Leave Only Footprints
From the Emmy-winning CBS Sunday Morning correspondent, an entertaining chronicle of his year spent traveling to every one of our National Parks, including his experiences with some of the most beautiful places--and most interesting people--that America has to offer.When Conor Knighton decided to spend a year wandering through "America's Best Idea," he was worried the whole thing might end up being his worst idea. But, after a broken engagement and a broken heart, he desperately needed a change of scenery. The ambitious plan he cooked up went a bit overboard in that department; Knighton set out to visit every single one of America's National Parks, from Acadia to Zion. Leave Only Footprints is the memoir of his year spent traveling across the United States, a journey that yielded his "On the Trail" series, which quickly became one of CBS Sunday Morning's most beloved segments. In this smart, informative, and often hilarious book, he'll share how his journey through these natural wonders, unchanged by man, ended up changing his worldview on everything from God to politics to love and technology. Whether it's waking up early for a naked scrub in an Arkansas bathhouse or staying up late to stargaze along our loneliest highway, Knighton goes behind the scenery to provide an unfiltered look at America. In the tradition of books like A Walk in the Woods or Turn Right at Machu Picchu, this is an irresistible mix of personal narrative and travelogue-some well-placed pop culture references, too-and a must-read for any of the 331 million yearly National Parks visitors.

Leave Only Footprints Details

TitleLeave Only Footprints
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 7th, 2020
PublisherCrown Archetype
ISBN-139781984823540
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Travel, Environment, Nature, Autobiography, Memoir

Leave Only Footprints Review

  • Ali
    January 1, 1970
    I had the lucky chance to pick up an advance copy at work. It was on our shelf, and something about it called out to me. It was the perfect book for me to read right now. I'm currently going through a challenging part of my life, and have set a goal for myself- travel the country and see many of our amazing national parks. I will admit, I'm not aiming for EVERY one in a year, like Conor achieved, but I do have 19 stops on my list (and counting.)This book is not what I expected. I thought it I had the lucky chance to pick up an advance copy at work. It was on our shelf, and something about it called out to me. It was the perfect book for me to read right now. I'm currently going through a challenging part of my life, and have set a goal for myself- travel the country and see many of our amazing national parks. I will admit, I'm not aiming for EVERY one in a year, like Conor achieved, but I do have 19 stops on my list (and counting.)This book is not what I expected. I thought it would be more of a guide- here's each park, and what I did there! If you're looking for that, there are other books. No, this book is a story- both of Conor's personal and physical journey, but also of some history of the parks, and the different elements that connects them. It was unexpected, but incredibly moving. Conor perfectly weaves a beautiful narrative, that was motivational, and moving to read. I could hardly put it down.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Highly recommend!!! Oh my gosh it left me energized and excited to adventure and jealous of his nomadic lifestyle and career. Left me wanting to read more about every one of the 56 parks he went to -- and experience them myself. Definitely not the kind of hard-core adventure book I was expecting; it's more in the vein of A Walk in the Woods and reads like a series of short articles. Knighton is a romantic and an engaging storyteller.
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  • Laura Hoffman Brauman
    January 1, 1970
    What an absolutely perfect way to spend an evening. Knighton visited 59 national parks in a year and wrote about the experience. I loved the way he structured it - not in the order he visited them or their geographic location, but by themes that connected them. Mystery, God, Sound, People, etc -- it was a really effective way to highlight how connected places that might seem dissimilar can be. For the parks I have already visited, it brought back wonderful memories. For the ones that I haven't, What an absolutely perfect way to spend an evening. Knighton visited 59 national parks in a year and wrote about the experience. I loved the way he structured it - not in the order he visited them or their geographic location, but by themes that connected them. Mystery, God, Sound, People, etc -- it was a really effective way to highlight how connected places that might seem dissimilar can be. For the parks I have already visited, it brought back wonderful memories. For the ones that I haven't, I got to do a little armchair travel as I added them to my bucket list.
