The Flight Girls
A stunning story about the Women Airforce Service Pilots whose courage during World War II turned ordinary women into extraordinary heroes1941. Audrey Coltrane has always wanted to fly. It's why she implored her father to teach her at the little airfield back home in Texas. It's why she signed up to train military pilots in Hawaii when the war in Europe began. And it's why she insists she is not interested in any dream-derailing romantic involvements, even with the disarming Lieutenant James Hart, who fast becomes a friend as treasured as the women she flies with. Then one fateful day, she gets caught in the air over Pearl Harbor just as the bombs begin to fall, and suddenly, nowhere feels safe.To make everything she's lost count for something, Audrey joins the Women Airforce Service Pilots program. The bonds she forms with her fellow pilots reignite a spark of hope in the face war, and--when James goes missing in action--give Audrey the strength to cross the front lines and fight not only for her country, but for the love she holds so dear.Shining a light on a little-known piece of history, The Flight Girls is a sweeping portrayal of women's fearlessness, love, and the power of friendship to make us soar.

The Flight Girls Details

TitleThe Flight Girls
Author
ReleaseJul 2nd, 2019
PublisherMIRA
ISBN-139780778369226
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, War, World War II

The Flight Girls Review

  • Norma * Traveling Sister
    January 1, 1970
    Fascinating, touching & entertaining!THE FLIGHT GIRLS by NOELLE SALAZAR is an enlightening, powerful and emotionally compelling historical fiction novel that has us following along fictionalized character, Audrey Coltrane and her involvement in the WASP program (Women Airforce Service Pilots) during World War II. NOELLE SALAZAR delivers an excellent, heartfelt, intriguing and well-written read here with wonderful, relatable, and well developed characters. The story is told from the first per Fascinating, touching & entertaining!THE FLIGHT GIRLS by NOELLE SALAZAR is an enlightening, powerful and emotionally compelling historical fiction novel that has us following along fictionalized character, Audrey Coltrane and her involvement in the WASP program (Women Airforce Service Pilots) during World War II. NOELLE SALAZAR delivers an excellent, heartfelt, intriguing and well-written read here with wonderful, relatable, and well developed characters. The story is told from the first person perspective of our main character, Audrey Coltrane and I absolutely loved her voice. She definitely captured my attention and my heart as well as the other WASP women. The bond that these women shared was absolutely beautiful and I absolutely loved and admired how courageous and brave they were.At times I felt that this storyline was simplified and rushed a little bit though because there was this strong romantic theme that I wasn't really expecting and sort of took away from the main historical story for me. In the end though I was able to put all my concerns aside and had me rooting for a happy ending for Audrey and James.Norma’s Stats:Cover: My ARC didn’t come with the actual cover design so I feel that I am unable to actually voice how I feel about it. Although I think the actual book cover is quite beautiful. Title: I absolutely love how intriguing and enticing that title is and think it’s a fantastic representation to storyline.Writing/Prose: Well-written, entertaining, engaging, readable, and compelling.Plot: Engrossing, heartfelt, interesting, steadily-paced, and entertaining.Ending: A touching and happy ending that left me feeling satisfied.Overall: 3.5 Stars! The role that these brave female pilots played was absolutely extraordinary and made this quite the captivating and irresistible page-turner. Would recommend!Thank you so much to Eden at Harlequin Trade Publishing / Mira Books and Noelle Salazar for the opportunity to read an advanced copy of this book. It was an absolute pleasure reading this historical fiction novel!Review can also be found on our Two Sisters Lost in a Coulee Reading book blog:https://twosisterslostinacoulee.com/
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  • Lindsay - Traveling Sister
    January 1, 1970
    4 stars! Adventurous, heart wrenching and inspiring!Audrey Coltrane is a young female pilot whose passion for flying started when she was a child. When the war begins, she signs up to train military pilots knowing she is helping her country prepare for what may come. Facing constant criticism and stereotyping, she is proud of her career and the adventures she gets to take while doing something she loves. This story is inspired by the real team of female pilots who trained soldiers in WWII. I lov 4 stars! Adventurous, heart wrenching and inspiring!Audrey Coltrane is a young female pilot whose passion for flying started when she was a child. When the war begins, she signs up to train military pilots knowing she is helping her country prepare for what may come. Facing constant criticism and stereotyping, she is proud of her career and the adventures she gets to take while doing something she loves. This story is inspired by the real team of female pilots who trained soldiers in WWII. I loved Audrey’s character! She was intriguing and heart warming; her immense bravery was shocking and inspiring. Though I found her journey to be predictable at times, it kept me engrossed and interested throughout. The writing flowed beautifully and was well paced. There is a strong romance theme underlying the main wartime story which I found a tad much at times, but in the end I was rooting for the lovely couple. This was an excellent debut from Noelle Salazar and I look forward to what she writes next! This was a Traveling Sister read with Brenda and Norma which we all enjoyed. To find our reviews, please visit our blog at:https://twosisterslostinacoulee.com/2...Thank you to HarperCollins for sending me an ARC to read and review!
