Ligeia
Ligeia is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe and first published in 1838. Ligeia is widely considered to be one of the top 100 greatest books of all time. This great novel will surely attract a whole new generation of readers. For many, Ligeia is required reading for various courses and curriculum's. And for others who simply enjoy reading timeless pieces of classic literature, this gem by Edgar Allan Poe is highly recommended.

Ligeia Details

TitleLigeia
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 2nd, 2004
PublisherBookSurge Classics
ISBN-139781594561900
Rating
GenreClassics, Horror, Short Stories, Fiction, Gothic

Ligeia Review

  • Peter
    January 1, 1970
    Absolute gothic masterpiece. First person narrator loses his love Ligeia (mysterious woman pale as marble) to death. In grief he moves to England buying an old decayed abbey. There he has stores the sarcophagus of Ligeia in a turret. His second wife, Lady Rowena, is getting ill after some months of strange marriage. Will she survive? What is ment with that bizarre 'revivication' the narrator is speaking of. This story is very psychological horror and runs shivers down your spine. What remarkable Absolute gothic masterpiece. First person narrator loses his love Ligeia (mysterious woman pale as marble) to death. In grief he moves to England buying an old decayed abbey. There he has stores the sarcophagus of Ligeia in a turret. His second wife, Lady Rowena, is getting ill after some months of strange marriage. Will she survive? What is ment with that bizarre 'revivication' the narrator is speaking of. This story is very psychological horror and runs shivers down your spine. What remarkable relationsship our narrator has to women and what dominant role opium plays. Very gothic, very dark, very ghastly. One of the great Poe horror tales! Absolutely recommended!
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  • Sean Barrs the Bookdragon
    January 1, 1970
    It's Halloween, so I have to revisit my favourite Poe short story!If a mind has found the most true and profound bliss what happens when it’s taken away? Well, the simple answer is it doesn’t work anymore, at least not very well. The narrator of this marvellous short story experiences a whole host of emotions and mental states after his loss. Firstly, he is hit with the expected wave of melancholy fuelled by his understandable grief; secondly, he feels the slow calm breeze of acceptance; It's Halloween, so I have to revisit my favourite Poe short story!If a mind has found the most true and profound bliss what happens when it’s taken away? Well, the simple answer is it doesn’t work anymore, at least not very well. The narrator of this marvellous short story experiences a whole host of emotions and mental states after his loss. Firstly, he is hit with the expected wave of melancholy fuelled by his understandable grief; secondly, he feels the slow calm breeze of acceptance; thirdly, and finaly, he is savaged by an unrealised state of delusion and fantasy. In this, Edgar Allan Poe demonstrates his true mastery of writing a character in different states of mental stability. Needless to say, he’s a remarkable writer. In beauty of face no maiden ever equaled her. It was the radiance of an opium-dream - and airy and spirit-lifting vision more wildly divine than the phantasies which hovered about the slumbering souls of the daughters of Delos. Yet her features were not of that regular mould which we have been falsely taught to worship in the classical labors of the heathen.”The narrator cannot be blamed for his fragility. He has lost his world: he has lost his beloved Ligeia. She was everything to him, and they both knew it. Nothing could lessen the blow of her death; nothing could take the pain away of her upcoming demise: nothing could save his mind in a world without her. They were living in harmony; their souls had achieved happiness and love; they were two lesser beings of one greater soul: they were at peace in their own transcendental plane, until she died. So, the narrator’s sense of self awareness and actuality has been destroyed. He is left with the tatters of a wonderful experience, and his own delusion. I recommend looking at the following quote and considering exactly who is speaking, and why he would conjure up such an image. Perhaps, he didn’t fantasise this. Maybe this is paranormal. I do love the multiplicity of its interpretation. This short story is a marvel. It appears confusing and contradictory, but if you stop and consider who is actually speaking then its true nature is revealed. Admittedly, on my first read I was a little lost, though after a second read I began to see it for what it was. This is not as approachable as some of Poe’s other works, and it really isn’t an advisable starting point for the author. But, the short story is wonderful, truly wonderful. It highlights the working of the mind in a state of sheer depravity; it is disturbing and brilliant. One thing that I’ve decided after reading this is that I must simply work my way through his entire works and write some more reviews of such a wonderfully dark writer.
