A Murderous Malady (Florence Nightingale Mystery #2)
For fans of Charles Todd and Deanna Raybourn comes Christine Trent’s second Florence Nightingale mystery.Cholera has broken out in London, but Florence Nightingale has bigger problems when people begin dying of a far more intentional cause—murder.The London summer of 1854 is drawing to a close when a deadly outbreak of cholera grips the city. Florence Nightingale is back on the scene marshaling her nurses to help treat countless suffering patients at Middlesex Hospital as the disease tears through the Soho slums. But beyond the dangers of the disease, something even more evil is seeping through the ailing streets of London.It begins with an attack on the carriage of Florence’s friend, Elizabeth Herbert, wife to Secretary at War Sidney Herbert. Florence survives, but her coachman does not. Within hours, Sidney’s valet stumbles into the hospital, mutters a few cryptic words about the attack, and promptly dies from cholera. Frantic that an assassin is stalking his wife, Sidney enlists Florence’s help, who accepts but has little to go on save for the valet’s last words and a curious set of dice in his jacket pocket. Soon, the suspects are piling up faster than cholera victims, as there seems to be no end to the number of people who bear a grudge against the Herbert household.Now, Florence is in a race against time—not only to save the victims of a lethal disease, but to foil a murderer with a disturbingly sinister goal—in A Murderous Malady.

A Murderous Malady (Florence Nightingale Mystery #2) Details

TitleA Murderous Malady (Florence Nightingale Mystery #2)
Author
ReleaseMay 7th, 2019
PublisherCrooked Lane Books
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Mystery, Fiction, Crime, Victorian

A Murderous Malady (Florence Nightingale Mystery #2) Review

  • Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede
    January 1, 1970
    I really, really loved the first book in this series. And, that makes writing this review a bit tough because I found the mystery in this book was just not on the same level as in No Cure for the Dead. Don't take me wrong, it's an interesting book, but I was more invested in the story in the first book because of Florence Nightingale's own trials and tribulations to solve the case. She just had to solve the case since the murder had happened in her own hospital. This time, her best friend Elizab I really, really loved the first book in this series. And, that makes writing this review a bit tough because I found the mystery in this book was just not on the same level as in No Cure for the Dead. Don't take me wrong, it's an interesting book, but I was more invested in the story in the first book because of Florence Nightingale's own trials and tribulations to solve the case. She just had to solve the case since the murder had happened in her own hospital. This time, her best friend Elizabeth Herbert and her father are attacked while they are traveling in a carriage in London. They survive, but the coachmen die. And, now Elizabeth husband is worried that there is someone out there who wants to kill Elizabeth and he wants Florence to investigate.Now I'm all for Florence playing amateur detective, but writing this review can't I help be a bit skeptic to why she of all people should take on this role. I mean sure she solved a murder, but she's not a detective. If Elizabeth had wanted Florence to investigate this event would it make more sense, but her husband Sidney? I would have thought someone with a bit more experience would have made a better choice. Anyhow Florence accepts and then the hunt is on for the truth. Personal the side story about King Cholera was way more interesting to read about. All and all, this story was not bad, the case may not have enthralled me the same way as the first books case did. However, I did enjoy reading about Florence and I'm looking forward to the next book in the series.I want to thank the publisher for providing me with a free copy through NetGalley for an honest review!
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  • Betty
    January 1, 1970
    The second book of Florence Nightingale's life covers the period just before she traveled to the Crimea War. The historical facts were well research and accurate. Florence is called to the household of Sidney Herbert as her friend Helen and her father were shot at on there way for a visit to a museum. The occupants of the carriage were not hurt but the coachman died. Sidney asked Florence to investigate. One of the upper servants of the Herbert Household dies at Florence's hospital from cholera. The second book of Florence Nightingale's life covers the period just before she traveled to the Crimea War. The historical facts were well research and accurate. Florence is called to the household of Sidney Herbert as her friend Helen and her father were shot at on there way for a visit to a museum. The occupants of the carriage were not hurt but the coachman died. Sidney asked Florence to investigate. One of the upper servants of the Herbert Household dies at Florence's hospital from cholera. The inquiry into the affair takes Florence into deep into Soho slums. I like the method that the physicians went about establishing the cause of the Cholera tracing it to a dipper rinse in a closeby area. Previous to that event happening cholera was thought to be from the air and not from the water.I highly recommend this book and series.Disclosure: Many thanks to NetGalley and Crooked Lane Books for a review copy. The opinions expressed are my own.
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  • The Lit Bitch
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsChristine Trent is an author I have had on my radar forever it seems like. When her Lady of Ashes series first came out, I tried to win a copy for months to no avail.Then as always seems to happen….I was on to another book. But I did continue to see her Lady of Ashes series pop up all over the place….my library, bookstores, social media. But then the timing just never seemed right.Now she has a new series out, The Florence Nightingale Mysteries, and I was eager to try and work this late 3.5 starsChristine Trent is an author I have had on my radar forever it seems like. When her Lady of Ashes series first came out, I tried to win a copy for months to no avail.Then as always seems to happen….I was on to another book. But I did continue to see her Lady of Ashes series pop up all over the place….my library, bookstores, social media. But then the timing just never seemed right.Now she has a new series out, The Florence Nightingale Mysteries, and I was eager to try and work this latest book into my review schedule. It is the second book in a series, but I wasn’t too worried about being ‘lost’ because the series basically just started so how much could I really be missing by picking up book 2?So I decided to give it a shot and see if this new series would appeal to me!Beyond just the author, I was interested in the premise for this book. I love Florence Nightingale and thought it would be interesting to have her as the ‘lady detective’ in this series so to speak. I wondered how her nursing experience would benefit her in this mystery but also how merging the two professions would work here.I don’t know that I loved the combination but I don’t know that I didn’t like it either. Something was off for me but it’s hard for me to put my finger on what exactly it was. I thought that Florence had an intelligence about her that made me want to know more about her and to keep reading this story. I also loved reading about the cholera epidemic as well as the lower classes on London. I loved seeing her respond to these issues and I could tell that the author did a lot of research on Nightingale herself as well as a ton of historical research. But something about her character just felt a little flat.I suppose it could have been that I haven’t read the first book in the series maybe? I think this book could easily be read as a stand alone and I certainly didn’t have a difficult time reading it in a couple of sittings, but I think I would have enjoyed Florence a little more had I known a little more about her from the previous book. Maybe then she would have been more fully realized for me.The mystery was believable and kept me guessing and I easily flew through this book in a couple of days and felt that it was overall enjoyable. I would happily read more books by Trent and am looking forward to finally getting around to the Lady of Ashes series! I would definitely recommend this book to historical mystery lovers, plus I am in love with the cover so there’s that!Be sure to check out the other stops in the tour as there are a few giveaways and more reviews to check out!See my full review here
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  • Dana-Adriana B.
    January 1, 1970
    It is great historical mystery based in London. I just found out it is the second book in Florence Nightingale Mystery, so I need to read even the first one. The characters are nice and the plot too. Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for this copy.
