Unraveling
In this standalone fantasy novel by an award-winning author, the dark truth behind a string of unusual murders leads to an otherworldly exploration of spirits, myth, and memory, steeped in Caribbean storytelling.Dr. Miranda Ecouvo, forensic therapist of the City, just helped put a serial killer behind bars. But she soon discovers that her investigation into seven unusual murders is not yet complete. A near-death experience throws her out of time and into a realm of labyrinths and spirits. There, she encounters brothers Chance and the Trickster, who have an otherworldly interest in the seemingly mundane crimes from her files.It appears the true mastermind behind the murders is still on the loose, chasing a myth to achieve immortality. Together, Miranda, Chance, and the Trickster must travel through conjured mazes, following threads of memory to locate the shadowy killer. As they journey deeper, they discover even more questions that will take pain and patience to answer. What is the price of power? Where is the path to redemption? And how can they stop the man--or monster--who would kill the innocent to live forever?

Unraveling Details

TitleUnraveling
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 4th, 2019
PublisherDaw Books
ISBN-139780756415204
Rating
GenreFantasy, Mystery, Fiction, Science Fiction, Science Fiction Fantasy

Unraveling Review

  • karen
    January 1, 1970
    NOW AVAILABLE!! if you’re going to read ONE african mythology-infused fantasy novel with magical portals, bloody dismemberments, shapeshifting, immortal beings, and a murder mystery that throws you in the middle of its world with zero regard for your comfort… probably read Black Leopard, Red Wolf. that’s glib, but the comparison is worth mentioning. i love marlon james, and i’m willing to work for his ‘catch me if you can’ brand of storytelling, but reading that book fulfilled my quota of madden NOW AVAILABLE!! if you’re going to read ONE african mythology-infused fantasy novel with magical portals, bloody dismemberments, shapeshifting, immortal beings, and a murder mystery that throws you in the middle of its world with zero regard for your comfort… probably read Black Leopard, Red Wolf. that’s glib, but the comparison is worth mentioning. i love marlon james, and i’m willing to work for his ‘catch me if you can’ brand of storytelling, but reading that book fulfilled my quota of maddeningly confusing fantasy novels for the year. blrw requires the reader’s close attention and critical engagement throughout, otherwise, it can be easy to get bogged down and lost. this book is the same kind of disorienting, but it never came together for me, even though i kept going back and rereading chunks of it, trying to find where i’d lost the thread.i suspect a lot of my confusion would have been avoided by reading Redemption in Indigo first. ten years is a long time to wait before writing a follow-up, and this lists as a standalone novel, but several of the characters were introduced in RII, and this book takes for granted that you are either already familiar with or can effortlessly wrap your head around its fantasy bits, and i am simply not that reader.i don’t think the word ‘standalone’ should ever be applied to a book set in a fantasy realm. because while the story itself may be a standalone, the specifics of the world are crucial for comprehension and enjoyment.‘cuz it would be fine if this book was about jimmy the baker and the first book was all about his bakery and all the fine loaves he baked therein. and if the readerly WE were only reading the second book featuring jimmy the baker and he made mention of the previous loaves in his life, we would be able to interpolate our own bread-related memories or experiences into the story and we would probably be a-ok. but this? this is about undying/immortal creatures and angels and a goddess and mindpaths and essences and amulets and I DON’T KNOW HOW THIS WORKS. but then, neither do the characters:The Trickster closed his eyes, pondering. “I can’t explain it. I barely understand the theory of how amulets work. I know a lot depends on human choice. I also know that there are some events—both those in the past and those yet to come by human reckoning—that are already completed, and others that are waiting for a choice to be made. Change or thwart those choices, and you change the world—past and future.”“There is no way I am going to understand that, is there?” She wagged her head in tired defeat. same. i enjoyed the parts i did understand—which was more of the book than this review is implying—and she does good word-work:The murmur and chatter had the disconcerting normality of a cocktail party hum, and the vague background surged and shifted with the turgid ennui of a crowd of people assembled to elegantly waste time (o, that assonance)but, yeah, i struggled with the conceptual foundation. and i hear you scolding me - 'karen, you have owned Redemption in Indigo for years. it’s your own damn fault you didn’t read it.' we all agree i am a dummy. you are probably better at fantasy than i am and this book will not trip you up the way it tripped me up. OR, to avoid being me, all bewildered and mewling, there are three weeks before this book comes out and Redemption in Indigo is < 200 pages. you can do it.******************************IS this a standalone? because it doesn't FEEL like a standalone! i am about 60 pages in and i am LOST!come to my blog!
