All That You Leave Behind
An acclaimed documentary filmmaker comes to terms with her larger-than-life father, the late New York Times journalist David Carr, in this fierce memoir of love, addiction, and family. Dad: What will set you apart is not talent, but will and a certain kind of humility. A willingness to let the world show you things that you play back as you grow as an artist. Talent is cheap. Me: ok i will ponder these things. I am a carr.Dad: that should matter quite a bit, actually not the name but the guts of what that name means.A celebrated journalist, bestselling author, and recovering addict, David Carr was in the prime of his career when he collapsed in the newsroom of The New York Times in 2015. Shattered by his death, his daughter Erin Lee Carr, an up-and-coming documentary filmmaker at age twenty-seven, began combing through the entirety of their shared correspondence--1,936 items in total.What started as an exercise in grief quickly grew into an active investigation: Did her father's writings contain the answers to the questions of how to move forward in life and work without your biggest champion by your side? How could she fill the space left behind by a man who had come to embody journalistic integrity, rigor, and hard reporting, whose mentorship meant everything not just to her, but to the many who served alongside him?In All That You Leave Behind, David Carr's legacy is a lens through which Erin comes to understand her own workplace missteps, existential crises, relationship fails, and toxic relationship with alcohol. Featuring photographs and emails from the author's personal collection, this coming-of-age memoir unpacks the complex relationship between a daughter and her father, their mutual addictions and challenges with sobriety, and the powerful sense of work and family that comes to define them.

All That You Leave Behind Details

TitleAll That You Leave Behind
Author
ReleaseApr 9th, 2019
PublisherBallantine Books
ISBN-139780399179716
Rating
GenreAutobiography, Memoir, Nonfiction, Biography

All That You Leave Behind Review

  • Book of the Month
    January 1, 1970
    Why I love itby Book of the MonthErin: I have watched you in the middle of the city with a box of your office crap and alone in a room struggling to make beautiful important things. As someone who has seen a fair amount of talented young people up close, I can say that you are in the far reaches of that bunch.So wrote David Carr, the late New York Times columnist in an email to his daughter, the author of this heart-smart and dazzling memoir. Technically, this is Erin’s story of growing up, stru Why I love itby Book of the MonthErin: I have watched you in the middle of the city with a box of your office crap and alone in a room struggling to make beautiful important things. As someone who has seen a fair amount of talented young people up close, I can say that you are in the far reaches of that bunch.So wrote David Carr, the late New York Times columnist in an email to his daughter, the author of this heart-smart and dazzling memoir. Technically, this is Erin’s story of growing up, struggling through a string of internships, and finding her way into documentary filmmaking. But at its heart, this book is a tribute to David, the brilliant editor, former addict, and occasionally mercurial father. In fact, some of the best moments in All That You Leave Behind—a coming-of-age story set in the glamorous-yet-grimy world of New York media—are these father-daughter correspondences, which are by turns vulnerable, wise, whacky and ferociously affectionate.What’s interesting about this book is that it’s both deeply personal and universal. As a retelling of their relationship, it’s safe to say this book isn’t for anyone but Erin and David. On the other hand, by examining their bond, Erin arrives at a story that feels utterly relatable in its complications and kindnesses.Read more at: https://bookofthemonth.com/all-that-y...
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  • Jennifer Bouchillon
    January 1, 1970
    This is not a book I normally would have chosen for myself, but I read it as an ARC, and I’m glad I did. It took me a little bit to get into it, maybe because I didn’t know either Erin or David Carr. But ultimately I found it poignant and insightful, both to the relationship between a father and daughter, and as an inside look at generational addiction.I was inspired by the author’s honesty in sharing her fears, struggles, mistakes, regrets, and her grief. I loved that she didn’t paint herself o This is not a book I normally would have chosen for myself, but I read it as an ARC, and I’m glad I did. It took me a little bit to get into it, maybe because I didn’t know either Erin or David Carr. But ultimately I found it poignant and insightful, both to the relationship between a father and daughter, and as an inside look at generational addiction.I was inspired by the author’s honesty in sharing her fears, struggles, mistakes, regrets, and her grief. I loved that she didn’t paint herself or her father in a perfect light, but instead laid bare their shortcomings in a way that made these unknown-to-me people come to life and had me rooting for and grieving with them. I think I’ll now enjoy reading David Carr’s The Night of the Gun.