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  • Brenda - Traveling Sister
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 StarsThe Flight Girls makes for an inspiring, lighter historical fiction that explores the dynamics between the characters rather than the historical events to the story. The story focuses on one women’s strength and will to follow her passion here with our well developed main character Audrey Coltrane. Her passion leads her to joining the relatively unknown, Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) during WWII. Noelle Salazar does a great job here dramatizing the camaraderie as she explores the 3.5 StarsThe Flight Girls makes for an inspiring, lighter historical fiction that explores the dynamics between the characters rather than the historical events to the story. The story focuses on one women’s strength and will to follow her passion here with our well developed main character Audrey Coltrane. Her passion leads her to joining the relatively unknown, Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) during WWII. Noelle Salazar does a great job here dramatizing the camaraderie as she explores the compelling friendships between the women of the WASP. She adds some romance here as well for Audrey that added a bit more drama than I would have liked. I love stories that focus on the strong women of WWII and Noelle Salazar sure delivers here with these women who each have joined the WASP for their own reasons. I enjoyed the dynamics here and the connections formed between the women and was drawn into their world. I could feel the emotional depth of the story here with the women’s strength and fears as a team as well as Audrey’s own emotions. I could visualize what it might have been like for the real strong and courageous pilots. I highly recommend for a lighter historical fiction that is inspired by the real women pilots. Thank you so much to Eden at Harlequin Trade Publishing / Mira Books and Noelle Salazar for gifting me a copy of this book.This was a Sister read with Norma and Lindsay. For more reviews from us "The Traveling Sisters Three" for this title can be found on our bloghttps://twosisterslostinacoulee.com/2...
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  • Katie B
    January 1, 1970
    As soon as I saw the cover, I knew I had to read this book. I keep saying I need to lay off the World War 2 historical fiction for awhile, but the chance to learn a bit about the WASPs (Women Airforce Service Pilots) was an opportunity I couldn't pass up. Audrey Coltrane loves to fly planes and it's her dream to one day own an airfield back home in Texas. It's 1941 and she is saving up money while training military pilots in Hawaii. With that one goal taking up all of her focus, she doesn't care As soon as I saw the cover, I knew I had to read this book. I keep saying I need to lay off the World War 2 historical fiction for awhile, but the chance to learn a bit about the WASPs (Women Airforce Service Pilots) was an opportunity I couldn't pass up. Audrey Coltrane loves to fly planes and it's her dream to one day own an airfield back home in Texas. It's 1941 and she is saving up money while training military pilots in Hawaii. With that one goal taking up all of her focus, she doesn't care to be anything more than friends with the handsome and charming Lieutenant James Hart. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, Audrey joins the Women Airforce Service Pilots. This is a story about friendship, love, loss, determination, and courage.I'm so pleased the author chose to write about the WASPs as it helps with giving the women the recognition they deserve for the contributions to the war effort. While the characters in the book are fictional, I do think the author captured the spirit of the women and what they endured as participants in the program. I thought there was a nice balance of historical facts about the program and a solid fictional story about a woman determined to set her own path in life. I highly recommend reading the Author's Note at the end as it provides good context for her writing process. To me the sign of a good historical fiction book is after I'm done reading I'm motivated to learn even more about the topic which was the case here.Audrey was an easy character to root for even though she suffered from Irresistible Woman syndrome. She seemed to cast a spell over men but it didn't annoy me that much because she had a lot of good qualities including intelligence and confidence. I loved the camaraderie among the women and how they did tend to look after one another. This is a pretty quick read even though it's 350+ pages. There are some good emotional moments throughout the story and I recommend this one for fans of World War 2 historical fiction and/or books that feature strong female characters. Romance is certainly a part of the story but not the only thing going on so I think this book will appeal to many different readers.I received a free advance copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve said it before: the stories from WWII are endless, as are the numbers of people impacted. I never tire of these stories, and The Flight Girls is indeed a special one. ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ Have you heard of the Women Airforce Service Pilots from World War II? In 1941, Audrey Coltrane loves to fly. Her father taught her back home in Texas. She signs up to train military pilots in Hawaii as the war is starting. She’s also not interested in romance because she’s focused on her career, but she forms a stron I’ve said it before: the stories from WWII are endless, as are the numbers of people impacted. I never tire of these stories, and The Flight Girls is indeed a special one. ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ Have you heard of the Women Airforce Service Pilots from World War II? In 1941, Audrey Coltrane loves to fly. Her father taught her back home in Texas. She signs up to train military pilots in Hawaii as the war is starting. She’s also not interested in romance because she’s focused on her career, but she forms a strong friendship with Lieutenant James Hart. Audrey is in the air when Pearl Harbor is bombed. This spurs her to join the Women Airforce Service Pilots program. When James is missing, Audrey is fighting for her country and also for James. Oh my, strong women! I was so inspired by Audrey’s story and that of the women beside her. I adored Audrey, and I loved her relationships with all the other women. The bond was solid, and they looked out for each other as those in the military do. I breezed right through The Flight Girls. It’s written smoothly and evokes every emotion. There is a romance here, but at the center of the story is these formidable women and what they did to protect our country. A beautifully written, well-told story. I received a complimentary copy. All opinions are my own. My reviews can also be found on my blog: www.jennifertarheelreader.com
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  • Sara Ackerman
    January 1, 1970
    The Flight Girls captivated me from the first page and never let go. Salazar’s writing is lively and fresh, as we ride shotgun with a cast of memorable characters, an epic love story, and a powerful tale of courage and sacrifice by the Women Airforce Service Pilots during WWII. A spectacular first novel.I was lucky and got an advance copy!
