The Threat
On March 16, 2018, just twenty-six hours before his scheduled retirement from the organization he had served with distinction for more than two decades, Andrew G. McCabe was fired from his position as deputy director of the FBI. President Donald Trump celebrated on Twitter: "Andrew McCabe FIRED, a great day for the hard working men and women of the FBI - A great day for Democracy."In The Threat: How the FBI Protects America in the Age of Terror and Trump, Andrew G. McCabe offers a dramatic and candid account of his career, and an impassioned defense of the FBI's agents, and of the institution's integrity and independence in protecting America and upholding our Constitution.McCabe started as a street agent in the FBI's New York field office, serving under director Louis Freeh. He became an expert in two kinds of investigations that are critical to American national security: Russian organized crime—which is inextricably linked to the Russian state—and terrorism. Under Director Robert Mueller, McCabe led the investigations of major attacks on American soil, including the Boston Marathon bombing, a plot to bomb the New York subways, and several narrowly averted bombings of aircraft. And under James Comey, McCabe was deeply involved in the controversial investigations of the Benghazi attack, the Clinton Foundation's activities, and Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server when she was secretary of state.The Threat recounts in compelling detail the time between Donald Trump's November 2016 election and McCabe's firing, set against a page-turning narrative spanning two decades when the FBI's mission shifted to a new goal: preventing terrorist attacks on Americans. But as McCabe shows, right now the greatest threat to the United States comes from within, as President Trump and his administration ignore the law, attack democratic institutions, degrade human rights, and undermine the U.S. Constitution that protects every citizen. Important, revealing, and powerfully argued, The Threat tells the true story of what the FBI is, how it works, and why it will endure as an institution of integrity that protects America.

The Threat Details

TitleThe Threat
Author
ReleaseFeb 19th, 2019
PublisherSt. Martin's Press
Rating
GenrePolitics, Nonfiction, History, Biography Memoir

The Threat Review

  • John Bordeaux
    January 1, 1970
    Important background for what’s nextGood, short overview regarding some recent history of interest. More tales of decent people, trying to do the right thing. Chewed over by, and spit from, the maw of today’s political reality show.
  • Bettie☯
    January 1, 1970
    McCabe concerned about 'unfair treatment' after book release delayed by FBIFormer assistant director of the FBI Frank Figliuzzi, former US attorney Chuck Rosenberg, former federal prosecutor Paul Butler, The Daily Beast’s Sam Stein, and NBC’s Carol Lee on former Acting FBI director Andrew McCabe’s new tell all that gives insight into Rod Rosenstein’s memo on the firing of James ComeyFeb. 8, 2019
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  • Maggie
    January 1, 1970
    Well Written, Credible and Scary as HellI wanted to read this book. I don't know much about the inner workings of the FBI and I knew this would explain a lot. It tells McCabe's own personal story and tells us just how the FBI works.The tall tales that trump tells about Mueller, Comey and McCabe are refuted easily by this book. Knowing about the people who work there and the way they do things you will find that the idea of three Republican career FBI men being involved in a plot against the man Well Written, Credible and Scary as HellI wanted to read this book. I don't know much about the inner workings of the FBI and I knew this would explain a lot. It tells McCabe's own personal story and tells us just how the FBI works.The tall tales that trump tells about Mueller, Comey and McCabe are refuted easily by this book. Knowing about the people who work there and the way they do things you will find that the idea of three Republican career FBI men being involved in a plot against the man in the White House is ludicrous. You would be just as concerned as they were and just as alarmed. If you aren't as scared as I am, you aren't paying attention. Thank you Andrew McCabe for an excellent book.
