Someone Who Will Love You in All Your Damaged Glory
From the creator and executive producer of the beloved and universally acclaimed television series BoJack Horseman, a fabulously off-beat collection of short stories about love--the best and worst thing in the universeWritten with all the scathing dark humor that is a hallmark of BoJack Horseman, Raphael Bob-Waksberg's stories will make readers laugh, weep, and shiver in uncomfortably delicious recognition. In "A Most Blessed and Auspicious Occasion," a young couple planning a wedding is forced to deal with interfering relatives dictating the appropriate number of ritual goat sacrifices. "Missed Connection--m4w" is the tragicomic tale of a pair of lonely commuters eternally failing to make that longed-for contact. The members of a rock band in "Up-and-Comers" discover they suddenly have superpowers--but only when they're drunk. And in "The Serial Monogamist's Guide to Important New York City Landmarks," a woman maps her history of romantic failures based on the places she and her significant others visited together.Equally at home with the surreal and the painfully relatable (or both at once), Bob-Waksberg delivers a killer combination of humor, romance, whimsy, cultural commentary, and crushing emotional vulnerability. The resulting collection is a punchy, perfect bloody valentine.

Someone Who Will Love You in All Your Damaged Glory Details

TitleSomeone Who Will Love You in All Your Damaged Glory
Author
ReleaseJun 11th, 2019
PublisherKnopf
Rating
GenreShort Stories, Fiction, Humor, Audiobook

Someone Who Will Love You in All Your Damaged Glory Review

  • karen
    January 1, 1970
    NOW AVAILABLE!!!i snatched this arc up because Raphael Bob-Waksberg is the creator of bojack horseman. i like my entertainment to be on the sadder side of the emotional spectrum, and bojack is the saddest show on television. do not come at me waving your this is us/million little things banners, because you’re not winning this one - between the writing, the vocal talents, and whatever the tragic analogue to comedic timing is, bojack's got the trophy for 'saddest' sewn up. and i know it takes sev NOW AVAILABLE!!!i snatched this arc up because Raphael Bob-Waksberg is the creator of bojack horseman. i like my entertainment to be on the sadder side of the emotional spectrum, and bojack is the saddest show on television. do not come at me waving your this is us/million little things banners, because you’re not winning this one - between the writing, the vocal talents, and whatever the tragic analogue to comedic timing is, bojack's got the trophy for 'saddest' sewn up. and i know it takes several villages to create a teevee show, and sometimes their creators’ll create a thing and then wander off to go create another thing, leaving the showrunners in charge of all that follows, but i was confident that this guy's sensibilities would make for some short stories that would kick me in my feelingparts.and i was not disappointed.no, wait, actually, at first, i WAS disappointed. here’s the thing - my looking-back sense of this book as a whole is very positive. however, the second half of the collection was stronger than the first, and it took me a while to start digging it. i am telling you this because i always feel compelled to review short story collections piece by piece because my life is full of poor time-management decisions, so, if you are reading this (because YOUR life is full of poor time-management decisions), you may read my mini-reviews of the early stories and too-hastily conclude, “oh, so this is a collection of meh stories,” but you would be as wrong in thinking this as you would be in thinking that this is us compares to a bojack in terms of its searing heartblistering devastation -- i.e. very wrong. so to begin:the first two are pretty much throwaway pieces. not that they aren't enjoyable, but they are very brief ( < 2 pages) nonstoriesSalted Circus Cashews, Swear to God ★★★★☆this isn't really a story so much as it is a thematic introduction; the risk v. reward of romantic relationships factor heavily in this collection, in which vulnerability is a recurring factor. love is one of those trust falls that will most certainly make a fool out of you, but what if, comes the whisper, the slick devil persuasion, what if it’s different this time?the symbolism is kind of fucking genius - using the olde snake in a can gag to invoke those tremulous ‘once bitten, twice shy’ beginning stages of any relationship; all the promises - This time there is no snake waiting, but there’s also an insidious underlayer of salesmanship to the pitch - a “you know you want to” invitation to open that can that invokes a different snake - the one whose persuasive talents led to that very first couple’s very first discord and therefore responsible for every breakup ever. all in under 2 pages. so - will you or won’t you? do you dare? SIDENOTE - i also really like the playfulness with fonts that occurs in this story and several others throughout the collection. it’s weird and wonky and fun.short stories ★★★★☆a series of ten... what to call these? too long to be epigrams, not didactic enough to be aphorisms, too interconnected to be flash fiction, too bleak to be greeting cards. let's call them bojack outtakes, because