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  • Monika Sadowski
    January 1, 1970
    I am not going to lie but I don’t know the author, so I picked this book only by looking at the cover page which seemed to me very intriguing. It’s a big maze with an eye in the middle. The main characters Dr. Miranda Ecouvo and two brothers Chance and Trickster have to go through the maze and solve complicated puzzles in order to catch a killer or rather confirmed that Walther Grey, Butcher of the City killed and mutilated 7 victims. I couldn’t get into the book on the beginning but when I did I am not going to lie but I don’t know the author, so I picked this book only by looking at the cover page which seemed to me very intriguing. It’s a big maze with an eye in the middle. The main characters Dr. Miranda Ecouvo and two brothers Chance and Trickster have to go through the maze and solve complicated puzzles in order to catch a killer or rather confirmed that Walther Grey, Butcher of the City killed and mutilated 7 victims. I couldn’t get into the book on the beginning but when I did I couldn’t stop. It’s difficult reading and needs a lot of attention because scenes change very quickly but it’s rewarding on the end. There is a lot of characters throughout the book so if someone likes challenging reading I recommend this one :).Thank you to First to Read and publisher for a free copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Carrie (brightbeautifulthings)
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free e-ARC through First to Read from the publishers at Penguin Random House. Trigger warnings: death, child death, body horror, dismemberment, severe injury, violence, blood, spiders.Dr. Miranda Ecouvo is a forensic therapist who helps people who have witnessed violent crime unravel the truth about what they’ve seen. She’s coming off one of the most gruesome cases The City has seen lately: a ritual murderer who dismembers his victims and keeps their body parts. However, when she’s I received a free e-ARC through First to Read from the publishers at Penguin Random House. Trigger warnings: death, child death, body horror, dismemberment, severe injury, violence, blood, spiders.Dr. Miranda Ecouvo is a forensic therapist who helps people who have witnessed violent crime unravel the truth about what they’ve seen. She’s coming off one of the most gruesome cases The City has seen lately: a ritual murderer who dismembers his victims and keeps their body parts. However, when she’s visited by Chance and the Trickster, two brother undying, she realizes that the murders may have been instigated by something other than human. The three of them follow the memories of various people involved in the case, bending both space and time, in the hopes that they can get close enough to the real killer to discover their identity and stop them before they complete the ritual and become immortal.This is one of the weirdest books in recent memory. We’re dropped abruptly into the story with little explanation into the plot or the world. While Unraveling claims to be a stand-alone fantasy novel, I kind of wish I had read Lord’s Redemption in Indigo first, if only to familiarize myself with the characters and the world-building. That being said, the plot itself is stand-alone, and it’s entirely possible to read it on its own, provided that readers are patient and don’t mind having all their questions answered immediately–if ever.The structure is gorgeously complicated as Miranda and the undying move in and out of timelines and imagined physical spaces. Very little of the plot actually takes place in the “real” world, and the timeline meanders into the memories of various minor characters, loops back on itself to see events play out again in a different way, and never manages to resemble anything close to linear. We’re always grounded by Miranda, Chance, or the Trickster’s perspectives, which keeps the novel from becoming too confusing. Again, it’s the kind of book that rewards patience and requires some thinking on the part of the reader to weave the many threads together into something intelligible.I’m new to Lord’s fiction, but I admire the restraint in her writing style. Her subject matter is complicated, and it would have been very easy for the language to be similarly complicated, which would likely render the novel utterly incoherent. Instead, the sentences themselves are clear and straightforward. I might not understand why things are happening, but I pretty much always knew what was happening, weird as it might be. I would encourage readers who want to experiment with nonlinear views of time and space to give it a try because, on the whole, it’s pretty accessible. In addition, it also presents Caribbean culture/mythology, which is a nice change from American/European fantasy.On an intellectual level, the novel has a