Fleishman Is in Trouble
If you could do it all over again, would you? Should you? One man finds out in this finely observed, compulsively readable, and occasionally raunchy novel of marriage, sex, and dating for readers of Jonathan Franzen, Lauren Groff, and Tom Perrotta.Recently separated Toby Fleischman is suddenly, somehow--and at age forty-one, short as ever--surrounded by women who want him: women who are self-actualized, women who are smart and interesting, women who don't mind his height, women who are eager to take him for a test drive with just the swipe of an app. Toby doesn't mind being used in this way; it's a welcome change from the thirteen years he spent as a married man, the thirteen years of emotional neglect and contempt he's just endured. Anthropologically speaking, it's like nothing he ever experienced before, particularly back in the 1990s, when he first began dating and became used to swimming in the murky waters of rejection.But Toby's new life--liver specialist by day, kids every other weekend, rabid somewhat anonymous sex at night--is interrupted when his ex-wife suddenly disappears. Either on a vision quest or a nervous breakdown, Toby doesn't know--she won't answer his texts or calls.Is Toby's ex just angry, like always? Is she punishing him, yet again, for not being the bread winner she was? As he desperately searches for her while juggling his job and parenting their two unraveling children, Toby is forced to reckon with the real reasons his marriage fell apart, and to ask if the story he has been telling himself all this time is true.

Fleishman Is in Trouble Details

TitleFleishman Is in Trouble
Author
ReleaseJun 18th, 2019
PublisherRandom House
ISBN-139780525510871
Rating
GenreFiction

Fleishman Is in Trouble Review

  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    While I enjoyed the content and subject matter of this novel (marriage, divorce, relationships in the digital age), I had difficulty with the presentation of it--told from a friend of Toby's during most of the book. It felt more like a "report" of things that happened to him instead of the reader being involved. So it was slow going for me at the beginning. Clearly the author is a talented writer and the pain of divorce and custody arrangements are certainly relevant given the ease (and burden?) While I enjoyed the content and subject matter of this novel (marriage, divorce, relationships in the digital age), I had difficulty with the presentation of it--told from a friend of Toby's during most of the book. It felt more like a "report" of things that happened to him instead of the reader being involved. So it was slow going for me at the beginning. Clearly the author is a talented writer and the pain of divorce and custody arrangements are certainly relevant given the ease (and burden?) of dating in the age of technology where apparently women are available at all hours of the day, regardless of whether they've met you in person. I just didn't feel invested in the characters enough to love this book but I would definitely read more by this author.Thanks to NetGalley for this ARC!
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  • Tyler Goodson
    January 1, 1970
    “I would write my book, and it would have something in it that Archer was incapable of, which is all the sides of the story, even the ones that hurt to look at directly—even the ones that made us too angry to want to hear them.”Toby Fleishman is in trouble. Rachel Fleishman is in trouble. This is a story about that trouble: their marriage and divorce and life (and sex) after marriage, their kids and their nervous breakdowns. It’s a novel so specific and funny and playful that it at first belies “I would write my book, and it would have something in it that Archer was incapable of, which is all the sides of the story, even the ones that hurt to look at directly—even the ones that made us too angry to want to hear them.”Toby Fleishman is in trouble. Rachel Fleishman is in trouble. This is a story about that trouble: their marriage and divorce and life (and sex) after marriage, their kids and their nervous breakdowns. It’s a novel so specific and funny and playful that it at first belies just how big and ambitious it really is. Don’t be fooled. It is big and ambitious and has things to say about marriage and friendship and being a woman and a person in the world. It surprises you over and over again with how smart and insightful and empathetic it is until you are not surprised anymore, just grateful it exists and you get to read it.