this:7. "I don't even think about you," he couldn't wait to tell her, just as soon as she called him back.calls to mind the sulking huff of a very drunk horse, and6. "I never thought I could be this happy," she imagined one day saying to someone.gives me the same sobbing-heart feelings as most of princess caroline’s storylines.okay, and now the "real" stories begin. i very much liked those first two pieces, but they were too short to really stick in my reader-craw. i spent much more time writing those words and looking for those pictures just now than i did reading the stories in the first place, once again proving that all my time management decisions are bad ones. no more pictures!A Most Blessed and Auspicious Occasion★★★☆☆unfortunately, this one didn't wow me. it’s a fine story, but as the first long piece in the book, i needed a bigger hook to land me. it's a solid three star; it's well-constructed and the lampooning of wedding culture is probably really enjoyable for readers who have gone through the experience themselves or have been to more than two weddings in the past 15 years. it just didn't inspire any strong feelings in me one way or another, even though i do appreciate all the splattery goat-slaughter parts. is it weird that i relate to that more than i relate to a wedding ceremony? should i bother unpacking that or would that be another one of those wastes of time? self-scrutiny = always a waste! moving on! Missed Connections--m4w★★★☆☆i promise you, my feelings for this book WILL skew positive. just not yet. this one seemed like another little throwaway piece and in fact it originally appeared on craigslist in the missed connections section. coming across it there, i think i would have been more delighted. its placement here, at the start of what is already a fairly shaky collection, is less so. it's a cute modern prufrockian urban love story about a love that coulda been, but again - it’s very brief (a full FOUR pages this time) and i haven't been landed yet. but i’m going to be landed - you’ll see. The Serial Monogamist's Guide to Important New York City Landmarks ★★★☆☆okay, it’s not this one, but again, this is a good story - it’s sweet and nostalgic and perfectly fine and relatable - especially for someone who has lived and loved all over NYFC and understands perfectly how many places are past-haunted and inspire flashback montages of happy and crappy romances. it just didn’t give me anything i hadn’t encountered elsewhere in my reading life. decent story, no fireworks.We Men of Science★★★☆☆this is the one i liked the least. i know - so far this review is a drag, but right now we are only on page 45 and there are more than 200 pages to go and soon you’ll forget all about these iffy ones just like i did. this one has fun doodles, including CATS! but it’s also a sci-fi-lite story with alternate realities and, i guess, multiple ways to screw up your relationships. perfectly acceptable as a story, just not my thing. you will probably like it more than i did because we are different people. however, this one does have one of the most bojack-y* ruminations: Perhaps a better me would have done the right thing and left, or a worse me wouldn’t have worried about it, just indulged in the transgression, but I am only as good as I am, and I could only do what the person as good as I am could do.A statue isn't built from the ground up—it's chiseled out of a block of marble—and I often wonder if we aren't likewise shaped by the qualities we lack, outlined by the empty space where the marble used to be. I'll be sitting on a train. I'll be lying awake in bed. I'll be watching a movie; I'll be laughing. And then, all of a sudden, I'll be struck by the paralyzing truth: It's not what we do that makes us who we are. It's what we don't do that defines us. Lies We Told Each Other (a partial list) ★★★★☆a bitterbleak comedy, in outline form, bullet-pointing a couple’s relationship arc—all the empty reassurances, promises, self-delusions, and gaslighting that goes into maintaining a healthy modern relationship. another brief one, but it’s astute and funny, plus it gets points for successfully suggesting the entire body of a relationship using only these skeletal snippets. These Are Facts ★★★★☆i don’t know what the hell i think about this one. this is the problem with reviewing each and every story when NOBODY ASKED YOU TO. on the one hand, i’m interested enough in the characters and the situation to want to read more - like, i think i could read a whole novel with these characters, or maybe a salinger-style story cycle. on the other hand, isn’t that supposed to be one of the hallmarks of a “good” short story - that it leaves you wanting more? WWRCD (in which RC is raymond carver, duh) i don’t know - i still feel like a short story dummy in many ways, as far as what they are “supposed” to “do” and what i, as a reader, am meant to “get” out of them. i liked a lot of moments in this story, i folded over a few pages because of an especially lovely turn of phrase or insight, but i’m not sure what, if anything, it left me with. for a story that ends with the words Yeah. I know, i really really don’t. Lunch with the Person Who Dumped You ★★★★☆another little bitty comedic interlude of a story. it’s that thing when you’re meeting someone