Rules for Visiting
A beautifully observed and deeply funny novel of May Attaway, a university gardener who sets out on an odyssey to reconnect with four old friends over the course of a year. At forty, May Attaway is more at home with plants than people. Over the years, she's turned inward, finding pleasure in language, her work as a gardener, and keeping her neighbors at arm's length while keenly observing them. But when she is unexpectedly granted some leave from her job, May is inspired to reconnect with four once close friends. She knows they will never have a proper reunion, so she goes, one-by-one, to each of them. A student of the classics, May considers her journey a female Odyssey. What might the world have had if, instead of waiting, Penelope had set out on an adventure of her own?RULES FOR VISITING is a woman's exploration of friendship in the digital age. Deeply alert to the nobility and the ridiculousness of ordinary people, May savors the pleasures along the way--afternoon ice cream with a long-lost friend, surprise postcards from an unexpected crush, and a moving encounter with ancient beauty. Though she gets a taste of viral online fame, May chooses to bypass her friends' perfectly cultivated online lives to instead meet them in their messy analog ones.Ultimately, May learns that a best friend is someone who knows your story--and she inspires us all to master the art of visiting.

Rules for Visiting Details

TitleRules for Visiting
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 14th, 2019
PublisherPenguin Press
ISBN-139780525559221
Rating
GenreFiction, Contemporary, Womens Fiction, Chick Lit

Rules for Visiting Review

  • *TUDOR^QUEEN*
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the publisher Penguin Press for providing an advance reader copy via Edelweiss.May Attaway is forty, single, childless, and still living at home with her widowed father. She's a graduate of the Landscape Architecture program at her local university. Landscape architects design harmonious natural plantings to augment a campus, parking lot, playground,or other public terrain. Once she graduated from the program she took a job at the university with the grounds crew. If you are a garde Thank you to the publisher Penguin Press for providing an advance reader copy via Edelweiss.May Attaway is forty, single, childless, and still living at home with her widowed father. She's a graduate of the Landscape Architecture program at her local university. Landscape architects design harmonious natural plantings to augment a campus, parking lot, playground,or other public terrain. Once she graduated from the program she took a job at the university with the grounds crew. If you are a gardening enthusiast (I'm not) you will probably love this book. Talk of numerous trees, flowers, bushes and gardening tips pollinate each chapter liberally- like overgrown vines on a building. There are also lovely drawings of various trees throughout the book. May plants a yew tree on university grounds taken from a cutting she procured from a legendary 3,000 old tree in a Scottish churchyard. A poet in the English Department was inspired to write a poem about it and won a $50,000 prize. In turn, the university recognized May for instigating and executing the planting of this tree which resulted in publicity for the school. Her "prize" was a generous amount of paid time off which she used to visit four longtime friends.May really isn't the visiting type. She also never has people over to her own house. Her mother died years ago under mysterious circumstances that are not revealed until the very end of the book. Mom kind of checked out of life at a certain point and took refuge in her bedroom. May's brother went to college out in California and decided to stay there. He hasn't been home in years. She's aware of her neighbors but for the most part keeps them at arm's length. Her father is much more neighborly, often gifting neighbors with flowers and plants. May is invited to a going away party on her block for a couple looking to downsize after their kids moved out of the nest. She notices that her name is included on an engraved silver platter that was gifted to this couple from their "friends". She also notices that there are many references and sayings about friends on various decorations in the kitchen. It's as if this idea of friends is suddenly swarming around her and she's inspired to use that gift of time off from work to visit each of her four friends.May is just a tad socially awkward and thinks of cliches to respond to conversations she's lured into. All her friends moved away, and most were married with children. It sort of feels like she's the outlier, the square peg, still living at home, unmarried, no children. Her travels take her to locales such as New York, London and Scotland. Never having a guest over herself, May learns the social graces of visiting when presented with her guest rooms, dealing with children and gift giving. It's interesting watching how other people live their lives who have taken a different path. I think the most enlightening takeaway from this book is how May wished her friends would just let her be part of a normal day in their lives rather than their taking special pains to visit a flower show or special restaurant. I actually identified with this character a bit, except for the gardening passion, of course. I also enjoyed the quiet and simple nature of the writing and story. There is an unexplained detachment I felt while reading this book, almost like I was looking through a cloudy window. As I peruse other reviews for this book, they seem to be in the 4-5 star range. I was really surprised by this, so I must be an outlier. For me it was a good book, but not great. As May says in the beginning of the book, "I read books, but not always the best ones."