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  • Athena Rupas
    January 1, 1970
    All That You Leave Behind is written by Erin Carr, the beloved New York Times columnist David Carr who passed away February 12, 2015. In this memoir, Erin Carr talks about her own struggles with addiction, which her father battled too as chronicled in his own memoir Night of the Gun. Erin's book is essentially about her relationship with her father who was also her mentor. She tells about how she faces many of the same demons (addiction) that her father did as well.What I liked the most about th All That You Leave Behind is written by Erin Carr, the beloved New York Times columnist David Carr who passed away February 12, 2015. In this memoir, Erin Carr talks about her own struggles with addiction, which her father battled too as chronicled in his own memoir Night of the Gun. Erin's book is essentially about her relationship with her father who was also her mentor. She tells about how she faces many of the same demons (addiction) that her father did as well.What I liked the most about the book was that Erin includes email exchanges with her father, so it's as if you get to hear his voice in the book. I think that concept is really cool and unique. It allows Erin to really give us a real sense of what their relationship was. I had a hard time putting my kindle down, I was that enthralled with the book. I've always been a big fan of David Carr and I am glad NetGalley allowed me to preview this book in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Stacey A. Prose and Palate
    January 1, 1970
    I was gifted with a wonderful dad who told me over and over how much he loved me. So many people do not get that. Yes, we want more time but I, right now at this moment feel gratitude for what I had. ..... I try to say “I love you” every day to him. Just in case he is in a place quiet enough to hear it. The skeptic in me doubts that he listens, but I still do it.” I stopped and started Erin Lee Carr's gorgeous memoir about six times last week. The only reason that I kept putting it down was beca I was gifted with a wonderful dad who told me over and over how much he loved me. So many people do not get that. Yes, we want more time but I, right now at this moment feel gratitude for what I had. ..... I try to say “I love you” every day to him. Just in case he is in a place quiet enough to hear it. The skeptic in me doubts that he listens, but I still do it.” I stopped and started Erin Lee Carr's gorgeous memoir about six times last week. The only reason that I kept putting it down was because I could no longer see the words on the page through my tears. ••All That You Leave Behind is Erin’s powerful memoir and tribute to her late father David, who passed away very unexpectedly four years ago. Erin finds herself completely unmoored by his absence and so she begins to sift through their correspondence. I did this very thing after my dad died, reading texts and emails over and over... watching videos of him and playing back voicemails just so I could hear him one more time. Being the prolific journalist that her father was, Erin was fortunate to have thousands of tweets, emails and film at her finger tips and the end result of that is this incredibly stirring story of a flawed man whose encouragement and big love for his daughters never wavered. His words and the life lessons that are found throughout this book are not only a gift to her, but a gift to all of us. Through Erin’s words, my heart was shattered - I could hardly get through some of the passages because I completely understood what she was experiencing and they made me miss my dad so much. Through her father’s words, my heart was put back together again because I was tenderly reminded of what it’s like to bask in the love of someone who is your biggest champion whether you are riding high on the waves of success or have hit rock bottom and are not sure how you will ever get back up. I am very grateful for Sarita's (of @sunflowerwrites) beautiful soul who buddy read this book with me. ❤️ I hope you will take a moment on this Monday morning and reach out to someone you care about... life passes too quickly to leave things unsaid. Thank you, Book of the Month for another amazing selection.
