to care for four young girls, from toddler to teen. Before long, one of the children is killed and Rowan is imprisoned, charged with murder. What happened in such a short time? In a letter written to a lawyer she hopes will defend her, she explains that the children she had met at the interview were not well-behaved, as she had been led to believe. The large house was monitored with cameras in every corner, with speakers turning on and off, day and night. She could not trust the estate handyman, the only other adult on site. And Rowan was left alone with the children during her first days there. The novel proceeds at a slow pace, with new clues dispersed here and there, leaving the reader wanting more. This is a novel for all mystery readers, especially those who want a little cringing with their reading. Thank you to Simon & Schuster Canada and NetGalley for the e-ARC in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Dianne
    January 1, 1970
    This was just what the doctor ordered. My husband and I are building a house, selling the one we’ve lived in for 28 years and it’s GO time......we’ll be out of this house and in the new one in a couple of months. I’m stressed, anxious, overwhelmed and can’t concentrate on anything that doesn’t have to do with paint, flooring, trim, furniture, realtors, contractors and to-do lists. Reading time is a luxury I haven’t had for a while and I so miss it.I have been trying to tackle a 2019 This was just what the doctor ordered. My husband and I are building a house, selling the one we’ve lived in for 28 years and it’s GO time......we’ll be out of this house and in the new one in a couple of months. I’m stressed, anxious, overwhelmed and can’t concentrate on anything that doesn’t have to do with paint, flooring, trim, furniture, realtors, contractors and to-do lists. Reading time is a luxury I haven’t had for a while and I so miss it.I have been trying to tackle a 2019 Booker finalist on and off, but now is not the time for anything cerebral. I have the attention span of a gnat and was desperate for something quickly consumable that would fully engage me for a couple of weekend nights. Done and done! I always enjoy Ruth Ware’s books and this did not disappoint. Rowan Caine takes a job as a nanny at a remote home in the Scottish Highlands. The house is a unsettling mix of high tech gadgetry and Victorian coziness. The owners are high-end architects and co-owners of a company that keeps them traveling a fair bit of the time. They need help right away with their four daughters. Rowan accepts the job for the outrageous money, but there at other unexplained murky reasons that are compelling her. The parents leave on a trip and Rowan finds herself alone in charge of their strange children and a house full of secrets and a seeming life of its own.Slightly creepy, engrossing and unputdownable - exactly what you look for in a good Ruth Ware thriller! I was up until 2:30 AM with this last night.....I enjoyed it very much.Now, back to packing, cleaning, making lists and staring at the ceiling at night trying to remember everything that I forgot to do. Thanks for the break, Ruth! 🙌🏻
    more
  • Yun
    January 1, 1970
    In The Turn of the Key, Rowan comes across an ad looking for a live-in nanny at a remote country estate. When she applies and gets the job, she is thrilled. But it seems the opportunity is too good to be true, and soon she realizes there are malevolent forces at work inside the idyllic house. The story is told with the reveal first, as a child is dead and Rowan is sitting in prison writing to her lawyer pleading that she did not kill the child. She then proceeds to tell him the story of what really In The Turn of the Key, Rowan comes across an ad looking for a live-in nanny at a remote country estate. When she applies and gets the job, she is thrilled. But it seems the opportunity is too good to be true, and soon she realizes there are malevolent forces at work inside the idyllic house. The story is told with the reveal first, as a child is dead and Rowan is sitting in prison writing to her lawyer pleading that she did not kill the child. She then proceeds to tell him the story of what really happened.And here is my first issue with this story: Rowan spends a good amount of time in the initial chapters telling her lawyer (and us) how important it is that he hears the whole story, every little detail, in order to understand her side. But the truth isn't that complicated and can be summed up in a few sentences. Yet she keeps going on about how he can't possibly understand everything if she left anything out. This style of foreshadowing is a pretty common tactic used by modern authors writing thrillers, and it drives me crazy. If the only way to achieve suspense is to tell your readers repeatedly that the good part is coming, maybe your story isn't that suspenseful?Rowan also isn't particularly likable or relatable as a character. She exercises poor judgement over and over again. For example, who would jump into a job that four people had previously vacated in just one year? To any thinking person, this would raise red flags and they would proceed with caution, but she didn't even ask any questions. As odd things start happening, she could have reached out to the parents or another adult, but she doesn't, fearing that others would view her as hysterical. She comes across as very melodramatic and silly, and therefore works herself into a bad situation.The majority of this story is Rowan trying to get the nanny job (100 pages), and then watching misbehaving children while smart technology around the house also misbehaves (another 170 pages). It wasn't until the last 60 pages that the book got somewhere. I just didn't find reading page after page of bratty children acting out to be that interesting nor malfunctioning smart technology to be that scary. When we finally get to the unraveling of the mystery, the twists are fairly unimaginative and straightforward. And the ending was rushed and incomplete, and it left a whole bunch of things unexplained.This is my third Ruth Ware book, and they've all been fairly disappointing. The premises seem intriguing, and the mysteries themselves have a lot of potential. But the way they are written, and in particular how stupid and self-defeating the female characters act make the stories real downers. I keep hanging on, hoping the author would mature and work out some of these story-telling tics, but it hasn't happened yet.