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  • Stephanie (Stephanie's Novel Fiction)
    January 1, 1970
    I knew when I read the synopsis for The Flight Girls that I would enjoy this book immensely, and I wasn't wrong. My husband is an Air Force veteran with a private pilots license, so it's safe to say that I've spent plenty of my time in and around lots of planes over the past 25 years, either as a passenger or watching them from the ground. There's something magical about flying, and Noelle Salazar manages to perfectly capture that in her debut novel even amidst the most harrowing of times―WWII.A I knew when I read the synopsis for The Flight Girls that I would enjoy this book immensely, and I wasn't wrong. My husband is an Air Force veteran with a private pilots license, so it's safe to say that I've spent plenty of my time in and around lots of planes over the past 25 years, either as a passenger or watching them from the ground. There's something magical about flying, and Noelle Salazar manages to perfectly capture that in her debut novel even amidst the most harrowing of times―WWII.Audrey Coltrane has always known exactly what she wants: to fly planes and eventually own her own air hanger, not be tied down with a husband and children like her mother expects. When the Army begins hiring women pilots to train new male recruits how to fly, she immediately takes the job and heads to Pearl Harbor. There she makes friends, especially with Lt. James Hart, one of the few people to understands her dreams. It's also where she's caught up in the fateful attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, while up in the sky.Audrey's brave spirit continues to persevere through the war as she joins the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP), women trained by the army to ferry planes from one military base to another and test new and repaired aircraft before it was sent overseas, all without the benefits of militarization.Salazar's novel is immediately fascinating, her writing crisp, and the characters unforgettable, some heartbreakingly so. It's particularly apparent when reading the descriptions of the training Audrey and the other women in the program went through, their day to day lives, the hard realities of the program, the male-dominated environment, the accidents, the deaths that Salazar meticulously researched the WASP program and the histories of real-life WASP women because the novel has such a realistic feel within every description.What I loved most about this novel is the depictions of the relationships between the women in the program. Except for their love of flying, they couldn't have been any more different, yet they bonded and became such wonderful friends. Salazar captured such distinctive personalities and clearly showed how these women were breaking the glass ceiling for the generations of women to follow them.I've read many, many books about WWII but never one about the WASP women. Their courage, sacrifice, and heroism during WWII were spectacular and Salazar has written an excellent first novel depicting those attributes. It's also a love story and an epic one too. The Flight Girls is an emotionally compelling debut (yes, I cried), and I look forward to Salazar's next novel!**Thank you MIRA-Harlequin Publishers for the gifted copy. All opinions are my own.**
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    Easy 5 Stars. I daresay this will be one of my favorite books of the year. This book follows the fictional Audrey Coltrane before, during, and after her time as a WASP during WWII. The WASP program (Women Airforce Service Pilots) did jobs like ferrying military planes between bases, trained the men entering the airforce and tested both new and repaired planes before they were shipped back overseas, all without the protection of military status. While the book does have a fair bit of romance, the Easy 5 Stars. I daresay this will be one of my favorite books of the year. This book follows the fictional Audrey Coltrane before, during, and after her time as a WASP during WWII. The WASP program (Women Airforce Service Pilots) did jobs like ferrying military planes between bases, trained the men entering the airforce and tested both new and repaired planes before they were shipped back overseas, all without the protection of military status. While the book does have a fair bit of romance, the most compelling relationships were the ones Audrey grew with the other women in her program. The portrayal of these women was so well rounded, each one we met had a distinct personality. I loved that the author showed all types of women in the book: ones that were "feminine", ones that were "tomboys", mean girls, engaged girls, and women who never want to be married. A woman who spent hours on her hair and makeup could still fly circles around the men, and a woman who never wanted kids wasn't suddenly swayed from her choice by a pretty face. Overall this was an excellent debut and I can't wait to see what comes next!
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  • Karren Sandercock
    January 1, 1970
    Feisty Audrey Coltrane loves to fly planes and she has dreams of one day owning her own air field.Audrey's plans for her future don't include her settling down, getting married and having babies!The military has started hiring women to train male pilots in Hawaii and her dad encourages her to give it a go.Audrey moves to Hawaii and soon she's instructing younger male pilots to fly. She enjoys spending time with her new friends, swimming, going to beach parties and drinking cocktails.On the 7th o Feisty Audrey Coltrane loves to fly planes and she has dreams of one day owning her own air field.Audrey's plans for her future don't include her settling down, getting married and having babies!The military has started hiring women to train male pilots in Hawaii and her dad encourages her to give it a go.Audrey moves to Hawaii and soon she's instructing younger male pilots to fly. She enjoys spending time with her new friends, swimming, going to beach parties and drinking cocktails.On the 7th of December 1941 Pearl Harbor is attacked and bombed by the Japanese forces.Audrey at the time is giving a young pilot a flying lesson, she manages to land the plane while under enemy fire and no one is hurt.Nothing can prepare Audrey for what happens after she lands her plane, what once was paradise has been destroyed, damaged or on fire. During this time a fellow pilot Lieutenant James Hart keeps her safe, provides her with somewhere to live and they try to find out what happened to her friends?In the past, both Audrey and James have avoided romantic relationships, despite the obvious attraction between them they decide to just be good friends. Audrey leaves Hawaii, she returns to Texas, she promises to keep in touch with James and they start writing letters to each other.Audrey returns home, after a few months she grows restless, she want's to help her country as it's now involved in WW II, try to get over what happened to her and her friends in Hawaii.Audrey decides to join the WASP, women pilots are needed to transport planes to and from different military bases around the US, they also test new planes before there sent to England and used in combat.The women who join the WASP, start a rigorous training program, they need be physically fit, pass written exams, and while in training they discover how dangerous their job will be!I really enjoyed reading about Audrey and her friends experiences during training and the comaraderie between them all.Once she graduates Audrey is sent to Fort Sam Huston, here she again experiences prejudice from men as they assume a woman can't fly a big plane and she's working in very a dangerous conditions.Audrey continues to write to James, but she's very concerned by his letters, the war has changed him and in his last letter it's almost like he's saying goodbye to her? Will she ever see or hear from James again, she starts to really think about their relationship and are they just friends?Audrey and her fellow pilots work long hours, the war takes it's toll, both physically and mentally. I shed quite a few tears, when one of Audrey's friends dies in a tragic flying accident and it's breaks your heart.I really enjoyed The Flight Girls, thank you Mira Publishing and Noelle Salazar for giving me the chance to read her first book. I gave The Flight Girls four stars and look forward to reading her next book.