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  • Fran
    January 1, 1970
    "And the will therin lieth, which dieth not. Who knoweth the mysteries of the will, with its vigor?" -Joseph Glanvill[Perhaps] "It was the radiance of an opium-dream-an airy and spirit-lifting vision..." "She came and departed as a shadow". The narrator tried to "recall to memory" his deceased wife, Ligeia. He described, "...her loveliness was indeed 'exquisite'...", but there was much pervasive "strangeness". He attempted " to portray the majesty, the quiet ease of her demeanor..." He "And the will therin lieth, which dieth not. Who knoweth the mysteries of the will, with its vigor?" -Joseph Glanvill[Perhaps] "It was the radiance of an opium-dream-an airy and spirit-lifting vision..." "She came and departed as a shadow". The narrator tried to "recall to memory" his deceased wife, Ligeia. He described, "...her loveliness was indeed 'exquisite'...", but there was much pervasive "strangeness". He attempted " to portray the majesty, the quiet ease of her demeanor..." He remembered her intoxicating eyes and her raven hair.Starting anew, he purchased an abby in the remote countryside of England. He remarried. But ..."Ligeia's beauty passed into my spirit, there dwelling in a shrine...".Edgar Allan Poe's short story "Ligeia", written in 1838, is classic. The narrator seemed "unreliable". The tale was shrouded in mystery. Highly recommended.
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  • Martha
    January 1, 1970
    Her name was Ligeia. Ligeia is a poetical, symphonic, rhythmic story about a husband who loses his wife, his idol, to an illness and gives us, the reader, his exquisite memories of her. Her eyes: “The hue of the orbs was the most brilliant of black, and, far over them, hung jetty lashes of great length.”There are ghostly images revealed within this story by the husband, who mentions a few times, his use of opium.As Ligeia lies close to death, she requests her husband to read a poem she had Her name was Ligeia. Ligeia is a poetical, symphonic, rhythmic story about a husband who loses his wife, his idol, to an illness and gives us, the reader, his exquisite memories of her. Her eyes: “The hue of the orbs was the most brilliant of black, and, far over them, hung jetty lashes of great length.”There are ghostly images revealed within this story by the husband, who mentions a few times, his use of opium.As Ligeia lies close to death, she requests her husband to read a poem she had written while she was ill. The last stanza: Out —- out are the lights — out all! And over each quivering form, The curtain, a funeral pall, Comes down with the rush of a storm. And the angels, all pallid and wan, Uprising, unveiling, affirm That the play is the tragedy, “Man.” And its hero the Conqueror Worm. There seems to be a hint of satire in this story, I feel, but not quite sure.I am hooked on Edgar Allen Poe! Thank you to Peter (here on Goodreads) for a great review of this story. If I had not seen his review, I would not have opened my eyes to Edgar Allen Poe’s writing this soon.
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  • Tristram Shandy
    January 1, 1970
    An I for an Eye.Is it really better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all? The answer to this question might depend on what else you lose when you lose the beloved person. In Edgar Allan Poe’s marvellous short story Ligeia (1838) the narrator cannot even remember when and under what circumstances he has first met the lady Ligeia, who is the love of his life, and whether this forgetfulness may be due to the workings of grief on a human brain, or to the abuse of opium, or whether An I for an Eye.Is it really better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all? The answer to this question might depend on what else you lose when you lose the beloved person. In Edgar Allan Poe’s marvellous short story Ligeia (1838) the narrator cannot even remember when and under what circumstances he has first met the lady Ligeia, who is the love of his life, and whether this forgetfulness may be due to the workings of grief on a human brain, or to the abuse of opium, or whether it might not have something to do with the uncanny nature of Ligeia herself, a dark and mysterious beauty, with a low, melodious voice and large, vivid eyes, a woman who is full of learning and knowledge of matters dark and forbidden, is a matter that every reader has to decide for himself.Suffice it to be said that our narrator is a typical example of an extremely unreliable narrator, and what we are told about the death of his second wife, the fair-haired and blue-eyed lady Rowena, who has always been in the shade of the overwhelming memories connected with Ligeia, sounds so unbelievable that it casts serious doubts on the honesty of our narrator. And then, are we really supposed to believe that a person’s resistance against death – whose inevitability must appear as a dire humiliation to anyone with a proud will – can actually make this person return and take possession of the body of somebody else? Or is it all a figment of our depraved narrator’s imagination? And what is such a broken-hearted creature ready to do, whereat will he shy, in order to win another glimpse at the black, wild eyes of the lady Ligeia?The story will not allow itself to be unravelled completely, and you can easily picture the narrator writing down his memories in a padded cell next to the one in which the man who extinguished the vulture eye sits, but it is full of magic whisperings. Drowning in the eyes of a beautiful and intelligent woman, is a death preferable to many others, but is it really worth to yield an I for an eye, to lose one’s mind and mental health about it?However, if your lady Ligeia is inspired with poetry as dark and haunting as “The Conqueror Worm”, one of the most intense instances of memento mori I have ever come across, especially since it is so unconciliatory towards Death, then I can understand why you will not hesitate to take the plunge into the realm of madness.