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  • eyes.2c
    January 1, 1970
    Florence Nightingale Intrigue. An Intelligent Victorian mystery!Once again a captivating Florence Nightingale mystery, embedded around the happenings of the First Anglo-Afghanistan War Disaster of 1839-1842 and the cholera epidemic, the Broad Street Outbreak. in 1854.Florence's friend Liz à Court, wife of Sidney Herbert, the War Secretary and daughter to General Charles à Court-Repington has been shot at and her carriage driver killed whilst she and the General were on their way to the British m Florence Nightingale Intrigue. An Intelligent Victorian mystery!Once again a captivating Florence Nightingale mystery, embedded around the happenings of the First Anglo-Afghanistan War Disaster of 1839-1842 and the cholera epidemic, the Broad Street Outbreak. in 1854.Florence's friend Liz à Court, wife of Sidney Herbert, the War Secretary and daughter to General Charles à Court-Repington has been shot at and her carriage driver killed whilst she and the General were on their way to the British museum. The question is who would want to harm Liz? For reasons not easily discernible, Sidney has chosen not to involve the police. Instead he asks Florence to find those responsible. The chase leads Florence from Sidney's home to the desperate slums in the notorious Seven Dials area.Florence investigations uncover a lady's maid obsessed with Liz's brother, a servant of Sidney's dying from cholera, a mad woman dying from the same disease and a mysterious set of dice, engraved with symbols and letters, "One was a “D,” the second a “G,” and the third a “5.”"Throughout the investigation Florence's maid Mary is by her side, mostly reluctantly.Florence also meets physician, John Snow and assistant curate in Soho, Henry Whitehead. Together they trace the progress of the cholera outbreak, eventually deciphering the cause.We leave Florence, having solved the cause of the attack on Liz's carriage and murders along the way, on the eve of a decision to go to the Crimea to organize "medical care into something humane and competent." Interestingly, as the plot thickens, we learn more of the British presence in Afghanastan and the resentments that are piled up against the British as their outré behaviours offend the Afghani religious and cultural practices. Trent has based her writing in solid research of the times, which is flawlessly and competently included to give the novel a true sense of Victorian England and the challenges not only Florence, but many women faced. Of particular note is the inclusion of Mrs Caroline Elizabeth Sarah Sheridan Norton, Sydney's ex lover who is publicly fighting her own battles on the topic of divorce and the rights of women.I thoroughly enjoyed this intelligent Victorian mystery, mixing fact and fiction, adeptly weaving its way through the political and social mores of the time giving solid background to an all encompassing and captivating read.A Crooked Lane ARC via NetGalley
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  • ABCme
    January 1, 1970
    I never knew Florence Nightingale to be a private investigator as well as a nurse, but alas, in this book she is. While part of London suffers from a deadly cholera outbreak, and Florence does all she can to help the victims and their families, she's also asked to find out more about a violent attack on her friend Liz in the slums of London's Soho. With just a small group of characters to get familiar with, the story moves at a great pace through busy streets full of dirt, horrific smells and an I never knew Florence Nightingale to be a private investigator as well as a nurse, but alas, in this book she is. While part of London suffers from a deadly cholera outbreak, and Florence does all she can to help the victims and their families, she's also asked to find out more about a violent attack on her friend Liz in the slums of London's Soho. With just a small group of characters to get familiar with, the story moves at a great pace through busy streets full of dirt, horrific smells and any other ugliness you can imagine. Entertaining historical fiction.
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  • The Cats Mother
    January 1, 1970
    This is the second book in a series about the world’s most famous nurse, Florence Nightingale, as an amateur detective in a cosy mystery type story set against the real backdrop of the cholera epidemic in 1850s London. When I received it from NetGalley several months ago, I intended to buy the first book, No Cure for the Dead, but it’s priced at over $NZ15 for the ebook, which is a bit steep for an author I didn’t know when I have so many other books in the queue. While there are references to t This is the second book in a series about the world’s most famous nurse, Florence Nightingale, as an amateur detective in a cosy mystery type story set against the real backdrop of the cholera epidemic in 1850s London. When I received it from NetGalley several months ago, I intended to buy the first book, No Cure for the Dead, but it’s priced at over $NZ15 for the ebook, which is a bit steep for an author I didn’t know when I have so many other books in the queue. While there are references to the events and people in that book, I think this stands alone as a mystery so don’t think missing the first one mattered.It’s summer, 1854, and 30-something Florence is running The Establishment, a successful hospital for middle-class women, when her friend, the War Secretary Sidney Herbert, asks her to investigate the attack on his wife’s carriage, where the horseman was killed. Her enquires take her, accompanied by her trusty elderly companion and note-taker Mary, to poverty-stricken Soho, where cholera has exploded and is killing indiscriminately. Intrigued by the dice found in the dead man’s pocket, she finds links to the disastrous war in Afghanistan two decades earlier, but is it this or a more personal vendetta that has set off a murderer?I found the first half of this a bit slow and was easily distracted, but eventually got into the story. What the author has done well is capture the pompous arrogance common to most great leaders, typified by the majority of surgeons I’ve ever met, which is necessary to do such a difficult job against the odds, but doesn’t make for a particularly appealing narrator. The writing was good although a few Americanisms crept in, such as diaper rather than nappy/napkin.I was most interested in the medical history aspects - and was prepared to be outraged if it was suggested that it was Florence not John Snow - the founder of modern epidemiology - who discovered how cholera was spread. In fact she remains wedded to the prevalent miasma theory of the time, and I found her discomfort at being proved wrong oddly charming, and humanising. I didn’t know much about the Afghan Wars and the afterword was very useful in explaining these, as well as clarifying which characters were not fictional.I didn’t guess the identity of the murderer at all, so congratulate the author on crafting an effective mystery around the true historical events. What I did find preposterous was the total lack of police involvement: while I can understand Herbert wanting to avoid a scandal, such a public attack couldn’t possibly have been kept quiet and surely Scotland Yard would’ve investigated.Overall I enjoyed this and would be interested in reading more about Florence’s adventures in Crimea, although suspect I would like her better if it were narrated from Mary’s POV. 3.5 rounded up for the fascinating history lesson.My thanks to NetGalley and Crooked Lane books for the ARC in exchange for an ARC which allowed me to give an honest review. A Murderous Malady is available now.
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  • Jeanette
    January 1, 1970
    Historical fiction is one of my all time favourite genres, especially when the story is based in London. I was born and raised in London. As much as i enjoyed 'A Murderous Malady', a few words had me stumped and had to look them up. I totally agree with the views of another reviewer in that a couple of words were for the American audience and were not in keeping with the language of Victorian Britain. It is the first time that i have read any books by Christine Trent and would happily read more. Historical fiction is one of my all time favourite genres, especially when the story is based in London. I was born and raised in London. As much as i enjoyed 'A Murderous Malady', a few words had me stumped and had to look them up. I totally agree with the views of another reviewer in that a couple of words were for the American audience and were not in keeping with the language of Victorian Britain. It is the first time that i have read any books by Christine Trent and would happily read more. My thanks to Netgalley and the Publishers for my copy. This is my honest review, freely given.