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  • Rachel Jackson
    January 1, 1970
    [In full disclosure, I received All That You Leave Behind as a Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review.]Back in my journalism days, I used to be among the masses who loved David Carr's writing. A highly renowned New York Times journalist, his columns and tweets were legendary among fellow journos, and I remember being enthralled when the documentary "Page One" came out. When I heard about his daughter Erin Lee Carr's memoir about his life and their relationship, I was curious what fu [In full disclosure, I received All That You Leave Behind as a Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review.]Back in my journalism days, I used to be among the masses who loved David Carr's writing. A highly renowned New York Times journalist, his columns and tweets were legendary among fellow journos, and I remember being enthralled when the documentary "Page One" came out. When I heard about his daughter Erin Lee Carr's memoir about his life and their relationship, I was curious what further informaiton she could provide about his life, separate from the gargantuan media reputation that he had both before and after his untimely death.Unfortunately, Carr's memoir falls flat of my expectations and wasn't able to hold my interest as I read along. The book is a chronicle of the relationship between David and Erin as they both struggled through addiction, careers and relationships with their families, but I found it devoid of compelling content and anything worth relating to. Instead, Erin Lee Carr sounded like a whiny, privileged girl the entire book through, making irresponsible choices, staying in denial, ignoring the feelings of people around her. I became annoyed with her the more she wrote about her life's experiences. Rather than providing a touching daughter's perspective into the life of David Carr, Erin Lee Carr made her father sound even more annoying and dangerous—which is eye-opening, for sure, but not in the way she was probably going for. And she also plays into that same tone herself, hyping up the party-girl reputation she had when she was drinking while not broadening her narrative into a deeper connection with her father. And indeed, Erin Lee Carr had so many opportunities to make All That You Leave Behind into a powerful memoir that connected father to daughter to community, but instead it was self-serving and frankly poorly written. She's a filmmaker, and that was obvious as I read along, since she failed to make meaningful stories or morals in her writing, the way that I kept hoping for and was disappointed about every time. Both she and her father have interesting stories if they were told properly, but it didn't work here. It was very disconnected and random in certain places, and the way she told the story didn't work with the content within it.It seems like the whole process of writing all of this out for the book was part of Erin Lee Carr's grieving process, which is certainly a healthy way to address those types of feelings. But it came across as much too stream-of-consciousness, word-vomit type of writing rather than a cohesive story. Telling a story as an output for grief has so much potential to leave an impact. But unfortunately I found myself doing a bit of hate-reading as I went, and I was wishing the book could be over with more quickly.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic memoir written by a woman who loses her (fascinating, complicated, famous in some circles) father far too soon. Beautifully written and an excellent listen on audiobook.
  • Anthony De Rosa
    January 1, 1970
    Erin's writing debut is crackling. Her words leap off the page. Punchy, to the point but without lacking details that paint a vivid picture of a chaotic life that she's managed to navigate through grit and hustle. The shadow of her legendary father looms large, a double edged sword that helped open doors but also forced her to prove her own talents, which she's done with this memoir and her exceptional documentary work. It stands on its own, but also works as a great compliment to her father's N Erin's writing debut is crackling. Her words leap off the page. Punchy, to the point but without lacking details that paint a vivid picture of a chaotic life that she's managed to navigate through grit and hustle. The shadow of her legendary father looms large, a double edged sword that helped open doors but also forced her to prove her own talents, which she's done with this memoir and her exceptional documentary work. It stands on its own, but also works as a great compliment to her father's Night Of The Gun, filling in the spaces where I wished to have heard more of her side of the story. Erin bravely shares the raw details of her complicated family and romantic relationships, struggles with addiction, the deep despair that comes with the loss of a father/mentor, and her strive to find her place as an artist on her own terms and merits. Erin managed to capture both the darkness and the light of her experience and provides a useful guide for how others might also find their way through to the other side.
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  • Barbara Zeller
    January 1, 1970
    A raw, honest, no punches pulled memoir. For fans of David or Erin Carr, budding journalists, grieving souls, this book is a must read. Superbly written. Could not put it down. Erin talks about how her dad mentored her into journalism, his invaluable advice and tough love. She is brutally honest about her and his struggles with alcohol, the pain it caused them both. She expertly shows the love he felt for his family and work. We are all flawed. Erin puts hers right out there. She has picked up t A raw, honest, no punches pulled memoir. For fans of David or Erin Carr, budding journalists, grieving souls, this book is a must read. Superbly written. Could not put it down. Erin talks about how her dad mentored her into journalism, his invaluable advice and tough love. She is brutally honest about her and his struggles with alcohol, the pain it caused them both. She expertly shows the love he felt for his family and work. We are all flawed. Erin puts hers right out there. She has picked up the story-telling gift from her dad, with a lot of hard work. I look forward to her future endeavors.