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  • Susan Wille
    January 1, 1970
    I started out loving this book.. I was captivated by Toby and his family life, his children, his relationship with Rachel. I was also fascinated by his career as a hepatologist, and this side story about the woman that needed a liver transplant. I have to say at times this novel was very confusing because it would switch into the character of Elizabeth and I wouldn't realize who is narrating the story for part of the book. I also felt a drag on a bit in the end, Way too much conversation between I started out loving this book.. I was captivated by Toby and his family life, his children, his relationship with Rachel. I was also fascinated by his career as a hepatologist, and this side story about the woman that needed a liver transplant. I have to say at times this novel was very confusing because it would switch into the character of Elizabeth and I wouldn't realize who is narrating the story for part of the book. I also felt a drag on a bit in the end, Way too much conversation between Rachel and Toby. I was incredibly disappointed by the ending. I did however finish the book and I did like the book. Although I might not recommend it to friends and family I would still like to continue to follow this author. Thank you for my advanced copy
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  • Bonnie Brody
    January 1, 1970
    Toby Fleishman is a 41 year old jewish doctor, 5'5" tall, and sort of a shlemiel. He is soon to be divorced from Rachel, the wife of his nightmares. Despite earning close to $300,000 annually, he wears frayed shirts and feels like he's poor compared to his neighbors on the Upper East Side. He has two children and is trying to have a productive social life (sex and more sex) but Rachel doesn't adhere to the separation agreement and drops the kids off at any old time, even the middle of the might. Toby Fleishman is a 41 year old jewish doctor, 5'5" tall, and sort of a shlemiel. He is soon to be divorced from Rachel, the wife of his nightmares. Despite earning close to $300,000 annually, he wears frayed shirts and feels like he's poor compared to his neighbors on the Upper East Side. He has two children and is trying to have a productive social life (sex and more sex) but Rachel doesn't adhere to the separation agreement and drops the kids off at any old time, even the middle of the might.I had high expectations for this book and anticipated a 'Jonathon Tropper' or Philip Roth type experience. However, for want of a better description, it is boring and redundant. There were only so many times I wanted to hear about Toby's internet sexting experiences, the 'visuals' he loved on dating sites, and his desire to have a second chance at life. The book read like 'Sex and the City', with each episode being the same one. By page 100 I stifled a yawn and decided not to finish the book. I have a 75 page rule, meaning I quit a book after 75 pages if it doesn't grab me, but I extended my reading an extra 25 pages.What was also annoying about this novel other than the repetition, was that it is told from different people's perspectives. I had trouble identifying who was talking or whether it was Toby in first person. Sometimes the book slipped into third person, like when Toby reminisces about meeting Rachel, and there seemed to be no special point to this confusing chorus.If you want a book to read on the plane or at the beach, and you think you'd enjoy 'Sex and the City' with a definitively jewish bent, this book might resonate with you.
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  • Pgchuis
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this novel from the publisher via NetGalley.I am quitting this novel at 27%. I have mixed feelings about it: I like the writing, but the subject matter is a little off-putting at times and nothing has yet happened, apart from the protagonist's wife failing to return from a yoga retreat. Toby has recently separated from Rachel after a marriage he spends a lot of time musing about, and in the intervening months has been sleeping with and sexting various women he meets on datin I received a copy of this novel from the publisher via NetGalley.I am quitting this novel at 27%. I have mixed feelings about it: I like the writing, but the subject matter is a little off-putting at times and nothing has yet happened, apart from the protagonist's wife failing to return from a yoga retreat. Toby has recently separated from Rachel after a marriage he spends a lot of time musing about, and in the intervening months has been sleeping with and sexting various women he meets on dating sites. We hear A LOT about this. We hear a fair amount about his children (he is a fond parent) and a little about his job (he is a compassionate doctor).The "I" of the narration, who pops up occasionally, is a friend from his youth called Elizabeth, but she is mostly absent. The back and forth between different periods of Toby's life is not confusing exactly, but it means the narrative lacks forward momentum. I think this is probably quite a good novel (it is wryly funny), but I can't summon up the interest to keep going and find out.
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  • Isabella Biedenharn
    January 1, 1970
    I will be thinking about this book for a long time. So good.