lot of impact. On an emotional one, it fails to hit any sort of mark. Chance and the Trickster are unique and interesting. I admire Miranda’s faltering when confronted with harrowing experiences and her ultimate grit in facing them down. The characters are compelling, but they’re typically not moving; I never felt a connection to them or to anything that was happening, and it’s my sense that the book holds readers at a distance. Similarly, while I felt I understood most of what had happened, I was less clear on what exactly I was supposed to take from that. It’s not that every novel needs a message, but if Unraveling has one, I have no idea what it is. I’d be open to reading more of Lord’s fiction in the future and possibly revisiting this book to see if I can get a better sense of its overall theme. I’ve certainly never read anything else like it.I review regularly at brightbeautifulthings.tumblr.com.
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  • Lata
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not entirely sure what I read. A story of a serial killer, a forensic therapist, and a pair of brothers, Ajit and Chance, one a Trickster, the other who is sort of human, and sort of undying. A story also of angels, and of a powerful being who can make undying individuals, and can separate a less-powerful being than her into undying and human....Miranda, the therapist, is pulled into the oddest investigation she's ever been on by Chance, who takes her through labyrinths to help her find the I'm not entirely sure what I read. A story of a serial killer, a forensic therapist, and a pair of brothers, Ajit and Chance, one a Trickster, the other who is sort of human, and sort of undying. A story also of angels, and of a powerful being who can make undying individuals, and can separate a less-powerful being than her into undying and human....Miranda, the therapist, is pulled into the oddest investigation she's ever been on by Chance, who takes her through labyrinths to help her find the identity of the serial killer and his motive. There was a lot of weird and wonderful in this book, and stuff I didn't really understand, like the pantheon of deities/super-beings, and the stuff about the amulets; but I liked Miranda and her prickliness, and her relationships with Chance and Ajit. As I'm still processing what I read, I'm giving this book 3.5 stars.
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  • Kristen
    January 1, 1970
    Unraveling is a mythic murder mystery that unfolds as a journey through time and memory. Karen Lord does a fantastic job making the undying and angels seem truly otherworldly while also making the undying who are currently mortal familiarly human, and I appreciated the thoughtfulness that went into it. However, it never engaged my heart as much as my head, and it just wasn't a book I found particularly memorable as someone who prefers stories with more in-depth characterization.3 1/2 StarsFull R Unraveling is a mythic murder mystery that unfolds as a journey through time and memory. Karen Lord does a fantastic job making the undying and angels seem truly otherworldly while also making the undying who are currently mortal familiarly human, and I appreciated the thoughtfulness that went into it. However, it never engaged my heart as much as my head, and it just wasn't a book I found particularly memorable as someone who prefers stories with more in-depth characterization.3 1/2 StarsFull Review on My Website
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  • Jill Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    I'm with the other reviewers on this one - it's a fantastic concept and there are marvelous threads in the story, but unraveling them (no pun intended) proved to be a LOT of work... There are some highly intriguing and original ideas here, and the characters held great potential, but everything seemed weighted down by a vaguely obtuse sense that I wasn't quite getting what the author was trying to tell me. The read was surprisingly uneven as a result; I'd be clicking along and thoroughly enjoyin I'm with the other reviewers on this one - it's a fantastic concept and there are marvelous threads in the story, but unraveling them (no pun intended) proved to be a LOT of work... There are some highly intriguing and original ideas here, and the characters held great potential, but everything seemed weighted down by a vaguely obtuse sense that I wasn't quite getting what the author was trying to tell me. The read was surprisingly uneven as a result; I'd be clicking along and thoroughly enjoying the journey for handfuls of pages, then suddenly find myself pulling back, shaking my head, and rereading the last few paragraphs to figure out what happened, where I got lost, and why things stopped making sense... Thanks to Penguin First to Read for my review copy.