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  • Rian Davis
    January 1, 1970
    Former Acting Director and Deputy Director of the FBI, Andrew McCabe has written book that has three parts: One that focuses on his career, another how the FBI operates in a post-911 world and why he thinks our democratic system is under threat both from within and without. After reading this book I agree with him on the third point.First, the career. McCabe talks about how he started wanting to work for the FBI despite getting a pay cut from his private practice and the sacrifices he made. He t Former Acting Director and Deputy Director of the FBI, Andrew McCabe has written book that has three parts: One that focuses on his career, another how the FBI operates in a post-911 world and why he thinks our democratic system is under threat both from within and without. After reading this book I agree with him on the third point.First, the career. McCabe talks about how he started wanting to work for the FBI despite getting a pay cut from his private practice and the sacrifices he made. He tells us that the FBI could have assigned him anywhere in the USA, but he ended up in New York City. Interestingly, he started his career investigating organized Russian crime because at the time, the main focus was Italian, and the Russian criminals seemed less of a threat. It would be organized Russian crime that would lead to his termination at the end of his career. He states that the Russian government and organized crime are essentially interchangeable. After reading numerous books about modern-day Russia, I must say that picture is accurate. Even in the news today, we get reports of an American businessman,Michael Calvey, being arrested in Russia. The big takeaway here is that 1) he made a sacrifice of his potential earnings to serve his country in the FBI role 2) Russia has become a bigger threat because the players there have serious money and power that could disrupt our Democratic institutions. He makes a case at the end saying how it is imperative that we keep attracting the best talent to the FBI and other government work because we rely on them to maintain our way of life.Second, he lays out how investigations work with organized crime and counter-terrorism. This part I found fascinating, and I was really impressed with how things are handled. Obviously, the FBI has stumbles here and there, but as a citizen it is good to know what is happening in the background when I read news about FBI activities, such as high-profile arrests. The picture he paints is one of dedicated professionalism. Last, and most controversially, he lays a case against the President, Donald Trump. He does not really even try to seem fair and impartial here, but I cannot say I blame him after all that Trump has said and done to him and his family. Normally, I would knock a star off for this kind of one-sidedness, but I will knock only half a star since I cannot really fault him, but it would be nice to have what he felt was the "other side" even though I doubt McCabe would say he could find one. What about future presidents? Is there a possibility a "bad actor" within the FBI could influence the president in some way via an investigation or damaging information? It was Nixon who bitterly complained about J. Edgar Hoover, when he said, "Hoover's got files on everybody god****t". I think a little more could have been done to dispel this argument. Nonetheless, the portrait he paints of Trump is dark and compelling. Throughout the book, he scatters hints about Trump's bad deeds, such as the well-publicized link between the Trump organization and Russian mafia types who bring laundered money in to purchase assets in Trump's real estate. Being an avid reader of other books about the dangers and inner workings of Trump (such as Fear and Team of Vipers), this was another interesting look at Trump's inner circle. After reading various books on the background of Trump, especially David Cay Johnston's It's Even Worse than You Think that goes into detail about Trump's relationships with Russians, I must say this is a dangerous time in government. It becomes obvious that Trump has hidden some dark secrets from the public, and I am sure that someday the whole Truth will come out. I also believe that after this presidency we need a way to separate the presidency from the Department of Justice, and especially the FBI somehow so that presidential interference cannot happen this way again.Overall, this is a highly-recommended look at how important our justice system is and how it is (and can be in the future) undermined by our elected officials. Voters would do well to read it to become better informed. 4.5 stars, rounded to 5
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  • Eric Allen
    January 1, 1970
    I bought this book, mostly, because I felt sorry for McCabe being fired 26 hours before he was eligible to receive his full retirement benefits in a malicious, and spiteful attack by Donald Trump, and wanted to pitch in the cover price of the book to help him out. I make no secret of the fact that I absolutely despise Trump and wish many horrible things that it is currently illegal to voice aloud to befall him. But I don't go out and read every book that comes out about him. I don't need a book I bought this book, mostly, because I felt sorry for McCabe being fired 26 hours before he was eligible to receive his full retirement benefits in a malicious, and spiteful attack by Donald Trump, and wanted to pitch in the cover price of the book to help him out. I make no secret of the fact that I absolutely despise Trump and wish many horrible things that it is currently illegal to voice aloud to befall him. But I don't go out and read every book that comes out about him. I don't need a book to tell me what a horrible excuse for a human being he is. All I have to do is sit down and turn on the news, or open my laptop and I get blasted with whatever horrible thing he