  • Alison Hardtmann
    January 1, 1970
    Toby [Fleishman is in trouble. He and his wife, Rachel, are in the middle of a divorce and while on-line hook-up apps have provided him with plenty to distract him, he's left with caring for two kids who aren't doing well with the divorce when his wife drops them off at his new apartment and disappears. He's also the financially disadvantaged spouse, being only a well-established specialist at a prestigious hospital, which in the wealthy enclaves of Manhattan, makes him contemptuously low-income Toby [Fleishman is in trouble. He and his wife, Rachel, are in the middle of a divorce and while on-line hook-up apps have provided him with plenty to distract him, he's left with caring for two kids who aren't doing well with the divorce when his wife drops them off at his new apartment and disappears. He's also the financially disadvantaged spouse, being only a well-established specialist at a prestigious hospital, which in the wealthy enclaves of Manhattan, makes him contemptuously low-income. This is the challenge that debut author Taffy Brodesser-Akner has set for herself; how do you write a scathing send-up of an Upper East Side family in which the reader is invited to feel sorry for the handsome doctor who is getting laid regularly, but who has to make do with a bare third of a million a year to live on? There's only so much sympathy that can be pulled from Toby's below-average height and chronic insecurity. For the most part, though, Brodesser-Akner pulls it off. The writing is smooth and having the narrator be an old friend of Toby's, who is now a New Jersey housewife, does ground the story somewhat. The final chapters of the novel are also far more nuanced and better written than the first three quarters, making me wish that the author had included the portions telling Rachel's story throughout the novel. One's enjoyment of this novel will depend entirely on one's tolerance for reading about the troubles of people living wealthy lives in Manhattan, but this does look like the literary vacation novel of the summer. It's an impressive debut that reads like the work of a seasoned author.
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  • Alison Hardtmann
    January 1, 1970
    Toby Fleishman is in trouble. He and his wife, Rachel, are in the middle of a divorce and while on-line hook-up apps have provided him with plenty to distract him, he's left with caring for two kids who aren't doing well with the divorce when his wife drops them off at his new apartment and disappears. He's also the financially disadvantaged spouse, being only a well-established specialist at a prestigious hospital which, in the wealthy enclaves of Manhattan, makes him contemptuously low-income. Toby Fleishman is in trouble. He and his wife, Rachel, are in the middle of a divorce and while on-line hook-up apps have provided him with plenty to distract him, he's left with caring for two kids who aren't doing well with the divorce when his wife drops them off at his new apartment and disappears. He's also the financially disadvantaged spouse, being only a well-established specialist at a prestigious hospital which, in the wealthy enclaves of Manhattan, makes him contemptuously low-income. This is the challenge that debut author Taffy Brodesser-Akner has set for herself; how do you write a scathing send-up of an Upper East Side family in which the reader is invited to feel sorry for the handsome doctor who is getting laid regularly, but who has to make do with a bare third of a million a year to live on? There's only so much sympathy that can be pulled from Toby's below-average height and chronic insecurity. For the most part, though, Brodesser-Akner pulls it off. The writing is smooth and having the narrator be an old friend of Toby's, who is now a New Jersey housewife, does ground the story somewhat. The final chapters of the novel are also far more nuanced and better written than the first three quarters, making me wish that the author had included the portions telling Rachel's story throughout the novel. One's enjoyment of this novel will depend entirely on one's tolerance for reading about the troubles of people living wealthy lives in Manhattan, but this does look like the literary vacation novel of the summer. It's an impressive debut that reads like the work of a seasoned author.
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  • Donna Hines
    January 1, 1970
    War of the Roses meet Mother Theresa and incorporate all that marriage and divorce entails while learning to re-love again!Love is blind! Love doesn't hurt! Love is compassion and compromise!Yes, well tell that to Toby who just separated from Rachel his wife of 15 years.He assumed a bumpy but somewhat smooth forward progression until she dropped off the kids and never returned.Perhaps a taste of his own medicine?Perhaps a workaholic using patients to hide behind his homemaking responsibilities?P War of the Roses meet Mother Theresa and incorporate all that marriage and divorce entails while learning to re-love again!Love is blind! Love doesn't hurt! Love is compassion and compromise!Yes, well tell that to Toby who just separated from Rachel his wife of 15 years.He assumed a bumpy but somewhat smooth forward progression until she dropped off the kids and never returned.Perhaps a taste of his own medicine?Perhaps a workaholic using patients to hide behind his homemaking responsibilities?Perhaps a time for reflection?Whatever occurred during this trial run he's now seeing things in a whole new light and that may just be what they both need in the end!Thank you to Taffy, the publisher, NetGalley for this ARC in exchange for this honest review.