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  • Seema Rao
    January 1, 1970
    Literary ~ Suspenseful ~ IntriguingThis book requires a bit of trust to get into. I spent the first chapter a bit lost, because I hadn't pre-read the blurb (I rarely do). But, the writing was strong, and the pacing was enjoyable. In the end, this book turned out to be the type of murder mystery that is as much literary novel as procedural (like Smilla's Sense of Snow in quality, though in no other sense). I love a mystery novel that breaks genres, like this on with its fantasy and mystical eleme Literary ~ Suspenseful ~ IntriguingThis book requires a bit of trust to get into. I spent the first chapter a bit lost, because I hadn't pre-read the blurb (I rarely do). But, the writing was strong, and the pacing was enjoyable. In the end, this book turned out to be the type of murder mystery that is as much literary novel as procedural (like Smilla's Sense of Snow in quality, though in no other sense). I love a mystery novel that breaks genres, like this on with its fantasy and mystical elements. I really enjoyed this book, and it is super fast read, partly b/c you ache to figure out what is happening. 3.5 Thanks to Penguin First to REad for the advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book for free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.The nitty-gritty: A story with a fascinating premise that is heavy on philosophical musings, this one just didn’t work for me.This is my first Karen Lord book, and I found out after I finished it that it’s actually set in the same world as Redemption in Indigo . I’m wondering if I might have connected more to the story if I’d read that first, I received this book for free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.The nitty-gritty: A story with a fascinating premise that is heavy on philosophical musings, this one just didn’t work for me.This is my first Karen Lord book, and I found out after I finished it that it’s actually set in the same world as Redemption in Indigo . I’m wondering if I might have connected more to the story if I’d read that first, because unfortunately, I really struggled with this book. Readers who need a solid plot to follow are probably going to struggle with this as well, since it’s more of a story of ideas than action. This is one of those rare reviews where I’m not even going to recap the story, because honestly, I’m not sure I understood what was going on enough to do so. Unraveling is a dreamy, almost stream of consciousness tale that really begs for a second reading in order to grasp all its complex parts.Our main character is a lawyer named Miranda Ecouvo who is snatched away from death by one of the undying, or immortals, a man named Chance. Chance wants Miranda to help him solve a mysterious string of murders, which Miranda does with very little resistance, I was surprised to see. Along with Chance’s brother the Trickster, a man who can turn into a spider, Miranda is taken on a journey through time and memory as she travels through the maze, a construct that allows one to jump off at different points on the timeline. They follow various “threads” to find key people to spy on, which relates to the “unraveling” of the title. But throughout the murder investigation, the characters pause to philosophize over the meaning of life and death and memory,  and these frequent side trips left me feeling bored and frustrated.Lord’s story is detailed and complicated and I’m quite sure masterfully written. However, the non-linear storytelling, as the characters jump from one time to another, trying to solve the murders, was simply baffling to me. All sorts of side characters make an appearance, but many of them are barely in the story at all and I couldn’t figure out how they all tied together. I was also confused by the fact that several of the characters have more than one name, which I’m sure ties back into the mythology aspects of the story. For me, that just added to my overall confusion.I actually enjoyed the murder mystery parts, which were something familiar to cling to, I guess. The murderer is taking body parts from his victims, a gruesome task that seems to be ritualistic and steeped in mythology. Miranda and her guides are determined to follow every thread and lead to find the truth, and I did like the idea of being able to jump around in time to find out what really happened. But for me, there just wasn’t enough of the “story” to keep me interested for three hundred pages, and when the truth was ultimately revealed, I honestly didn’t care about the results at all.There are lots of four and five star reviews for Unraveled on Goodreads, so take my thoughts with a grain of salt. I’ve heard that fans of Neil Gaiman will love this, which might be part of my problem, because it turns out I’m not a big fan of his. This story takes laser focus to absorb, so if you’re not in the mood to ponder some big ideas about life, or if you’re simply prone to distraction like I am, you might have a similar reading experience.Thanks to the publisher for supplying a review copy.This review originally appeared on Books, Bones & Buffy
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  • Liz (Quirky Cat)