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  • Meike
    January 1, 1970
    Full disclosure: Eddie Poe, the old Gothic dipsomaniac, is one of my favorite writers, and his masterpiece The Tell-Tale Heart is, in my humble opinion, the best short story ever written. "Ligeia" gives us lots of classic Poe ingredients: There's the beautiful woman who dies (consumption? well, it's Poe!), there's the metaphysical/supernatural, and there's even a poem within the story. As usual, this author is not here for apparent shock value, but for psychological horror, in this case the Full disclosure: Eddie Poe, the old Gothic dipsomaniac, is one of my favorite writers, and his masterpiece The Tell-Tale Heart is, in my humble opinion, the best short story ever written. "Ligeia" gives us lots of classic Poe ingredients: There's the beautiful woman who dies (consumption? well, it's Poe!), there's the metaphysical/supernatural, and there's even a poem within the story. As usual, this author is not here for apparent shock value, but for psychological horror, in this case the disturbing effects of loss and death.The unnamed narrator falls in love with and marries Ligeia, an unconventional beauty who is not only highly educated in science and languages, but also has a penchant for metaphysical inquiries. When Liegeia falls ill, she writes the poem "The Conqueror Worm" and dies. The narrator moves to an English abbey and enters a loveless marriage with Rowena, and then - well, creepy things start to go down.As this is Poe, the story raises a lot of questions regarding the mental state of the unnamed protagonist, who qualifies as an unreliable narrator: Not only is he addicted to opium, he also tries to suppress memories of Ligeia, but can't - so what is it that really happens to Rowena, and why? The trauma of a love lost haunts the narrative, and the effect on the depiction of the events remains intentionally unclear. And of course, there's the apparent opposition between raven-haired and dark-eyed Ligeia, who hails from a city near the Rhine and dabbles in forbidden wisdom, and fair-haired and blue-eyed Rowena, an Englishwoman with whom the narrator lives in an abbey. Then again, some academics have mentioned the possibility that parts of the story might simply satirize Gothic literary conventions - with this author, everything seems possible.If you look for outrageous, in-your-face horror, Poe is clearly not your guy: He is the expert for psychological horror that investigates the dark and lonely corners of the human heart, and I just love him for his multi-faceted, perfectly composed and always slightly enigmatic texts.
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  • Mia (Parentheses Enthusiast)
    January 1, 1970
    While I didn't really understand the point or message of this story, it was beautifully written and the tone is darkly, insanely, intensely beautiful, so I cannot help but bestow four well-deserved stars upon yet another short story by my beloved Mr Poe.The basic premise of this story is the narrator's relationship with Ligeia, his wife, to the grave and beyond. This tale is aptly named, as not a single thought passes through the protagonist's head that is not about the eponymous Ligeia. Our While I didn't really understand the point or message of this story, it was beautifully written and the tone is darkly, insanely, intensely beautiful, so I cannot help but bestow four well-deserved stars upon yet another short story by my beloved Mr Poe.The basic premise of this story is the narrator's relationship with Ligeia, his wife, to the grave and beyond. This tale is aptly named, as not a single thought passes through the protagonist's head that is not about the eponymous Ligeia. Our narrator (who is unnamed, as per usual) takes every chance he can to declare his love for the Lady Ligeia- four pages are dedicated to a description of her face, for god's sake- but, to me, there was something... off about their love. It seemed like a mutual obsession with each other, that Ligeia and her husband loved each other in a sick, narcissistic, warped kind of way, and I loved those subtle undertones of darkness beneath the veneer of dramatic, undying proclamations of love both from the narrator and his wife.Another wonderful thing about this short story is the tone. Throughout the climax and much of the story, the narrator is under the influence of opium, which casts a feverish, hyperreal yet dreamlike feeling upon it all. The ending, while it was in line with what I expect of Poe, was still great. He could have easily just (view spoiler)[brought back Ligeia as some sort of ghost/corpse bride/zombie, but the whole dramatic ripping off of the bandages to reveal waves of raven-black hair and dark eyes was awesome. I quite liked the use of that transformation. (hide spoiler)]But, like I mentioned earlier, I really don't know the meaning of this story. It's more of a story for story's sake, which I am completely fine with. This isn't typical Poe- the narrator is much more manic here than in most of the other poems and stories I've read so far. (Excepting the Tell-Tale Heart, of course, but not The Cask of Amontillado, because Montresor really was quite calm about the whole thing, wasn't he?) He reaches marvellous highs and crashing lows, and is deep in the throes of grief, which Poe writes so heartbreakingly well it's hard not to be convinced that he was pouring a lot of his own pain into this particular tale. Read it here."My memory flew back (oh, with what intensity of regret!) to Ligeia, the beloved, the august, the beautiful, the entombed. I revelled in recollections of her purity, of her wisdom, of her lofty- her ethereal nature, of her passionate, her idolatrous love. Now, then, did my spirit fully and freely burn with more than all the fires of her own. In the excitement of my opium dreams (for I was habitually fettered in the shackles of the drug), I would call aloud upon her name, during the silence of the night, or among the sheltered recesses of the glens by day, as if, through the wild eagerness, the solemn passion, I could restore her to the pathways she had abandoned- ah, could it be forever?- upon the earth."