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  • Stacia Manion
    January 1, 1970
    To disclose all of the reasons why I relate SO hard to this book would be an overshare of the longest and most cringeworthy sort. The book is short, but I took in every word slowly and will do so again, no doubt. Additionally, I took a night off from reading to watch Thought Crimes, which I can also wholly 5-star recommend (though, I agree with your dad, girl: wayyy too much of Gil eating!)And finally, I took MANY many moments to text my dad and a full two hours this last Saturday to speak with To disclose all of the reasons why I relate SO hard to this book would be an overshare of the longest and most cringeworthy sort. The book is short, but I took in every word slowly and will do so again, no doubt. Additionally, I took a night off from reading to watch Thought Crimes, which I can also wholly 5-star recommend (though, I agree with your dad, girl: wayyy too much of Gil eating!)And finally, I took MANY many moments to text my dad and a full two hours this last Saturday to speak with him on the phone (ON THE PHONE - THAT'S NOT ME). It was lovely and David Carr's words of encouragement (and disappointment) to Erin are just so similar to my own father's unwavering support (and disappointment) for me; this memoir made me want to hug him every last day of his life and thank him endlessly for being my amazing dad.
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  • Jillian
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked this book. I’m not big on media or movies or things like that, but still found the story compelling. It was a good tribute to her father and it was really easy to read. Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    Erin Carr poured utter and raw honesty and emotion in her memoir, All That You Leave Behind. I admire and respect her courage to share her tumultuous past and her intense relationship she had with her dad and family with her readers. She must have struggled as she recounted her life as she chose which parts to share, and I’m guessing she shed many a tear and experienced grief and sorrow again and again as she wrote it. I found her story beautifully told, and though I am not familiar with her or Erin Carr poured utter and raw honesty and emotion in her memoir, All That You Leave Behind. I admire and respect her courage to share her tumultuous past and her intense relationship she had with her dad and family with her readers. She must have struggled as she recounted her life as she chose which parts to share, and I’m guessing she shed many a tear and experienced grief and sorrow again and again as she wrote it. I found her story beautifully told, and though I am not familiar with her or her father, I am now intrigued to learn more about them.
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  • Scott Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    For a book so frequently humbling to the author, it still suggests that much has been withheld. The net is something affecting but shallow: a grief memoir that, quite reasonably, takes for granted the reader's native interest in David Carr but does so at the expense of maximum interrogation, and an addiction memoir that likewise assumes, and frequently refers to, David Carr's own addiction and addiction memoir as a means to establish genetic connectivity without plumbing it very deeply, either.T For a book so frequently humbling to the author, it still suggests that much has been withheld. The net is something affecting but shallow: a grief memoir that, quite reasonably, takes for granted the reader's native interest in David Carr but does so at the expense of maximum interrogation, and an addiction memoir that likewise assumes, and frequently refers to, David Carr's own addiction and addiction memoir as a means to establish genetic connectivity without plumbing it very deeply, either.There's also not a lot of questioning here about the layers of privilege attending the author's journey. One of the harsher, though perhaps least intended, takeaways about David Carr here is that, however earned it surely was, his own authority as a writer and thinker was thoroughly intertwined with that of the Times. The paper was mace and shield for him, and even here, in his daughter's book, there's the feeling that it infected him with a self-importance sometimes unbecoming -- and in keeping with that of his peers, especially in the Trump era that postdates his death. There's something sort of cringe-inducing, to me anyway, about the scenes of his wake and his funeral, with its media A-list. I would like to imagine that David Carr would be among the most critical media watchers were he alive today; but this book is a reminder that, to a certain echelon of media, of which Carr was a member and which he clearly relished, it's all a game. So, yeah, this is a book for people who miss David Carr, and it shows him as a devoted but complex and very flawed parent. It also shows that, while storytelling may be heritable, elitism and succession in media aren't good things.
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    OH MY. I know David Carr the writer & it was heartbreaking and raw and beautiful to read about David Carr the father. I give Erin Lee Carr so much credit for sharing such a personal look at her relationship with her father, a man so many people felt a connection to. Especially since much of the story was about her own personal battles. She is a talented young woman who got so much from her father.
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  • Emily Cornell
    January 1, 1970
    This was a book that couldn't be put down (even if it meant a disappointed husband who lost both his dinner and breakfast companion). Carr weaves together the pieces of her story using fragments from correspondence between herself and her father -- who amongst us hasn't done the same in an age when Google and Facebook messenger save even the things we're not sure are worth saving but who amongst us can also masterfully turn those scraps and threads into a book?