    more
  • Jayme
    January 1, 1970
    This book BEGINS and ENDS, with a letter."Dear Mr. Wrexham, I know you don't know me, but please. please, please, you have to help me...." Rowan Caine will do anything to secure the post as Nanny at The Heatherbrae House, smitten with the home, and the generous salary. She will even ignore the fact that FOUR Nannies have left the post in the last year.That decision will put her in prison, awaiting trial for murder.Can she convince Mr Wrexham of her innocence? This book BEGINS and ENDS, with a letter."Dear Mr. Wrexham, I know you don't know me, but please. please, please, you have to help me...." Rowan Caine will do anything to secure the post as Nanny at The Heatherbrae House, smitten with the home, and the generous salary. She will even ignore the fact that FOUR Nannies have left the post in the last year.That decision will put her in prison, awaiting trial for murder.Can she convince Mr Wrexham of her innocence? Can she convince you??This gothic suspense novel had it all!An OLD home with a history of MISFORTUNES which has now been MODERNIZED with surveillance cameras throughout the house, and "Smart Home" technology.Technology which always seems to malfunction in the middle of the night....Is there a malignant force in the house? Or a malignant person??The LETTERS at the end of the book are a bit cryptic and whether or not you will find the ending satisfying MAY depend on how YOU interpret the letters...This worked well for me, and this just may be MY favorite book of hers to date!Thank you to Edelweiss, Gallery/Scout Press and Ruth Ware for the digital ARC I received in exchange for a candid review! The release date for this one has been moved up to Aug. 6th, 2019!!
    more
  • Lindsay - Traveling Sister
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars! Gothic and suspenseful. Atmospheric and addictive. Twisty and mesmerizing.A nanny hired to watch over four children in the remote countryside in Scotland. An old mansion house upgraded with all the latest technology. Unexplainable happenings. Unmanageable children. Add all of these together and you get the perfect formula for a brilliantly spellbinding gothic mystery thriller - that’s exactly what this novel was!Rowan is a nanny who is hired by the Elincourt fa 4.5 stars! Gothic and suspenseful. Atmospheric and addictive. Twisty and mesmerizing.A nanny hired to watch over four children in the remote countryside in Scotland. An old mansion house upgraded with all the latest technology. Unexplainable happenings. Unmanageable children. Add all of these together and you get the perfect formula for a brilliantly spellbinding gothic mystery thriller - that’s exactly what this novel was!Rowan is a nanny who is hired by the Elincourt family. I loved every part of Rowan’s flawed character. There were so many layers to her background and personality – I enjoyed following her through this eerie and mysterious journey.I have read and enjoyed all of Ruth Ware’s books. Her writing always pulls me into a trance of feeling as though I am right there with the characters. I loved the haunting and engrossing atmosphere throughout this story. The pace and flow were perfect – kept me intrigued and curious from start to finish. I highly recommend this!!I read this with the Traveling Friends and we all enjoyed it! Thank you to NetGalley for providing me with an ARC to read and review!The Turn Of The Key is available now!
    more
  • Carol (Bookaria)
    January 1, 1970
    Another engaging novel from one of my favorite authors!The story starts with Rowan, a former babysitter who is now imprisoned, we do not know the details of how she got there but she's writing a letter to an attorney asking for help. In the letter she slowly reveals the events that led her to where she is now.I love Ruth Ware's books because they have a classic feel to it, the stories have gothic undertones and she reveals pieces of the story in a way that keeps you interested and wanting to know mo Another engaging novel from one of my favorite authors!The story starts with Rowan, a former babysitter who is now imprisoned, we do not know the details of how she got there but she's writing a letter to an attorney asking for help. In the letter she slowly reveals the events that led her to where she is now.I love Ruth Ware's books because they have a classic feel to it, the stories have gothic undertones and she reveals pieces of the story in a way that keeps you interested and wanting to know more. At the end, I wanted to go back and reread some sections, the pieces have fallen onto their places and wow, I did not see it coming.The first half of the novel is a bit slow but once you past the midway point it's a pageturner. Overall, I enjoyed it recommend it to readers of mysteries/thrillers and contemporary fiction. Received ARC from publisher via Netgalley
    more
  • Amy Imogene Reads
    January 1, 1970
    Well! I’m completely shattered by that final series of reveals. Holy what now. I did not expect to give this a 5 star until the last 50 pages.Writing: ★★★★★Pacing: ★★★★Mystery/Reveals: all the starsDear Mr. Wexham, I know this isn't the usual way of doing things, but you have to believe me. I didn't kill that little girl. Rowan Caine wasn't looking for a job opportunity but when the perfect job appears in a Google search, she can't say no. A live-in nanny position, a large salary, a beautifully modern Scottish manor hous/>Dear/>/>/> Well! I’m completely shattered by that final series of reveals. Holy what now. I did not expect to give this a 5 star until the last 50 pages.Writing: ★★★★★Pacing: ★★★★Mystery/Reveals: all the starsDear Mr. Wexham, I know this isn't the usual way of doing things, but you have to believe me. I didn't kill that little girl. Rowan Caine wasn't looking for a job opportunity but when the perfect job appears in a Google search, she can't say no. A live-in nanny position, a large salary, a beautifully modern Scottish manor house, and a free ride out of London. The house is outfitted with a smart-home software called "Happy," and the family inside this happy home appears to be perfect. But as the saying goes, all that glitters is not gold...Before long, Rowan is dealing with terrifying steps in the attic, "Happy" malfunctions with sinister undertones, children with secret agendas, and a creeping sense that this home may be a mousetrap...and Rowan has walked right in.Told in letters to Dr. Wexham—a lawyer who Rowan is trying to persuade to help her case—The Turn of the Key took all the things that Ruth Ware is known for and amped up the game. The writing is tight, the characters are perfect shades of morally grey, and the twists are shocking. I might have enjoyed the first 75% of the novel, but I LOVED the last 25%. The Turn of the Key might be obvious on some levels, but then on other levels it might not be so obvious at all...
    more
Write a review