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  • Sophie
    January 1, 1970
    Florence Nightingale is investigating the attempted murder of one of her friends while there's a cholera outbreak in Soho - which just happens to be the neighbourhood this attempted murder took place in.The good: the author took the time to research the period and give insight into a conflict most of us wouldn't have known much about otherwise (Anglo-Afghan wars in 1848). All the story threads came together at the end even if there was no way for the reader to figure out who dun it themselves.Th Florence Nightingale is investigating the attempted murder of one of her friends while there's a cholera outbreak in Soho - which just happens to be the neighbourhood this attempted murder took place in.The good: the author took the time to research the period and give insight into a conflict most of us wouldn't have known much about otherwise (Anglo-Afghan wars in 1848). All the story threads came together at the end even if there was no way for the reader to figure out who dun it themselves.The frustrating: Ok so this might just be me. It might be a historically accurate way to describe them, but calling the ladies in the 'Establishment' i.e. a hospital 'inmates' made me think of them as prisoners instead. On a similar note, I don't know of anyone in the UK who uses the word stoop which is used on multiple occasions in this. Just grated to me.So my criticisms are quite picky and my enjoyment of this probably wasn't helped by the fact my family and I all had stomach bugs while I was reading it (thankfully not cholera!); it was a well thought through mystery plot with a lot of historical figures and details.Thanks to Netgalley and the publishers for an ARC
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  • Meg - A Bookish Affair
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. In "A Murderous Malady," Florence Nightingale is still tending to the sick with her incomparable nursing skills but she is also solving the mystery of the attempted murder of her dear friend. She is secure in her medical skills but she isn't sure where to start with solving the mystery offered up to her. Add to this that a massive cholera outbreak has just hit London. Can Florence handle it all?This is the second book in Christine Trent's Florence Nightingale Mystery series. I have no 3.5 stars. In "A Murderous Malady," Florence Nightingale is still tending to the sick with her incomparable nursing skills but she is also solving the mystery of the attempted murder of her dear friend. She is secure in her medical skills but she isn't sure where to start with solving the mystery offered up to her. Add to this that a massive cholera outbreak has just hit London. Can Florence handle it all?This is the second book in Christine Trent's Florence Nightingale Mystery series. I have not read the first book. I think "A Murderous Malady" works pretty well as a stand alone. I think that perhaps reading the first book may have given a little more insight into some of the secondary characters in the second book, which would have been nice to have. More importantly, I loved Florence and I would love to get to know her better through the first book even though you really do get a good sense of her in this book. I loved the idea of Florence Nightingale as a detective of sorts. This book takes place before she went to be a nurse in the Crimean War. She throws herself into the mystery of her friend's attempted murder but she also throws herself into helping people hurt by the cholera outbreak, which so badly affected so many people. We get to see how Nightingale is the definition of grace under pressure. The writing of this book was good. The beginning started with a bang and then slowed a bit but it had a satisfying ending. I loved all of the details that the author included. You have a really nice mix between a good mystery and a lot of solid scene-setting in the form of good detail about London at a particularly volatile time. The details of how everyone was handling the cholera outbreak as it spread was particularly good. I loved how the author was able to weave everything all together.
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  • Amy Bruno
    January 1, 1970
    A Murderous Malady is the second book in author Christine Trent's Florence Nightingale Mystery series and though I haven't read the first one it didn't damper my enjoyment one bit. In Trent's series, Florence Nightingale investigates mysteries, in addition to her role as a nurse. Florence is in London when someone tries to attack the wife of the Secretary of War, who is her friend, and they ask her to help find out why she was attacked. Traveling to the poorest slums in London to investigate she A Murderous Malady is the second book in author Christine Trent's Florence Nightingale Mystery series and though I haven't read the first one it didn't damper my enjoyment one bit. In Trent's series, Florence Nightingale investigates mysteries, in addition to her role as a nurse. Florence is in London when someone tries to attack the wife of the Secretary of War, who is her friend, and they ask her to help find out why she was attacked. Traveling to the poorest slums in London to investigate she encounters first hand the extent of the recent Cholera outbreak. Racing against time, Florence and others try to find a way to stem the outbreak. All while searching for the persons who attacked her friend.I found A Murderous Malady to be a quick and fascinating read! I greatly enjoyed the relationship between Florence and her assistant, Mary, and Florence's determination and her unwavering mission for standing up for the sick and poor was inspirational. I can't wait to see what's next for Florence!If you're looking for a unique read featuring an intelligent and strong heroine, check out A Murderous Malady!
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  • Rekha Rao
    January 1, 1970
    The story also gives the reader a clear picture of the situation in the slums of London during the Cholera Outbreak. Overflowing public toilets and water pumps, pathetic condition of the slum dwellers, violence and death – the reader is given more than just a glimpse of all these.Dr. John Snow, the physician who played a major role in discovering the real reason behind Cholera outbreak, plays an important role in the story. There is also a mention or two of obstetrics anaesthesia – one of John S The story also gives the reader a clear picture of the situation in the slums of London during the Cholera Outbreak. Overflowing public toilets and water pumps, pathetic condition of the slum dwellers, violence and death – the reader is given more than just a glimpse of all these.Dr. John Snow, the physician who played a major role in discovering the real reason behind Cholera outbreak, plays an important role in the story. There is also a mention or two of obstetrics anaesthesia – one of John Snow’s treatments. One also gets to read about Reverend Henry Whitehead. Rev. Whitehead helped Dr. Snow in making charts – charts that helped Dr. Snow identify the real cause of the outbreak.The historical facts were well researched. One also gets to read (in detail) about Florence Nightingale’s life as a nurse.The identity of the perpetrator was unexpected and shocking! I loved the story. Be it the relationship that Flo shares with Mary, or Flo's helpful nature, or the Cholera outbreak and how it affected people, Trent has done an excellent job in keeping her readers hooked on to the story.Rating: 4.5/5
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  • Melissa Dee
    January 1, 1970
    An intriguing historical mystery starring Florence Nightingale. Christine Trent brings a number of historical people and events into play in her latest Nightingale story. She does a great job of bringing “The Lady in the Lamp” to life. Interestingly both Nightingale and Dr John Snow, a bit player in the novel, were both early practitioners of data science and visualization.I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • Jypsy
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't know this book is second in a series, but that didn't hinder my understanding. A Murderous Malady is a story about Florence Nightingale. It's a bit historical fiction and a bit fact based. It's a very intriguing story. The characters are likeable and engaging. It's a good read overall.
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  • Bonnye Reed
    January 1, 1970
    Christine Trent has a couple of series of historical British mysteries going - one whose main protagonist is Violet Morgan, a wife who takes over her husband's undertaking business, and this series, of which this novel, A Murderous Malady features a private detective written in the persona of Florence Nightingale, along with several other actual public characters of that time period. All of her mysteries are completely stand-alone, though there are several characters that recur throughout the se Christine Trent has a couple of series of historical British mysteries going - one whose main protagonist is Violet Morgan, a wife who takes over her husband's undertaking business, and this series, of which this novel, A Murderous Malady features a private detective written in the persona of Florence Nightingale, along with several other actual public characters of that time period. All of her mysteries are completely stand-alone, though there are several characters that recur throughout the series. The backgrounds and descriptive passages are completely authentic. I want to read all of these books by Christine Trent.A Murderous Malady takes place in London in the summer of 1854, in the Soho district, and in Florence's hospital in Marylebone where she also lives, The Establishment for the Temporary Illness of Gentlewomen, but also in the fine home of the Secretary of War Sidney Herbert and his wife Liz, who is Florence's dear friend. Visiting the Herbert home is the father of Liz, Lieutenant General Charles a'Court, who is a life-long member of her Majesty's military, given the colonelcy of the 41st Welsh Regiment of Foot in 1848. Sidney is attempting to sort out the beginning of the war in Crimea. A lot going on, but the tale is easily followed.Elizabeth and her father are riding to the British Museum by way of Soho, a festering slum with a current spreading outbreak of cholera. Their open carriage is attacked by a man on foot, he screams insults at Liz before he is shoved off by the coachman. Almost immediately several shots are fired from the crowded street. Liz is a near miss, the shot cutting a flower from her hat. The coachman, Josh Pagg, is killed. The carriage quickly carries them out of danger thanks to the fast reactions of the family tiger, Isaac Bent riding at the rear of the carriage. But no one seems to know who was the actual target of the attack, nor who made the decision to access the British Museum through dangerous Soho nor could they follow the logic of how their route would be known to the assassin. All mysteries placed in the hand of friend Florance and her side-kick and note taker Mary Clarke, the widow of Florance's tutor in her youth. Also, as the city is in the grips of a cholera epidemic, Florence is involved in her own hospital's needs and upgrading the Middlesex Hospital to cover the needs of their many patients. Also with the aid of the Reverend Henry Whitehead and Doctor John Snow, a London doctor who treats both the inhabitants on Soho and the royal family, Florence is busy charting the outbreaks of cholera in an effort to pinpoint the cause of the disease. Florence Nightingale is a very busy woman. But can she do it all? I received a free electronic copy of this historical novel from Netgalley, Christine Trent and Crooked Lane Books. I have read this book of my own volition and this review reflects my honest opinion of this work.pub date May 7, 2019Crooked Lane BooksReviewed May 14, 2019, at Goodreads, Netgalley. Smile.Amazon, Barnes and Noble, BookBub and Kobo.