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  • Hillary Copsey
    January 1, 1970
    This is about Erin Lee Carr's addiction as much as it is about her grief over her father's death and her struggle to be in the world without him. She doesn't spare herself, but she's sensitive to her stepmother and sisters -- they're here, as they must be, but in parts, only as needed -- and generous with her father, sharing his emails and texts to her. If you've read The Night Of The Gun and/or followed David Carr's career, his daughter's book is a biting, bittersweet epilogue to his story.
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  • Emily Kennard
    January 1, 1970
    Brutally honest. Must read.
  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    This was one of the hardest books I have read in the last couple years. But it was so necessary.
  • Kristen Mcknight
    January 1, 1970
    This was quite an emotionally heavy book that dealt with many complicated topics.I think I'm ready for a light read!
  • Mary Bierbaum
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent readErin Carr you are a talented courageous truthful writer. You spoke from your heart and took us on your journey in life and the magnificent relationship you had with your dad. He will always live in your heart. We MN relatives say congrats on a job well done.
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  • Danielle
    January 1, 1970
    Erin Carr is the daughter of well-know New York Times columnist David Carr who died in 2015. He wrote his own memoir Night of the Gun which chronicled his battle with drug and alcohol addiction. In this memoir Carr presents her own story of addiction but it's ultimately about her relationship with David Carr as both her father and mentor and how she faces many of the same demons he did. I read Night of the Gun when it came out and this book is a really nice companion piece to it. It was a really Erin Carr is the daughter of well-know New York Times columnist David Carr who died in 2015. He wrote his own memoir Night of the Gun which chronicled his battle with drug and alcohol addiction. In this memoir Carr presents her own story of addiction but it's ultimately about her relationship with David Carr as both her father and mentor and how she faces many of the same demons he did. I read Night of the Gun when it came out and this book is a really nice companion piece to it. It was a really compelling read that I couldn't put down. Carr includes many email exchanges she had with her father in the book so it also has his voice and you get a real sense of their relationship. If I had rated this book immediately after I finished reading it I probably would have rated it a tiny bit higher, but having a couple of days to reflect on it I downgraded my rating a little bit. The book is purposefully and specifically about Carr's relationship with her father and dealing with his death, which is a very legitimate point of view for her to take in the book. It's also totally makes sense if she felt like she didn't have a right to write about personal details of her living family members. However, because she mostly avoids talking about her relationships with her twin sister, her younger sister, and her step-mom except in passing it felt like something was missing to fully flesh out her story. Ultimately I think this quibble is really more on me as a reader rather than on her as a writer. I definitely recommend this memoir, but I would highly suggest reading Night of the Gun first if you haven't already. In fact I suggest you read that book even if you have no intention of reading this one.
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  • Janilyn Kocher
    January 1, 1970
    All That You Leave Behind is a revealing, candid memoir of Erin Carr. It's also a tribute to her father. David Carr was the one constant in her life, her mentor, both father and mother, and her sounding board. Part of the memoir relates her growing up years and her father's challenges. Carr faced similar challenges, with alcohol. Suddenly, her go to person is no longer there to guide her and she's groundless for a time. Mining all the digital forms of communication between her father and herself All That You Leave Behind is a revealing, candid memoir of Erin Carr. It's also a tribute to her father. David Carr was the one constant in her life, her mentor, both father and mother, and her sounding board. Part of the memoir relates her growing up years and her father's challenges. Carr faced similar challenges, with alcohol. Suddenly, her go to person is no longer there to guide her and she's groundless for a time. Mining all the digital forms of communication between her father and herself, Carr compiles a guide for living and gets on with getting on. It's a revealing story about how one has to cope with a demise of a much relied upon parent, in so many aspects. Thanks to NetGalley for the advance copy.
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    It was a really great book. It totally painted a picture for me of her life and her relationship with her father. You don't have to know who David Carr is to enjoy the memoir. I had no idea who he was going into it and I loved it. A must read for anyone who loves reading memoirs. It made me want to go out and pick up David Carr's own memoir.
