All My Colors
From Emmy-award winning author David Quantick, All My Colors is a darkly comic novel about a man who remembers a book that may not exist, with dire consequences. A bizarre, mind-bending story at the intersection of Richard Bachman, Charlie Kaufman and Franz Kafka. It is March 1979 in DeKalb Illinois. Todd Milstead is a wannabe writer, a serial adulterer, and a jerk, only tolerated by his friends because he throws the best parties with the best booze. During one particular party, Todd is showing off his perfect recall, quoting poetry and literature word for word plucked from his eidetic memory. When he begins quoting from a book no one else seems to know, a novel called All My Colors, Todd is incredulous. He can quote it from cover to cover and yet it doesn't seem to exist.With a looming divorce and mounting financial worries, Todd finally tries to write a novel, with the vague idea of making money from his talent. The only problem is he can't write. But the book - All My Colors - is there in his head. Todd makes a decision: he will "write" this book that nobody but him can remember. After all, if nobody's heard of it, how can he get into trouble?As the dire consequences of his actions come home to both Todd and his long-suffering friends, it becomes clear that there is a high - and painful - price to pay for his crime.

All My Colors Details

TitleAll My Colors
Author
ReleaseApr 16th, 2019
PublisherTitan Books
Rating
GenreHorror, Fiction, Fantasy

All My Colors Review

  • Runalong
    January 1, 1970
    Who doesn’t like a horror tale where the mediocre but very loud man gets his just desserts? Funny and pacy Full review - https://www.runalongtheshelves.net/bl...
  • Carolyn
    January 1, 1970
    If you like your main characters to be likeable, you might struggle a little with this to begin with, as the main character of David Quantick's All My Colors, Todd Milstead, is introduced on the very first page as not only being a "jerk" but a jerk who "was giving free rein to his inner dickhead." But the writing is so good - and so funny - that you won't care. Todd does have sporadic moments of self-awareness and at certain points it feels like he may learn and avoid the doom we know he's headi If you like your main characters to be likeable, you might struggle a little with this to begin with, as the main character of David Quantick's All My Colors, Todd Milstead, is introduced on the very first page as not only being a "jerk" but a jerk who "was giving free rein to his inner dickhead." But the writing is so good - and so funny - that you won't care. Todd does have sporadic moments of self-awareness and at certain points it feels like he may learn and avoid the doom we know he's heading towards- but this is the kind of story where the chance of redemption is given and the character f***s it up (this is, after all, a morality tale as well as a satirical one). I've seen it likened to an episode of The Twilight Zone and that's not a bad thumbnail description, along with some very wry meditations on the act of writing, inspiration and plagiarism. Both funny and creepy, Todd Milstead's All My Colors may not be the real deal but Quantick's is!
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  • Lou
    January 1, 1970
    Starts with a Saturday night meeting of writers, struggling ones, and strange conversing on Norman Mailer and a story of a women and a case of wanting a finger sawn off.Main protagonist Todd Milstead has a Jerk-off room.Which writer has that?There will be dark comedy in the narrative and I happen to be in need of a laugh or two.Struggling writer to successfull published first novel, but at what cost and length of the road will this main character Todd partake upon?Absurdities await the to be nov Starts with a Saturday night meeting of writers, struggling ones, and strange conversing on Norman Mailer and a story of a women and a case of wanting a finger sawn off.Main protagonist Todd Milstead has a Jerk-off room.Which writer has that?There will be dark comedy in the narrative and I happen to be in need of a laugh or two.Struggling writer to successfull published first novel, but at what cost and length of the road will this main character Todd partake upon?Absurdities await the to be novelist of something that well you must discover but don’t take it all serious there is dark humour on the road of this authors writing life, one that is succumbed within that great or not so great pursuit of a published novel.Review also @ More2Read
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  • Jake
    January 1, 1970