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  • Sarah Perchikoff
    January 1, 1970
    Florence Nightingale solves crimes. Do I need to say more?? That is exactly what this book and this series is about. Once again, because I never check anything beforehand, this is the second book in the series and I haven't read the first one. Is this the third or fourth time this has happened? I have no clue. I just can't believe it keeps happening!! But enough about that. Let's get to the review!Synopsis (from Goodreads):Cholera has broken out in London, but Florence Nightingale has bigger pro Florence Nightingale solves crimes. Do I need to say more?? That is exactly what this book and this series is about. Once again, because I never check anything beforehand, this is the second book in the series and I haven't read the first one. Is this the third or fourth time this has happened? I have no clue. I just can't believe it keeps happening!! But enough about that. Let's get to the review!Synopsis (from Goodreads):Cholera has broken out in London, but Florence Nightingale has bigger problems when people begin dying of a far more intentional cause—murder. The London summer of 1854 is drawing to a close when a deadly outbreak of cholera grips the city. Florence Nightingale is back on the scene marshaling her nurses to help treat countless suffering patients at Middlesex Hospital as the disease tears through the Soho slums. But beyond the dangers of the disease, something even more evil is seeping through the ailing streets of London. It begins with an attack on the carriage of Florence’s friend, Elizabeth Herbert, wife to Secretary at War Sidney Herbert. Florence survives, but her coachman does not. Within hours, Sidney’s valet stumbles into the hospital, mutters a few cryptic words about the attack, and promptly dies from cholera. Frantic that an assassin is stalking his wife, Sidney enlists Florence’s help, who accepts but has little to go on save for the valet’s last words and a curious set of dice in his jacket pocket. Soon, the suspects are piling up faster than cholera victims, as there seems to be no end to the number of people who bear a grudge against the Herbert household. Now, Florence is in a race against time—not only to save the victims of a lethal disease, but to foil a murderer with a disturbingly sinister goal.A Murderous Malady starts off with Florence trying to figure out who attacked her good friend, Liz, and Liz's father (the General) in their carriage on their way to the British Museum. They don't know if they were attacked because of Liz's husband's duties as the Secretary at War, because of her father, the General, or because of Liz herself. Liz and her husband, Sidney, put Florence on the case and she takes to the streets of Soho and Liz's own household to figure out who could be responsible for the attack.But that's not the only thing Florence has to deal with. Cholera has also come to London and as one of the best nurses in the city, she must take care of the many residents in her hospital and also must make sure other hospitals are running efficiently as well (they are not!!). Florence and her companion, Mary witness awful deaths but also a few spectacular recoveries. With the disease spreading across London and time seemingly running out to find out who the attacker is, Florence and Mary must go where ladies of their station are rarely seen. They witness the despair of poverty and the brutality of the pubs in Soho. But despite Mary's hesitance, Florence is ready to step into just about any situation and use her wits and intellect to talk the clues she needs out of the people of London. I have to say, I was expecting more of this book. While the story was good and intriguing at points, it didn't pull me in as much as I expected. I wanted a little more depth to all the characters but especially from Florence. Yes, there were allusions to a life beyond nursing but we never get to really see it.The one friendship we do get to see is between Florence and Mary (or as Florence calls her, Goose). I really enjoyed their adventures together through Soho, either helping people or interviewing them. The bond between them is clear. But beyond that and Florence's nursing, I wanted more. More of Florence than just the caregiver and the fixer of everyone's problems.I wanted a bit more action as well, but I really wanted to be immersed into these characters' lives and I felt like I was only just skimming the surface. Maybe it was that the mystery didn't seem urgent enough. No one that we had gotten to know had died because of this attack. Just a coachman who we learned almost nothing about. That being said, I was genuinely shocked by who the attacker/killer turned out to be. I never suspected them. I read a lot of crime/mystery/detective books, so I usually suspect everyone in the book, but this one definitely surprised me.Overall, A Murderous Malady was a good read, but not as good as I expected. I am giving it 3 out of 5 stars. If Florence Nightingale solving crimes sounds like something you can't pass up, give it a shot. You might like it better than I did.A Murderous Malady by Christine Trent comes out May 7, 2019 (I know! Not for a long time.)Thank you to NetGalley and Crooked Lane Books for the free ARC in exchange for my honest review. 
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  • Robin
    January 1, 1970
    The second book in Christine Trent’s Florence Nightingale series is even more gripping than the first. The story opens with a friend of Florence’s innocently heading to the British Museum with her father and on the way, their carriage is attacked and their driver is killed. Because Florence’s friend is married to the secretary of war, the family wants discretion, and ask Florence to investigate rather than the police.Of course Florence is no lady of leisure – she’s running a hospital (the center The second book in Christine Trent’s Florence Nightingale series is even more gripping than the first. The story opens with a friend of Florence’s innocently heading to the British Museum with her father and on the way, their carriage is attacked and their driver is killed. Because Florence’s friend is married to the secretary of war, the family wants discretion, and ask Florence to investigate rather than the police.Of course Florence is no lady of leisure – she’s running a hospital (the center of the action in the first novel) and in this novel, she’s asked to consult when cholera breaks out in the Soho section of London, a notoriously poor and miserable part of the city. She does agree to take on the investigation though and so when another of her friend’s servants turns up at her hospital suffering with cholera, she’s on a tear.The servant dies and the only clue are three oddly marked dice. Florence is sure deciphering the code scratched into the dice is key, and she goes about finding out what happened. I don’t know how closely the fictional Florence Nightingale as portrayed by Christine Trent is to the actual Florence Nightingale, but I suspect she’s pretty close.As Trent portrays her, she’s a relentless force to be reckoned with. In the first book, her novel approach of opening windows and requiring the nurses to wash their hands was examined; in this one, while she went to her deathbed believing that cholera was caused by an airborne “miasma,” her approach to collecting data about the outbreak is far more scientific and forward thinking than most of the people around her.In this novel, Florence encounters a Dr. Snow and a Rev. Whitehead, both of whom were ultimately responsible for tracing and proving that the cholera outbreak in the novel and in real life stemmed from an infected water main. The three of them in the novel make for an interesting match up, and you can almost feel the excitement, so many years later, as the three begin to puzzle out why there’s an outbreak, and in the case of Florence, what to do about it.Florence’s investigation into the murder of the carriage driver also leads her into some knowledge of the British conflict in Afghanistan, one that will ultimately lead her to her famous hospital in Scutari. This novel was a completely compelling and enjoyable read, one that had me both wondering who killed the carriage driver, but even more interestingly, what caused the cholera outbreak.Trent is a deft writer, skilled at illuminating her chosen time period via character and setting, so the history part is in equal partnership to the narrative. I literally can hardly wait for the next installment in the series, which will find Florence and her team of nurses on the way to Scutari. She’s already righteously engaged in this novel as she hears of the poor preparation on the part of the war department. I can’t wait to see her in action once again.