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  • justjotter
    January 1, 1970
    Raw, honest, thought-provoking. Erin Lee Carr's dad, David has had more influence on my writing life and career than anyone. When he collapsed in the NYT newsroom, I felt like a big chunk of me went with him. If someone like myself, who'd never had the pleasure of meeting him felt this gutted, one can hardly fathom how his daughter felt. Till now. For anyone who has struggled with sudden loss, this book is. a must. It shines light on the darkest corners and leaves you with the comfort that you a Raw, honest, thought-provoking. Erin Lee Carr's dad, David has had more influence on my writing life and career than anyone. When he collapsed in the NYT newsroom, I felt like a big chunk of me went with him. If someone like myself, who'd never had the pleasure of meeting him felt this gutted, one can hardly fathom how his daughter felt. Till now. For anyone who has struggled with sudden loss, this book is. a must. It shines light on the darkest corners and leaves you with the comfort that you are not alone. Others have been here, too. Having just lost my dad at 91 on January 1, 2019, I can relate. More-so, losing a dear friend suddenly in December. Sudden, unexpected loss has proved to be the cruelest loss of all. They were there, you just saw them, talked, and then...gone - missing - lost. Human minds were not meant to grasp it. And although we may learn to deal with it, it never heals - it never goes away. There is a blank place and I struggle daily to imagine a time when it might be filled. If it can be filled. Doubtful. Yet, there has to be hope, right? When we look deeply and take away the lessons to be learned, seek some understanding, and communicate with others who have suffered similarly, we can gain something from the sadness. In this over-saturated, media crazy, constantly buzzing world, we learn that talking is key. For those fans of David Carr, there are chapters in this book that are difficult to read. Although I've longed to know what happened the night he died, the loss and shock of his passing come over you like a wave again. I bawled my heart out. Same with the funeral and the remembrances spoken by Erin and her sisters, friends and colleagues of David. Sharing such personal memories and truth is brave and takes incredible courage. To say nothing of the details of Erin's struggles with alcoholism. Having followed her on social media for many years, I had no clue she was going through such personal turmoil. She gave all the signs of a talented professional in total control. How people function so well amidst such struggle astounds. In the end, it's humanness, courage, dedication and strength that bursts forth - in the book and in Erin's life. One takeaway is that Erin still communicates and learns from David on a daily basis. As one who frequently turns to his writing for answers, I found this comforting. David's words and advice are timeless. They are there, preserved for the ages, and thank God for that! There is much Carr wisdom plastered in the spaces of my daily life. It is helpful and enormously comforting. As David reminds us, "writing is choosing." No one got to the heart of the matter like he did. Erin is following and filling his big shoes. Lucky us. It's refreshing when a long awaited book proves to be all you expected. Of course, we're left wanting more and I feel certain more will come from Erin. She certainly has the storyteller gift. This is blatantly clear in her amazing films, but I'm hopeful that she will take up the pen and write more in the future. PLEASE, Erin! Your Dad is grinning from ear-to-ear. Of that we can be assured. And, thank you!
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  • Alyssa
    January 1, 1970
    Erin Carr is a celebrated documentary filmmaker and the daughter of the late David Carr, a well-known New York Times writer (and infamous, longtime addict) who died suddenly in the Times newsroom.In the memoir, the younger Carr looks back on her somewhat tumultuous life with her larger-than-life father. And though she recalls some harrowing moments throughout the years when her father fell victim to his addiction, what really stands out are the moments when he was just being her dad. And it’s cl Erin Carr is a celebrated documentary filmmaker and the daughter of the late David Carr, a well-known New York Times writer (and infamous, longtime addict) who died suddenly in the Times newsroom.In the memoir, the younger Carr looks back on her somewhat tumultuous life with her larger-than-life father. And though she recalls some harrowing moments throughout the years when her father fell victim to his addiction, what really stands out are the moments when he was just being her dad. And it’s clear that Carr was an incredible father. He was unfailingly encouraging and effusive in his love for her. He was constantly telling her how proud he was of her and how much he loved her. They had an extraordinary relationship, and as readers, we get to be privy to it with Erin Carr’s amazing collection of conversations via email, text, and G-chat that she has saved and shares in the book.This book surprised me. I had expected it to be a dark tale of addiction (something that, unfortunately, was passed on from father to daughter), and though those moments are certainly there, the book is ultimately joyful, uplifting, and inspiring. You are able to witness an incredible father/daughter relationship, and two people that likely lived in a way that would not leave room for regrets. Carr’s early passing was certainly tragic, but at least there were no “I wish I would have told him this” thoughts. They loved each other and were open about their love. They said what needed to be said, and in that way, the book is really an unexpected model for the way parent/child relationships should be. And it really makes you want to call your dad. :)
