Losing Mars
Disaster strikes in orbit around Mars. A Chinese spacecraft is disabled, stranded near Phobos. Well over a hundred million miles from Earth, their only hope for rescue comes from the American base on the edge of the Vallis Marineris on the surface of Mars. The Americans need to decide, do they lose Mars or their humanity?

Losing Mars Details

TitleLosing Mars
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 28th, 2018
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Space, Aliens, Fiction

Losing Mars Review

  • Petr
    January 1, 1970
    Another great book by Peter Cawdron, one of the most underrated authors. The story about a Mars expedition cut short because of a mysterious event near Phobos masterfully blends elements of realistic hard sci-fi and mindbending concepts. It reminded me of both The Martian and the movie Arrival which might sound cliché but I mean it in the best way possible.Full disclosure: I was one of the beta readers for this book.
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  • Colby
    January 1, 1970
    Cawdron has done it again. With wonderful characters and a fast moving plot, he kept me on the edge of my seat and I finished this book in two days. Losing Mars is a sci-fi masterpiece. Like most sci-fi, the story really revolves around what it means to be human, and our place in the universe. Cawdron has such an inspiring way of looking at things that I am left thinking about this story still, hours after finishing it, and I probably will be for quite some time. I can't recommend this story, or Cawdron has done it again. With wonderful characters and a fast moving plot, he kept me on the edge of my seat and I finished this book in two days. Losing Mars is a sci-fi masterpiece. Like most sci-fi, the story really revolves around what it means to be human, and our place in the universe. Cawdron has such an inspiring way of looking at things that I am left thinking about this story still, hours after finishing it, and I probably will be for quite some time. I can't recommend this story, or this author highly enough. I want to give this story all the stars in the Milky Way. Five is not enough.
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  • Karl M Yuhas
    January 1, 1970
    Best SF I've read in a long timeHard Sci-Fi that's not another boringly predictable military space opera. The saga proceeds with unexpectedly fascinating plot turns and great realism. I couldn't stop reading, highly recommend starting when you don't have school or work the next day.
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  • Jim Paddock
    January 1, 1970
    Mentally stimulating!An awful lot of scientific details. But when you get to the end of the book you can see why. Character development of the main character demanded the details. The final concepts are ones we should think long and hard about. What is normal? Do we have to stick our noses into everything trying to fix it? Loved the story and its moral.
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  • Santos
    January 1, 1970
    Imagine keeping a secret for 50 years in fear of it sending all of man kind into chaos. This is what happens when Mars astronaut Cory Anderson crash lands on the moon Phobos in the Stickney Crater and makes the discovery of a life time. The story takes off simply enough as a team of 6 living on Mars doing their own thing, running test, mapping the land, growing their own food and so on when one of the team gets hurt and needs rescued after attempting to retrieve a downed drone. Then NASA sends w Imagine keeping a secret for 50 years in fear of it sending all of man kind into chaos. This is what happens when Mars astronaut Cory Anderson crash lands on the moon Phobos in the Stickney Crater and makes the discovery of a life time. The story takes off simply enough as a team of 6 living on Mars doing their own thing, running test, mapping the land, growing their own food and so on when one of the team gets hurt and needs rescued after attempting to retrieve a downed drone. Then NASA sends word of an accident involving a Chinese crew in orbit around the moon Phobos and a rescue attempt is made. The writing in this story is fantastic. Peter Cawdron does a great job of character development and world building with his use of geological land markers and tech jargon to help bring the story to life without dragging it down. A true masterpiece of hard sci-fi writing and very thought provoking
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  • Frits
    January 1, 1970
    ‘Losing Mars’ by Peter Cawdron is one of the most exciting sci-fi books I’ve ever read! The story captivated me from beginning to end, combining an exciting plot with a realistic scientific basis. Losing Mars is a story about space exploration, heroism and ultimately about what is means to be human.Set on Mars, the book has similarities to Scott Weirs ‘The Martian’, a book which I also adore. Losing Mars went above and beyond what I was expecting, as its wonderfully mind-blowing ending had me fe ‘Losing Mars’ by Peter Cawdron is one of the most exciting sci-fi books I’ve ever read! The story captivated me from beginning to end, combining an exciting plot with a realistic scientific basis. Losing Mars is a story about space exploration, heroism and ultimately about what is means to be human.Set on Mars, the book has similarities to Scott Weirs ‘The Martian’, a book which I also adore. Losing Mars went above and beyond what I was expecting, as its wonderfully mind-blowing ending had me feeling goosebumps.I highly recommend this book to anyone who loves books such as The Martian or movies such as Arrival or Interstellar. Furthermore, I hope that Peter Cawdron gets the recognition which he deserves!