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  • Ameya
    January 1, 1970
    3* This is a murder mystery combining fact and fiction, around the protagonist, Florence Nightingale. The famous English nursing pioneer lived from 12 May 1820 until 13 August 1910. It was only when I began reading this book that I learnt this fact, making me fear that a historical treatise would take precedence over the mystery. This fear was realised. The book seems more of a history lesson than a murder mystery, which is educational and illuminating, while at the same time makes the pages dra 3* This is a murder mystery combining fact and fiction, around the protagonist, Florence Nightingale. The famous English nursing pioneer lived from 12 May 1820 until 13 August 1910. It was only when I began reading this book that I learnt this fact, making me fear that a historical treatise would take precedence over the mystery. This fear was realised. The book seems more of a history lesson than a murder mystery, which is educational and illuminating, while at the same time makes the pages drag.There are inconsistencies in the use of English that could perhaps have benefitted from more stringent editing. For example, “is frequently that which we cannot possibly suspect is true which is very often the deadly culprit.” This is a convoluted way of saying that the thing one least suspects often turns out to be true. But with padding and purple prosing thrown in.Another example of convoluted phrasing: “Even if Fenton was guilty of a gambling vice, he still deserves justice in the form of apprehending my wife’s attacker.” The speaker, Mr. Herbert seeks justice in finding his wife’s attacker, which doesn’t fit with what happened to Fenton.There are redundant verbs e.g. the act of sitting in the following sentence, “Around a long oak table sat six of Goodfellow’s colleagues, seated in tufted leather chairs.”Oswyn Davies, an English publican in the story, speaks a pidgin English, for which an irrational reason is given, and which is irritating, and muddlesome to read. His nouns and verbs are inverted, e.g. “’Be blamed, can I? Davies snapped.”I found out in the author’s afterword that the historical elements I thought were factual, were sometimes changed for the cause of fiction. I didn’t think even long-dead historical figures, like General A Court ought to have their name falsely smeared, as the author confesses doing in the novel. The timeline of the Crimean outbreak is also smudged. I thought that the history had to be correct when using historical figures like Florence Nightingale, the Herberts and the A Courts; and historical events like the Crimean War.There is a reference to “milquetoast,” the word derived from a cartoon character, Caspar Milquetoast, created by North American cartoonist, H. T. Webster, in 1924. Florence Nightingale lived until 1910, and this book is set in mid-1854.The mystery goes thus: Mrs. Herbert, the wife of the English politician, is attacked while traveling through Soho, London, with her father, General a Court. Soho is a down-at-heels suburb, surrounded by affluential suburbs. They are spared but their coachman is shot. A second Herbert coachman dies of cholera in Florence Nightingale’s hospital, giving a cryptic clue and three dice. There is another murder later in the book.Due to this ambling, stilted style, the mystery takes a back seat. Florence Nightingale’s character and her hospital reform takes much of the book, as does her good deeds in helping cholera sufferers.Was it a worthy read? Yes.Was it a fun read? Not really.My thanks to #AmurderousMalady #NetGalley and Joffe Books for an ARC copy of this title in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Caitlin Gonya
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley for this free Advanced Reader Copy. This is my honest, heartfelt review. Florence Nightingale (already pretty cool) is called to her dear friends Sidney and Elizabeth Herbert's household, just to discover someone has taken deadly action against them. Fortunately for Elizabeth and her father, General a Court, they were spared. Unfortunately, the Herbert driver and servant was not. Sidney has asked, against the General's advice, Florence to conduct a discreet investigation. Thank you to NetGalley for this free Advanced Reader Copy. This is my honest, heartfelt review. Florence Nightingale (already pretty cool) is called to her dear friends Sidney and Elizabeth Herbert's household, just to discover someone has taken deadly action against them. Fortunately for Elizabeth and her father, General a Court, they were spared. Unfortunately, the Herbert driver and servant was not. Sidney has asked, against the General's advice, Florence to conduct a discreet investigation. Florence agrees. As if she doesn't have enough to deal with, King Cholera has also decided to pay a visit to the streets of London, Soho more specifically. Now Florence must maintain her own nursing Establishment, investigate a fatal shooting, and devise a way to combatant King Cholera on behalf of the residents of Soho. All this before a murderer makes another attempt.First thing first, I did like reading this novel. I enjoyed the friendship between Florence, the Herberts, and Mary a.k.a. Goose. My favorite part about Florence was her mind. There is a comment made by Mary about not being able to remove Florence from Henry Whitehead's study because of charts. But I felt this gave the reader the window into Florence. She was genuinely interested in healing, and found joy in researching the various paths. However, I was expecting just a bit more. I wanted to "get to know" Florence. Not just about her passion for healing, but her other desires, fears, and her past. There are veiled illusions to something, but nothing in depth.Second thing is the plot itself. The description is why I wanted to read the novel. Florence Nightingale solving crime? Who could pass that up? But in the end, it fell kind of flat. There is one scene in particular that has no bearing on the rest of the novel until particularly the end. As I was reading, I kept thinking, why is this necessary? And while a good mystery writer keeps the identity of the murderer a secret, this one felt like a leap. I mean, once the explanation was given, it made sense. But there wasn't really a build up to it. I should also preface all this opinions by also saying that this is the second novel in this series. I clearly didn't read the first one, but I think I will go back and see if maybe Florence's character is more developed there. Maybe the author had built her up so much in the first one, that she wanted to focus on the crime in this one? I'm not sure. But, as someone who is reading this for the first time, I feel comfortable rating this novel 3 even 3.5 stars out of 5. https://caitlinmariegonya.blogspot.co...