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  • Cindy Burnett
    January 1, 1970
    In this non-fiction gem, Knighton chronicles the year he spent traveling to every national park in the United States. The parks are grouped by theme instead of location which works surprisingly well, and the book is interspersed with humor and intriguing details about each of the parks. Knighton highlights the importance of our national parks, how various parks received their designations, and how climate change and over-visiting is impacting many of these beautiful places. In the Epilogue, In this non-fiction gem, Knighton chronicles the year he spent traveling to every national park in the United States. The parks are grouped by theme instead of location which works surprisingly well, and the book is interspersed with humor and intriguing details about each of the parks. Knighton highlights the importance of our national parks, how various parks received their designations, and how climate change and over-visiting is impacting many of these beautiful places. In the Epilogue, Knighton discusses how the National Park System continues to expand and quickly reviews the three parks that have achieved the designation after 2016 (the year Knighton made his journey). Most importantly, Knighton demonstrates that “national parks have become our collective sanctuaries”; this book is such a fascinating and beautiful read and will certainly make my top ten list for 2020.For more reviews, check out my Instagram account: https://www.instagram.com/thoughtsfro... and my newsletter: https://www.cfapage.net/subscribe.
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  • Tara
    January 1, 1970
    Knightons nature memoir of traveling to each of the National Parks has something for everyone- an overview of each park (sometimes too brief), a recovery tale of a broken heart, an adventurous itinerary to explore many unknown corners in our country, and a motivation to act towards saving these American treasures. Theres a lot happening at once, but I enjoyed the split into different themes or topics that readers from various backgrounds can connect to and enjoy. Knighton’s nature memoir of traveling to each of the National Parks has something for everyone- an overview of each park (sometimes too brief), a recovery tale of a broken heart, an adventurous itinerary to explore many unknown corners in our country, and a motivation to act towards saving these American treasures. There’s a lot happening at once, but I enjoyed the split into different themes or topics that readers from various backgrounds can connect to and enjoy.
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    When it is snowy and cold outside, superspeed readers like me can read 150 - 200+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book and many more today. LOLI received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸.The Emmy-winning CBS Sunday Morning correspondent chronicles his year When it is snowy and cold outside, superspeed readers like me can read 150 - 200+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. LOLI received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸.The Emmy-winning CBS Sunday Morning correspondent chronicles his year travelling to every one of our National Parks, discovering the most beautiful places and most interesting people that America has to offer.When Conor Knighton decided to spend a year wandering through America's "best idea," he was worried the whole thing might end up being his worst idea. But after a broken engagement and a broken heart, Conor desperately needed a change of scenery. The ambitious plan he cooked up went a bit overboard in that department; Knighton set out to visit every single one of America's National Parks, from Acadia to Zion.Leave Only Footprints is the memoir of his year spent travelling across the United States, a journey that yielded his "On the Trail" series, which quickly became one of CBS Sunday Morning's most beloved segments. In this smart, informative, and entertaining book, he shares how his journey through these natural wonders ended up changing his worldview on everything from God and love to politics and technology. Whether he's waking up early for a naked scrub in a historic bathhouse or staying up late to stargaze along our loneliest highway, Knighton goes behind the scenery to provide an unfiltered look at our country. In doing so, he reveals the unforgettable stories behind the often beautiful, always fascinating lands that all Americans share.My mom and I the only indoorsy members of our family - - the rest of them have done fun things like, say, backpacking around Baffin Island for 90 days sot his is the perfect book for them. (In fact, my one brother is getting and "IOU this book" coupon for Christmas as it does not come out until April of 2020.) He plans to visit every US (61) and Canadian (48) National Park during his newly retired life - he and his wife managed to do 19 of the 109 the summer of 2019 alone and got a major dose of altitude sickness along the way in Utah. THEN they are going to hike the Appalachian and other trails with their kids, spouses and grandkids They are an exhausting family!If you have a hiker or outdoor fan this is the perfect book for you - if you are a "hot house plant" (as my mom calls me) this is a nice way to read about and vicariously visit the parks with this book. It comes out in time for spring thaws and hiking being made easier for you or those outdoorsy type people in your lifeAs always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I love emojis (outside of their incessant use by "🙏-ed Social Influencer Millennials/#BachelorNation survivors/etc. " on Instagram and Twitter... Get a real job, people!) so let's give it 🥾🏔🥾⛺🥾NOTE: I changed the release date here on Goodreads as it was wrong ...