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  • Jessica Kane
    January 1, 1970
    What are the Rules for rating your own book???
  • Emer
    January 1, 1970
    I adore quiet, intimate books. Books that are not perhaps laden with action and mad-cap adventures but are brimming with vitality all the same. Because they breathe life. Books like these get to the core of what it means to be human. They have a beating heart and connect with the reader on a soulful level. 'Rules for Visiting' is one such book. It is majestic in its simplicity and honesty. It is a book that made me laugh, made me cry, it made me pause for thought to reflect on my own life and th I adore quiet, intimate books. Books that are not perhaps laden with action and mad-cap adventures but are brimming with vitality all the same. Because they breathe life. Books like these get to the core of what it means to be human. They have a beating heart and connect with the reader on a soulful level. 'Rules for Visiting' is one such book. It is majestic in its simplicity and honesty. It is a book that made me laugh, made me cry, it made me pause for thought to reflect on my own life and the friendships I have made in my life. May, the narrator and main character, is in mid-way through her fortieth year and single. She lives with her father since the death of her mother and is a quiet sort of person. Somewhat detached from the rest of the everyday world. She is given some time off from the university where she works; she is involved in gardening and horticulture there. And with her time off she decides, much like an old Austen classic, to visit with some of her lifelong friends and spend time in their homes. And from there the book just unfurls in this most organic of manners. It's never rushed, but also never too slow. It simply flows along to its own gentle rhythms.I feel nourished after this reading experience. It's probably a strange way to describe how one feels after reading a book but this book... Oh it was just a salve to my soul and I wholeheartedly recommend it to anyone who loves quiet and thoughtful reads. Four and a half stars rounded up to five. *An e-copy of this book was kindly provided to me by the publisher, Granta Publications, via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review*
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  • Tyler Goodson
    January 1, 1970
    Isn't every reading experience a visit to a character and the world they live in? I thoroughly enjoyed spending time with May Attaway as she visits four of her friends. Part of her journey is a scholarly and earnest pursuit to discover what it means to have and be a friend. As May finds her answers, we are treated to a character and a story that are beautiful and quietly profound. Consider this my thank-you note.
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  • Dan
    January 1, 1970
    I've been thinking a lot about the role of friendship in my life lately in large part thanks to this book. Jessica Francis Kane has crafted a beautifully subtle and surprisingly funny exploration of how we cope with grief over the long haul. Friendship, it turns out, is the key, but so too is a powerful connection to the natural world. The premise here is pretty clever. May Attaway is a gardener at a local university. A yew tree she planted years back has inspired an award-winning poem by one of I've been thinking a lot about the role of friendship in my life lately in large part thanks to this book. Jessica Francis Kane has crafted a beautifully subtle and surprisingly funny exploration of how we cope with grief over the long haul. Friendship, it turns out, is the key, but so too is a powerful connection to the natural world. The premise here is pretty clever. May Attaway is a gardener at a local university. A yew tree she planted years back has inspired an award-winning poem by one of the university's professors. To reward her for her part in creating the atmosphere that allowed the university to secure this prestigious honor, her superiors grant her a month of vacation. May choses to use the time to visit old friends she's lost touch with. What follows is a story of picking up where one left off, reckoning with the past, and embracing the new possibilities life presents us with all the time if we're willing to see them.I think my favorite part had to be the quiet, wry voice at the center of this book. May is a self-acknowledged unreliable narrator, but she's neither evasive nor abusive. You get the sense that she's doing the best she can and being as open and honest as she can muster. Her love for plant and tree life fills these pages like a spring bloom. Delightful sketches of trees introduce each section and plant and tree names are always followed by their Latin names in parentheses — May even speaks them aloud in dialogue. Braided throughout is the story of the once well-tended but now neglected Attaway clan. It's not hard to see that May's love for the natural world and the care with which she tends it is an extended metaphor for the way she has withdrawn from family and friends.Unlike anything I've read before, Kane's restrained, evocative prose draws the reader into the private world of her protagonist, allowing the characters and the plot to unfold on the page with the natural pace and beauty of a rare bloom. Highly recommended. If you liked this, make sure to follow me on Goodreads for more reviews!