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  • Jenna Bookish
    January 1, 1970
    My thanks to NetGalley and MIRA for sending me an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own and are not influenced by the publisher. I’ll start this out by freely admitting that I seem to be in the minority opinion on this one. I read a lot of rave reviews and went in with super high hopes, ready for a WWII story with a lot of substance and a strong, interesting female protagonist. What I got felt more… fluffy romance set against a dark backdrop.The book My thanks to NetGalley and MIRA for sending me an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own and are not influenced by the publisher. I’ll start this out by freely admitting that I seem to be in the minority opinion on this one. I read a lot of rave reviews and went in with super high hopes, ready for a WWII story with a lot of substance and a strong, interesting female protagonist. What I got felt more… fluffy romance set against a dark backdrop.The book definitely plays lip service to the idea of a strong female lead, but it doesn’t really feel like it goes beyond that. Audrey is not like other girls because she likes to fly planes and doesn’t want to get married and have babies. The only reason she doesn’t want to get married and have babies, by the way, seems to be because it’d be nearly impossible to find a husband who would “allow” her to keep flying. I think this really gets at the heart of my issue with Audrey: that her love of flight really felt like her singular defining character trait. She never starting feeling like a person to me. I love that she had an unconventional passion for a woman of the time, but that’s not enough on its own to make her an interesting character.Another reviewer on Goodreads also pointed out some anachronisms in the novel. This truly isn’t something that bothers me as a reader (barring something ridiculous like if Audrey were to suddenly pull out a flip phone) but for readers who are super into the accuracy of their history, it’s bound to ruffle some feathers.The romance, while it took up a bigger part of the story than I would have liked, was fine. I liked that Audrey found someone who shared her passion and there seemed to be a huge amount of respect between the two of them, especially considering the normal power dynamics of a relationship in the time period. This felt healthy and sweet, if a bit predictable (although what romance isn’t?) My only real qualm with the romance aspect of the book was that I’m not a huge fan of the basic concept of the story, which was: “girl who adamantly never wants to get married discovers she just hasn’t met the right man yet!” I think The Flight Girls will appeal to romance fans far more than historical fiction fans, which seems odd given the premise and marketing of the book.The Flight Girls is a story with a lot of potential that, while it missed the mark for me personally, seems to be a huge hit with a lot of readers. Pick this up if you’re in the mood a light read, but don’t expect hard-hitting historical fiction that makes you think. This is Noelle Salazar’s debut novel, and I do think she has tons of potential. I’m excited to see what she writes next!You can read all of my reviews on my blog, Jenna Bookish!Facebook | Instagram | Tumblr
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. A stunning story about the Women Airforce Service Pilots, whose courage during World War II turned ordinary women into extraordinary heroes1941. Audrey Coltrane has always wanted to fly. It’s why she implored her father to teach her at the little airfield back ho I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. A stunning story about the Women Airforce Service Pilots, whose courage during World War II turned ordinary women into extraordinary heroes1941. Audrey Coltrane has always wanted to fly. It’s why she implored her father to teach her at the little airfield back home in Texas. It’s why she signed up to train military pilots in Hawaii when the war in Europe began. And it’s why she insists she is not interested in any dream-derailing romantic involvements, even with the disarming Lieutenant James Hart, who fast becomes a friend as treasured as the women she flies with. Then one fateful day, she gets caught in the air over Pearl Harbor just as the bombs begin to fall, and suddenly, nowhere feels safe.To make everything she’s lost count for something, Audrey joins the Women Airforce Service Pilots program. The bonds she forms with her fellow pilots reignite a spark of hope in the face war, and—especially when James goes missing in action—give Audrey the strength to cross the front lines and fight for everything she holds dear.Shining a light on a little-known piece of history, The Flight Girls is a sweeping portrayal of women’s fearlessness in the face of adversity, and the power of friendship to make us soar.As the niece of two fighter pilots who lost their lives in war, I hade zero ideas that there were female pilots in WWII but then again, we do not study much, if any, American history in Canada. (We have enough to learn about our history, but less "theirs"). This was an amazing read for me - history, compelling characters and a well-written plot and a dash of romance that enthralled me from page one to end. This is a fabulous book - I look forward to reading more of Miss Salazar's work: if this book is any indication, her works are stellar! This is also a perfect book club pick as one could discuss women's roles then and now and compare the two. As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I love emojis (outside of their incessant use by Millennials on Instagram and Twitter) so let's give it 🛩 🛩 🛩 🛩 🛩  NOTE: I cannot link this review to LinkedIn - there is something wrong with the linking/programming and it will not happen
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  • Jacqueline Simonds
    January 1, 1970