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  • Melissa Ramirez
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely captivating. Most certainly, my best Book of the Month pick yet! Erin Carr weaves together her experiences in the world of film and media, with tidbits from her childhood and tender (as well as rough) moments with her dad, celebrated writer and columnist, David Carr. While I'm not familiar with either Carr's work, really, I consider myself a film nut (or, put more delicately, a film enthusiast) so the surface subject matter here appealed to me immensely, right off the bat. How could a Absolutely captivating. Most certainly, my best Book of the Month pick yet! Erin Carr weaves together her experiences in the world of film and media, with tidbits from her childhood and tender (as well as rough) moments with her dad, celebrated writer and columnist, David Carr. While I'm not familiar with either Carr's work, really, I consider myself a film nut (or, put more delicately, a film enthusiast) so the surface subject matter here appealed to me immensely, right off the bat. How could anything involving film be anything less than super? Erin Carr falls short of literary perfection, but let's get real for a moment: the idea of literary perfection is controversial. Memoirs are meant to tell true stories, they are designed to be raw and honest. In my mind, a memoir doesn't have to be technically perfect to be good. While parts of "Behind" feel a little cliche, Erin is trying to be honest in 'fessing up about her struggles with alcohol, grief, a broken family, an absent mom. She paints her dad as the shining light who held the family together; and this sense of genuine warmth and love is what makes the book. This is not a book about Erin Carr, or about David Carr. This is a book about relationships: successful, failed, (some, repeatedly so) and otherwise. This is a book about family, about finding work-life balance, about finding independence. Erin Carr really, truly, fiercely loves her dad, and it shows. This book shows everything her dad was, and is, and continues to be, wrapped in accessible, compulsively readable prose. All 5 stars!!! Full disclosure, I received this book as my Book of the Month for April. This in no way influenced my review.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    In 2015, Erin Lee Carr's father, the journalist David Carr, passed away. This book travels backward and forward in time from that point, talking about Erin's relationship with her dad, their shared struggles with substance abuse, her career and personal life, and how she coped with his death. While this book tells a very specific story of Erin's life and the role her father played, it also tells a larger story of parents and children everywhere and how our lives weave together. As a parent and a In 2015, Erin Lee Carr's father, the journalist David Carr, passed away. This book travels backward and forward in time from that point, talking about Erin's relationship with her dad, their shared struggles with substance abuse, her career and personal life, and how she coped with his death. While this book tells a very specific story of Erin's life and the role her father played, it also tells a larger story of parents and children everywhere and how our lives weave together. As a parent and a child, I was able to see things from both Erin's and David's point of view - I thought about what I'm doing well and what I could be doing better. One thing that I really appreciated about this book is that Erin doesn't make her dad into a saint. It's clear how much she loved and looked up to him, but she's also open about some of his flaws. I think that's comforting to hear - you don't have to be a perfect parent to be a good one. I also really loved the how the emails from David to Erin show the strong relationship they had. At the end of the book, Erin incudes a list of "Things I Learned from David Carr," such as "Listen when you enter a room," and "Don't be the first one to talk, but if you do talk first, say something smart." He shared countless life lessons with his daughter, and I'm glad she shared them with me. Thanks to NetGalley and Random House - Ballantine for the ARC.
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  • Christina
    January 1, 1970
    I liked All That You Leave Behind more than 3 stars but less than 4 (better than average, but not great). Erin Lee Carr, daughter of esteemed journalist David Carr, writes a raw memoir of living in her idolized father's shadow and wrestling with her grief after his sudden death. This book tells many stories but none seemed to delve deep enough for me: David Carr's life as a single parent and successful writer; Erin Carr's young life as an aspiring documentary filmmaker; Erin Carr's discomfort/pr I liked All That You Leave Behind more than 3 stars but less than 4 (better than average, but not great). Erin Lee Carr, daughter of esteemed journalist David Carr, writes a raw memoir of living in her idolized father's shadow and wrestling with her grief after his sudden death. This book tells many stories but none seemed to delve deep enough for me: David Carr's life as a single parent and successful writer; Erin Carr's young life as an aspiring documentary filmmaker; Erin Carr's discomfort/pride/fear of being her father's acolyte; Erin Carr's struggle with alcoholism. The author needed her father's connections to gain traction in their shared industry, yet she was left wondering if her successes were the result of her own talent or familial association. I wondered the same thing about the book. Was she telling her story because she is David Carr's daughter? I believe so. And that's OK. It's always interesting to read about the lives of people we admire. However, I just couldn't find a commonality with the author to make her story meaningful to me. As an aside, I thoroughly enjoyed the emails from her father she wove into her narrative.