said or did today until my eyes bleed. The exceptions have been James Comey's book A Higher Loyalty, which I bought for the same reason I bought this one, and Bob Woodward's Fear: Trump in the Whitehouse, because I am something of a Woodward fan, and I was curious to see his take on Trump. What I wasn't expecting was for this book to be good. Like, actually, genuinely good. McCabe is a competent writer, though I understand he had the help of a writing team for this book to polish it up for him. But it's not really the writing that makes the book good, more the way he goes about telling his story. He gives a very in-depth look at how the FBI operates, and how they go about investigations that I found to be pretty fascinating. The majority of the book is about McCabe's career, first in going after Russian organized crime in the USA and then in counterterrorism after 9/11. He lays out exactly how the FBI finds and investigates terrorists and to me, at least, it was extremely interesting. He also has a pretty good sense of humor. I mean, he's not cracking jokes while talking about hunting down terrorists or FBI procedure, but he puts just the right amount of sarcasm, gallows humor, and wisecracks in to bring some much-needed levity to the things he's describing.As you can imagine, the last quarter of the book or so is epically damning of Donald Trump. But, really, can you blame him after what Trump did to him? I'd be out for blood were I in his position. Someone would bleed for that. But at the same time, he puts his dislike of Trump in the context of investigating him, and his campaign, taking a look at everything that happened between them through the eyes of an investigator. Though the last few paragraphs are a pretty harsh and personal condemnation of Trump. If you're at all interested in how the FBI operates, as told by a man who spent over 20 years as an FBI agent, you'll probably really enjoy this book. Just be aware that it does get political at the end. If you're not so much into that sort of thing, you may want to skip this one, or stop reading when he gets to Trump.
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  • Nick Smith
    January 1, 1970
    After I checked out this book at the library, I kept hearing people on TV saying things like this:"Andrew McCabe's new book, which doesn't come out until Tuesday..."And so, I thought, wait - I have this book in my hands. It's here. So - did I get a copy of the book BEFORE the release date? And as I heard more talking heads confirming that it "doesn't come out until Tuesday," I simply counted myself lucky that I had a chance to read it!And I wasn't disappointed. McCabe uses this book to explain w After I checked out this book at the library, I kept hearing people on TV saying things like this:"Andrew McCabe's new book, which doesn't come out until Tuesday..."And so, I thought, wait - I have this book in my hands. It's here. So - did I get a copy of the book BEFORE the release date? And as I heard more talking heads confirming that it "doesn't come out until Tuesday," I simply counted myself lucky that I had a chance to read it!And I wasn't disappointed. McCabe uses this book to explain what the FBI does, how it does it, from working cases to refraining from any political considerations at all, and how it saves lives and brings down terrorists, mobsters, and criminals. We hear what it was like to be in the FBI after 9/11 happened, when the Boston Marathon bombing happened, and in moments of heated political controversy like the Benghazi investigations and the intersection of Donald Trump with the federal government of the United States.We hear also, about the Mueller investigation. About working "the Russia case." About the events which sparked it, the moment of Comey's firing, the frenetic, fraught conversations in which Deputy A.G. Rod Rosenstein thought rapidly about wearing a wire to surveil the President, or invoking the Twenty-Fifth Amendment to remove the President. (Those last two ideas never were seriously considered, but were instead part of that frantic time of seeing direct evidence of a suggestion of obstruction of justice when the President may have been trying to shut down the Russia investigation). But even though they were never implemented, those options of that heady time are a great descriptor of just how momentous a time in history we are experiencing, of just how massive the considerations of impropriety and the undermining of public institutions such as the FBI really are, and will continue to live on in history books forever after.I do believe in the FBI, and it has angered me to see this gradual withering by the President, who says the Mueller investigation is a "witch hunt," and who attacks the Director (Comey), the Acting Director (McCabe), and also people like Peter Strzok, Lisa Page, and Jeff Sessions. I've always trusted the FBI. McCabe makes clear several times in this book that the primary role of the Bureau is to uphold the Constitution and investigate crimes.You do get an in-depth perspective of different types of cases, from counterterrorism to counterintelligence, and how an agent works a case, how the team at the FBI interacts with each other and with the Justice Department and yes, sometimes Congress and the President. But you also see what it does NOT do - from following political considerations to having much interactions at all with the President. They don't use political concerns EVER. They just collect intelligence, which assists prosecutions, and keeps us all safe. I feel safe at night, knowing they're out there. And our democracy, although it has undertaken a tremendous corrosive erosion during the current Administration, will survive and hopefully will get back to its former status seen in the eyes of our allies and the world.It's a quick, easy read. If you wonder about it at all, just get it and read it. It's really compelling, and I've heard other people say the same thing. Five stars. Timely. Outstanding.