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    "It occurred to me that part of the reason Id seen so much debate about the years first sunrise, and not its last sunset, was that our beginnings always seem more important than our endings. In life, we can often control how things start. Endings are elusive and amorphous and uncertain."I loved this book. My word of the year this year is "wild" which is about being in the wilderness more. In 2002, I did a cross-country trip with my husband where we went to 30+ national parks and promised each "It occurred to me that part of the reason I’d seen so much debate about the year’s first sunrise, and not its last sunset, was that our beginnings always seem more important than our endings. In life, we can often control how things start. Endings are elusive and amorphous and uncertain."I loved this book. My word of the year this year is "wild" which is about being in the wilderness more. In 2002, I did a cross-country trip with my husband where we went to 30+ national parks and promised each other to rent an RV when we retired so we could do more of that. So when I saw this book I knew I wanted to read it immediately. I wanted to revisit the parks I'd seen in person and find out about all the ones I hadn't."I don’t know what, if anything, comes after this life. But I can tell you this: If there is a Heaven, I bet it looks a lot like Yosemite."And the book did not disappoint. It is the journey of the author over the course of a year as he visits every National Park in the United States. The book has parts that are informative, parts that are funny, and parts that are poignant. For me, it struck the perfect balance between the three, managing to make it a really enjoyable read."In a cave, you are simultaneously outdoors and indoors, protected from the elements and yet exposed to all sorts of new dangers."I will admit that more than once, I wished the book came with photos. I wanted to be able to imagine what the parks looked like as he told stories about being in them. Some are very briefly mentioned, while the others are longer. But I wanted to see photos of all of them. I spent time going between my book and internet searches so I could see the photos of the mentioned places. "When I saw the pile, I couldn’t decide if it was depressing or beautiful. It’s probably a bit of both. It’s a monument to our desire to do the right thing, but it’s also proof that, sometimes, doing the right thing doesn’t matter. Sometimes it can be too little, too late."I know the author has live video segments, I haven't seen any of them, but I will definitely go looking for them so I can enjoy all of this once more.Thank you to netgalley and Crown Publishing for an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Allen Adams
    January 1, 1970
    https://www.themaineedge.com/adventur...If youve ever paid a visit to one of this countrys National Parks, you know that there is a surfeit of awe-inspiring natural wonder in the U.S., albeit one that is perhaps not given quite the degree of respect that it deserves. Its hard to imagine standing in one of these majestic places and not feeling overwhelmed by its beauty.Now imagine doing that for ALL OF THEM.Thats Conor Knightons travel guide/memoir Leave Only Footprints: My Acadia-To-Zion Journey https://www.themaineedge.com/adventur...If you’ve ever paid a visit to one of this country’s National Parks, you know that there is a surfeit of awe-inspiring natural wonder in the U.S., albeit one that is perhaps not given quite the degree of respect that it deserves. It’s hard to imagine standing in one of these majestic places and not feeling overwhelmed by its beauty.Now imagine doing that for ALL OF THEM.That’s Conor Knighton’s travel guide/memoir “Leave Only Footprints: My Acadia-To-Zion Journey Through Every National Park,” a book whose subhead is both accurate and insufficient. Knighton, a correspondent for “CBS This Morning,” does precisely what he says – he goes to every single National Park (though a couple more have been established since his 2016 trip.Zigzagging through the country over the course of the year – sometimes with his sage photographer sidekick, often alone – Knighton offers up a loving look at our national natural pride. But it’s an internal journey as well, with Knighton also spending this time dealing with the aftermath of his breakup from his fiancée and other personal turmoil.Knighton starts his journey literally as early as possible, joining a handful of die-hards who spend their New Year’s Eve making their way to the top of Cadillac Mountain in Maine’s Acadia National Park, all of them seeking to be the first to see the sunrise. It’s an apt beginning, providing a spot-on illustration of the cheerful relentlessness that Knighton brings to the entire trip.He makes an interesting choice, opting against laying the book out chronologically. Instead, he groups his visits thematically, with chapter headings that offer a bit of insight as to their contents. While one could argue that something is lost without the linear retelling of the story, there’s something really compelling about the connections he’s choosing to emphasize instead.He leads off with “Sunrise” and closes with “Sunset,” but it isn’t all that straightforward. There are chapters with titles like “God” and “Forgiveness” and “Mystery” and “Love” to go along with “Caves” and “Canyons” and “Trees.” By attaching like to like, Knighton is able to delve deeper into the thoughts and feelings being generated by these experiences; the story seems fuller not just despite being told largely out of order, but BECAUSE it is out of order.Winding through it all, alongside his vividly and passionately rendered descriptions of his experiences in these places, a thorough introduction to the National Parks writ large and the people – past and present – responsible for creating, maintaining and protecting them. The people who teach and continue to constantly learn about these incredible settings.Standing in sandy silence in one of the quietest places on Earth or looking up into one of its darkest skies. Standing atop mountains and beside lakes. In deserts and forests and on islands and in caves. And everywhere, the people – the people who seek to celebrate these places and the people whose literal job it is to do so.There’s also a healthy amount of Knighton himself sprinkled throughout, to the reader’s benefit. His sense of humor – largely self-deprecatory – is never far from the surface, even as he relates the more emotionally fraught aspects of his life (and maybe a few Tinder dates). Still, he manages to be consistently present in the moment; his introspective moments are tied just as indelibly to his surroundings as his joyful noise.