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  • chels marieantoinette
    January 1, 1970
    Part one of this book was hard for me. It felt jumpy, yet slow and discombobulated. But the honor of reading an advance copy forced me onward - I wanted to give this book my undivided attention and a thorough review. Boy am I glad that I did!I truly love May Attaway. At first I equated her to “the next Eleanor Oliphant,” but she is so much more.No, I am not obsessed with plants. Nor am I a 40-year-old, single woman living with my father and my cat... I am a 30-year-old engaged woman living with Part one of this book was hard for me. It felt jumpy, yet slow and discombobulated. But the honor of reading an advance copy forced me onward - I wanted to give this book my undivided attention and a thorough review. Boy am I glad that I did!I truly love May Attaway. At first I equated her to “the next Eleanor Oliphant,” but she is so much more.No, I am not obsessed with plants. Nor am I a 40-year-old, single woman living with my father and my cat... I am a 30-year-old engaged woman living with my fiancé and our cat, but I FELT myself in May. I rooted for her as she stepped out of her comfort zone to rekindle friendships. I related to her as she attempted to relate to friends who had changed by getting married, separating, having children and becoming craftoholics. I ached for May and the loss of her mother... the depth of their relationship beautiful and painful. And she urged me to dig into details about Emily Post, Emily Dickinson, etc - May is a fountain of knowledge (and an excellent houseguest). I cried with May and giggled with May and seriously felt like I GREW with May. This book is THE book. Everyone should give it a shot.
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  • Cindy Bellomy
    January 1, 1970
    Quite enjoyed this gem. I was a bit concerned at the beginning, but soon got caught up in May's quest to be different than her mother, to be a friend & to have friends, to connect with others, & to understand why that is important.Wonderful character & fine example of character growth.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    I really loved May. She reminded me of myself. A introvert who doesn’t give her friendships the time that they deserve. I loved her quest to travel and see as many friends as she could and it made me think about who I would travel to see and spend a few days with. It’s a short list but I know I would cherish every moment. Goals.
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  • Marcy Dermansky
    January 1, 1970
    What a beautiful book. I did not know how Jessica Francis Kane could write a whole novel about visiting friends and trees but she did and I loved it. I felt understood.
  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    I felt very unsympathetic toward May, the main character of Rules for Visiting, until about 80% of the way through the book, and then I understood her and I loved it from there on out. I think this one will stick with me for a long time. Thank you to NetGalley and Penguin for the advance copy!
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  • Kathleen Gray
    January 1, 1970
    I suspect I won't be the only one who will recognize herself in May, a 40 year old who finds herself in need of restoring friendships. She's an interesting woman- a landscape architect who works as a gardener and lives in her childhood home with her widowed father. When rewarded with a month of annual leave, she opts to visit four friends from her youth- Lindy, Vanessa, Neera and Rose. And if you didn't recognize a piece of yourself in May, you might in one of them. There is wonderful informatio I suspect I won't be the only one who will recognize herself in May, a 40 year old who finds herself in need of restoring friendships. She's an interesting woman- a landscape architect who works as a gardener and lives in her childhood home with her widowed father. When rewarded with a month of annual leave, she opts to visit four friends from her youth- Lindy, Vanessa, Neera and Rose. And if you didn't recognize a piece of yourself in May, you might in one of them. There is wonderful information on trees, a wry sense of humor, a little romance (no-don't worry it is only a dance of sorts), and terrific writing. There were no false notes for me in this wonderful book, which also made me think about what I absolutely need to live (and what to pack in a suitcase and about petunias.). Thanks to Edelweiss for the ARC. This won't be for everyone- it isn't flashy and there isn't drama writ large- but I very much enjoyed it and highly recommend to those looking for a thoughtful and highly entertaining read about a woman discovering herself.