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  • Helen Howerton
    January 1, 1970
    Who has it in for Elizabeth Herbert -- the wife of the Secretary of War? For somebody seems to, as A Murderous Malady, the second mystery “starring” Florence Nightingale (written by Christine Trent) starts with the lady’s attempted murder. She is Florence Nightingale’s good friend, and it is to Miss Nightingale that Mr. Sidney Herbert, he of Her Majesty’s Government, turns to to solve this mystery. Who would want to harm “Liz?” Nobody, it would seem. Then, perhaps the intended target was General Who has it in for Elizabeth Herbert -- the wife of the Secretary of War? For somebody seems to, as A Murderous Malady, the second mystery “starring” Florence Nightingale (written by Christine Trent) starts with the lady’s attempted murder. She is Florence Nightingale’s good friend, and it is to Miss Nightingale that Mr. Sidney Herbert, he of Her Majesty’s Government, turns to to solve this mystery. Who would want to harm “Liz?” Nobody, it would seem. Then, perhaps the intended target was General a’Court, Mrs. Herbert’s father and traveling companion in the carriage. He’s rather a horrible old man, so it’s certainly possible. Sidney himself? Ah, Mr. Secretary has his own secrets. Good gracious, the plot thickens. Soon enough, readers are drawn into a darker world of evil. This is not a story filled with sweetness and light. The description of Soho and its citizens is dreadful, the misery of the times overwhelming. Miss Nightingale receives an invitation to visit another hospital and see to its running and revitalization. Again, a horrendous situation. Again, described in excruciating detail. Hospitals of the time were pretty appalling -- indeed, you were as like to die inside a hospital as outside one. The author doesn’t stint in her descriptions here, especially towards the end after the mystery has been cleared up, when our Miss N learns of the medical conditions in the Crimea. In between is a study in the detection of how cholera was determined to have spread in the streets of London in 1854 and laid waste to the populace (I’ve spared you these details). Miss Nightingale has her theory -- which turns out to be false.Some of the characters are perfectly disagreeable, especially General a’Court. And that lady’s maid! Also, a little of “Goose,” AKA Mary Clarke, Miss Nightingale’s companion, secretary and friend, goes a long way. But as a Watson to the Nightingale Holmes, she functions wells enough. The ending comes out of left field somewhat, but it’s explained in such a way by the author that readers should be content with it. This is a study in how pasts come back to haunt, as pasts often do. A long Author’s Note at the end of the book explains more fully the medical side and further history of the times, including events in the Anglo-Afghan Wars. If you like education with your historical mystery fiction, Ms. Trent’s A Murderous Malady fits the bill.Thanks to the publisher and to NetGalley for a copy of the book in advance of publication, in exchange for this review.
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  • Jackie
    January 1, 1970
    Note: I received a copy of this book from NetGalley in return for an honest review.Florence Nightingale is focusing on her improvements to the Establishment when she’s summoned to her friend’s home, an attempt having been made on Liz Herbert’s life. Liz’s husband Sidney, the secretary of war, asks Florence to investigate. As Florence looks into the attack on Liz, there is also a cholera outbreak and her assistance is needed in determining the cause of the epidemic as well as assisting at a local Note: I received a copy of this book from NetGalley in return for an honest review.Florence Nightingale is focusing on her improvements to the Establishment when she’s summoned to her friend’s home, an attempt having been made on Liz Herbert’s life. Liz’s husband Sidney, the secretary of war, asks Florence to investigate. As Florence looks into the attack on Liz, there is also a cholera outbreak and her assistance is needed in determining the cause of the epidemic as well as assisting at a local hospital taking in the afflicted. The closer Florence gets to the truth, the more damning secrets she finds about the Herbert and a Court families, and it’s not only cholera that threatens Florence and those she holds dear - the killer will do anything to protect themselves.When I reviewed No Cure for the Dead, the first book in this series, I had a bit of an issue with how the author writes women. They were catty and backstabbing, and Florence herself was quite judgmental of the women around her, her patience easily tested. I found the author had improved with this issue, but only slightly - there were still moments where Florence was annoyed by the women she came into contact with, and there was one moment early on in the book where she expresses surprise that her friend would have a servant so attractive, and that her friend would “”allow”” the servant to outshine her - a classist attitude, to be sure, and one not favorable to Florence’s friend, either, nor to Florence herself.That being said, once again I was impressed with Trent’s ability to weave historical fact with her mystery. I really enjoyed how she brought in the cholera epidemic of 1854; I had read a book about this and found it fascinating, so it was nice to realize as I was reading the book that Trent was addressing this and the real life heroes who discovered what caused and spread cholera. The political commentary on colonialism and the British war in Afghanistan (and Crimea) was timely and interesting, especially as I had no prior knowledge of either conflict beyond having them mentioned in other historical fiction. The characters had interesting dynamics, and it’s fun to explore London through the lens of Florence Nightingale and her hospital reforms. I appreciated the twists and turns of the mystery, and found the book enjoyable, and wouldn’t hesitate to pick up the next in the series.A Murderous Malady is set to be released on May 7, 2019.
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  • Patty
    January 1, 1970
    A Murderous Malady is the second book in a series featuring Florence Nightingale – yes that Florence Nightingale – as a not only a nurse but also as a sort of female Sherlock Holmes. I did not have the good fortune to read the first book, No Cure for the Dead, but don’t worry if you are in the same boat – it won’t matter. This book stands on its own quite well.One of Florence’s good friends is married to the Secretary at War. Elizabeth Herbert is in a carriage with her father in law, a general o A Murderous Malady is the second book in a series featuring Florence Nightingale – yes that Florence Nightingale – as a not only a nurse but also as a sort of female Sherlock Holmes. I did not have the good fortune to read the first book, No Cure for the Dead, but don’t worry if you are in the same boat – it won’t matter. This book stands on its own quite well.One of Florence’s good friends is married to the Secretary at War. Elizabeth Herbert is in a carriage with her father in law, a general of the English army, when suddenly curses and then shots ring out. Their coachman is killed but fortunately Elizabeth and her father are shaken up but not harmed. Sidney Herbert calls Florence to the house to see Elizabeth and to ask her to find out who tried to kill her – for he believes it was an attack on his wife. Florence feels it’s an investigation best taken up by the police but Sidney does not want them involved as the attention would not be welcome while he is trying to deal with sensitive War Dept. issues.Florence reluctantly agrees and sets off to try and discover why someone would want her friend dead. At the same time cholera is making an appearance in the poorer sections of London and she is called upon to help in a hospital that truly needs her revolutionary ideas. She is also trying to figure out the how of cholera infection. She has a theory but so do some other people in London. Will someone learn the method of transmission before it’s too late? And will they be able to stop it?I found this to be a clever novel. The combination of the medical mystery of the cholera epidemic tied together with the murder mystery made for a different kind of book. Plus it’s historical so that made me happy too. I’m always happier when I’m reading a book set in the past. Ms. Trent creates a very dark London – one where the poor are left to languish with little care for them and few caring about them. Her Florence Nightingale is a very strong woman who is not afraid to share her knowledge and she does not back down when confronted by men who think they are superior simply because of their sex.It was a pretty quick read – I finished it in one day. Not in one sitting as I had a babka to bake. But it was a fascinating look at a smart woman who was definitely ahead of her time. I look forward to the next installment in the series.