(Shout out to Efraim, the photographer who accompanied Knighton on parts of this journey and who managed to drop a handful of insightful and delightful pearls of wisdom over the course of the book. Every big journey could use an Efraim.)In addition, one can’t help but take into account our world’s current circumstances as well. As the situation doesn’t allow for us to venture out to see these incredible sights for ourselves right now, there’s something to be said for hearing a well-told account of said sights. Obviously, someone else’s story isn’t the equal of your own first-hand experience, but the view through Knighton’s eyes is definitely a good one.“Leave Only Footprints” is an engaging and captivating piece of travel writing, packed with the small details that really drive the reality of a place. Conor Knighton makes for a charming and entertaining guide, offering a smart and funny look at our country’s network of natural wonder and one man’s journey of a lifetime.“Take only memories, leave only footprints.” – Chief Si’alh
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  • Chelsea
    January 1, 1970
    I liked this book, even if it just made my wanderlust and claustrophobia from being stuck at home that much worse. There are tons of interesting stories and tidbits I picked up, like the pioneering parkitecture of Mary Colter at the Grand Canyon or the mysterious"Old Man" of Crater Lake. And of course, like any American outdoorsy book, it is peppered with plenty of John Muir and Teddy Roosevelt quotes. Some of the stories are quite funny too, especially the bears at Katmai.But I didn't love the I liked this book, even if it just made my wanderlust and claustrophobia from being stuck at home that much worse. There are tons of interesting stories and tidbits I picked up, like the pioneering parkitecture of Mary Colter at the Grand Canyon or the mysterious"Old Man" of Crater Lake. And of course, like any American outdoorsy book, it is peppered with plenty of John Muir and Teddy Roosevelt quotes. Some of the stories are quite funny too, especially the bears at Katmai.But I didn't love the book. Some parks got interesting stories (whether historical, ecological, or Knighton's personal), but many parks received short shrift. Acadia is mentioned for its claim as the "first sunrise of the year", but otherwise nothing. Olympic is only discussed in relation to a story about needing a cell phone, which turns into a longer piece on cell service and connectedness throughout the parks. Interesting, but I still wanted to hear about Olympic itself. With 56 parks to go through in one year and one book, it's understandable that there just isn't enough time/ room to go into every park in detail. But disappointing nonetheless. Overall, the humor and writing style had more misses than hits for me, filled with pat jokes and bad lines (like "America's parks really do shine from sea to sea"). After every section, I can almost hear him saying "Now back to you, Tom!", like the TV reporter he is. Knighton is definitely not the next Bill Bryson. His writing at times feels heavily influencing by blogging and on-air TV personalities, in that carefully calculated confessional style that makes you think they're being open and honest about their lives, but feels like another mask. It's the "trying to appeal and seem relatable to the largest audience possible" that makes him feel a little fake and, honestly, boring. Travel books like this one that are centered around the person traveling, rather than the destination, needs a narrator who isn't afraid to be unlikable, foolish, and neurotic at times. It makes for better stories. Otherwise, it feels like watching your friend's vacation photos and hearing their anecdotes, fun for a bit, but not riveting.
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  • Leann
    January 1, 1970
    Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are. Mason CooleyAs a National Park nerd myself, I absolutely enjoyed reading Conor Knightons journey through the National Parks. He spent a year visiting Americas Best Idea starting in Acadia National Park in Maine and working his way through all 59 of them.I could relate to many anecdotes like how often to wind up chatting with people on the trails, or making big plans, only to realize youre not in shape for the hike you chose. Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are. – Mason CooleyAs a National Park nerd myself, I absolutely enjoyed reading Conor Knighton’s journey through the National Parks. He spent a year visiting “America’s Best Idea” – starting in Acadia National Park in Maine and working his way through all 59 of them.I could relate to many anecdotes – like how often to wind up chatting with people on the trails, or making big plans, only to realize you’re not in shape for the hike you chose. And the scenery he describes throughout the book – I’ve been there and lived it in many of the parks – and he describes it so perfectly.I also found myself pausing at times to Google and research some of the parks and places that I haven’t been to – and while they were already on my bucket list, some of them were moved up and places and destinations around the parks were added. Not to mention, considering visiting at off times of year – like Yellowstone in the winter.I truly enjoyed Conor’s writing style – a perfect combination of casual and humorous; reflective and insightful. The entire book feels like a long conversation with an old friend.This was also a enjoyable read during this COVID-19 quarantine. While I would normally be out in the spring visiting the National Parks myself, I was able to visit 59 of them through the lens of Knighton’s words.