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  • Brian
    January 1, 1970
    May Attaway is a bit of an oddity. A middle-aged landscape gardener living with her elderly father, she finds the preoccupations of other people difficult to relate to. Almost intentionally, she seems to have boxed herself in and it's not at all clear how she's going to change.But she's conscious of the way that other people celebrate friendship and aware that it's a huge part of modern life from which she's excluded. So when her employer gives her a month's paid holiday she decides to use the t May Attaway is a bit of an oddity. A middle-aged landscape gardener living with her elderly father, she finds the preoccupations of other people difficult to relate to. Almost intentionally, she seems to have boxed herself in and it's not at all clear how she's going to change.But she's conscious of the way that other people celebrate friendship and aware that it's a huge part of modern life from which she's excluded. So when her employer gives her a month's paid holiday she decides to use the time to visit the four most important friends from her childhood and student days. May's reticent and quirky voice is beautifully observed as we follow her on that journey, gradually uncovering the tragedy that cast its shadow over her youth and witnessing the reawakening of emotional articulacy. If you like fast-moving page turners, Rules For Visiting may not be for you but it offers rich rewards to the patient reader.
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  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book, although I do confess that it's probably not for everyone. If you're looking for a fast-moving plot, look elsewhere. This is one of those stories about ordinary life, one that provides some profound insights into human nature, specifically friendship. May is 40 years old, single, working as a gardener at the local university and living in her childhood home while her father lives in the basement apartment. She receives some extra time off work and decides to use it to visit va I loved this book, although I do confess that it's probably not for everyone. If you're looking for a fast-moving plot, look elsewhere. This is one of those stories about ordinary life, one that provides some profound insights into human nature, specifically friendship. May is 40 years old, single, working as a gardener at the local university and living in her childhood home while her father lives in the basement apartment. She receives some extra time off work and decides to use it to visit various friends she has all but lost touch with. I loved the insights into friendship, the many references to literature, and learning about different types of trees. If I have any complaint about this book it's that I wanted more; I wanted to discuss these (sometimes uncomfortable) visits to friends. This would be a great book club book. I don't purchase a ton of books, but this is one I want on my bookshelf.
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  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    Book about a woman embarking upon an adventure in the name of friendship? Hell yes. May Attaway is hard to get to know; she loves plants, her car, and eating at her local taqueria, but we gotta go with her and listen close to peel away her layers. And damn if that isn't so relateable. I love that she's 40 and she's thinking so much about the people around her and how to connect and tying her surroundings to literature and plants. I honestly wish she could be my friend IRL (and my use of 'IRL' wo Book about a woman embarking upon an adventure in the name of friendship? Hell yes. May Attaway is hard to get to know; she loves plants, her car, and eating at her local taqueria, but we gotta go with her and listen close to peel away her layers. And damn if that isn't so relateable. I love that she's 40 and she's thinking so much about the people around her and how to connect and tying her surroundings to literature and plants. I honestly wish she could be my friend IRL (and my use of 'IRL' would make her reject me outright haha). Anyway, this book was beautiful and weird and you should read it.
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  • Ilyssa Wesche
    January 1, 1970
    Not since Dietland have I read a book that felt more like a personal manifesto to me. I could not wait to finish this book so I could immediately tell everyone I know that they must read this. I'm going to visit a friend of mine tomorrow - we've been friends for 35 years - and this book only amped up my anticipation of the visit, and vice-versa. May is an almost-middle-aged woman who lives with her father in the house she grew up in. She's a landscape artist at the local university, and she love Not since Dietland have I read a book that felt more like a personal manifesto to me. I could not wait to finish this book so I could immediately tell everyone I know that they must read this. I'm going to visit a friend of mine tomorrow - we've been friends for 35 years - and this book only amped up my anticipation of the visit, and vice-versa. May is an almost-middle-aged woman who lives with her father in the house she grew up in. She's a landscape artist at the local university, and she loves trees. Loves is maybe not the right word. Passionate about. Relates to on a core level. She even made me love trees. She's somewhat of an introvert, but she does have friends and in this book she sets out to better understand what it means to be a friend, both in general and to her specifically. I loved her trips, I loved watching her relationships grow even more satisfying, I just fucking loved the whole thing. I want to plan out trips to see some of my old friends, and to maybe be a better friend to the ones I see on the regular. But none of this happened in a horrible, "live an intentional life" kind of way. She does address social media in the book, and she's not a Luddite by any means, but at no time is May twee or anything less than sincere. It's hard to be that sincere and not maddening but she manages to do so.If you liked Elinor Oliphant Is Completely Fine, you will like this book. So satisfying.