for dinner but you’re hungry NOW and you shove whatever’s handy into your face to tide you over and it’s not that you don’t enjoy the eating of it but you’re really ready for dinner to happen.RUFUS ★★★★★this is dinner happening. this is the story that started turning it around for me. fun fact: i don't usually love dog-voiced stories, but this one made me smile and got me all soft in the heart. in a book filled with love stories, this one--about the waxing and waning of a human romance seen through the fuzzy filter of doggy-understanding -- this is the one that got me a little choked up.ManMonster scratches my back and he makes a noise like, "Rufus rufus rufus." And I know that noise "Rufus" can mean many things. Sometimes "Rufus" means "I am happy to see you" and sometimes it means "I am upset," and this time I discern that it means both things at once.he is Goodog.Rules for Taboo ★★★★☆another tiny (3-page) story, but coming as it did after a GREAT story, i was more pleasantly disposed towards it. on the one hand, this story is an instruction-booklet for how to play the board game taboo. on the other hand, it's an instruction-booklet for why couples shouldn't play games, in mixed company, that encourage the sharing of personal history because what begins as an innocent night of fun can quickly turn into an airing of grievances and too much insight into a relationship's stress fractures. also: title-sighting! Up-and-Comers ★★★★★this one is the one. my favorite. it has so much energy and is so much fun. it’s one of the longest ones in the collection (it might even be the longest - it’s either this or the penultimate story, but i REFUSE to do any math/research into the matter because i am LEARNING how to be more judicious about my time expenditures - have you even NOTICED the lack of pictures?) if you know me, you might think it is strange that my favorite story in this collection is about the exploits of a rock band who are also superheroes. i know me and i think it is strange, but it is more about the very small and ordinary human things that are happening underneath all the flash and glamor of being in a rock band and being superheroes and it is deeply moving and sweet in its most quietly uneventful moments and it got me all over. this isn’t true spoiler, but it is a maybe-spoiler to someone because it is the end of the story. it doesn’t, you know, reveal the name of the murderer or anything. also, spoiler alert, there isn’t a murderer.i just liked it. so i typed it.(view spoiler)[I remember one time I asked Iris if she was afraid to die. This was when we were trapped in the Man-Pig Pit of Dimension K and it really looked like we might not make it home. Iris said, afraid or not, it didn't really matter. That the thing about death is that it's terrifying and overwhelming and it can happen at any moment. And when we're confronted with death we can either be cowardly or we can be brave, but either way we're going to die, so...And I thought, Whoa, that's dark.But here I was, sitting in my childhood bedroom with a guitar. The Up-and-comers were over and done with and it was just Lizzy and me and it was the afternoon and it was summer in Tulsa and Lizzy was lying on my bed, looking as calm and beautiful as I had ever seen her, and she was asking me to play her something I had written.And I thought about how, actually, if you wanted to, you could say the same thing about life. That life is terrifying and overwhelming and it can happen at any moment. And when you're confronted with life you can either be cowardly or you can be brave, but either way you're going to live.So you might as well be brave. (hide spoiler)]Move across the country ★★★★☆another l’il shorty: 2 pages, second-person, a short sad circle about the self-defeating patterns of behavior in a depressive cycle - recognizing the ways in which it causes relationships to end but unable to avoid it happening again and again - but maybe it will be different this time. snakes rattling in a can.You Want to Know What Plays Are Like? ★★★★★i did not think i was going to like this one. it seemed gimmicky - ANOTHER second person pov, right on the heels of the ministory preceding it, plus a theater-focus, but then it really expanded into something… else and became a funny-sad little powerbomb of a story, one of the strongest in the collection.I TOLD YOU IT WAS GOING TO GET BETTER! are you still here? probably not, but that’s fine, now i can just talk about you behind your back.the poem ★★★☆☆i don’t have any feelings about this one, but i will say that he manages his rhyme scheme and scansion much better than lang leav ever has.The Average of All Possible Things ★★★★★yes, this one YEEEEESSSSSSSS!! sooo, this one maybe hit a little too close to home. not necessarily the details, but the feels. like lucinda, i am regular, and average, and boring, and fine. and my life and opportunities and expectations? Everything was beige, and stucco, and fine.and all the other stuff?The truth was Lucinda never even wanted to work there in the first place; she just kind of fell into the position, the same way she seemed to always just kind of fall into everything. A person as unexceptional as Lucinda doesn't live a life as much as a life just floods in around her, filling up whatever empty space a life