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  • Carianne Carleo-Evangelist
    January 1, 1970
    What happens when an engagement breaks off and a man is left rudderless? He decides to visit every national park within one year. I liked that this wasn't a chronological journey, but rather buckets of similarity between the parks. I learned a lot more about which parks were actually parks and which are monuments and other NPS properties, which he didn't hit. Toward the end when he got more into Tinder and other dating musings, I wish he'd go back to the parks, but it was overall OK with the What happens when an engagement breaks off and a man is left rudderless? He decides to visit every national park within one year. I liked that this wasn't a chronological journey, but rather buckets of similarity between the parks. I learned a lot more about which parks were actually parks and which are monuments and other NPS properties, which he didn't hit. Toward the end when he got more into Tinder and other dating musings, I wish he'd go back to the parks, but it was overall OK with the balance of life v. trip. I liked that there were photos of some of the highlights, but would like to see more about the history and connections between some of the parks. Particularly enjoyed the elements of diversity (or lack thereof), the architectural elements of the Grand Canyon, Efraim's connections to Big Bend and how often he connected Muir and other Parks historic figures. Overall a good read, and added a lot to my bucketlist.
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  • Kim McGee
    January 1, 1970
    Conor Knighton makes us realize that we have national treasures out there that may not look the same way to our grandchildren and great grandchildren. From the sheer joy and awe he feels by visiting each one of our National Parks throughout the course of one year to the awareness he shares of the fate of some the lesser known parks and the conservation plans within, we are caught between feeling ashamed of taking it all for granted and also wanting to book a family road trip across the country Conor Knighton makes us realize that we have national treasures out there that may not look the same way to our grandchildren and great grandchildren. From the sheer joy and awe he feels by visiting each one of our National Parks throughout the course of one year to the awareness he shares of the fate of some the lesser known parks and the conservation plans within, we are caught between feeling ashamed of taking it all for granted and also wanting to book a family road trip across the country to see as much as possible. These parks are magnificent and the variety and beauty found there in one country is unparalleled. Conor Knighton's easy going style pulls you in immediately and offers equal amounts of his own experience with the history and nature lesson. My thanks to the publisher for the advance copy.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    This book took me a while to read because I could not stop googling all of the amazing places he wrote about. I may have even tried to plan a trip or two while reading. So sad that at the moment all National Parks are closed. I really enjoyed this book, though it was not what I was expecting. The chapters were organized into different topics and highlighted parks related to those topics, which was interesting and brought to light things I never would have thought about. To make it 5 stars for This book took me a while to read because I could not stop googling all of the amazing places he wrote about. I may have even tried to plan a trip or two while reading. So sad that at the moment all National Parks are closed. I really enjoyed this book, though it was not what I was expecting. The chapters were organized into different topics and highlighted parks related to those topics, which was interesting and brought to light things I never would have thought about. To make it 5 stars for me, I would have loved to read more of his actual experiences in each park (best hiking trails, etc) but there are other books about that, I’m sure.
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  • Judy
    January 1, 1970
    A CBS correspondent from CBS Sunday Morning, Knighton determined to visit all 59 of the official National Parks in America in one year, 2016, just 100 years since the National Park Service was established. CBS contracted with him and he began the journey in Acadia NP in Maine and ended at Point Reyes in California. His book is part travelogue, part journalism, and part memoir. It is more a description of the experience he had in the parks, than a description of the parks themselves. He divided A CBS correspondent from CBS Sunday Morning, Knighton determined to visit all 59 of the official National Parks in America in one year, 2016, just 100 years since the National Park Service was established. CBS contracted with him and he began the journey in Acadia NP in Maine and ended at Point Reyes in California. His book is part travelogue, part journalism, and part memoir. It is more a description of the experience he had in the parks, than a description of the parks themselves. He divided the book by themes (Water, Animals, Sound, Trees, etc.) rather than geographically. He traveled back and forth from the Everglades, to American Samoa, to Utah, the Northwest and Alaska.