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  • Alyssa
    January 1, 1970
    Toby is going through a divorce from his wife of 15 years. We watch him discover the whole new world of dating apps and struggle as a single dad. We hear about Rachel, his shrew of an ex-wife. But then, one day, Rachel disappears. Is she dead? Missing? Having an affair? We eventually learn the truth—and discover that there are two sides to every story and that everything isn’t always how it appears.I *loved* this book. I was excited to read it, because I absolutely adore Taffy Brodesser-Akner’s Toby is going through a divorce from his wife of 15 years. We watch him discover the whole new world of dating apps and struggle as a single dad. We hear about Rachel, his shrew of an ex-wife. But then, one day, Rachel disappears. Is she dead? Missing? Having an affair? We eventually learn the truth—and discover that there are two sides to every story and that everything isn’t always how it appears.I *loved* this book. I was excited to read it, because I absolutely adore Taffy Brodesser-Akner’s celebrity profiles in the New York Times (her story about Gwyneth Paltrow is legendary). I had no idea what it was about when I picked it up, but wow—it was amazing. It delighted me, it hooked me, it made me laugh out loud, it made me think, it made me highlight particularly insightful passages in the book, it made me feel. This book is about divorce, yes, but so much more. It’s about marriage, feminism, ambition, workplace struggles, New York City, parenthood, friendship, and on and on. It’s incredibly smart and one of the best books I’ve read in quite some time. Highly recommend.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    "Fleishman Is in Trouble" focuses on a trio of high-achieving, upwardly mobile college friends who reconnect one summer as one of them faces the aftermath of an ugly divorce. They're rich, successful people who nevertheless feel like something's missing from their middle-aged lives. Is it love? Understanding? More fun? Less time with their children? They're by turns angry, jealous, insecure, horny and, in the end, not even sure what's wrong with themselves and their partners. How did Toby's marr "Fleishman Is in Trouble" focuses on a trio of high-achieving, upwardly mobile college friends who reconnect one summer as one of them faces the aftermath of an ugly divorce. They're rich, successful people who nevertheless feel like something's missing from their middle-aged lives. Is it love? Understanding? More fun? Less time with their children? They're by turns angry, jealous, insecure, horny and, in the end, not even sure what's wrong with themselves and their partners. How did Toby's marriage fail? Can Elizabeth just relax and be happy in her own? Should Seth ever marry at all? They revisit their time as study abroad students in Israel and their early dating lives in search of answers. Taffy Brodesser-Akner, author of some incisive magazine pieces on subjects ranging from the diet industrial complex to Gwyneth Paltrow, brings these characters to life and tracks their miserable paths through New York and its suburbs. No one is perfect here, but Brodesser-Akner gives you just enough information to empathize with everyone. There's more than a nod to "The Great Gatsby" as she lays bare the levels of wealth, class and sophistication on display in their lives. Note: I received an advance reader's copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Skye
    January 1, 1970
    I love when a debut from a new author is just what you've been looking for. I also love when a woman writes from a man's point of view and you have to keep checking the cover to see if it really is a woman writing flawlessly about a mans journey. The use of specifics and detail make reading about Toby so enjoyable and so relatable even though I am a different age and gender than the main character. I particularly enjoyed the reoccurring references to the ridiculous workout tops we stuff ourselve I love when a debut from a new author is just what you've been looking for. I also love when a woman writes from a man's point of view and you have to keep checking the cover to see if it really is a woman writing flawlessly about a mans journey. The use of specifics and detail make reading about Toby so enjoyable and so relatable even though I am a different age and gender than the main character. I particularly enjoyed the reoccurring references to the ridiculous workout tops we stuff ourselves into daily- so funny. While the topic of middle age divorce has certainly been covered, the way the author navigates the details is both fresh and insightful . The author does not follow the typical gender stereotypes, she sheds light on dads in the more traditional mom roles and wives in the more traditional husband roles. I also appreciate the role of Elizabeth as she relates to Toby and navigates the same season of life. I found it a little confusing to go back and forth between characters, but not enough to be distracted or put off. I look forward to future reads by this author. What drove me nuts: its super white, everyone seems to agree being a dr is an unambitious job (???)I was given an advanced copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Ed to add: Her writing reminded me of the author Tom Perotta