    Some asshole is the only person who knows a book, so he writes it it himself. Turns out it's really good, and then the accolades start rolling in. Sure, it might be plagiarism, but so what? It's not hurting anyone, right? Wrong. I found All My Colors to be a wild, and at times frightening book. It's kind of like a David Lynch movie, one of the Coen Brother's stranger offerings, or the magnificent White Tears (which is also about a person who "steals" an un-attributable work and then has to "pay Some asshole is the only person who knows a book, so he writes it it himself. Turns out it's really good, and then the accolades start rolling in. Sure, it might be plagiarism, but so what? It's not hurting anyone, right? Wrong. I found All My Colors to be a wild, and at times frightening book. It's kind of like a David Lynch movie, one of the Coen Brother's stranger offerings, or the magnificent White Tears (which is also about a person who "steals" an un-attributable work and then has to "pay the piper" as it were). It starts out normal enough, then some small weird things start happening, but we don't really have time to dwell on them. Then, about halfway through, things start getting really strange, then things start getting just plain old scary. It's got the right mix of strange and scary, but I do have just two critiques of it; and SPOILERS will happen in this paragraph: First, we're told that Todd, the main character, is an asshole, but we're never really shown the full extent of his assholery. Yes, he cheats on his wife, and yes, that's a bad thing to do, but does he really deserve his fate? (To say nothing of several of his friends and acquaintances, who also meet grisly ends.) There's a lot of jerks and philanderers out there, so what made Todd so special? Which leads to my second point: If everyone who cheated on their spouse (not to mention innocent people in their orbit) suffered the same fate as Todd, there would be way more unexplained disappearances and mutilations happening. Hell, if you just limited that to male aspiring writers who cheat on their wives, there would probably be an All My Colors situation happening every day. So why Todd? Anyways, don't let my critiques ruin the book for you. It's a damn fine story.Note: I read an ARC, which may differ from the final version that is due out in April.
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  • Tracy
    January 1, 1970
    So, kind of an odd book, and not something I would typically pick up (expanding my perspectives!), but it kept me turning pages until the end. It's a great premise, and I just had to connect the dots laid out in the beginning. For those who like quirky, speculative, horror-ish fiction.
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  • Jason
    January 1, 1970
    I was in my late teens when Jurassic Park and The Firm were originally published. While reading those books, I couldn't sleep until I read one more chapter. Of course one more chapter turned into “All the Chapters” and I was exhausted at high school the next day. This was a new phenomenon for me. I had heard people say they couldn't put a book down, but I had never heard of people not being able to sleep because they were so engaged with the plot. That's the power of a good book. I'd regularly e I was in my late teens when Jurassic Park and The Firm were originally published. While reading those books, I couldn't sleep until I read one more chapter. Of course one more chapter turned into “All the Chapters” and I was exhausted at high school the next day. This was a new phenomenon for me. I had heard people say they couldn't put a book down, but I had never heard of people not being able to sleep because they were so engaged with the plot. That's the power of a good book. I'd regularly experience it after that into my early 20s and then the magic stopped. I know part of that had to do with age and priorities and so on. It's been a long, long while since I've read a book that kept me up until the wee hours of the morning.All My Colors broke that trend. I couldn't sleep until this book was done (and this was on the first night I started it). And I don't even mean “fighting off sleep so I can power through and finish.” No, this was a bona fide NEED to know how this is all going to end. Quantic set the hook during a particularly uncomfortable and chilling scene in a library. At that moment, I was in it for good, almost as if I was driven similarly by the same supernatural energies that made Todd Milstead write the novel that shares this novel's title. As someone else has said already, All My Colors is indeed the love child of Franz Kafka, Charlie Kaufman and Richard Bachman. And that's a good thing through and through. Read this book. Though you might want to pace yourself if you have to get up for work in the morning.