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  • Minh
    January 1, 1970
    Nothing remarkable happens. Except for the prose, all else quite revolves around Poe's main theme: death of a beautiful woman, monomania, drug...etc. Still a nice read for Halloween. But compared to Rue Morgue, I prefer the latter.
  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    This definitely deserves a second reading! I flew into this book immediately after reading a review about it. The premise of it was unbelievably seductive. And it didn't disappoint....I kept wavering between a 4 and 5 star rating after I finished reading this not because it was lacking or defective in any way, but rather because some lines just flew right over my head(that's where the need for a second reading comes in). I struggled with comprehension and interpretation of some sentences. It This definitely deserves a second reading! I flew into this book immediately after reading a review about it. The premise of it was unbelievably seductive. And it didn't disappoint....I kept wavering between a 4 and 5 star rating after I finished reading this not because it was lacking or defective in any way, but rather because some lines just flew right over my head(that's where the need for a second reading comes in). I struggled with comprehension and interpretation of some sentences. It felt fraudulent giving a full 5 star rating because I think the one star deducted should represent the few lines I failed to grasp.But this short story was too wholesome for deductions or halves; it was velvety and beautiful beyond words. It begs attention and care while digesting it's words. The emotions conveyed are so intense and engulfing that even though I can't imagine a love so transcendent that it's loss leads to a state of absolute brokenness, I sympathize with the narrator's misfortune.
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  • Elliot A
    January 1, 1970
    Another required reading for my zombie/vampire course, this short story had me on the fence until the very end.I am not really a fan of long-winded descriptions and overly prolonged suspense until the reader doesn’t even remember what the suspense was supposed to be for, but it absolutely work with this story. I was sitting at my desk, reading on my computer with my arms crossed defensively in front of me and leaning back, wondering when the “good” will start. By the end I was leaning into my Another required reading for my zombie/vampire course, this short story had me on the fence until the very end.I am not really a fan of long-winded descriptions and overly prolonged suspense until the reader doesn’t even remember what the suspense was supposed to be for, but it absolutely work with this story. I was sitting at my desk, reading on my computer with my arms crossed defensively in front of me and leaning back, wondering when the “good” will start. By the end I was leaning into my computer, mere inches from the screen, clutching the edge of my desk with white knuckles. It was that good.Overall, I haven’t had the chance to read much by Poe, but this story certainly spiked my interest in his other works. I would definitely recommend it.ElliotScribbles
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  • LGandT
    January 1, 1970
    Classic descent into madness brought on by death. Brilliant
  • Sadie
    January 1, 1970
    An early work of Poe, a short story about a man losing his beloved wife Ligeia and then remarrying. The central theme here is the theory that the death of a human is only a sign of weak willpower. Those whose will to live is strong enough, will survive.The story couldn't really capture me, mostly because of the narrator's descriptions of Ligeia - she who is more beautiful, intelligent, wonderful and what not than words could ever say. The narrator's obsession with his first wife - be it due to An early work of Poe, a short story about a man losing his beloved wife Ligeia and then remarrying. The central theme here is the theory that the death of a human is only a sign of weak willpower. Those whose will to live is strong enough, will survive.The story couldn't really capture me, mostly because of the narrator's descriptions of Ligeia - she who is more beautiful, intelligent, wonderful and what not than words could ever say. The narrator's obsession with his first wife - be it due to his deep grief, his opium abuse or whatever - made me feel very uncomfortable, and not in a good way. It was way too much for my liking and made a better enjoyment of the story overall not possible.