    I picked up an ARC of this book at my job in a bookstore. After 100 pages, I declared a book divorce. Yes, it's that bad.First, let's talk about the fact this book is so poorly edited, it made me, a former editor, nearly cry. No, I didn't find piles of typos. I found piles of anachronisms for a book about 1941 - 45.~Referring to women as "Ms." - the term was not in broad popular use until 1968.~A male character keeps bumping his head against the "headrest" of a Jeep. They barely had seats back t I picked up an ARC of this book at my job in a bookstore. After 100 pages, I declared a book divorce. Yes, it's that bad.First, let's talk about the fact this book is so poorly edited, it made me, a former editor, nearly cry. No, I didn't find piles of typos. I found piles of anachronisms for a book about 1941 - 45.~Referring to women as "Ms." - the term was not in broad popular use until 1968.~A male character keeps bumping his head against the "headrest" of a Jeep. They barely had seats back then, let alone headrests. ~Women wear "Victory Rolls" (big curls in their hair) before Pearl Harbor (after was OK).~Asserts that people "watched the horrors of Pearl Harbor on television" and I can't even begin to slam this statement hard enough.~Numerous statements that the MC's mother was against her flying, then states she encourages her to fly.~spends almost 2 full pages describing an apartment we'll never see again, but only about 3 graphs on the devastation at Pearl Harbor.This is lazy, poorly researched, poorly executed "historical fiction" that does the writer no favors, nor the entire genre of "women's fiction." It has a nifty premise and should have been a good read, even if the "we'll just be friends even though we're madly attracted to each other" premise is pretty silly.Do I sound angry? I read a lot of independent authors' work that runs rings around this book that the indies can't even get anyone to look at. And then dreck like this gets put out. It makes me tired.
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  • Sara (Sjthroughthelookingglass)
    January 1, 1970
    WWII Historical Fiction is quickly becoming a favorite genre of mine so I was thrilled to win an advanced copy of The Flight Girls from Goodreads..The Flight Girls is an epic love story that follows the amazing courageous journey of fictional pilot Audrey Coltrane, starting with her fateful days at Pearl Harbor through training with fellow WASP women. The fast friendships, dedication, courage, personalities and backgrounds of these women was we'll rounded and lively. I loved taking jumpseat for WWII Historical Fiction is quickly becoming a favorite genre of mine so I was thrilled to win an advanced copy of The Flight Girls from Goodreads..The Flight Girls is an epic love story that follows the amazing courageous journey of fictional pilot Audrey Coltrane, starting with her fateful days at Pearl Harbor through training with fellow WASP women. The fast friendships, dedication, courage, personalities and backgrounds of these women was we'll rounded and lively. I loved taking jumpseat for this adventure!.This book captured my heart and mind from the very first chapter, never letting go or letting me down.
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  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    I ordered this book when I first heard about it, then I won a drawing for an Advance Reader's Edition! What a treat! At times I couldn't put the book down, at other times I needed to take a break after getting too wrapped up in it. Audrey is a character I cared about, I rooted for, I even got a bit annoyed with at one point - her friendships and hardships will draw you to her. It's hard to believe this is Noelle's first novel. I want to share my copy of this book, but I'm afraid I won't get it b I ordered this book when I first heard about it, then I won a drawing for an Advance Reader's Edition! What a treat! At times I couldn't put the book down, at other times I needed to take a break after getting too wrapped up in it. Audrey is a character I cared about, I rooted for, I even got a bit annoyed with at one point - her friendships and hardships will draw you to her. It's hard to believe this is Noelle's first novel. I want to share my copy of this book, but I'm afraid I won't get it back!
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  • The Just-About-Cocky Ms M
    January 1, 1970
    So here we have the American Cousin of the equally awful "Spitfire Girls," whose pilots were consumed by romantic fantasies and getting their lipstick on correctly.I suppose this dreadful and ultimately insulting drivel featuring a collection of ubiquitous "Girds" will continue to appear, and I will continue to treat it with justified disdain.
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  • Sarah Booth
    January 1, 1970
    I basically picked this book up at work and started reading it when I had a spare moment, but after I got started I couldn’t put it down. Being a female pilot in a man’s world and WWII was a pretty big deal. Our heroine Audrey was flying since she was 12. She was lucky to have a father that didn’t let the fact his child was female stand in the way of what she wanted to do which was fly, and a good pilot she was at that. She starts out as a flight instructor at Pearl Harbor (my grandfather was th I basically picked this book up at work and started reading it when I had a spare moment, but after I got started I couldn’t put it down. Being a female pilot in a man’s world and WWII was a pretty big deal. Our heroine Audrey was flying since she was 12. She was lucky to have a father that didn’t let the fact his child was female stand in the way of what she wanted to do which was fly, and a good pilot she was at that. She starts out as a flight instructor at Pearl Harbor (my grandfather was there for the bombing as well) and later joins the Women Airforce Service Pilots program. Though singular in her desire not to be involved with the opposite sex, she falls for another pilot who she works to be just friends with but fails at miserably. The book though gripping, I couldn’t put it down, tended to dwell too much on her emotion and heartache. I got tired of Audrey’s emotional upheaval which seemed to go on and on. Granted the tears were a way to show how supportive her other female pilots and friends were , but there seemed excessive to the story and to work against her being a strong woman with their frequency and intensity. I don’t really care for romances so perhaps this is an issue with me as opposed to a legitimate problem with the story. You did end up pulling for the romance eventually, but I thought the fact they were flyers was the real draw. I mean, WOW; you were flying army planes in WWII when most people thought that women were incapable of such things and not only could they do them but do them better than some men when everything was working against them. Men had a system for them to pee when flying, women didn’t. They had to make do, lord only knows how. Women who did this job not only were doing “a man’s job” but taking all the risks without the benefits such as a military pension and care in case of injury and/or death. These women had serious guts! They worked their butts off for little or no reward or recognition often with the resentment of men. My uncle was a B-17 pilot in WWII who flew 26 missions over Germany so anything about WWII pilots interests meThis story had me up reading until I couldn’t keep my eyes open. It’s an easy and enjoyable read, despite the flaws I pointed out I give the book a good 4.5.