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  • Doreen
    January 1, 1970
    4/12/19 3.5 stars rounded up. Full review tk here and at The Frumious Consortium.4/16/19 Every aspiring creative knows that inspiration is that most fickle of creatures. The Muse will not be forced... but what if she does show up? And what if she's out to get you?Todd Milstead is an asshole. A literary wannabe who sponges off the fortune of his long-suffering wife Janis, his main asset is his eidetic memory, that he often wields as a weapon against the small circle of friends who gather to drink 4/12/19 3.5 stars rounded up. Full review tk here and at The Frumious Consortium.4/16/19 Every aspiring creative knows that inspiration is that most fickle of creatures. The Muse will not be forced... but what if she does show up? And what if she's out to get you?Todd Milstead is an asshole. A literary wannabe who sponges off the fortune of his long-suffering wife Janis, his main asset is his eidetic memory, that he often wields as a weapon against the small circle of friends who gather to drink his booze for the price of putting up with his overbearing egotism. He's amazed one night to discover that none of them are familiar with a book he can recite chapter and verse, a novel called All My Colors written by one Jake Turner. Turns out they're not the only ones: no one he meets has ever heard of this book. When Janis has finally had enough and leaves, Todd, facing poverty and homelessness, decides to type out All My Colors and submit it for publication under his own name.Despite a rough creative period, fortune seems to favor Todd. All My Colors is picked up, launching a suddenly sober Todd on a seemingly stratospheric trajectory. But he still can't get over Janis, not because he cares about her but because he's convinced she's seeing someone else despite his own serial adultery being grounds for their divorce. Then the hallucinations start, and people around him keep dying in shockingly grisly ways. What is the truth behind All My Colors and how it's been revealed to Todd, and what is the price he'll have to pay for claiming it as his own?This was a compulsively readable novel, which I found especially amusing given how compulsively written the book within the book was. Speaking of books within books, I enjoyed the literary gift box nature of this novel, and rated quite highly the excerpts included. Too many novels about fictional stories do a terrible job of convincing the reader that the subject matter is actually worthwhile: this is one of those rare books that creates a wholly convincing novel on which to hang its plot. Thing is tho, I actually felt bad for Todd. I know he's an asshole but he didn't seem especially extraordinary in that respect to merit the treatment he received. But I suppose that is the point of the novel -- or of any decent horror novel, really -- that life can be arbitrary and unkind. It's certainly the kind of book that will have you second-guessing where your ideas come from. In that respect, All My Colors is definitely more a book about every writer's nightmares and less about a pompous jerk getting his comeuppance and taking his poor friends down with him in the process.Interview with David Quantick to come soon!
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  • Hebridean Reader
    January 1, 1970
    Todd Milstead is a jackass; barely tolerated by a few close friends who love his whiskey more than him and loathed by almost everybody else, his arrogance and self-satisfaction mark him for a comeuppance well overdue. Until one night when he discovers that he can recall a book, word for word, that no one else has ever heard of – the titular All My Colors. Being a wannabe writer who, until this moment hasn’t managed to construct enough narrative to fit on a napkin, Todd decides that this is his c Todd Milstead is a jackass; barely tolerated by a few close friends who love his whiskey more than him and loathed by almost everybody else, his arrogance and self-satisfaction mark him for a comeuppance well overdue. Until one night when he discovers that he can recall a book, word for word, that no one else has ever heard of – the titular All My Colors. Being a wannabe writer who, until this moment hasn’t managed to construct enough narrative to fit on a napkin, Todd decides that this is his chance, and while fending off an acrimonious divorce sets about writing the next Great American Novel. After all, if no one else can remember the book, then surely it’s his for the taking? And that’s when the weird starts. All My Colors is the latest novel from the writer of Veep and The Thick of It, David Quantick, who this time takes a twisty look at the Publishing industry and the pain of trying to write something, sometimes anything, that might help you leave a mark. In this case it comes with a high price for Todd and his long suffering friends, proving a cautionary tale at chasing your dreams at any cost, and serving up an end reminiscent of an episode of Tales from the Crypt – weird but deserved and with a cackley twinkle.Titan Books is promoting this to fans of Chuck Palahniuck and I can’t think of a more appropriate comparison. All My Colors is dark and twisty and has a horrible protagonist, even in his nicer moments and so-called reformation. While the end feels a little bit too rushed and the atmosphere is all over the place, it carries enough threads of curiosity through it to keep you turning the pages and wondering how they can all be tied together. Has Todd really witnessed what he thought he witnessed? Is he going mad? Or is something more malevolent at work? And will it all be worth it in the end?I was provided a copy of All My Colors for a fair and honest review. I’d give it about 3 and a half stars (out of 5). It’s not average, but it’s not shot to the top of my must read lists either.