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  • Prashant
    January 1, 1970
    This is first work of Poe that I read and how the details can be used to make the story stick to the reader. The story is narrated by a guy who is desperately in love with his wife Ligeia and is praising everything about her. Poe has described the character at length so it can come alive to the reader. After the death of Legeia the man marries Lady Rowena. The new wife succumbs to illness one night and the man mourns her death all night while her body lies in the same room. What follows is This is first work of Poe that I read and how the details can be used to make the story stick to the reader. The story is narrated by a guy who is desperately in love with his wife Ligeia and is praising everything about her. Poe has described the character at length so it can come alive to the reader. After the death of Legeia the man marries Lady Rowena. The new wife succumbs to illness one night and the man mourns her death all night while her body lies in the same room. What follows is gruesome description of how the guy witnesses the multiple instances of life coming and going out of the woman's body. This is the most interesting part of the story when the man sits there confused and terrified and there is some new transformation taking place in the corpse.The details depicted in the story are really vivid. Poe is a genius and I hope to get the strength to read some more of his celebrated works.
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  • Aditya Patil
    January 1, 1970
    There is no point at all in the story. The writing however, is beautiful.
  • Ankur
    January 1, 1970
    This story left me sleepless, and not in a comfortable way. It has everything I wanted from a gothic story. Madness, resurrection from death, ruined abbey, spooky hallways, haunting statues and sarcophagus, creepy tapestry artwork,watching a dead body twitching all night, and an obsession with beauty.As usual with most of Poe's narrators, we now have one who is under the influence of opium, after the death of his wife, Ligeia, with whose beauty he had a strange and other worldly obsession. He This story left me sleepless, and not in a comfortable way. It has everything I wanted from a gothic story. Madness, resurrection from death, ruined abbey, spooky hallways, haunting statues and sarcophagus, creepy tapestry artwork,watching a dead body twitching all night, and an obsession with beauty.As usual with most of Poe's narrators, we now have one who is under the influence of opium, after the death of his wife, Ligeia, with whose beauty he had a strange and other worldly obsession. He was spellbound with her intelligence, her eyes, her forehead, her chin, her lips and her deep dark black raven hair. The way he compares her beauty and framework with Gods and celestial objects is really some great writing. After her death due to some unspecified illness, most probably consumption, he sees her beauty decay and her body shrink which deeply disturbs him and before dying she narrates one of Poe's poem "The Conqueror Worm" to her husband. After her death the husband moves to a secluded abbey in the mountains to grieve alone and remarries Lady Rowena Trevanion who he starts to hate and designs a disturbing "bridal chamber" for her to stay which starts to affect her sanity till she falls fatally ill like her previous wife and the narrator tries to restore her back to life. Does the narrator succeed? Read on to find out.This was the first official story which made me a life long fan of Poe and made me embark on a reading spree to finish all of his short stories. The narration is tense, scary and quite disturbing. The narrator who starts off normally starts to turn depressive and maniacal to the point of disbelief and we start to wonder why is he even doing what we think he is doing. It deals with death, depression and the will to conqueror death through man's eternal strong will power over it. The narrator's bridal chamber is a metaphor for his mind, both are twisted, out of balance and always shifting. Slowly the narration starts to cloud the memory, induce visions and blur the lines between dreams and reality till we experience the world through his opium clouded lenses.A great work of horror with enough mind bending dreads and gothic twists. On a side note, "The Conqueror Worm" was a poem of Poe which dealt with the concept of death and which told how man is a slave to supernatural beings and play their parts until a "crawling shape" emerges and consumes them all which fits in quite beautifully and tragically with the main story."I cannot, for my soul, remember how, when, or even precisely where, I first became acquainted with the lady Ligeia."-Narrator
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  • Franky
    January 1, 1970