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  • Sally
    January 1, 1970
    Imagine not having a source of running water in your home. Imagine you have to walk to a communal water pump to get your water. Imagine, further, that the water isn’t exactly crystal clear. This was the case for much of Britain until the 20th century. In A Murderous Malady, Christine Trent takes readers back to London in 1854 when little was known about health and hygiene. When Cholera struck in the district of Soho, many believed it had to do with unhealthy air. The many included famous nurse, Imagine not having a source of running water in your home. Imagine you have to walk to a communal water pump to get your water. Imagine, further, that the water isn’t exactly crystal clear. This was the case for much of Britain until the 20th century. In A Murderous Malady, Christine Trent takes readers back to London in 1854 when little was known about health and hygiene. When Cholera struck in the district of Soho, many believed it had to do with unhealthy air. The many included famous nurse, Florence Nightingale.A Murderous Malady is Trent’s second Florence Nightingale Mystery. There’s no need to have read the first; I hadn’t and was able to follow the narrative without difficulty. The story starts when the very real historical figure of Elizabeth Herbert and her father, the equally real and historical Charles Ashe à Court-Repington, are attacked while traveling to get to the British Museum through Soho. Rather than go to the police, Elizabeth’s husband approaches Nurse Nightingale to locate the attacker and bring them to justice. Why Nightingale? Because apparently she solved the mystery in book one of the series.This is a great snapshot of life for the haves and have-nots in 19th century London. Florence and her team travels between the various sections of society, dispensing revolutionary health care and solving questions. Many of the characters can be found in British history books including scientists, politicians and military men. Trent weaves them together in a compelling read. Who was Elizabeth’s attacker? Is there a connection with the cholera epidemic, or was her coach attacked because of her father’s actions in the Anglo-Afghan Wars? Speaking of which, there’s an extensive retelling of the historical massacre of British and Indian forces in that country in 1842. It’s an incident that this British-born reviewer had known nothing about. It’s also a narrative that will have you asking questions, such as “Why?” And, let me say, the British forces don’t exactly come out shining. I don’t think it’s a spoiler to say the story ends with Sydney Herbert sending Florence Nightingale to the military hospital in Scutari, Turkey – because he did.With thanks to Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours and the publisher for my copy of A Murderous Malady. The above review consists of my own thoughts and opinions on this title.
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  • Linda Baker
    January 1, 1970
    It's a sweltering August in 1854 when "King Cholera" strikes London, not for the first time. The deadly disease is no respecter of persons, affecting rich and poor alike, strikes unannounced and can disappear as quickly as it came. This time it seems to afflict the notorious slums of SoHo. The common wisdom says that the disease is airborne, occurring in the form of "miasmas," a theory that Florence Nightingale subscribes to. Even though she is fully involved with her hospital for women, Florenc It's a sweltering August in 1854 when "King Cholera" strikes London, not for the first time. The deadly disease is no respecter of persons, affecting rich and poor alike, strikes unannounced and can disappear as quickly as it came. This time it seems to afflict the notorious slums of SoHo. The common wisdom says that the disease is airborne, occurring in the form of "miasmas," a theory that Florence Nightingale subscribes to. Even though she is fully involved with her hospital for women, Florence would become involved in the current outbreak no matter how busy, but a call from her friends, Sidney and Elizabeth Herbert sends her to SoHo on a different mission. Elizabeth and her father, a retired General, are attacked in their carriage, resulting in the death of their coachman. When Sidney sends a second servant into SoHo, the man returns suffering from cholera and dies quickly. Based on Florence's success with her first case, Sidney is frantic for her to investigate. The General, however, is less than forthcoming. The search for answers will bring Florence and her assistant, "Goose," into contact with many historical figures and the lowest residents of the London slums. It also shines a spotlight on British Army conduct in Afghanistan.I admit to only the most superficial of knowledge of Florence Nightingale, other than her history as "The Lady of the Lamp" during the Crimean War. While I doubt that she ever had the time or energy for detecting, she was close to the center of current events and associated with the movers and shakers of the era. The mystery, in this case, has plots and sub-plots that were sometimes difficult to follow and the solution eluded me. I did like Florence and her dogged persistence in leading the life she wanted for herself. A number of the characters are well documented historically, and Trent provides appendices of their lives and works. There was a fascinating short history of the last 200+ years of Afghan history; one that clearly indicates the utter futility of imperialist designs on that country. The next book will take her to her most significant triumphs in the Crimea, and I look forward to that.Thanks to Crooked Lane Books and NetGalley for an advance copy. Thee opinions are my own.RATING-3.5 Stars rounded to 4
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  • Rosanne Lortz
    January 1, 1970
    When Florence's best friend Liz is attacked in her carriage while traveling through the dilapidated neighborhood of Soho, her coachman is killed. Victorian nurse-turned-sleuth Florence Nightingale is enlisted to find out who was involved and why. Liz's father, a general in the Afghanistan War, seems to be hiding something, and his callous indifference to the domestics speaks little in his favor. On the other hand, Liz's husband, the minister of war, is equally dodgy about the incident, leading F When Florence's best friend Liz is attacked in her carriage while traveling through the dilapidated neighborhood of Soho, her coachman is killed. Victorian nurse-turned-sleuth Florence Nightingale is enlisted to find out who was involved and why. Liz's father, a general in the Afghanistan War, seems to be hiding something, and his callous indifference to the domestics speaks little in his favor. On the other hand, Liz's husband, the minister of war, is equally dodgy about the incident, leading Florence to wonder if some old connections of his might be the reason for the attack.While investigating events in Soho, Florence comes face to face with a deadly cholera outbreak and is forced to split her time between hospital reform and murder investigation. Is it the miasmas in the air that spread cholera, or could an original new theory about polluted water be correct? In the end, both cholera and murder combine to create a deadly atmosphere, and Florence must solve the mystery in the nick of time before succumbing herself. The second book in Trent's Florence Nightingale series (see my review of book #1, No Cure for the Dead), this story continues the tale of the medical crusader who pioneered nursing as a hygienic and respectable field. The radical difference between Florence's upper class life and the tenements in Soho is emphasized as well as Florence's bravery in entering the homes of those many would consider "untouchable." Some of the extra historical info felt like a bit of a rabbit trail, but I appreciated learning more about the cholera epidemic. The ignorance surrounding the deleterious effects of raw sewage is astounding, given that civilizations as old as the Minoans had sewer systems and 19th century London did not. This was an enjoyable mystery that shines a light on the unhealthier side of Victorian London and the varying ways that the upper class treated their more unfortunate neighbors. Disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley. All opinions expressed in this review are my own.