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  • Jillian Doherty
    January 1, 1970
    A brilliantly narrative, that could be a modern how-to for feeling human, and reconnecting again. Offering fascinating factoids from Emily Post, Jane Austen, Emily Dickinson, Newton, and Aristotle - at its heart feels like Plato‘s lessons on platonic love.The narrative is directed by a reluctant heroin; erudite is the best way I can think to describe May Attaway. She’s a quietly cerebral, gardener ~ the kind of person who is not quite introverted, but more so a person who just hasn’t been asked A brilliantly narrative, that could be a modern how-to for feeling human, and reconnecting again. Offering fascinating factoids from Emily Post, Jane Austen, Emily Dickinson, Newton, and Aristotle - at its heart feels like Plato‘s lessons on platonic love.The narrative is directed by a reluctant heroin; erudite is the best way I can think to describe May Attaway. She’s a quietly cerebral, gardener ~ the kind of person who is not quite introverted, but more so a person who just hasn’t been asked enough about their thoughts. The story pops when a work accomplishment allows May to go on sabbatical, she reaches out to long lost friends and reignites friendships, connections, and her self.This charming, and surprising read warms you up as it illustrates who we’ve become, and how to get back to happily interacting with those around us!Galley borrowed from the publisher.
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  • James Beggarly
    January 1, 1970
    A university gardener gets a month of paid leave from her job and decides to visit four old friends, three in the US and one in England, to try set a spark to make these relationships matter again, but to also bring a spark to help her change the person she is now. It’s a lovely book about visiting friends and the history of visiting and friendships from writers through the ages.
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  • Jodi Paloni
    January 1, 1970
    Rules for Visiting promised readers a road trip and delivered, steadily, quietly, which I loved because of the subtly I could chew on, how I felt invited to engage, to make meaning about the nature of human connection, of loneliness and friendship, of a woman making an effort to pull herself out of a dark place. She has the agency, but she takes her time, so in this regard the novel reads very much like real life. The characters have stayed with me, as if I had gone along for the ride and observ Rules for Visiting promised readers a road trip and delivered, steadily, quietly, which I loved because of the subtly I could chew on, how I felt invited to engage, to make meaning about the nature of human connection, of loneliness and friendship, of a woman making an effort to pull herself out of a dark place. She has the agency, but she takes her time, so in this regard the novel reads very much like real life. The characters have stayed with me, as if I had gone along for the ride and observed seemingly quotidian lifestyles, while getting a peek into the underbelly. Kane treats her characters with compassion and leaves us with a sense of hope, that one can move on, of radical self-acceptance, of love after loss.
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  • Moira
    January 1, 1970
    Like Kate Christenson and Jane Gardam, there is something about the tone of Jessica Francis Kane's prose that I find irresistable. She is crisp and unsentimental while telling stories that are intensely emotional and profound. I find that balance wonderous, and as with This Close and The Report, I devoured this book with pleasure.
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  • Onceinabluemoon
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 rounding up because I am a garden gal! I listened to this while working in the garden, this book is made for those much younger than me, but I found it entertaining with plenty of thought provoking ideas. I will say she is a garden snob, too much attitude against color, i.e. Petunias and mums! Lots of social commentary tossed in her garden of friends, for chick lit I actually made it to the end, it was the garden chatter that kept me close to the dirt...
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    I am a bookseller and received an advanced review copy of RULES FOR VISITING.I loved this book. I am a big fan of Jessica Francis Kane's earlier novel, The Report, and was very excited when I received this. The focus of the book is on friendship, but I was also moved by May's thoughts and experiences with trees and other plants. With it's emphasis on face-to-face rather than virtual connection, and the value of the non-human world, it's a perfect read for our time. Excited to start hand-selling I am a bookseller and received an advanced review copy of RULES FOR VISITING.I loved this book. I am a big fan of Jessica Francis Kane's earlier novel, The Report, and was very excited when I received this. The focus of the book is on friendship, but I was also moved by May's thoughts and experiences with trees and other plants. With it's emphasis on face-to-face rather than virtual connection, and the value of the non-human world, it's a perfect read for our time. Excited to start hand-selling this one.