    “My memory flew back (oh, with what intensity of regret!) to Ligeia, the beloved, the august, the beautiful, the entombed.” As the weather and season starts to change and we get closer to Halloween, I always think it is a good opportunity to delve into the world of Edgar Allan Poe. I know he wrote much more than Gothic tradition style stories, but some of his most enduring and memorable works are those ones where the creepy factor is high. “Ligeia” is one of his lesser known stories, but much “My memory flew back (oh, with what intensity of regret!) to Ligeia, the beloved, the august, the beautiful, the entombed.” As the weather and season starts to change and we get closer to Halloween, I always think it is a good opportunity to delve into the world of Edgar Allan Poe. I know he wrote much more than Gothic tradition style stories, but some of his most enduring and memorable works are those ones where the creepy factor is high. “Ligeia” is one of his lesser known stories, but much like some of his other works, it has some elements of the supernatural and ambiguity from the standpoint of the main character. I know there are some speculations out there that Poe created this story as sort of a parody or satire of the Gothic story (much in the vain of Northanger Abbey being a send up of the Gothic romance novel). So, in a way, a reader can read this as a straight Gothic tale, or that Poe was having a little fun poking fun at the genre. Either way, it’s a spooky little tale with some definitive Poe staples, perhaps one being a possibly unreliable narrator, and works as a highly effective supernatural tale. I think another interesting aspect of this story is that readers can look at this story from many different lenses and perspectives, and so, this is what gives it some ambiguity. What is real, and what is illusion? It is not clearly defined. The basis for the story is an unnamed narrator lamenting and brooding over his beloved wife, Ligeia. Much of the beginning portions of the story is the narrator describing her traits and attributes. Oddly enough, he is not sure about where he met her and seems a bit feverish about his passion. As we know with a Poe story, things will not go status quo, and there is certainly a tragedy to befall, so there is a shift when Ligeia mysteriously becomes gravely ill….How will the narrator pick up the pieces of the memory of his beloved? This story has high doses of atmosphere. I was reminded quite a bit of “The Raven” and “The Fall of the House of Usher” as I read. The final pages of this story are so effectively crafted. I think that there is a brilliance that Poe is able to create this feeling, something that the reader shares along when reading. I know some who have criticized this story as there being “nothing really going on.” I would beg to differ, as I believe there is a quite a bit going on in the main character’s head that we have to decipher and figure out. I think this is a story that could be read multiple times for different meanings and viewpoints.
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  • Dimitris
    January 1, 1970
    Lo! ’t is a gala night Within the lonesome latter years! An angel throng, bewinged, bedight In veils, and drowned in tears, Sit in a theatre, to see A play of hopes and fears,While the orchestra breathes fitfully The music of the spheres.Mimes, in the form of God on high, Mutter and mumble low,And hither and thither fly— Mere puppets they, who come and go At bidding of vast formless things That shift the scenery to and fro,Flapping from out their Condor wings Invisible Wo!That motley drama—oh, Lo! ’t is a gala night Within the lonesome latter years! An angel throng, bewinged, bedight In veils, and drowned in tears, Sit in a theatre, to see A play of hopes and fears,While the orchestra breathes fitfully The music of the spheres.Mimes, in the form of God on high, Mutter and mumble low,And hither and thither fly— Mere puppets they, who come and go At bidding of vast formless things That shift the scenery to and fro,Flapping from out their Condor wings Invisible Wo!That motley drama—oh, be sure It shall not be forgot!With its Phantom chased for evermore By a crowd that seize it not,Through a circle that ever returneth in To the self-same spot,And much of Madness, and more of Sin, And Horror the soul of the plot.But see, amid the mimic rout, A crawling shape intrude!A blood-red thing that writhes from out The scenic solitude!It writhes!—it writhes!—with mortal pangs The mimes become its food,And seraphs sob at vermin fangs In human gore imbued.Out—out are the lights—out all! And, over each quivering form,The curtain, a funeral pall, Comes down with the rush of a storm, While the angels, all pallid and wan, Uprising, unveiling, affirmThat the play is the tragedy, “Man,” And its hero, the Conqueror Worm.
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  • Gabriel Vugon
    January 1, 1970
    Plot: Drug addict rambling about his 2 dead wives and having hallucinationsOne of the reasons why I dislike this short story, is that I'm never a fan of poems or fancy, poetic words. Plus, having to google a bunch of names of angels from Hebrew mythology is really not my favorite thing to do while reading. The story is almost pointless, the unreliable narrator spends pages to describe literally everything. The only interest I've found in the story, was the gothic ambiance. Ligeia, who is the Plot: Drug addict rambling about his 2 dead wives and having hallucinationsOne of the reasons why I dislike this short story, is that I'm never a fan of poems or fancy, poetic words. Plus, having to google a bunch of names of angels from Hebrew mythology is really not my favorite thing to do while reading. The story is almost pointless, the unreliable narrator spends pages to describe literally everything. The only interest I've found in the story, was the gothic ambiance. Ligeia, who is the narrator's first wife, with her unordinarily gigantic black eyes, raven hair, can be an ideal costume for Halloween.