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  • Megan Collins
    January 1, 1970
    THE FLIGHT GIRLS has been taking the world by storm (an instant bestseller!), and after reading it in two days, it’s easy for me to see why. I was completely transported to the 1940s when, due to the war effort, the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) program was initiated. I adored witnessing Audrey risk everything to follow her heart and serve her country by doing the one thing she loves more than anything else—flying. This book has everything: a beautiful and believable romance; a strong, en THE FLIGHT GIRLS has been taking the world by storm (an instant bestseller!), and after reading it in two days, it’s easy for me to see why. I was completely transported to the 1940s when, due to the war effort, the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) program was initiated. I adored witnessing Audrey risk everything to follow her heart and serve her country by doing the one thing she loves more than anything else—flying. This book has everything: a beautiful and believable romance; a strong, endearing narrator; heartbreak; history; healing; feminism; action; snappy dialogue; humor... I could go on and on. But what I loved most about this book was its warm and memorable cast of characters—the family Audrey has back in Texas, the family she makes in Hawaii (before and after the bombing of Pearl Harbor), and the family she finds in the women she meets while being a pilot. Although the underlying tension of war permeates the entire book in big and small ways, the camaraderie between the WASP women made this a surprisingly comforting read. It touched my heart in ways I didn’t expect, and though I learned a lot while reading this book, I FELT a lot too—and those emotions I experienced will be what sticks with me the most. THE FLIGHT GIRLS is a gift of a novel; it’s a reminder to be true to ourselves but allow room for growth, a reminder to be open to love and connection, a reminder to say yes to our dreams—even when those dreams change—and a testament to the strength and power of women. This is an exquisite debut, and I can’t wait to read whatever Noelle Salazar writes next.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    What a beautiful and captivating way through this historical fiction novel to learn about the largely unacknowledged women that provided this critical service for our country during WWII! Audrey and her friends are an inspiring group of women from all different walks of life that come together and show what the beauty of friendship and respect between likeminded women can be. And I loved the relationship between Audrey and James and found it refreshing that a woman of this time chose her path an What a beautiful and captivating way through this historical fiction novel to learn about the largely unacknowledged women that provided this critical service for our country during WWII! Audrey and her friends are an inspiring group of women from all different walks of life that come together and show what the beauty of friendship and respect between likeminded women can be. And I loved the relationship between Audrey and James and found it refreshing that a woman of this time chose her path and found a man that not just accepted it but loved her for it. I cannot wait for this to be made into a movie!
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  • Lauren Stoolfire
    January 1, 1970
    The WASP are a fascinating part of WWII and I love reading about them, fiction or nonfiction. If you're looking for an inspiring and well researched historical fiction featuring women's efforts in during war, The Flight Girls by Noelle Salazar is worth your time.
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  • Dawn
    January 1, 1970
    At first, I thought this was a romance historical fiction and I was a little turned off. The story intrigued me however as I had never heard of Flight Girls. I'm so glad I kept reading. The romance that was in it turned out to be real and good for the story. I read this in a day or so because I wanted to know what happened to the main girl.
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  • Ruth
    January 1, 1970
    Was happy to see an advance copy in my mail box. Thanks for that. I was even happier after I finished the book in less than 24 hours!Wonderful characters and very informative.I did wonder about the reference on page 113 about people having learned about Pearl Harbor on their televisions. Didn't know there were many TV's in homes in 1941....But, all in all, an entertaining book. I enjoyed it.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    This book was terrific! We first meet our heroine, Audrey Coltrane, in Pearl Harbor as she trains pilots for the military. Her experiences during the attack were riveting. She then joins the WASP (Women Airforce Service Pilots) to ferry planes around the country to free up male pilots to fight in WWII. The history of this group of women was fascinating to me. Noelle Salazar created some great characters who I really cared about and the love story drew me in. I loved every minute of this read and This book was terrific! We first meet our heroine, Audrey Coltrane, in Pearl Harbor as she trains pilots for the military. Her experiences during the attack were riveting. She then joins the WASP (Women Airforce Service Pilots) to ferry planes around the country to free up male pilots to fight in WWII. The history of this group of women was fascinating to me. Noelle Salazar created some great characters who I really cared about and the love story drew me in. I loved every minute of this read and highly recommend it--especially if you're a fan of WWII fiction. Thanks to MIRA books for an ARC of this novel won through a Goodreads giveaway. I will be passing this book on to my friends!
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  • Julie Barnard
    January 1, 1970
    Great book - doesn’t publish until July, but definitely worth reading.