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  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    https://wordnerdy.blogspot.com/2019/0...The entire internet seems to be buzzing about this book, and I love the author's essays and profiles, so I was psyched to read her first novel. But it left me a little bit cold. It centers on a 41-year-old man, in the process of divorcing, who's trying to be a good dad to his kids and a good doctor where he works, except he’s obsessed with hooking up with women via dating apps. Like I really needed about 80 percent less of this guy and his horny thoughts. https://wordnerdy.blogspot.com/2019/0...The entire internet seems to be buzzing about this book, and I love the author's essays and profiles, so I was psyched to read her first novel. But it left me a little bit cold. It centers on a 41-year-old man, in the process of divorcing, who's trying to be a good dad to his kids and a good doctor where he works, except he’s obsessed with hooking up with women via dating apps. Like I really needed about 80 percent less of this guy and his horny thoughts. Once we meet the narrator, things are a little more interesting, and I liked the last say 20 percent a lot (the end is amazing), but I just was not feeling this. Maybe it’s because I’m not married and don’t have kids, and it seems to be thinking deeply about those subjects? Or maybe because so much of it is about a dude thinking about all the ladies he is banging or wants to bang. Maybe both! But the more I think about it, the more depressing I find it. B.__A review copy was provided by the publisher. This book will be released in June.
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  • Dana S
    January 1, 1970
    This book is the story of a marriage, and pushes the reader to see both sides of the story. While the characters are not particularly likable, they're realistic, and I quickly found myself invested in their lives. It also nicely contemplates dating in a digital age, both easing and complicating relationships. My interest faded in the middle, but I found the ending pulled me back in. It is told through the perspective of a secondary character, for reasons that I didn't understand until late in th This book is the story of a marriage, and pushes the reader to see both sides of the story. While the characters are not particularly likable, they're realistic, and I quickly found myself invested in their lives. It also nicely contemplates dating in a digital age, both easing and complicating relationships. My interest faded in the middle, but I found the ending pulled me back in. It is told through the perspective of a secondary character, for reasons that I didn't understand until late in the book, but in the end I found the side characters important in their own ways. There was a lot of sexual content-- more than I thought was necessary, but easy to skim if desired. While there were sometimes several different stories going on, I didn't find this confusing, because they eventually lend perspective on the others-- on the meaning of commitment even as people grow and change.I was given an advanced copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Kim McGee
    January 1, 1970
    Toby Fleishman is newly separated and on the prowl. His job keeps him busy but not too busy to have sex with any female and see his two kids who he adores. While re-discovering himself sexually, which seems like he is doing with half of Manhatten, his ex-wife drops the kids off at his place and disappears. While she has never been the mother of the year, she is still taking care of the kids half the time and now has left Toby to shoulder all their needs 24/7. Summer camp helps as does a few days Toby Fleishman is newly separated and on the prowl. His job keeps him busy but not too busy to have sex with any female and see his two kids who he adores. While re-discovering himself sexually, which seems like he is doing with half of Manhatten, his ex-wife drops the kids off at his place and disappears. While she has never been the mother of the year, she is still taking care of the kids half the time and now has left Toby to shoulder all their needs 24/7. Summer camp helps as does a few days off of work but he still can't locate her so hence the book's title- he is in trouble. When he doesn't find her he must come to the realization that he has to make this work for his kids. All of this just makes him still ponder what exactly went wrong with his marriage, his work and his life. Sometimes you have to be thrown into chaos to find the important things. My thanks to the publisher for the advance copy.