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  • Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    I do think I love every book I commit to reading because there are gifts in each. I’m this memoir, Erin Carr gives so much on a truly enviable father/daughter relationship. The no-nonsense truth is passed from father to daughter, as does addictive personalities. Both father and daughter are passionate and fierce despite the ordinary self-doubt that creeps in, and seeing the ordinary in these two extraordinary people is at once enlightening and relatable. My own family is not without its characte I do think I love every book I commit to reading because there are gifts in each. I’m this memoir, Erin Carr gives so much on a truly enviable father/daughter relationship. The no-nonsense truth is passed from father to daughter, as does addictive personalities. Both father and daughter are passionate and fierce despite the ordinary self-doubt that creeps in, and seeing the ordinary in these two extraordinary people is at once enlightening and relatable. My own family is not without its characters and addictions, and I felt a familiarity with Erin’s emotions and reactions. Thank you, Erin, for sharing your search for yourself amidst your cast of characters. I loved the relationship between father and daughter, so different from mine, as well as the description of the way family members populate events, both joyful and grief-filled. And I love how Erin and her father own their part in their shortcomings while still creating and moving forward in life. Entertaining and inspirational for me. My next steps will be to look into her films and her father’s work.
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  • Kelcy
    January 1, 1970
    My first memoir/non-fiction...makes me want to read more, that is for sure.It feels weird to "rate" a memoir...even something like tone because it's a sharing of experiences and personal messages. I guess I'll just say it's not a 5-star as I wished more was explored regarding alcoholism and more of the struggles...seems like it was skimmed over or talked about lightly. But then again, I understand it is up to the writer to disclose.I did get emotional. Especially because I am very close to my da My first memoir/non-fiction...makes me want to read more, that is for sure.It feels weird to "rate" a memoir...even something like tone because it's a sharing of experiences and personal messages. I guess I'll just say it's not a 5-star as I wished more was explored regarding alcoholism and more of the struggles...seems like it was skimmed over or talked about lightly. But then again, I understand it is up to the writer to disclose.I did get emotional. Especially because I am very close to my dad, so reading this got hard for me when it came to topics of the morality of parents. I tend to not think about those things although it is important and reality. Definitely liked this book. Wished there was more in-depth exploration regarding some topics but again, hard to judge a memoir. I was very touched and will be reading more memoirs in the future.Fave part was the excerpt from his speech at UC at Berkeley commencement .
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  • Suzanne
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of All That You Leave Behind by Erin Lee Carr from Goodreads.The best part of the book would be the list of lessons learned from David Carr. This list is in the back of the book.All That You Leave Behind is Erin's story of her close bond with her father, David Carr. The legendary David Carr is a former addict. Erin Lee Carr struggles with her addiction and is in denial about her alcoholism. Mr. Carr uses his work contacts to open doors for Erin. Mr. Carr died at a young ag I received a free copy of All That You Leave Behind by Erin Lee Carr from Goodreads.The best part of the book would be the list of lessons learned from David Carr. This list is in the back of the book.All That You Leave Behind is Erin's story of her close bond with her father, David Carr. The legendary David Carr is a former addict. Erin Lee Carr struggles with her addiction and is in denial about her alcoholism. Mr. Carr uses his work contacts to open doors for Erin. Mr. Carr died at a young age in 2015. Erin lost her mentor. I do hope she doesn't let her grief over her father's death destroy her life and career. I think she can beat her addiction if she will acknowledge she has an addiction and follows her dad's list of lessons.You can do it, Erin. Don't give up.Thanks for writing All That You Leave Behind.
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