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  • Mona
    January 1, 1970
    Fortnight Friends! I’m going to start using that hashtag after reading this! Since I won this book on Goodreads I didn’t know what to expect. I ended up really enjoying it. Very funny! And touching... And as a bonus I learned about trees. I love the sketches between each section too. Great little read about friendships. ❤ Fortnight Friends! I’m going to start using that hashtag after reading this! Since I won this book on Goodreads I didn’t know what to expect. I ended up really enjoying it. Very funny! And touching... And as a bonus I learned about trees. I love the sketches between each section too. Great little read about friendships. ❤️
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  • Danielle
    January 1, 1970
    A lovely read:)
  • Diane Payne
    January 1, 1970
    Fabulous novel! The author has a great sense of humor, knows how to share just enough facts about trees and flowers to make the reader curious but not bogged down, and motivate us to consider looking up old friends.
  • Siobhan
    January 1, 1970
    Rules for Visiting is a novel about friendship, a meditative novel and focused on travel and home. May's life is a series of routines: she lives with her elderly father, doesn't see her brother, and doesn't really talk to her neighbours. Though she enjoys her gardening career at the local university, she feels she needs something more, and some paid leave sparks off a chance to revisit some old friendships. As May visits her friends one by one, she reflects on their lives and her own, comparing Rules for Visiting is a novel about friendship, a meditative novel and focused on travel and home. May's life is a series of routines: she lives with her elderly father, doesn't see her brother, and doesn't really talk to her neighbours. Though she enjoys her gardening career at the local university, she feels she needs something more, and some paid leave sparks off a chance to revisit some old friendships. As May visits her friends one by one, she reflects on their lives and her own, comparing classic literature and modern communication as she searches for what friendship is.This is a calming sort of read, light and quirky but with some real meaning sown throughout. It has a precise and distinctive style, reflecting May's thought processes, but leaving gaps for the reader to notice her loneliness and what she isn't saying. The plant and book references are another distinctive feature, again very much linked to May's character but also about how we use different points of reference to track our lives and our friendships.Rules for Visiting is a quietly quirky book that looks at human connections and dealing with the past and the present. Maybe fittingly, it would make a good book to keep in a spare room or give to a visiting friend: a quick, understated yet moving novel that makes you think about friendship across time.
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  • Colleen
    January 1, 1970
    I adored this book. A reflection on friendship, grief, and trees. It sounds like a difficult combination but it was magical and I thoroughly enjoyed the journey with May.
  • Sheila
    January 1, 1970
    A good book for reminding me that friendships are important and require intention, vulnerability, and love.
  • Kathy (McDowell) Miller
    January 1, 1970
    This book made me want to get out and get in touch with long-lost friends.
  • Annarella
    January 1, 1970
    Fascinating, engaging and full of food for thought.A book I will remember for a long time as I think May is a very well written and unforgettable characters.Highly recommended!Many thanks to the publisher and Edelweiss for this ARC, all opinions are mine
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  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    More reviews and book-ish content @ Club Book Mobile & Andrea RBKRules for Visiting by Jessica Francis Kane was one of those books that just kept me thinking - in a good way. This is a fiction read (although it reads like a nonfiction memoir) where the main character decides to re-invest in her friends. She realizes that so much of friendship has become via social media, and she wants to change that. She yearns for the way she used to be connected to her friends, and so she decides she's goi More reviews and book-ish content @ Club Book Mobile & Andrea RBKRules for Visiting by Jessica Francis Kane was one of those books that just kept me thinking - in a good way. This is a fiction read (although it reads like a nonfiction memoir) where the main character decides to re-invest in her friends. She realizes that so much of friendship has become via social media, and she wants to change that. She yearns for the way she used to be connected to her friends, and so she decides she's going to visit them. Not just a visit as she's passing through, or for a meal of food with someone in the same town, but an actual visit where she stays with each of them. She identifies four friends from different phases of her life that she's going to go see, and the book chronicles this experience. Through these visits, some things have stayed the same, while other things have definitely changed. In the meantime, she's also navigating both past and present relationships with her family which adds another layer to these visits. For me, this is one I'm still thinking about as I wondered what it would be like to go on this adventure with my own friends. Her assessment of the current state of friendship could not be more right on, and it's made me continue to reflect on how I connect with my own friends. My only critique is I wanted to know even more about her friendships. Because I was so drawn in, I wanted more background, more about the visits, and just more of what was happening. All in all, this one is an enlightening and emotional read that I'd recommend checking out when it hits shelves in May!
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