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  • Cindy
    January 1, 1970
    I consider this book a social commentary on marriage, divorce, mid-life dating and raising a family and as I find common in the social commentary genre it was a bit strange. My reading experience was a roller coaster ride - It has a strong opening, then it had a lull and I almost stopped reading it but it was just interesting enough to keep me turning the pages and then it got better and better and I didn't want to put it down. Unexpectedly in part three, the plot stopped working for me and I lo I consider this book a social commentary on marriage, divorce, mid-life dating and raising a family and as I find common in the social commentary genre it was a bit strange. My reading experience was a roller coaster ride - It has a strong opening, then it had a lull and I almost stopped reading it but it was just interesting enough to keep me turning the pages and then it got better and better and I didn't want to put it down. Unexpectedly in part three, the plot stopped working for me and I lost interest again. I must say I definitely found myself rooting for Toby throughout the book. The roller coaster ride made this a hard one to score on a 5 point scale! Due to my love of the middle I gave it a 4. If you like social commentaries I'd definitely give this one a read.Thank you to NetGalley for providing me an early release in exchange for an honest and fair review.
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  • Ashleigh Ruhl
    January 1, 1970
    An artist strung together the words in this ambitious novel, but it isn't a pretty story. It's an insightful, playful, and disturbing look at falling in and possibly out of love in the modern day.Fleishman's third-party narrator is a woman named Elizabeth, a character with her own dramas and biases at play who recounts a couple's (the Fleishmans) divorce, sex life, and marriage. Expect to be engaged by punctuations of sharp and comical wit, but brace yourself for what I personally found to be an An artist strung together the words in this ambitious novel, but it isn't a pretty story. It's an insightful, playful, and disturbing look at falling in and possibly out of love in the modern day.Fleishman's third-party narrator is a woman named Elizabeth, a character with her own dramas and biases at play who recounts a couple's (the Fleishmans) divorce, sex life, and marriage. Expect to be engaged by punctuations of sharp and comical wit, but brace yourself for what I personally found to be an emotionally draining novel with an arguably ambiguous end. This is a good literary read, but it isn't the book for everybody. And, don't be fooled by the book jacket: This is not the suspenseful plot someone might expect from a tale that revolves around a husband whose wife has literally and metaphorically disappeared.
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  • Ilyssa Wesche
    January 1, 1970
    First I was like, if Rachel is dead I'm going to be so irritated. But we find out quickly enough that she isn't. After that, I was in. We got a LOT more of Toby's side than of Rachel's, but it was good to get both.Not only did we get less of Rachel's story, but I thought there would be more hidden emotional labor. But maybe I was just hoping for that.The only thing I found super annoying (other than the daughter!) was...I mean, you're asking me to feel sorry for a doctor on the UES of Manhattan, First I was like, if Rachel is dead I'm going to be so irritated. But we find out quickly enough that she isn't. After that, I was in. We got a LOT more of Toby's side than of Rachel's, but it was good to get both.Not only did we get less of Rachel's story, but I thought there would be more hidden emotional labor. But maybe I was just hoping for that.The only thing I found super annoying (other than the daughter!) was...I mean, you're asking me to feel sorry for a doctor on the UES of Manhattan, and you're not even the big earner in the family. Not that we don't all have our troubles, and it isn't easy to be a single parent, but it's a lot fucking easier when you get a $7500 alimony check every month.The end tho - just blew me out of the water.