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of Unraveling through NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. Unraveling is described as a standalone novel by Karen Lord. It's a novel where mystery and Caribbean lore meet in the middle. The end result is whimsical, dark, and thoroughly enchanting. The novel follows two immortals (Chance and Trickster) along with one forensic therapist and they attempt to unravel the truth behind a series of murders. I should clarify why I said that this is described as a standa I received a copy of Unraveling through NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. Unraveling is described as a standalone novel by Karen Lord. It's a novel where mystery and Caribbean lore meet in the middle. The end result is whimsical, dark, and thoroughly enchanting. The novel follows two immortals (Chance and Trickster) along with one forensic therapist and they attempt to unravel the truth behind a series of murders. I should clarify why I said that this is described as a standalone novel – instead of just saying that it is a standalone novel. You see, it can be read on its own (I managed), but it uses characters and references from Redemption in Indigo – a novel written and published over ten years ago by Karen Lord. I enjoyed this novel quite a lot without having read the previous novel, though there were times where I found myself regretting my reading order. So I just want to mention it here.(view spoiler)[ Warnings: This novel follows immortals and a serial killer that, well, he's driven to commit these murders for a reason. There are graphic murders and dismemberment, and not all of the victims are adults. So bear this in mind before diving in. Unraveling is unlike any other novel that I have read. Though there were many elements that I found familiar and fascinating. The blend of so many different elements made it stand out, and I know it's one that I will remember for some time to come. For me, Unraveling felt like a cross between Caribbean lore and Good Omens. There were immortals – neither exactly good nor bad – directly interacting and meddling with humankind. The quirks of both novels shined through, making them humorous and somewhat absurd. Though I would argue that on the whole, Unraveling had a more somber and serious tone to it. The character writing and development for this novel was astonishing. The immortals, Chance and Trickster were interesting, and I found myself trying to puzzle out as much about them as I could, while still thinking about the mystery at hand. And then there's Miranda. She's the human forensic therapist that found herself in the center of this mystery. Her story and the delving into her mind were some of my favorite parts of this novel. Including her allowed for a stark contrast to be made – for the two immortals and how they behaved. It was a nice touch, and it gave us reasons to be afraid, curious, and concerned. The written in this novel was brilliant – delicate and flowing, yet powerful. It handled heavy subjects without the slightest hint of hesitation. And yet even when blending so many different things together, it all still felt organic and natural. If I could have, I would have dived head first into the words on these pages. I'll confess that I had never written anything by Karen Lord before. The cover art was what drew me in to begin with, and the description sold me. I still wish that I had read Redemption in Indigo first, despite the declaration that this is a standalone novel. But that really is my biggest complaint, which isn't really all that much of one. (hide spoiler)]For more reviews check out Quirky Cat's Fat Stacks
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  • Brooke Banks
    January 1, 1970
    Won from Penguin’s First to Read site.WTF did I just read? I legit don't know. I feel mindfucked in a satisfying way.I was initially intrigued by the paranormal mystery aspect and it being inspired by Caribbean mythology. The first half does include the ‘who is killing these people’ mystery. But it goes about it in such SUCH a different way. Then it shifts to this soul-searching soul-mated redemption kind of thing. All set in this weird-but-not-really world with landowners reigning like Rome and Won from Penguin’s First to Read site.WTF did I just read? I legit don't know. I feel mindfucked in a satisfying way.I was initially intrigued by the paranormal mystery aspect and it being inspired by Caribbean mythology. The first half does include the ‘who is killing these people’ mystery. But it goes about it in such SUCH a different way. Then it shifts to this soul-searching soul-mated redemption kind of thing. All set in this weird-but-not-really world with landowners reigning like Rome and America's electoral college. It kept me reading and thinking about it afterwards. I immediately started trying to research the inspiration for this to try & understand better. I feel this is very important to do for colonists reading from other cultures instead of trying to supplant their own over it. It sounds like Redemption in Indigo is a prequel to Unraveling. It gave me more tips to find out more about the inspiration for this story to understand it better. I'm going to read Redemption in Indigo and continue following Karen Lord. I really hope they have audiobook versions, since Caribbean storytelling is so verbal. And Lord's mentioned how that affects her writing. I’m really happy I found a new unexpected author with unique stories to follow!This AMA was also enlightening.