should be occupying.that’s me in a nutshell these days. i’m not proud of this wallow, but things in my life are still trending sour. (since you’re not here anymore, i feel okay about being a little confessional and self-pitying) this story described so many of my moods, i just had to love it. More of the You That You Already Are ★★★★☆FRANKLIN PIERCE IS MENTIONED IN THIS STORY.that is all. We will be close on Friday 18 July ★★★★☆aaaaand the book closes with a one-page downer of a story. which is the perfect way to end a book. this book, any book.so you see - (not that you are still here to see) - now that i have finished reviewing this, i’ve already forgotten reviewing, let alone reading the earlier, less-satisfying stories, and i’m left with an overall glow of appreciation for this book.and maybe you have saved a life or birthed a baby or prevented a crime and made a more lasting contribution to the world in the time it took me to self-indulgently prattle on about all of my thoughts and feels about some short stories, but iiiii did all this while wearing a onesie with a monkey on it, so i win the cozy trophy. * bojack the show. this feel more like a diane moment. HOLY SHIT I JUST REALIZED WHAT A NERD I AM!!!come to my blog!
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    Spectacular. Bob-Waksberg debuts with a delightfully strange and darkly funny collection. While reading "love stories" about drunk superheroes, sacrificial weddings, inverted universes, and theme parks of dead presidents, a lump caught in my throat, a smile crept across my face, and I gasped, "I know exactly what that feels like!"
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  • Fatma
    January 1, 1970
    like a 2.5 stars?i wanted to like this a lot more than i actually did. i think the only story i genuinely enjoyed was the last one. other than that, the stories were okay. they had their standout moments, but as a whole, they werent very standout themselves. ps: the audiobook is excellent!!! stephanie beatriz is in it!!! and a whole lot of other really excellent narrators!!
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  • Toni Smith
    January 1, 1970
    So weird and wonderful. Laugh-in-public funny. Always remember to hire a professional goat slaughterer.
  • Emily Tyler
    January 1, 1970
    5 stars!I picked up this ARC in the break room of the bookstore I work at because the title is cool and intriguing and the cover is kind of weird. I didn't know what to expect, and I was a little nervous going it, but I throughly enjoyed reading this short story collection.One of my favorite things about this as a collection is that each of the stories are so distinct. Most of them take place in the world as we know it, but often with a twist that is so out of left-field (one of my favorites is 5 stars!I picked up this ARC in the break room of the bookstore I work at because the title is cool and intriguing and the cover is kind of weird. I didn't know what to expect, and I was a little nervous going it, but I throughly enjoyed reading this short story collection.One of my favorite things about this as a collection is that each of the stories are so distinct. Most of them take place in the world as we know it, but often with a twist that is so out of left-field (one of my favorites is the presidential theme park), but the characters and storytelling make it seem like just another quirk of the world that everyone takes for granted. Although they are all so wildly different, these stories make sense together. I don't know why or how, but the cohesiveness is another thing I love about this book/concept.My favorites are "Lies We Told Each Other (a partial list)", "Lunch with the Person Who Dumped You", "Rules For Taboo", and "The Average of All Possible Things". That being said, I did enjoy every story in the book (obviously). If you want to read something weird that will make you go "huh," I can't recommend this short story collection enough.
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  • Zélia Padilha
    January 1, 1970
    Raphael knows love like no one else. And he knows good writing. When you mix those two things, you have a powerful and dangerous combination. Because with some short stories, or even paragraphs, Raphael can make you FEEL things. Access feelings you didn't realize you had until now. He can make you remember people, sensations and times of your life when you were happier or sadder, it all depends on where you are in the present. And that's so magical. That's what books are made of. He was able to Raphael knows love like no one else. And he knows good writing. When you mix those two things, you have a powerful and dangerous combination. Because with some short stories, or even paragraphs, Raphael can make you FEEL things. Access feelings you didn't realize you had until now. He can make you remember people, sensations and times of your life when you were happier or sadder, it all depends on where you are in the present. And that's so magical. That's what books are made of. He was able to do that in the form of the sad cartoon horse. And now he's done it again. You're going to experience love, pain, sadness, and also joy in so many different forms that you'll end up these 18 stories wishing that there was more.