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  • Jaime
    January 1, 1970
    I really really liked this book - that being said, I do wish there were more of the PARKS in the book. I know that would result in a much longer book and is a monumental task. The chapters felt very brief and almost survey-like, and I almost always wished they were longer and more in-depth. As it is, this book blends the parks with people - the people who created the parks and work at/with the parks, the people he meets along the way....Regardless, I really enjoyed reading this and would love to I really really liked this book - that being said, I do wish there were more of the PARKS in the book. I know that would result in a much longer book and is a monumental task. The chapters felt very brief and almost survey-like, and I almost always wished they were longer and more in-depth. As it is, this book blends the parks with people - the people who created the parks and work at/with the parks, the people he meets along the way....Regardless, I really enjoyed reading this and would love to just sit and chat with Knighton or go hiking with him. He seems like a genuinely good guy and I underlined so many things. I’ll definitely be recommending this book to lots of people.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    I may not be giving up on this permanently, but for now I am setting it aside. I read about half of it and it was not what I was in the mood for. I wanted it to be like Wild America but instead it was more like the movie version of Big Year (except obviously not just about birds). I kept getting annoyed that he couldn't write about the beauty or uniqueness of these places without cracking jokes or meandering into some personal story. On another occasion, I might have found this book a lot of I may not be giving up on this permanently, but for now I am setting it aside. I read about half of it and it was not what I was in the mood for. I wanted it to be like Wild America but instead it was more like the movie version of Big Year (except obviously not just about birds). I kept getting annoyed that he couldn't write about the beauty or uniqueness of these places without cracking jokes or meandering into some personal story. On another occasion, I might have found this book a lot of fun. Six other people are waiting for it at the library, so I decided to let them have a shot at it.
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  • C.T. Liotta
    January 1, 1970
    Conor Knighton may not be Hiram Bingham discovering Machu Picchu, but fans of his CBS Sunday Morning segments should love this intimate, behind-the-scenes reflection.If you've ever wondered how a reporter gets sent on assignment to all the National Parks and what life on the road is like, this answers it.I like the way this book is organized: rather than a chronological or alphabetical journey, Knighton organizes parks by common themes. It's a unique way of thinking about them, and makes me want Conor Knighton may not be Hiram Bingham discovering Machu Picchu, but fans of his CBS Sunday Morning segments should love this intimate, behind-the-scenes reflection.If you've ever wondered how a reporter gets sent on assignment to all the National Parks and what life on the road is like, this answers it.I like the way this book is organized: rather than a chronological or alphabetical journey, Knighton organizes parks by common themes. It's a unique way of thinking about them, and makes me want to get out there and visit.
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  • Joy Matteson
    January 1, 1970
    This was a lovely, somewhat cheeky memoir about a 30 something guy who loves to travel, especially in the National Parks. It was a light-hearted walk through some of the more well known parks, and it was peppered with his thoughts on life, love, and how the Parks are faring with climate change. It was clearly written for a millennial audience, which I didn't mind, but I can see older folk bristling at his thoughts on Tindr. But it was a lovely easy read, and I laughed out loud more than once. This was a lovely, somewhat cheeky memoir about a 30 something guy who loves to travel, especially in the National Parks. It was a light-hearted walk through some of the more well known parks, and it was peppered with his thoughts on life, love, and how the Parks are faring with climate change. It was clearly written for a millennial audience, which I didn't mind, but I can see older folk bristling at his thoughts on Tindr. But it was a lovely easy read, and I laughed out loud more than once. Great summer read!