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  • Jose Moa
    January 1, 1970
    Another masterwork of the genial Poe,written with his matchless prose thah have influenced several writters,clearly Lovecraft.Beguins with perhaps the most great description of the beauty and atributes of the ideal romantic heroine Ligeia ,inaprehensible to the meaning of words,not yet to the classic paradigmas,as only the genial writter can make ,overall, her eyes.Ligeia is the quintaesence of beauty,passion,wiseness and love,a ideal ,a abstract comcept that as inmortal trascends the human Another masterwork of the genial Poe,written with his matchless prose thah have influenced several writters,clearly Lovecraft.Beguins with perhaps the most great description of the beauty and atributes of the ideal romantic heroine Ligeia ,inaprehensible to the meaning of words,not yet to the classic paradigmas,as only the genial writter can make ,overall, her eyes.Ligeia is the quintaesence of beauty,passion,wiseness and love,a ideal ,a abstract comcept that as inmortal trascends the human nature and as in the tale is able of trespass the border between life and death and reincarnate in the body of lady Rovena.Perhaps the greatest romantic gothic tale ever written
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  • Soycd
    January 1, 1970
    Of all the women whom I have ever known, she, the outwardly calm, the ever-placid Ligeia, was the most violently a prey to the tumultuous vultures of stern passion.Even though Ligeia is well within familiar territory for Poe (there is the eerie and gloomy scenery, the misterious muse who is counting her minutes left, and the main character whose twisted mind you get to know) it still manages to stand out as a unique and wonderfully crafted story due to Poe's magnificent prose and his talent for Of all the women whom I have ever known, she, the outwardly calm, the ever-placid Ligeia, was the most violently a prey to the tumultuous vultures of stern passion.Even though Ligeia is well within familiar territory for Poe (there is the eerie and gloomy scenery, the misterious muse who is counting her minutes left, and the main character whose twisted mind you get to know) it still manages to stand out as a unique and wonderfully crafted story due to Poe's magnificent prose and his talent for creating an atmosphere that keeps you on the edge of your seat until the end. Highly recommended.
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  • A Mig
    January 1, 1970
    So far my favorite romantic/gothic story by Poe, from his Complete Works. There is a lot to it and I loved the shift from the description of Ligeia, his love, to the description of a building instead, following the character's second wedding. In the final act, we get very close to what a future Lovecraft will excel at, the horror of what might follow Death. But Poe adds a more romantic mid 19th c. atmosphere to it.
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  • Francy Narvaez
    January 1, 1970
    “That motley drama—oh, be sure It shall not be forgot!With its Phantom chased for evermore By a crowd that seize it not,Through a circle that ever returneth in To the self-same spot,And much of Madness, and more of Sin, And Horror the soul of the plot.” I loved this so much, everytime I re-read Edgar Allan Poe I love him more and more “That motley drama—oh, be sure It shall not be forgot!With its Phantom chased for evermore By a crowd that seize it not,Through a circle that ever returneth in To the self-same spot,And much of Madness, and more of Sin, And Horror the soul of the plot.” I loved this so much, everytime I re-read Edgar Allan Poe I love him more and more♥
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  • Vaishali
    January 1, 1970
    Every woman on earth aches to be loved the way the narrator does his deceased wife. <3Quite verbose, which I survived only due to the late Vincent Price's expert rendering at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kN4yk...
  • Emily Woolford
    January 1, 1970
    The second half of this short (where the narrator is wed to Rowena) is beautiful. That is if you're willing to call someone's diminishing mental state after losing two wives beautiful. It's true though, I am drawn to tragic love stories.
  • Carly Ellen Kramer
    January 1, 1970
    Ligeia isn't Poe for Beginners, at least not as I see it. A new reader of Poe would be advised to read The Raven and The Pit and the Pendulum first, and read Ligeia later.
  • Sylvia McIvers
    January 1, 1970
    In a ruined German city, a man lives with his wonderful wife Ligiea. Really, she's wonderful. Three pages of detail on her eyes, her nose, her mouth her skin, her hair, her wisdom, her walk - and another few pages for her to die, all the while fighting, never surrendering her will to Death.Our Hero wanders to an English abbey - also ruined - and sets up an opium addicted life. He marries a woman who is described in one sentence. Several paragraphs explain how their bedroom has tomb-elements, In a ruined German city, a man lives with his wonderful wife Ligiea. Really, she's wonderful. Three pages of detail on her eyes, her nose, her mouth her skin, her hair, her wisdom, her walk - and another few pages for her to die, all the while fighting, never surrendering her will to Death.Our Hero wanders to an English abbey - also ruined - and sets up an opium addicted life. He marries a woman who is described in one sentence. Several paragraphs explain how their bedroom has tomb-elements, besides being in a ruined abbey.Surprise - the 2nd wife dies. And as Our Hero sits up with the body in an opium daze... Ligiea's ghost takes over the body and stands up. Totally not an opium dream! Maybe.Gothic Checklist:Ruined building - check. Just in case a ruined city isn't enough, Our Hero has to move into an abandoned abbey.Obsessed character who thinks he's perfectly normal - check. Our Hero doesn't know Legiea's family name, we don't know his name at all, but of course being in love with your wife is normal, right? RIGHT?Innocent person who has no idea that horror is about to unfold - check. How the heck Wife #2's family could let her marry an opium addict in a crumbling building is a little nuts, especially with five sarcophagi in the bedroom. Crazy much?