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  • Tory
    January 1, 1970
    Part humor, part heart, part satire, part real, part earnest, part cynical, and hella hella enjoyable. Laugh out loud but also sometimes remarkably poignant and insightful. I'm so impressed. I've never watched Bojack Horseman but I'm going to now!RUFUS. ❤❤❤
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  • Alyssa
    January 1, 1970
    I read an Atlantic article about this book, and it was laudatory enough to make me think about reading this collection. I then saw the author in person at a publicity event. Raphael Bob-Waksberg came across as emotionally intelligent and funny, and peers of his (Jonny Sun and others) lauded him too, so I bought the book. Perhaps my expectations for this particular book were too high -- in his publicity event, Bob-Waksberg talked confidently (if sarcastically) about how he was a good writer. And I read an Atlantic article about this book, and it was laudatory enough to make me think about reading this collection. I then saw the author in person at a publicity event. Raphael Bob-Waksberg came across as emotionally intelligent and funny, and peers of his (Jonny Sun and others) lauded him too, so I bought the book. Perhaps my expectations for this particular book were too high -- in his publicity event, Bob-Waksberg talked confidently (if sarcastically) about how he was a good writer. And I'd already read a lot of nice things about it. Perhaps, also, my standards are too high. I love short stories, and I read a lot of them. I particularly love Keret, Kishon, and Murakami's various collections of shorts. Regardless, I was surprised that this book was largely terrible. I'm sorry to say it, because Bob-Waksberg really came off as a nice person. But most of the stories in this collection are trite, over-contrived, and cliche. Bob-Waksberg uses over-detailed absurdity in some of the short stories -- in the first two stories, it was funny. But he did it in short story after short story, making it an annoying hack, a cheap trick to replace substance. To his credit, Bob-Waksberg is creative; a lot of the story ideas are inventive and fun. But his execution of these ideas is mediocre and uncompelling. People have lauded his book as emotionally resonant, but I personally don't find this to be true -- at least, not compared with masters of subtle emotional evocativeness like Keret and Murakami. In terms of comedy, I guess I have also been spoiled by the causal satirical brilliance of Kishon. I am surprised this book has had such a good reception thus far, and I am honestly confused by it. For readers yearning for what this book, in those many positive reviews, claims to be, I suggest reading one of the three guys I mentioned above. Keret's stories accurately depict emotions that cannot easily be said, while Bob-Waksberg's leave me disappointed.
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  • Chris Browning
    January 1, 1970
    I was hesitant going into this one - on the one hand, I like Bojack Horseman (even if it has a predilection to being more tell-y than show-y; sometimes i feel like it was tailor-made for screenshots with subtitles of some quote about being a depressed person ), on the other, I felt like this had all the likelihood of being a Saunders pastiche. The verdict? It's a good thing I still like Saunders pastiche! That's a littleness reductive, of course, as Bob-Waksberg only commits one egregious sin in I was hesitant going into this one - on the one hand, I like Bojack Horseman (even if it has a predilection to being more tell-y than show-y; sometimes i feel like it was tailor-made for screenshots with subtitles of some quote about being a depressed person ), on the other, I felt like this had all the likelihood of being a Saunders pastiche. The verdict? It's a good thing I still like Saunders pastiche! That's a littleness reductive, of course, as Bob-Waksberg only commits one egregious sin in this collection and that comes in "Rufus." Yes, it emotionally affected me more than any story in this collection, but that's because it's far too targeted; any writer who writes a story from the POV of a dog knows exactly what they're doing and the embracing of such unadulterated sentimentality is gross to me (yes, I fall for it, but I don't like falling for it). Otherwise, this is good! Yes, BW relies too much on over-capitalization of words and yes, there is a very Saundersian set-up in the collection's longest story ("More of the You That You Already Are") but the crucial moment comes in that story's climax where the narrator sidesteps the absurdity. Saunders would have embraced it, and although the story ends in about the same place I'd expect either way, I think the strength of BW is knowing when to stop. Formal experiments like Craigslist Missed Connection narratives, a somewhat-rhyming poem, and the expansion of Rupi Kaur-esque writing in "Lies We Told Each Other" mostly work, and the overall theme of love in different forms comes through strong (if nothing else, this is an exceptionally thematically unified collection of stories). Plus I think it's nice that both of BW's grandmothers get a blurb on the back cover. Not necessarily any better than I was expecting it to be, but solid and worth my time. 3.5 stars, rounded up out of general goodwill.