  • Shelleyrae at Book'd Out
    January 1, 1970
    The Flight Girls by Noelle Salazar is a fascinating, fictionalised account of the role female pilots played on the home front during World War II.With dreams of one day owning her own small airfield in her home town, Audrey Coltrane is one of a handful of female civilian flight instructors assisting in the training of airforce recruits in Hawaii as World War II rages in Europe. She’s content spending her days in the air, and her nights in the company of her roommates, determined to avoid any rom The Flight Girls by Noelle Salazar is a fascinating, fictionalised account of the role female pilots played on the home front during World War II.With dreams of one day owning her own small airfield in her home town, Audrey Coltrane is one of a handful of female civilian flight instructors assisting in the training of airforce recruits in Hawaii as World War II rages in Europe. She’s content spending her days in the air, and her nights in the company of her roommates, determined to avoid any romantic entanglements which could jeopardise her future plans.And then, on an ordinary day in December during a training flight with a new recruit, Audrey encounters a squadron of Japanese planes on their way to devastate Pearl Harbor. While Audrey narrowly escapes with her life, thousands, including a close friend and colleague, are not so lucky.In the wake of the attack, Audrey returns home to Texas but soon grows restless and accepts an invitation to join the newly formed Women Airforce Service Pilots.Audrey Coltrane is a well developed character, the story unfolds from her first person perspective and I found her to be relatable, admiring her passion, courage and strength. The character of Audrey seems to have been in part inspired by Cornelia Fort, Like Cornelia, Audrey comes from a well off family, and graduated from Sarah-Lawrence College. Fort was the first aviator to encounter a Japanese pilot during a training flight on the day of the Pearl Harbour attack, and was one of the first women to join the WASP program, though tragically, Fort was killed during a mission in 1943, attributable to another (male) pilot’s error.I was fascinated by the activities of the Women's Auxiliary Ferrying Squadron (WAFS) and Women's Flying Training Detachment (WFTD), which were later combined and became the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP), though this isn’t the first time I’ve encountered it in fiction. Fannie Flagg’s The All-Girl Filling Station's Last Reunion also tells the story of this group of female aviators. These women were incredible, coming from a variety of backgrounds, volunteering to serve their country. They risked their lives flying aircraft cross-country, testing both new and repaired aircraft, and towing targets for live artillery practice. They were required to complete intensive military training, but the government took little responsibility for their well-being. They did not qualify for any military benefits, and the women were required to pay for their own room and board, transportation, uniforms, and flight gear, and if they were killed (a total of 38 women died), all funeral expenses, including the return of their loved one, was at the family’s cost.The women with whom Audrey served, and the bonds that formed between them, is definitely a strength of the novel. The supporting characters are well crafted with distinct personalities, and I think representative of the varied women who joined the WASP. Salazar creates a genuine sense of camaraderie between these women, who both live and work together. Their support of one another is heartwarming, and Audrey’s friendship with Carol Ann is particularly delightful.There is a strong romantic storyline through the book. Though Audrey believes there is no room in her life for love, marriage or children if she is to achieve her dreams, her relationship with airman Lieutenant James Hart, whom she first meets in Hawaii, causes her to question her convictions. After the attack in Pearl Harbor, James is deployed to Europe and while the two write to each other, Audrey is unwilling to admit the depth of her feelings for him until she receives word that he is missing in action, presumed dead or captured by the Germans.What dulled my enthusiasm for the story slightly was the imbalance between ‘showing and telling’, with a single first person perspective, at times the narrative dragged. In her enthusiasm, I also think Salazar occasionally got carried away with including too many details that didn’t necessarily advance the story, and glossed over more important issues. There is the odd anachronism too, but I think overall Salazar managed to accurately portray the sense of time and place.The Flight Girls is entertaining, touching, and interesting. I think it tells an important story that recognises and appreciates the contribution these women made to the war effort.
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  • Lizzy
    January 1, 1970
    Most books I have read about WWII charted the lives of those who survived the war on the European front, so it was enlightening to read about a group of women who played a critical role in the war efforts while remaining on American soil. I had never heard of the Women Airforce Service Pilots before this novel, but I was fascinated while learning about both the tragedies and incredible accomplishments achieved by this brave group of ladies. The vast majority of this book flew by with vivid descr Most books I have read about WWII charted the lives of those who survived the war on the European front, so it was enlightening to read about a group of women who played a critical role in the war efforts while remaining on American soil. I had never heard of the Women Airforce Service Pilots before this novel, but I was fascinated while learning about both the tragedies and incredible accomplishments achieved by this brave group of ladies. The vast majority of this book flew by with vivid descriptions of wartime attacks (like Pearl Harbor), personal dramas faced by the characters, and historical details that kept me engaged. After finishing this book, I’m left wanting to know even more about the WASP program and the women who made it possible!
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    The premise of the book was about the main character, Audrey, and her love life. Based on the reviews I thought the story would be more about the WASPs. I did enjoy the interaction and friendships Audrey made, especially with Carol Ann, who was my favorite of all her friends. I look forward to reading Noelle’s next book.
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  • erinn
    January 1, 1970
    I LOVED this book. Read it in two days as I could not put it down. I enjoyed the story, The characters, and the WWII historical setting. I enjoyed imagining that if I had lived during that time that I’d be like the main character, Audrey, brave, flying planes to do her part in the war, courageous to step outside the normal cultural assumptions that women lived with. I think this book has firmly put me into the camp of historical fiction as my favorite genre. There’s enough history, and enough fl I LOVED this book. Read it in two days as I could not put it down. I enjoyed the story, The characters, and the WWII historical setting. I enjoyed imagining that if I had lived during that time that I’d be like the main character, Audrey, brave, flying planes to do her part in the war, courageous to step outside the normal cultural assumptions that women lived with. I think this book has firmly put me into the camp of historical fiction as my favorite genre. There’s enough history, and enough flight descriptions to make it believable, but engrossingly focuses on the characters and their stories to keep it from reading as a history book or flight manual. I hope there is more to come from this author.