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  • Dan Trefethen
    January 1, 1970
    Karen Lord's books include gods, immortals, or aliens from outer space. These creatures serve to contrast and compare the behavior and intentions of humans.In this book she draws from her Caribbean background to offer a god (Patience) and two of the 'undying' (not the same as immortal) brothers, one of whom is the Trickster, equated with (but never named) as Anansi the spider.The plot revolves around an attempt to by an undying entity to achieve immortality by manipulating human desires and sacr Karen Lord's books include gods, immortals, or aliens from outer space. These creatures serve to contrast and compare the behavior and intentions of humans.In this book she draws from her Caribbean background to offer a god (Patience) and two of the 'undying' (not the same as immortal) brothers, one of whom is the Trickster, equated with (but never named) as Anansi the spider.The plot revolves around an attempt to by an undying entity to achieve immortality by manipulating human desires and sacrificing humans. The point, of course, is to focus on human hubris in placing oneself above others by denying the others' humanity and treating them viciously as the means to a goal.A labyrinth is used as a device to move forward or backwards in time to solve the problem, and to test the resolve of the human protagonist to endure suffering in order to save others. Throughout, the story deals with issues of balance, both by the gods and undying, and the humans who need to recognize their place in existence and accept their role in the balance of the universe, without turning their backs on their humanity or that of other people.
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  • Di
    January 1, 1970
    More like a 2.5This book was very confusing to me unfortunately. There is a lot of stuff happening, but once we veered away from the murder mystery aspect of the story, I got really lost. I could sit and read numerous chapters at a time, but couldn't tell you or understand what was going on for most of this book. I even re-read several sections to see if maybe I missed something that would tie what I was reading together, but that didn't help. There are also multiple POVs, which is something I d More like a 2.5This book was very confusing to me unfortunately. There is a lot of stuff happening, but once we veered away from the murder mystery aspect of the story, I got really lost. I could sit and read numerous chapters at a time, but couldn't tell you or understand what was going on for most of this book. I even re-read several sections to see if maybe I missed something that would tie what I was reading together, but that didn't help. There are also multiple POVs, which is something I don't enjoy as a reader.Hours after I finished the book, I'm still struggling to figure out what this story was really about. Also, not being told where this story was taking place made my confusion even worse. Have I put a lot of thought into what was going on in the book while I was reading and after I completed it? Yes, but without being able to grasp what story the author was trying to tell, I'm really having a hard time gathering my thoughts on this read.Thank you to the First to Read Program from Penguin Random House for providing me with an Advanced Reader Copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Beverly Flanagan
    January 1, 1970
    This was one strange story, and I knew it when I took it home from the library. It may have been well written, but to the end I was not really clear WHAT was going on. There was a mystery, with several crimes that appear to have been solved, but were not completely solved. In the end, they were solved but not understood. There is a dystopian society to be aware of, a near-death experience, spirits, labyrinths, working through nightmares & memories. This is considered a stand-alone fantasy no This was one strange story, and I knew it when I took it home from the library. It may have been well written, but to the end I was not really clear WHAT was going on. There was a mystery, with several crimes that appear to have been solved, but were not completely solved. In the end, they were solved but not understood. There is a dystopian society to be aware of, a near-death experience, spirits, labyrinths, working through nightmares & memories. This is considered a stand-alone fantasy novel. And while I usually LOVE fantasy, I am uncertain about this one.