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  • William T
    January 1, 1970
    Realistic sci-fiIf you are a fan of the Expanse novels, you should give this book a reas. The orbital mechanics and realistic consequences of life in orbit were a joy to read. The surprise time travel (non-spoiler) was something I didn’t see coming
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  • Dan Ward
    January 1, 1970
    Slow start to strong finish. I must admit the start of this book had me thinking it was a poor offshoot of The Martian. Happily I was disavowed of this belief and came to enjoy the story very much. I appreciate the science the author utilized making this a true science fiction work. If you’re reading the book, stick with it. I can only hope you enjoy it as much as I did.
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  • Alex
    January 1, 1970
    Coming out after "The Martian" makes comparisons inevitable but tbh I haven't read (or seen) that story so am only assuming there is some similarity, going by what I know of it. Other influences that are definitely there include "SevenEves", "Arrival" and even a (very bad) TV series "Defying Gravity".It's a very hard sci-fi (in the sense that a lot of effort has gone into getting real physics working properly) so, like "SevenEves" I found it slightly boring; but then spaceflight IS boring. 9 mon Coming out after "The Martian" makes comparisons inevitable but tbh I haven't read (or seen) that story so am only assuming there is some similarity, going by what I know of it. Other influences that are definitely there include "SevenEves", "Arrival" and even a (very bad) TV series "Defying Gravity".It's a very hard sci-fi (in the sense that a lot of effort has gone into getting real physics working properly) so, like "SevenEves" I found it slightly boring; but then spaceflight IS boring. 9 months of sitting in a tin can trying not to go mad isn't very romantic; neither is looking after the hydroponics labs on a Mars base.The author comes across as a very humane and compassionate individual, and this crosses over to the main protagonist who is adamant he is no 'Hero'. He is instead humble, curious, engaged but realistic.It is his Catch-22 decision at the end of the novel that is the real crux of the matter. Either way he chooses means gains and losses that are essentially impossible to measure.I found it surprisingly moving, a bit like "Arrival". It was thought-provoking and I'm still not sure if the main character did 'Choose wisely' in the end, which is actually a good point in the book's favour in my opinion.Recommended for fans of realism in sci-fi but be aware it goes beyond that into more imaginative realms halfway through, to good effect though.
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  • Stuart Cliffe
    January 1, 1970
    If you enjoyed The Martian, you'll love thisHard science fiction - the kind of sci-fi that's based on real facts and figures - is hard to write because it's a massive info-dump. You need to educate most of your readers in things like rocket science, orbital mechanics, distances and speeds - and you can't just make stuff up, because someone, somewhere is going to *be* a rocket scientist, and they'll call you out. All that education can get in the way of an enjoyable story and make reading it abou If you enjoyed The Martian, you'll love thisHard science fiction - the kind of sci-fi that's based on real facts and figures - is hard to write because it's a massive info-dump. You need to educate most of your readers in things like rocket science, orbital mechanics, distances and speeds - and you can't just make stuff up, because someone, somewhere is going to *be* a rocket scientist, and they'll call you out. All that education can get in the way of an enjoyable story and make reading it about as thrilling as a cookbook. Not so in this case. Like Andy Weir in The Martian, Peter Cawdron has fleshed out his science with utterly believable, warm and humorous individuals placed in... unusual situations. I'm not totally sure I agree with the final payoff, but the journey there was exciting and engaging - and I even learned a few new things about Mars. It's a very good book!