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    While it was not the best book Ive ever read, this is the book that got me to focus on reading for more than 5 minutes at a time during the pandemic, which is saying something. It was able to satisfy my wanderlust without irresponsibly actually traveling, while adding cute quirky commentary. In normal situations, 4/5 stars, but during the pandemic, it gets a full 5/5 for making me enjoy reading again. While it was not the best book I’ve ever read, this is the book that got me to focus on reading for more than 5 minutes at a time during the pandemic, which is saying something. It was able to satisfy my wanderlust without irresponsibly actually traveling, while adding cute quirky commentary. In normal situations, 4/5 stars, but during the pandemic, it gets a full 5/5 for making me enjoy reading again.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Well, this was just delightful! I listened to it on audio, but I took so many notes that I need my own copy. I love how the chapters were organizedan examination of the parks grouped by sound, animals, trees, light. I liked learning about the history of it all and about dark rangers. It made me really appreciate America and want to get out in nature. The author was on his own journey and what he shares is heartwarming and often hilarious. Loved it! Well, this was just delightful! I listened to it on audio, but I took so many notes that I need my own copy. I love how the chapters were organized—an examination of the parks grouped by sound, animals, trees, light. I liked learning about the history of it all and about “dark rangers”. It made me really appreciate America and want to get out in nature. The author was on his own journey and what he shares is heartwarming and often hilarious. Loved it!
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  • Jill Young
    January 1, 1970
    Nonfiction. Personal travel account to 56 National Parks in a year. Very enjoyable to read during the Covid pandemic when we are housebound. Some accounts are quite humorous, especially Hot Springs, Arkansas. Many of these parks I was not familiar with and probably wont travel to due to remoteness or lack of interest. But I appreciated the authors adventure! Nonfiction. Personal travel account to 56 National Parks in a year. Very enjoyable to read during the Covid pandemic when we are housebound. Some accounts are quite humorous, especially Hot Springs, Arkansas. Many of these parks I was not familiar with and probably won’t travel to due to remoteness or lack of interest. But I appreciated the author’s adventure!
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  • Rach Geo
    January 1, 1970
    It's amazing how deeply similar we both found our park experiences. I have had many of these same realizations in the parks myself. I've been to 19 and absolutely host the goal of going to all. There was some beautiful prose and deep contexts here. I liked it. I just didn't have a strong drive to read through it. Great for hammock reading.
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  • Elizabeth Duffey
    January 1, 1970
    I learned about this book from Sunday Morning on CBS. Weve always been fans of national parks, so I loved finding Knightons tour of every park in a year. It was fun remembering the ones wed been to, and now theres a bunch more I want to go to. He also has an engaging personal story he weaves throughout his travels. I learned about this book from Sunday Morning on CBS. We’ve always been fans of national parks, so I loved finding Knighton’s tour of every park in a year. It was fun remembering the ones we’d been to, and now there’s a bunch more I want to go to. He also has an engaging personal story he weaves throughout his travels.
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  • Rather.be.reading1
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the publisher for the opportunity to read and review this book! It was amazing and came to me exactly when I needed it the most. I was overjoyed to follow along Knighton's journey. It reminded me a bit like "Wild" by Cheryl Strayed. I love nature, national parks and landmarks so this fascinated me highly.
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  • Sharique Jamal
    January 1, 1970
    If you have a bohemian and a nomad mindset, go for this book. It is a burst of energy and a flow of fresh air, for people who love wildlife and the sheer thrill of travelling.Loved the novel and highly recommend to all people who have the courage to walk the path not taken, the wild side and immerse in the beauty of Nature.Sharique Jamal
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  • Megan Hart
    January 1, 1970
    Leave Only FootprintsThe saying "leave only footprints and take only memories" is appropriate for this book. A recounting of one man's journey to visit the national parks after his life was turned upside down.
  • Elizabeth McNair Demolat
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved the combination of personal journey, guidebook, and social commentary in this book. The only complaint I have is that it wasnt long enough. I could happily have read twice as much. I absolutely loved the combination of personal journey, guidebook, and social commentary in this book. The only complaint I have is that it wasn’t long enough. I could happily have read twice as much.
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  • Harry Coffill
    January 1, 1970
    Really enjoyed this. Made me want to go to lots of parks, though. Appreciated how the author found one highlight of every park as he journeyed that someone visiting might not notice. Very envious of visiting Yellowstone in winter! I'd love to do that!
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  • Stacy
    January 1, 1970
    What a beautiful book. I bought it on a whim because of the gorgeous cover, and the writing is just as lovely. Thanks for helping me feel like I've traveled across the country to enjoy the wonders of nature at a time when I am stuck at home.
  • Melanie Ullrich
    January 1, 1970
    The authors humor and unpreparedness was refreshing amongst the gads of travel books that tend to be overly serious and make the experiences seem unobtainable. He almost reads like a millennials Bill Bryson. The author’s humor and unpreparedness was refreshing amongst the gads of travel books that tend to be overly serious and make the experiences seem unobtainable. He almost reads like a millennials’ Bill Bryson.
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