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  • Thomas Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    The book read like a page turner. It was great to learn all the background processes that go into FBI investigations. TV shows don't really tell all the truth. McCabe was also an excellent writer. Often government officials need help with that. Apparently he didn't.I was particularly struck by his descriptions of the confusion and lack of decorum he experience when dealing with Sessions and Trump. The little schoolboy chairs that Trump had set up in front of his desk for people to sit in. The wh The book read like a page turner. It was great to learn all the background processes that go into FBI investigations. TV shows don't really tell all the truth. McCabe was also an excellent writer. Often government officials need help with that. Apparently he didn't.I was particularly struck by his descriptions of the confusion and lack of decorum he experience when dealing with Sessions and Trump. The little schoolboy chairs that Trump had set up in front of his desk for people to sit in. The whiplash of interviewing for the job of FBI director one day and getting hammered by Trump on Twitter the next. What it must be like to actually have to report to a president who runs the administration like a criminal enterprise. A page turner, but hard to read in another way. What we have been learning about Trump is worse than we thought.
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  • Donna Hewell
    January 1, 1970
    Herein lies a responsibility to readersMr McCabe ' s words, his straight forward disclosures of the realities of our American democracy and the threats to its survival, resounded with me personally. A wakeup call. Why do I read and internalize comments on facebook? Why do I let those loose ramblings affect my emotions? I have respect for our government institutions and feel a personal responsibility to support them, much as I feel protected and supported by them. Sometimes there are rotten apple Herein lies a responsibility to readersMr McCabe ' s words, his straight forward disclosures of the realities of our American democracy and the threats to its survival, resounded with me personally. A wakeup call. Why do I read and internalize comments on facebook? Why do I let those loose ramblings affect my emotions? I have respect for our government institutions and feel a personal responsibility to support them, much as I feel protected and supported by them. Sometimes there are rotten apples in the barrel but we, as responsible citizens, have the privilege and responsibility to remove them. I observe a lot of labeling. I have been personally labeled on facebook in ways that do not reflect my beliefs at all. I am not a Republican. I am not a Democrat. I do vote in every election. My focus is to choose each candidate carefully based on whether I believe that person is making their decisions based on what is the best choice for the good of all. I completely trust Andrew McCabe's revelations in this book and thank him for presenting them so clearly.
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  • Douglas Pierre
    January 1, 1970
    A must read. This is a well written, easy to read a book. McCabe comes across as a conscientious and honest FBI agent. Even if you, like I have, tried to keep up with all aspects of the Russia case from day one, this book is well worth your time. You will see how the people of the FBI work very hard to protect the country and how the President is having a detrimental effect on one of America's great institutions.
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  • Ian
    January 1, 1970
    Not what I expected based on media reports of the book, which is a plus. This is much more about how FBI operates from training to all the levels of investigation and oversight then it is specifically about Trump related matters. I think that is a positive and makes it a good read. There is enough to learn about both the happenings to Comey and McCabe if that's your interest but worth reading even if you think you can not learn more than what was reported about this book.
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  • Sandra
    January 1, 1970
    Just finished. This is by far the best book I’ve read of this milieu! It rings of authenticity. Very heartening to hear the story of someone who didn’t get sullied by working beside the vicious, mean spirited filth of the Trump administration. Must read for Americans who care about what this country stands for (even when we’ve failed miserably at it at times.)
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  • SC
    January 1, 1970
    So McCabe comes out on national TV and admits that he was part of an organized coup to overthrow the President of the United States. How is it that people can continue to swallow this Deep State propaganda? The Threat is real and it is the author of this book and his fellow three-letter agency goons.
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  • Douglas G.
    January 1, 1970
    Progressives who despise the current national administration will find this book illuminating, though there will be those who think the author has been discredited. Watching him on television promoting his book, however, will find him credible.
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