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  • Shauna
    January 1, 1970
    I say this in every review I do of short story collections, but I don't like short stories. I always feel like I need to put that out there to give the review context. I don't like the process of getting to know the characters and the situation and then having to do it all over again 15 pages later.But that's why, if I am reading short stories, I want them to be weird. I want them to involve bizarre scenarios that get me invested right away. So reading this book worked out! My favorites involved I say this in every review I do of short story collections, but I don't like short stories. I always feel like I need to put that out there to give the review context. I don't like the process of getting to know the characters and the situation and then having to do it all over again 15 pages later.But that's why, if I am reading short stories, I want them to be weird. I want them to involve bizarre scenarios that get me invested right away. So reading this book worked out! My favorites involved the one about strange and sacrificial wedding rituals and the one about an amusement park of U.S. presidents. But there were some non-bizarre ones that I liked, too. They were all thoughtful in their own ways.There were others I didn't care for as much, either because they weren't bizarre enough for me or they just didn't resonate with me. (One of them was in the form of a poem, and if there's anything I hate more than short stories, it's poetry. Admittedly it was done in a creative way, and I get it, but. Don't do this to me, book.) But this gets five stars no matter what because as a teenager I was a big fan of the author's comedy sketches and I've followed his career every since. And every now and then while reading this I'd come across something funny that would be so reminiscent of the exact brand of humor of those sketches, which are nostalgic for me at this point. So for that, and for the stories I loved (not to mention meeting the author at a signing and learning he's as nice as he always seemed?!), five stars.
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  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    finished this in one sitting today on my flight from nyc to la! it was a fun read, and i generally enjoyed these stories - i liked salted circus cashews, missed connection, the serial monogamist's guide to important nyc landmarks, lunch with the person who dumped you, you want to know what plays are like? i actually didn't like most of his longer stories, and i intensely disliked more of the you that you already are, but i'm not sure exactly why. i loved and appreciated the level of detail he in finished this in one sitting today on my flight from nyc to la! it was a fun read, and i generally enjoyed these stories - i liked salted circus cashews, missed connection, the serial monogamist's guide to important nyc landmarks, lunch with the person who dumped you, you want to know what plays are like? i actually didn't like most of his longer stories, and i intensely disliked more of the you that you already are, but i'm not sure exactly why. i loved and appreciated the level of detail he included in each piece, which made them all the more relatable and believable, and his sense of humour is so evident throughout the collection. while each character had their own voice and pov and mannerisms etc, his distinct voice (and humour) also very much came through. again, while i liked this, i think i may have enjoyed it more if i had read it on 2-3 separate occasions rather than straight through. i also feel like many of the stories ended unnaturally, with a contrived statement, trying to convey some sort of greater theme/message. not sure if just me, but that was something i disliked immensely.
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  • Cindy
    January 1, 1970
    Inventive and, at times, funny short stories about love, life and relationships. Raphael Bob-Waksberg (of BoJack Horseman fame) plumbs our emotional depths while entertaining with clever wordplay: reimagining engagement pressure in antiquity; the behind-the-scenes lives of career superheroes; our world through a dog’s perspective. He has a talent for intuiting the lies we tell to ourselves and to others. Only “We Men of Science” seemed to bog down / go on too long, as poignant as it was. Well na Inventive and, at times, funny short stories about love, life and relationships. Raphael Bob-Waksberg (of BoJack Horseman fame) plumbs our emotional depths while entertaining with clever wordplay: reimagining engagement pressure in antiquity; the behind-the-scenes lives of career superheroes; our world through a dog’s perspective. He has a talent for intuiting the lies we tell to ourselves and to others. Only “We Men of Science” seemed to bog down / go on too long, as poignant as it was. Well narrated by the author and his friends.