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  • Edlira Dibrani
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it <3`` I cannot , for my soul, remember how, when, or even precisely where, I first became acquainted with the Lady Ligeia. Long years have since elasped. and my memory is feeble through much suffering. Or, perhaps, I cannot now bring these points to mind, because, in truth the character of my beloved, her rare learning, her singular yet placid cast of beauty, and the thrilling and enthralling cloquence of her low musical language, made their way into my heart by places so steadily and Loved it <3`` I cannot , for my soul, remember how, when, or even precisely where, I first became acquainted with the Lady Ligeia. Long years have since elasped. and my memory is feeble through much suffering. Or, perhaps, I cannot now bring these points to mind, because, in truth the character of my beloved, her rare learning, her singular yet placid cast of beauty, and the thrilling and enthralling cloquence of her low musical language, made their way into my heart by places so steadily and stealthily progressive that they have been unnoticed and unknown````Yet I cannot conceal it from my own perception that, immediately subsequent to the fall of the ruby-drops, a rapid change for the worse took place in the disorder of my wife; so that, on the third subsequent night , the hands of her menials prepared her for the tomb, and on the fourth, I sat alone, with her shrouded body, in that fantastic chamber which had received her as my bride.``And now slowly opened the eyes of the figure which stood before me. `Here then, at least,` I shricked aloud, ` can I ever-- can I ever be mistaken-- these are the full, and the black, and the wild eyes-- of my lost love-- of the lady-- of the LADY LIGEIA.´´ AWESOMEEEE !!!!!
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  • Madalin Boboc
    January 1, 1970
    Truly remarkable story, at least as the idea is concerned.The writing is pretty cheesy the whole way through, except the last part, which is honestly where the whole strength of the story resides.Poe in this and another short story of his (that was passable), writes about love in such a way that it lacks subtlety and looks like an infatuated teenager rather than an adult that understands the complexities of love.Still, I have the ability of separating the execution of a story and appreciating it Truly remarkable story, at least as the idea is concerned.The writing is pretty cheesy the whole way through, except the last part, which is honestly where the whole strength of the story resides.Poe in this and another short story of his (that was passable), writes about love in such a way that it lacks subtlety and looks like an infatuated teenager rather than an adult that understands the complexities of love.Still, I have the ability of separating the execution of a story and appreciating it for the pure idea of it, and this is a really spooky turn of situations that it's just so satisfying.
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  • Chad O'Haver
    January 1, 1970
    While "Ligeia" has no apparent meaning, while the metaphor, if any is present, is not so facilely discerned, I believe this story is a presentation of the preoccupation of the mind upon a single, wistful thought (in this case, his deceased wife Ligeia, and the longing for her return) and how this preoccupation can manifest as an absurd event (in this case, the resurrection of Ligeia through the body of his second, also deceased wife, Rowena).Possibly, Poe would have been a fine psychologist, or While "Ligeia" has no apparent meaning, while the metaphor, if any is present, is not so facilely discerned, I believe this story is a presentation of the preoccupation of the mind upon a single, wistful thought (in this case, his deceased wife Ligeia, and the longing for her return) and how this preoccupation can manifest as an absurd event (in this case, the resurrection of Ligeia through the body of his second, also deceased wife, Rowena).Possibly, Poe would have been a fine psychologist, or at the very least, he would have served as an interesting patient.
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  • Megha Chakraborty
    January 1, 1970
    A German city, a rich man, a beautiful mysterious wife. Edgar Allan Poe is a spook genius, his style of writing is exceptional. This book is a Goth's dream book, it has all the goth element, tomb, opium. It is predictable yet it has this mysterious vibe surrounding it, Edgar's description of Ligeia is beautiful. The book is about love, obsession, opium and not letting go. The ending is really really good. I am in love with his writing style, Ill highly recommend this.Happy Reading!!
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