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  • Stephan Classen
    January 1, 1970
    The story takes a bit to draw you in, much like figuring out how a labyrinth's twists and turns will get you to the end. But once in, it was a compelling story of seeing both past and future, and needing human choice to decide how to catch a murderer. Throughout it all, it ties a mystic type/group of beings to the inner workings of human society, and also does a lot of good work on determining what it means to be human. I would rate it higher if it had gripped me more, but it was engaging, using The story takes a bit to draw you in, much like figuring out how a labyrinth's twists and turns will get you to the end. But once in, it was a compelling story of seeing both past and future, and needing human choice to decide how to catch a murderer. Throughout it all, it ties a mystic type/group of beings to the inner workings of human society, and also does a lot of good work on determining what it means to be human. I would rate it higher if it had gripped me more, but it was engaging, using interesting mythos, and tying new concepts to interesting characters.
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  • Galen Strickland
    January 1, 1970
    Closer to 4.5 stars, although after I think on it some more, or re-read it, that might increase to 5.I was confused throughout, but don't interpret that as anything more than my comprehension skills. I _think_ I know the answer to the puzzle, but may be mistaken. I should re-read this, and Redemption in Indigo too, but that will have to wait for later.http://www.templetongate.net/unraveli...
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  • Gisell
    January 1, 1970
    The mishmash of elements and genres did not blend well in this novel. The murder mystery was interesting and engaging although the resolution was a bit confusing and underwhelming. The fantasy aspect did not seem thoroughly explained and became confusing as did the “time bending” (?) and/or “time travel” (?). I enjoyed it while I was reading it as long as I didn’t think too long and hard about deciphering what was going on, but I would not necessarily read it again.
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  • Hadi
    January 1, 1970
    I liked the start of this, just being dropped into this very strange world with all manner of beings and mythologies. But after 80 or so pages in I was no closer to understanding it; the chopping between POVs was getting tiresome; and the writing seemed overly complicated for the story. I put it down and was not motivated to pick it up again.
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  • Carole
    January 1, 1970
    Miranda put the murder away. But is he the one who really did these horrible murders? A master of words Karen Lord weaves a tapestry of dimensions and time that do not let you put this book down until you have savored every word.
  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    Traveling in a labyrinth of memory and the potential future alongside otherworldly spirits, the truth and the bounds of reality are explored in Karen Lord's Unraveling. To read this, and other book reviews, visit my website: http://makinggoodstories.wordpress.com/.A forensic therapist, Dr. Miranda Ecouvo helped to solve a string of serial killings in the City, but her investigation is not yet quite complete. Faced with a near-death experience where she's almost hit by a bus, Miranda is thrown fr Traveling in a labyrinth of memory and the potential future alongside otherworldly spirits, the truth and the bounds of reality are explored in Karen Lord's Unraveling. To read this, and other book reviews, visit my website: http://makinggoodstories.wordpress.com/.A forensic therapist, Dr. Miranda Ecouvo helped to solve a string of serial killings in the City, but her investigation is not yet quite complete. Faced with a near-death experience where she's almost hit by a bus, Miranda is thrown from time and into a realm of spirits. Guided by the invested interest of Chance and his brother the Trickster, Miranda explores the victims of the serial killer in greater detail, traversing memories via a labyrinth, in the hopes of gleaning vital information to help catch the mastermind behind the murders, one who seeks immortality. Delving deeper and deeper, the trio are faced with increasing questions of a moralistic nature and ponder how they could prevent the mastermind from achieving success.The story contains elements that are intriguing, matching with the tone and content of the novel's synopsis, and the exploration within the narrative provoked deeper thought; however, it was generally rather difficult to connect with, almost as if the concept was clear in the author's envisioning of it, but that enormity didn't quite translate to the portrayal offered on the page. The cosmic balancing and/or karmic equilibrium of the story eventually comes together, but the journey for the reader to that point was tedious and confusing (though I do wonder if this was intentional to place the reader more deeply inside the story, providing a sense of Miranda's experience). I recognize that I might not be the right audience for this story in this format as I struggled through to the end, but with some further development of the world and characters that would offer a less nebulous how and why, I might enjoy the story more.Overall, I'd give it a 2.5 out of 5 stars.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Weird and thought provokingUnraveling is a strange look at one moment in time, and everything that led to it and came from it. But somehow that moment isn’t the one that’s important.