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  • Clint
    January 1, 1970
    Good story spoiled by unnecessary preaching from the authorI've read and enjoyed a few of Cawdron's novels in the past so I picked this up immediately when it was released. And it turned out to be a good story and good read with a fatal flaw. It seems Cawdron, like too many author's, just can't resist the opportunity to beat you over the head with their politics, which, not coincidentally, all flow the same way:Left. So, if you lean right, be prepared to be told how bigoted and homophobic you ar Good story spoiled by unnecessary preaching from the authorI've read and enjoyed a few of Cawdron's novels in the past so I picked this up immediately when it was released. And it turned out to be a good story and good read with a fatal flaw. It seems Cawdron, like too many author's, just can't resist the opportunity to beat you over the head with their politics, which, not coincidentally, all flow the same way:Left. So, if you lean right, be prepared to be told how bigoted and homophobic you are. With no evidence mind you, just the same old liberal strawman you've heard before. This virtue signaling is just a ham fisted way to moralize the story from one view point only. I think I'll decline that beating in the future from Mr. Cawdron.
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  • Patrick Barnes
    January 1, 1970
    Small and tenseThe story is well put together. He introduced a lot of current and near future technical descriptions of NASA equipment. The writing style appealed and felt kind of perfect for this disaster in space story. I think about the title and am going back and forth on how it fits the story. I haven't done that in a long time.There's a nice small, manageable cast that leaves room for the tech details and works with the writing style. The background is way plausible and even the time shift Small and tenseThe story is well put together. He introduced a lot of current and near future technical descriptions of NASA equipment. The writing style appealed and felt kind of perfect for this disaster in space story. I think about the title and am going back and forth on how it fits the story. I haven't done that in a long time.There's a nice small, manageable cast that leaves room for the tech details and works with the writing style. The background is way plausible and even the time shifts while a little confusing, seemed almost natural. That was a cool surprise. I'm looking at his other books.
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  • Kimmy C
    January 1, 1970
    An eagerly awaited pre-order based on the strength of his previous books, and I’m reviewing this without completely finishing it yet(disclosure). Fantastic book, level of detail walks the fine line between well researched in its explanations but not dry scientific fact. The descriptions are credible for a mere earth dweller to imagine. It has it all, action, suspense (remember to BREATHE), and the examination of work and personal relationships in an expedition setting. I’ll be recommending it to An eagerly awaited pre-order based on the strength of his previous books, and I’m reviewing this without completely finishing it yet(disclosure). Fantastic book, level of detail walks the fine line between well researched in its explanations but not dry scientific fact. The descriptions are credible for a mere earth dweller to imagine. It has it all, action, suspense (remember to BREATHE), and the examination of work and personal relationships in an expedition setting. I’ll be recommending it to my smarter friends. Top work again, Peter
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  • Marco C
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent storytelling and a story worth of itI really enjoyed this book. The characters were real people behaving as real people would.In a sea of books where protagonists are either infallible automatons or complete idiots that wouldn't have been allowed on a tour of NASA, let alone as crewmembers on a mission to mars, this story stands out. It's definitely worth a read. My score should have been 4 stars based on my own grading system,but I decided on a fifth star to offset the lower scores th Excellent storytelling and a story worth of itI really enjoyed this book. The characters were real people behaving as real people would.In a sea of books where protagonists are either infallible automatons or complete idiots that wouldn't have been allowed on a tour of NASA, let alone as crewmembers on a mission to mars, this story stands out. It's definitely worth a read. My score should have been 4 stars based on my own grading system,but I decided on a fifth star to offset the lower scores that I felt were undeserved.
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  • Roger Ball
    January 1, 1970
    Unexpectedly good!I went into this read with low expectations. Wasn’t sure where the story would lead and not familiar with the author. Even though it seemed to start out rather dry and heavy on facts, it soon ramped up and found myself hooked. I still think it was to heavy on explaining the science and at times the main character was overly introspective. But the story becomes engaging and interesting soon enough and hard to put down. Look forward to reading more of his work!
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  • Tony Barkley
    January 1, 1970
    A really good bookI like si-fi books, I read a lot of them. Here lately, they have been kind of boring, hard to finish. Losing Mars was a refreshing break from what seems to have become the norm. It is well written, great storyline, great characters.... a book you wanted to finish, but also one you didn't want to see end either. Peter really went in-deep on this one. You wonder, how do people think of this stuff? I really enjoyed the book, and look forward to reading more by Peter Cawdron.