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  • Monica Huerta
    January 1, 1970
    ARC kindly provided by netgalley and publisher. The opinions expressed within this review are purely my own.Rating: 2.5/5 (stopped reading at 77%, sadly)I stopped reading this book because, unfortunately, it fell flat for me. I lost interest in the main character as she was either pining for a man for most of the book (about 65%) or feeling guilty for being interested in someone else. Furthermore, I felt like the author had a hard time deciding what she wanted to make of the book. To me, it did ARC kindly provided by netgalley and publisher. The opinions expressed within this review are purely my own.Rating: 2.5/5 (stopped reading at 77%, sadly)I stopped reading this book because, unfortunately, it fell flat for me. I lost interest in the main character as she was either pining for a man for most of the book (about 65%) or feeling guilty for being interested in someone else. Furthermore, I felt like the author had a hard time deciding what she wanted to make of the book. To me, it did not blend seamlessly and their was a struggle as to what to make of it- romance, coming of age, women's rights- all are interesting and combined, would make for a kick ass book... but the way this story was told? I felt like these different aspects were at war with each other, battling for the attention of the reader rather than mixing to tell a convincing story. If you are the fan of historical fiction who likes plots that are focused on relationships/romance with some historical information added throughout, then this book is just for you. The plot follows Audrey Coltrane, the daughter of a Texan oil tycoon who's one dream in life is to purchase her own airfield and fly as she pleases. She vows to not be distracted by men until she meets Lieutenant James Hart in Hawaii, where she is a government contractor, teaching army recruits to fly planes. Their stay is cut short by the attack on Pearl Harbor where both must part ways. In sum, the book is about Audrey and her life in Hawaii, followed by her joining the Women Airforce Service Pilots program. She meets a lot of interesting and amazing women, loses friends along the way, and experiences sexism first hand due to her occupation. I was able to appreciate the historical portion of the book and wished the author had not decided to focus 70% of the book on Audrey's relationship with Lt. Hart and the way she pined after him. I gave this book 2.5 stars because I felt like there was no climax, the end goal that the main character dreamed of was frequently brought into question, and she spent half of the book either pining over a man or feeling guilty about being interested in another one. I appreciated the attention to describing what day to day life would have been like for these women, but I felt like it was too detailed, dragged on too long, and the focus on flying and overcoming sexist scenarios was put on the backburner. I would have liked it if the author would have either decided to make this book a romance, a coming of age book, or a book focusing on the lives of the many women Audrey meets (which, if I may add, are too many and you end up losing track of who is who/ end up not giving any one or other much significance) and their fighting to help the war effort while battling sexism at the same time. I felt like this book was a battle between all three of the aforementioned, rather than a seamless blend of it all.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    I do not give this review lightly, this book deserves each of it's five stars. I cannot express how absolutely blows away I am that this is Noelle Salazar's first book. The writing had me craving more from the second I picked the book up. I laughed, I cried (multiple times), and I smiled until my face hurt. This is one of the most beautifully written books that I have ever read and I will absolutely be reading it again in the future. This book will move you in ways you didn't know you could be m I do not give this review lightly, this book deserves each of it's five stars. I cannot express how absolutely blows away I am that this is Noelle Salazar's first book. The writing had me craving more from the second I picked the book up. I laughed, I cried (multiple times), and I smiled until my face hurt. This is one of the most beautifully written books that I have ever read and I will absolutely be reading it again in the future. This book will move you in ways you didn't know you could be moved and you'll find yourself so deeply involved with every character that their emotions become your own. Incredibly high praises to Salazar and I cannot wait to see what she writes next!!!
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  • Escape_in_a_Book
    January 1, 1970
    This book may very well be one of the best things to happen to my book-nerd book obsessed heart in 2019.😍This is the first book by Noelle Salazar and let me tell you, she knocked it straight outta the park with this one. This is based on a group of women who trained pilots during WWII and they were a kickass group. From the first few pages I was wholly pulled into this world. From nervous and tentative flushing out of romantic attraction, to the fear, adrenaline and horror as they watched/experi This book may very well be one of the best things to happen to my book-nerd book obsessed heart in 2019.😍This is the first book by Noelle Salazar and let me tell you, she knocked it straight outta the park with this one. This is based on a group of women who trained pilots during WWII and they were a kickass group. From the first few pages I was wholly pulled into this world. From nervous and tentative flushing out of romantic attraction, to the fear, adrenaline and horror as they watched/experienced the attack on Pearl Harbor... these pages are steeped in so much feeling and history. Sometimes I get my hands on a book and I start fangirling like a lunatic... this is one of those books.Historical fictions fans, fiction fans, fans of words, do not miss out on this book. It is a note of perfection flying above a sea of books. (You see what I did there?🤓😂) I have read this book TWICE! Two times despite all of the other books I have committed to reading while trying to live life. Both times I did not want to put it down.I’m a raving fan of this one.Thank you to the publisher for providing a complimentary advance copy of this title. All comments/opinions are my own.
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