  • Chaya Nebel
    January 1, 1970
    Fantasy book with a twist. Interesting, definitely different kind of read.
  • Meghan
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book for free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review.Do you love books that blend fantasy and the mundane? Are you a fan of African mythology? Or murder mysteries? How about a book that blends all of the above? Karen Lord's new novel has all these aspects and more. Unraveling by Karen Lord is creative blend of the fantastical and the mundane, with time travel and/or dream walking thrown in.There is a mix of mythology and higher powers and yet it feels very grounded. I received this book for free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review.Do you love books that blend fantasy and the mundane? Are you a fan of African mythology? Or murder mysteries? How about a book that blends all of the above? Karen Lord's new novel has all these aspects and more. Unraveling by Karen Lord is creative blend of the fantastical and the mundane, with time travel and/or dream walking thrown in.There is a mix of mythology and higher powers and yet it feels very grounded. I must admit I started the book in a slightly confused state. But I was so drawn into the writing and the possibility that I kept reading, much like Miranda keeps walking her labyrinths. Dr. Miranda Ecouvo is a brilliant woman. But perhaps even more impressive is her ability to persevere and keep moving forward even with devastating emotional trauma. Her strength is something to admire. I think even the immortals are impressed with her fortitude.The route to uncover a murdered forces Miranda to travel a path through memory and dreams and ultimately choose her destiny after discovering where it leads. This book does requires some dedication and effort. As ti wanders through time and viewpoints, it can be tough to unravel. But it is worth it. This is one of those books that stayed with me after I finished reading it. And I was left wanting more from Chance and Miranda as their paths continue to wind and unwind over time. If you love the weird and quirky, if you enjoy seeing the Trickster about, do yourself a favor and pick up this new novel from Karen Lord. It's available everywhere from DAW Books on June 4, 2019.
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  • Nathan
    January 1, 1970
    Very Ok. The author showed more than told, which I appreciate. It's a rare skill for most of the authors I read, unfortunately. She built a world, like William Gibson or PK Dick. I probably would have enjoyed this more, but for the marketing on the back. I didn't see the "Caribbean storytelling" bit, at least not in the way I was expecting. The ending/denouement was reminiscent of a Neal Stephenson novel. I don't plan on rereading this novel, but I might check out some of her other stuff.
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  • Phillip
    January 1, 1970
    This mystery didn't do much for me. The world the characters inhabit is interesting. It shifts between our world and a fairy like world. Some of the characters are mythic in nature, which is kind of cool. However, Miranda, the main character, felt so bland to me. I never bought into her involvement in these events or found a reason to care about what happened to her. That made it sort of a drag to read through the book that I would have found intriguing otherwise. There are some satisfying momen This mystery didn't do much for me. The world the characters inhabit is interesting. It shifts between our world and a fairy like world. Some of the characters are mythic in nature, which is kind of cool. However, Miranda, the main character, felt so bland to me. I never bought into her involvement in these events or found a reason to care about what happened to her. That made it sort of a drag to read through the book that I would have found intriguing otherwise. There are some satisfying moments, particularly in the latter half of the book. While the story didn't work for me, I'd recommend checking it out if you have any interest based on the blurb.
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