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  • Joseph F Cowan
    January 1, 1970
    Wonderful novelWas totally taken by surprise midway through the book owing to the author's cleverness. Great character and the plotting was driving rather than slow. It made the potential reality of the plot mire 'realistic' to me.As for the moral issues mentioned by the author in the post-script, how can we ever deal with other lifeforms if we can't even deal with the diversity of humanity?Thanks, Peter.
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  • David Dixon
    January 1, 1970
    Losing Mars but gaining a good book.I really enjoy so-called hard science fiction and this is an excellent example. More importantly the characters didn't get lost. Both they and the story came across as authentic. The author noted as a possible concern the amount of orbital mechanics, but I felt it was a necessity to set the scene. Besides, Heinlein did it frequently, and didn't seem to suffer! All in all , a well done and recommended read.
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  • Pat Dailey
    January 1, 1970
    MovieThis deserves a movie. It needs to include the epilog, it is best part that pulls the entire story together.I love. As an engineer, I love science and engineering based science fiction. It lends a bit of truth to the story.Seriously, this would make a great movie that would eclipse the 2001 space odessey films.
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  • Robert W.
    January 1, 1970
    Too Much MoralizingFor an SF book the basic story is good, not the author spends the last quarter of the book preaching his moral viewpoints. I don't buy SF books for anyone's religious or Social value lesson. I buy Science Fiction books for entertainment. Mr Crowden needs to decide what business he is in. I hope he can choose wisely.
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  • Jamie Rich
    January 1, 1970
    Losing Mars (Kindle Edition) by Peter CawdronRather dry in the first half, then a bit more interesting in the second half.Seemed like the author wanted to rewrite The Martian in the first half of the book, but it was so dry it lost attention. The second half did pick up, and he did present some fun twists, but then the book went from too believable to not believable enough.
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  • C
    January 1, 1970
    Great hard science fiction. Grounded in fact, yet will make you think bigI give 5 stars rather infrequently. If only more people could be like the hero of the story! I cant say much more without a spoiler. You'll like this book if your a fan of great fiction. I was sad to hit the end.
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  • Bob
    January 1, 1970
    Another great story by Peter CawdronI try to get my hands on every story Peter writes. His books are well informed, the plots are logical and well thought through, and his characters, especially first person narrators, completely human (except for the aliens of course). This book was no exception. Thanks for the read, Peter!
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  • Vincent Luce
    January 1, 1970
    Realistic, well paced journey.Realistic, well paced journey from science fact to science fiction. A personal viewpoint that doesn’t patronize the reader or dazzle with too much jargon at once.
  • Pat Chadwick
    January 1, 1970
    Great story and solid science!The characters are so well done that I was very comfortable with each of them almost immediately. Similar to both The Martian and The Abyss, the real science and engineering details made this already terrific story even better!
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  • Simon Williams
    January 1, 1970
    Lots of science .... then a twistLoved this book, with lots of what felt like authentic science (I don't know enough on the subject to pick holes, if there are any to pick, that is), plot twists, then an alien and time travel encounter.
  • Curt Bradley
    January 1, 1970
    Superb!Excellent for those of you who really like hard sci-fi. Mr. Cawdron immerses you in the reality of actual space operations, but doesn't let it overshadow his characters. Great story telling! Looking forward to more from him.
  • Adamx
    January 1, 1970
    Proper hard science fiction. Accurate physics and realistic scenarios make this a really gripping read.I was getting really adrenalised at several points, and it is rare for me to have heartbeat accelerating from reading!If you liked (the book of) The Martian this should be equally enjoyable, it feels as if its going in a similar direction at one point, but then zooms off excitingly on its own journey.
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  • james walker
    January 1, 1970
    Losing MarsA well written and thought provoking novel sci fi yesPossible Yes who knows what's out there not me orthe author
  • Johnny C Bryan
    January 1, 1970
    Extremely enjoyableI loved the technical explanation of things as they are instead of the common science fiction habit of just ignoring the laws of physics.
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