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  • Allison
    January 1, 1970
    *I read an Advanced Review Copy of All My Colors. Some elements are subject to change.All My Colors is an interesting idea that required more development. It was hard to tell where the story was going at times, as Todd's general characterization as "an a**hole" left many oppurtunities for his comeuppance. This really interfered with the story's more narrow final message: That men should not use women as two dimensional muses to inspire their work and then turn around and hate women in everday li *I read an Advanced Review Copy of All My Colors. Some elements are subject to change.All My Colors is an interesting idea that required more development. It was hard to tell where the story was going at times, as Todd's general characterization as "an a**hole" left many oppurtunities for his comeuppance. This really interfered with the story's more narrow final message: That men should not use women as two dimensional muses to inspire their work and then turn around and hate women in everday life.Some of the story felt anachronistic to me as well. For example, at some point Timothy watches Rocky Horror Picture Show and refers to it as sitting down to watch an "old movie" despite it supposedly being 1979 and Rocky Horror only just out in 1975 (would it even have been on tv?). Setting the book in the past does not seem to provide much substance to the narrative overall as the characters do not interact in a way that could not be perceived as contemporary. "We did her wrong." *Mild spoilers below*Without specific buildup, this ending felt unsatisfying because almost any sort of lesson about Todd's problematic behavior could have been substituted. Quantick also does little to discuss exactly what behaviors need to be challenged by toxic male society to fix the issue. The "bad" men in his story are obvious, self-proclaimed a**holes as well as murderers. It was a little ironic to me that All My Colors' inspiration was the concept of turning women into two-dimensional muses with no input in their stories while the book never provided its female characters with depth, gave them a perspective on the narrative, or challenged male behaviour beyond condemning a man who is rude to everyone he encounters and men who murder women. Although the "bad" men in All My Colors get punished because of their bad male behaviour, they never understand exactly what is wrong with the way they act or express regret for their actions. They only mourn the consequences. By developing the narrative style and moral of the story, Quantick would have provided a much more insightful thriller satire.
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  • Oliver Clarke
    January 1, 1970
    This review first appeared on scifiandscary.com. I received a copy of the book from Titan Books for review consideration.‘All My Colors’ is a weird blend of horror and comedy that manages to work a lot better than books that mix those genres sometimes do. I often find that comedy horror veers too far one way or the other, being either funny but not scary or creepy but with jokes that fall flat. David Quantick’s book steers a path straight down the middle and is both laugh out loud funny and genu This review first appeared on scifiandscary.com. I received a copy of the book from Titan Books for review consideration.‘All My Colors’ is a weird blend of horror and comedy that manages to work a lot better than books that mix those genres sometimes do. I often find that comedy horror veers too far one way or the other, being either funny but not scary or creepy but with jokes that fall flat. David Quantick’s book steers a path straight down the middle and is both laugh out loud funny and genuinely mysterious and unsettling. Given that Quantick is part of the team who wrote TV shows ‘The Thick Of It’ and ‘Veep’, I expected the jokes. What I didn’t count on was him having such a talent for horror.The book is the tale of a failed writer in 1970s middle America who finds that no-one else can remember a famous novel which he knows word for word. Seizing the opportunity, he rewrites the book. Given that this is a horror novel, his actions set in motion a suitably horrific sequence of events that build up nicely as the book progresses. The premise is pure Twilight Zone, and the 70s setting makes it read a little like a lost Stephen King novel, only much, much funnier. It never quite reaches King levels of terror, but it does have some memorably nasty imagery and a denouement that is lingeringly creepy. It also features the King trope of the alcoholic writer. To my mind, though, it’s a better book about writing than anything King has penned. It perfectly captures the mystery of the creative impulse and the way in which a work of art ceases to belong to its creator once it is finished. Most of all, though, ‘All My Colors’ is a really fun read. It’s engaging, gripping and hilarious by turns. I couldn’t put it down and ploughed through it in a day. If you like your horror smart, inventive and witty I can’t recommend it highly enough.
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  • Georgia_books
    January 1, 1970
    I was very kindly sent this book from titanbooks in exchange for an honest review. All my colors is David Quantick's most recent book, quirky, full of dark humour and rather challenging behaviour. Todd is in the middle of a divorce, he's broke and he's.. Well let's face it, he's an ass!This book was an okay read for me, I mean it isn't the typical type of book I'd reach for, but I did find myself enjoying parts and I definitely didn't find myself willing for it to end! It was pretty creepy, pret I was very kindly sent this book from titanbooks in exchange for an honest review. All my colors is David Quantick's most recent book, quirky, full of dark humour and rather challenging behaviour. Todd is in the middle of a divorce, he's broke and he's.. Well let's face it, he's an ass!This book was an okay read for me, I mean it isn't the typical type of book I'd reach for, but I did find myself enjoying parts and I definitely didn't find myself willing for it to end! It was pretty creepy, pretty funny but I was also pretty frustrated at the lack of depth given to any female character and the over all attitude towards women in general.
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  • Steve Gillway
    January 1, 1970
    Up there with Coupland as an outlandish gothic parable. Makes you wait for the Echo and the Bunnymen reference.
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