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  • Ileana Renfroe
    January 1, 1970
    The second book in the Florence Nightingale Series - “A Murderous Malady” is exactly what I expected. A true well written historical novel that leaves you wanting for more. The characters are well written, authentic and easy to like, how can you not?Florence Nightingale, a private detective in London during the summer of 1854 is busy with the cholera epidemic hitting the city, but not too busy to try to figure out alongside her note-taker and companion Mary who tried to kill her friend Liz.On th The second book in the Florence Nightingale Series - “A Murderous Malady” is exactly what I expected. A true well written historical novel that leaves you wanting for more. The characters are well written, authentic and easy to like, how can you not?Florence Nightingale, a private detective in London during the summer of 1854 is busy with the cholera epidemic hitting the city, but not too busy to try to figure out alongside her note-taker and companion Mary who tried to kill her friend Liz.On their way to a new exhibit at the British Museum, Josh the coachman announces loudly as the carriage passes through a less desirable section of town “General à Court and Mrs. Herbert coming through!” Her father the “General” had joined the Army back in 1801 and was now advising Liz’s husband Sidney the War Secretary on the conduct of war.All of a sudden the carriage is attached by what appears may be a madman howling insults at them pointing wildly as his eyes rolled around. As he walks away shots are fired. A bullet barely misses Liz, but Josh the coachman is not so lucky. He is killed and Liz and her husband needs answers. So they enlist the help of Florence to find out what really happened and who could have killed Josh.Not only is Florence dealing with her friend’s attempted murder, she is also busy working at the nearby hospital and helping find work for needy families.One of the points of this book I enjoyed was the background history and summary of characters, such as, Captain Sir Alexander Burns and even Caroline Elizabeth Sarah Sheridan Norton. That being said I would have liked either this information at the beginning or a notice telling the reader this information is at the end for purposes of reference.​Overall this is a great historical novel that keeps you guessing until the very end and leaves you wanting for more.​I was provided this book for free in exchange for my honest opinion.I HIGHLY RECOMMEND this book for anyone who loves a great historical mystery. 📕👍🏼I GIVE IT A 5 STAR: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
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  • Kelly-Jo Sweeney
    January 1, 1970
    I love a good historical murder mystery, so I couldn't wait to start reading A Murderous Malady. I discovered later that it's actually the second book in the series, but I don't think that I missed out by having not read the first. It works fine as a stand-alone novel. Choosing to use real people as the characters in your book is always a challenge. Are you just borrowing the names of these people, or are you trying to faithfully recreate them as they were. In this book, not only is the main cha I love a good historical murder mystery, so I couldn't wait to start reading A Murderous Malady. I discovered later that it's actually the second book in the series, but I don't think that I missed out by having not read the first. It works fine as a stand-alone novel. Choosing to use real people as the characters in your book is always a challenge. Are you just borrowing the names of these people, or are you trying to faithfully recreate them as they were. In this book, not only is the main character a real person but so are many many of the other characters. On the whole, I think this worked and worked well. I will admit that this isn't really my period, so I don't know much about any of these people and can't comment on how true to life they are. From a murder mystery novel point of view, they all work really well. I don't know if I can picture Florence Nightingale being an amateur detective, as well as all of the nursing reforms that she undertook, but in terms of the book, it worked well.There were a few Americanisms that crept into the story, which for me at least, did detract from the overall read. I know that this book is probably mostly for an American audience, but it is set in Victorian Britain and personally, I prefer it to be more faithful to the language that would have been used. The word 'stoop' was used quite a bit, I tried to look it up and I think that it's something to do with the front of the house, but I'm still not entirely sure. Apparently, it comes from the Dutch language originally. Either way, it's not something that we have ever used in Britain and it really got on my nerves. Little niggles like this aside, I really enjoyed the story and the mystery setting. I'd be more than happy to read more in this series.I received a complimentary copy of this book through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Florence Nightingale is back! And she's got another doozy of a mystery to solve. When her friend Liz is attacked by a man with a gun while riding in her carriage, Florence is asked by her husband Sydney, to investigate and try to determine who did it and why. Trouble is, the carriage was traveling through SoHo at the time and there's an outbreak of cholera in the district. Florence can't help but get involved at a local hospital in spite of the risk of contracting the disease herself.So what kee Florence Nightingale is back! And she's got another doozy of a mystery to solve. When her friend Liz is attacked by a man with a gun while riding in her carriage, Florence is asked by her husband Sydney, to investigate and try to determine who did it and why. Trouble is, the carriage was traveling through SoHo at the time and there's an outbreak of cholera in the district. Florence can't help but get involved at a local hospital in spite of the risk of contracting the disease herself.So what keeps drawing me to this series? First of all, the mysteries are intriguing but I think what I like best is the historical aspects of the stories. Not only is the author following the progression of Florence's career by using real events from her life in the stories, but she is also using the story to relate pieces of history that the reader might not otherwise come across. In this book, the plot focuses on events that took place in Afghanistan when the British tried to take over control of that country in the 1800's. I found that reading about that war really helped me to understand the current difficulties in that country and their resentment of western countries. In this story, I also enjoyed how the author incorporated the work of Dr. Snow into the story. I have come across parts of his story and his impact on the fight against cholera before and it was fun to find him in this story. Ms. Trent's Florence Nightingale is lovely, likable, and very committed to the work of improving the standard of nursing wherever she found herself. I think this series is a wonderful addition to the genre of historically based mysteries and suggest that you waste no time checking it out.
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  • Michelle Kidwell
    January 1, 1970
    A MURDEROUS MALADYA FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE MYSTERYBY CHRISTINE TRENTCROOKED LANE BOOKSMYSTERY & THRILLERSPUB DATE 07 MAY 2019I am reviewing a copy a a Murderous Malady through Crooked Lane Books and Netgalley:Cholorea broke out in London, but what is worth that people are dying of something else, they are murder.Late in the summer of 1854 a Cholorea outbreak had spread throughout London . Florence Nightingale isoniazid the scene marshaling her nurses to help treat the countless suffering pati A MURDEROUS MALADYA FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE MYSTERYBY CHRISTINE TRENTCROOKED LANE BOOKSMYSTERY & THRILLERSPUB DATE 07 MAY 2019I am reviewing a copy a a Murderous Malady through Crooked Lane Books and Netgalley:Cholorea broke out in London, but what is worth that people are dying of something else, they are murder.Late in the summer of 1854 a Cholorea outbreak had spread throughout London . Florence Nightingale isoniazid the scene marshaling her nurses to help treat the countless suffering patients at the Middlesex hospital , while the disease tared through the slums of Soho! Beyond the danger of the disease something darker and more dangerous is lurking.It starts with the attack on the carriage of Florence’s friend Elizabeth Herbert, the wife of Secretary at war Sidney Herbert, Florence survives but her coachman does not. In just a matter of hours, Sidney’s valet stumbles into the hospital, mutters a few cryptic words about the attack, and then dies from cholera. Afraid that an assassin is stalking his wife, Sidney enlists Florence’s help, who accepts but has little to go on save for the valet’s last words and a curious set of dice in his jacket pocket. Soon, the suspects are piling up faster than cholera victims, and there seems to be no end to the number of the people who hold a grudge against the Herbert household.I found this book held my attention from the first page to the last and was filled with intrigue so I give A Murderous Malady five out of five stars!Happy Reading!
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  • Pamela
    January 1, 1970
    This is the second entry in Trent’s Florence Nightingale series. In this outing, Florence is asked to investigate an attack on the Secretary at War’s carriage where his wife and father-in-law were on their way to a museum. His driver is killed, but no one else is hurt. Unfortunately, Florence has no clues to go on. In the meantime, the Secretary’s valet shows up at Florence’s hospital blurts out a few cryptic sentence fragments and dies. Florence must somehow connect the two deaths, figure out w This is the second entry in Trent’s Florence Nightingale series. In this outing, Florence is asked to investigate an attack on the Secretary at War’s carriage where his wife and father-in-law were on their way to a museum. His driver is killed, but no one else is hurt. Unfortunately, Florence has no clues to go on. In the meantime, the Secretary’s valet shows up at Florence’s hospital blurts out a few cryptic sentence fragments and dies. Florence must somehow connect the two deaths, figure out who the target is and why, and who is murdering people.This mystery almost stalled out, it moved so slowly. It seemed that a great deal of it was about the social history of London in the mid-1840s. The author gave little or none of Florence’s background and thereby failed to develop Florence’s character. It seems she assumed everyone who picked up her book had read the first book and already knew Florence. The writing felt dense and unengaging, almost ponderous. The publisher compares Trent to Charles Todd, I saw no such comparison.Interestingly, the author decided to put the events that were shaping Florence’s world into a “From the Author” chapter in the back of the book rather than put references to the events and people she includes in this final chapter in the body of the book. While definitely not a stand-alone entry in the series, it is a cozy and thus takes it time getting to the end. If you love historical series, you might want to start with the first book in the series.Thanks to Crooked Lane Books and NetGalley for an eARC.
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