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  • whitney
    January 1, 1970
    Love bojack so of course I had to read this immediately and I liked it overall but I felt the stories about family were more impactful than the ones about romance, and the ones with more straightforward format were more effective to me than the ones with a framing gimmick (lists, rules, poems). I particularly loved the second to last story because it made me laugh out loud a couple times for real. It was also fun for me to be able to sense parts of the ethos of Bojack in and around this collecti Love bojack so of course I had to read this immediately and I liked it overall but I felt the stories about family were more impactful than the ones about romance, and the ones with more straightforward format were more effective to me than the ones with a framing gimmick (lists, rules, poems). I particularly loved the second to last story because it made me laugh out loud a couple times for real. It was also fun for me to be able to sense parts of the ethos of Bojack in and around this collection, one of my all time favorite shows & best shows in existence period! Thenks father for my life
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  • Delany Holcomb
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't know I could feel so much through so many different stories and writing styles, but that's exactly what Raphael Bob-Waksberg has done to me with "Someone Who Will Love You in All Your Damaged Glory". Each story has its own air of honest individualism and flowing through each one of Bob-Waksberg's tales is like having waves crash into you, one after the other. If you've seen Bob-Waksberg's show "Bojack Horseman" you will absolutely adore his writing in this smorgasbord of short stories.
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  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    The audiobook is highly recommended for this one. It reads so casually and the jokes hit harder when it isn't told to me by the voice in my own head. Many of the stories had a clear, relatable message about love and life, though some were hard misses for me. I especially enjoyed "A Most Blessed and Auspicious Occasion""The Serial Monogamist's Guide to Important New York City Landmarks""rufus.""Move Across the Country.""More of the You That You Already Are"
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  • Talia
    January 1, 1970
    This was just wonderful. I think short stories are particularly difficult to write well because they have to throw you into the world with well-developed characters and basically no room for exposition. Each of these stories handled that excellently. The collection reminded me a bit of BJ Novak's book of short stories, which I also really loved. The stories are a good blend of humor and genuine emotion.
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  • Quin
    January 1, 1970
    It's hard to review a short story collection, because nothing can describe all of them. But many of these I found incredibly endearing, and many formally fascinating. Favorites: A Most Blessed and Auspicious Occasion; Missed Connection--m4w; Rufus; Rules for Taboo; More of the You That You Already Are; We will be close on Friday 18 July
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  • Micki Boden
    January 1, 1970
    It’s a fun book but the shift in length and tone between stories is a little too jarring. My favorites were “the serial monogamist’s guide to important New York City landmarks” and “lunch with the person who dumped you.”
  • Shauna
    January 1, 1970
    Did I love every single story? No. But almost, and that’s more than I can say for basically every other short story collection I’ve read. I audibly laughed on multiple occasions, and felt some feelings, and even did both simultaneously a few times.
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  • Madi
    January 1, 1970
    "And it kills me that this is all the normal, typical people-in-love stuff, because I want to believe our love is special- that it's bigger and more interesting than any love that anyone else had before- but the heartbreaking truth is my love for you is so consistent and predictable and boring."
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  • Chris O'Neill
    January 1, 1970
    i was amused often but also shed a tear once while reading in the library (which might be more a reflection of myself) but anyway this book was really good! some of the stories are definitely a bit absurdist, but others aren't. wait am i reviewing the audible version oh noanyway yes i recommend
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  • Matt Miles
    January 1, 1970
    Every now and then, not always, the title of a book will come across to me as a sort of promise I hope the contents live up to. Through use of humor, sadness, and insight into all manners of human relationships, the absurd yet emotionally grounded stories more than make good on that promise.
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  • Squeasel
    January 1, 1970
    Maybe 4 stars, maybe 5. I can't tell if it feels like it's going to settle down at 4, or keep poking at me that it's really a 5 after all? Not that you probably needed to know that. It feels like it comes from the same planet as Joey Comeau stuff, and I consider that a good thing.
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  • Alexis
    January 1, 1970
    Strong four for the stories on average (DIED at most, a few were underwhelming), strong six for the cast of excellent narrators.(One of my Best of 2019 so far picks at Paste: https://www.pastemagazine.com/article...)
  • Alex
    January 1, 1970
    Observant, amusing, lighter than a packet of 3 musketeers
  • Alex Piatski
    January 1, 1970
    A few gems. Came in expecting Bojack Horseman in book form. Got it over and over again. It just got a bit repetitive.
  • Molly
    January 1, 1970
    Perfect and funny and wonderful and everything you would expect from the creator of Bojack Horseman.
  • Jason Seligson
    January 1, 1970
    A wonderful collection of short stories by one of my favorite comedy writers.
  • Annie Blum
    January 1, 1970
    Some of these stories were good and a large number of them were incredible. The last 5 all broke my heart.
  • Jason Pangilinan
    January 1, 1970
    Impossibly specific yet heart-shatteringly relatable. Read this in a day. It cleansed me.
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