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  • Lisa Gabriele
    January 1, 1970
    In trying to describe to a friend what made this compulsive book so much fun to read, I said it felt "lived in", like I knew these people and trusted everything the author told me about Toby, Rachel, and the bitchy, wired bunch of people surrounding them and their failed marriage. Part Maria Semple, part (funny) Philip Roth, this is a romp through bad love, old friends, the big city, new dating rituals (by turns starkly depressing and very sexy), the poetry of the human liver, and the gift (and In trying to describe to a friend what made this compulsive book so much fun to read, I said it felt "lived in", like I knew these people and trusted everything the author told me about Toby, Rachel, and the bitchy, wired bunch of people surrounding them and their failed marriage. Part Maria Semple, part (funny) Philip Roth, this is a romp through bad love, old friends, the big city, new dating rituals (by turns starkly depressing and very sexy), the poetry of the human liver, and the gift (and horror) of looking at your life in a new way. A ridiculously confident debut by one of my favourite writers. Can't wait for her next one.
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  • Andrienne
    January 1, 1970
    Toby’s marriage is uncertain. He’s a successful doctor in NYC but his ambitious and cutthroat wife outearns him by a lot. During an arranged child care dropoff, his wife fails to show and he’s left to juggle single parenting, mediocre career and a budding midlife crisis on his own. Full of acute life truths, it has plenty to say about marriage and what’s important in life. Thanks to the publisher for the advance reading copy.
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  • Angela
    January 1, 1970
    It took me a while to get into this book, but halfway through I couldn't put it down. It's a uniquely whimsical and surprisingly insightful read, with lessons on marriage, motherhood, and life. While none of the characters are particularly likable, their flaws are both realistic and recognizable.I highlighted all over the place and finished this book thinking I'd read something important. Highly recommend.Thanks to NetGalley and Random House for providing an advance copy in exchange for an hones It took me a while to get into this book, but halfway through I couldn't put it down. It's a uniquely whimsical and surprisingly insightful read, with lessons on marriage, motherhood, and life. While none of the characters are particularly likable, their flaws are both realistic and recognizable.I highlighted all over the place and finished this book thinking I'd read something important. Highly recommend.Thanks to NetGalley and Random House for providing an advance copy in exchange for an honest review!
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  • Kerry Pickens
    January 1, 1970
    This book was surprisingly funny, and I enjoyed the Jewish aspects of the story. The main character is a Jewish doctor who is going through a mid-life crisis. He gets divorced and realizes that he is now besieged with sexually aggressive women, and although he enjoys the attention he is not quite sure what to think about the tactics. I also could relate to his attempts to co-parent with a narcissist, self-centered ex who just disappears based on her own whims and doesn't focus on the children's This book was surprisingly funny, and I enjoyed the Jewish aspects of the story. The main character is a Jewish doctor who is going through a mid-life crisis. He gets divorced and realizes that he is now besieged with sexually aggressive women, and although he enjoys the attention he is not quite sure what to think about the tactics. I also could relate to his attempts to co-parent with a narcissist, self-centered ex who just disappears based on her own whims and doesn't focus on the children's needs at all. Life is a struggle.
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  • Nicole Cox
    January 1, 1970
    I would agree with other reviewers that the story Fleishman Is in Trouble, is insightful, and funny, but generally leaves me feeling despair about marriage, and the expectation of women in marriage despite the stories' main perspective being the narration of the man, friend, husband, and father that is Fleishman.
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  • Gail O'Connor
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting story on a husbands viewpoiint of ending his marriage and dealing with relationships.His humor, dating apps and attitude with woman were a little too much over the top for me.Couldn't get into it.
  • Dorre
    January 1, 1970
    One of the best books I’ve read this year . Divorce , family life and dating this book has it all. Highly recommend! Thank you to netgalley for providing me this book in exchange for an honest review.
  • Morgan Schulman
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advanced reader’s copy in exchange for an honest review Men, they’re just like us. Except clueless. But you can’t help but feel for Fleishman, although, as a 42 year old working wife and mother, I really didnt want to, but he sucked me in despite myself.
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  • Mike Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    I feel very conflicted about this book. It really "went for it," but came up short throughout. It might be something I reread in a few years and feel more definitive (one way or another) about.
  • Lauren Gershell
    January 1, 1970
    Pure brilliance. This book felt like a gift in my life- so grateful to have received an early copy!
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