Murder at Archly Manor (High Society Lady Detective #1)
A high society murder. A spirited lady detective. Can she out-class the killer before an innocent person takes the fall?   London, 1923. Olive Belgrave needs a job. Despite her aristocratic upbringing, she’s penniless. Determined to support herself, she jumps at an unconventional job—looking into the background of her cousin’s fiancé, Alfred. Alfred burst into the upper crust world of London’s high society, but his answers to questions about his past are decidedly vague. Before Olive can gather more than the basics, a murder occurs at a posh party. Suddenly, every Bright Young Person in attendance is a suspect, and Olive must race to find the culprit because a sly murderer is determined to make sure Olive’s first case is her last. Murder at Archly Manor is the first in the High Society Lady Detective series of charming historical cozy mysteries. If you like witty banter, glamorous settings, and delightful plot twists, you’ll love USA Today bestselling author Sara Rosett’s series for Anglophiles and mystery lovers alike.Travel back to the Golden Age of detective fiction with Murder at Archly Manor. 

Murder at Archly Manor (High Society Lady Detective #1) Details

TitleMurder at Archly Manor (High Society Lady Detective #1)
Author
ReleaseOct 15th, 2018
PublisherSara Rosett
Rating
GenreMystery, Historical, Historical Fiction, Cozy Mystery

Murder at Archly Manor (High Society Lady Detective #1) Review

  • Cindy Burnett
    January 1, 1970
    Murder at Archly Manor is the fabulous start to a new series starring the very likeable and highly entertaining Olivia Belgrave. Despite her posh upbringing, Olivia is penniless and needs a job. Hired by her aunt to investigate a man her cousin has decided to marry, Olivia attends a weekend party and witnesses a murder. She must solve the crime before someone else becomes the next victim. Rosett has clearly done her research and the time period – fashions, word usage, and Archly Manor itself – i Murder at Archly Manor is the fabulous start to a new series starring the very likeable and highly entertaining Olivia Belgrave. Despite her posh upbringing, Olivia is penniless and needs a job. Hired by her aunt to investigate a man her cousin has decided to marry, Olivia attends a weekend party and witnesses a murder. She must solve the crime before someone else becomes the next victim. Rosett has clearly done her research and the time period – fashions, word usage, and Archly Manor itself – is expertly detailed. This is a fun new series that I highly recommend.
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  • LORI CASWELL
    January 1, 1970
    Dollycas’s ThoughtsOlive Belgrave didn’t plan to become a detective, but she needed a job and when asked to look in the background of her cousin’s fiancé, Alfred, she can’t refuse. Before she can really delve into his history the man falls to his death at a party right before her eyes. There was someone else on the balcony so now her investigation is expanded into looking for a killer. Everyone the party is now a suspect and the murderer is determined to get away scot-free.***I liked Olive right Dollycas’s ThoughtsOlive Belgrave didn’t plan to become a detective, but she needed a job and when asked to look in the background of her cousin’s fiancé, Alfred, she can’t refuse. Before she can really delve into his history the man falls to his death at a party right before her eyes. There was someone else on the balcony so now her investigation is expanded into looking for a killer. Everyone the party is now a suspect and the murderer is determined to get away scot-free.***I liked Olive right away. A strong woman for the 1920’s, wanting to be independent. She is smart, inquisitive and well educated, although no real work skills, she just needs to find the perfect job. Her cousin’s Gwen’s telegram arrives when she is almost out of money. Her other cousin Violet has taken up with a man they know nothing about and he is very evasive about the details of his upbringing. Violet is in love and doesn’t care, but her mother and sister sure do, They decide to pay Olive to investigate Alfred Eton and that puts Olive one step closer to the independence she seeks. These characters and the rest in the story are very cleverly written. I worry about Olive’s father because of her overbearing stepmother. The group that attends the party thrown by Sebastian Blakely, Alfred’s godfather and noted photographer, are a hodgepodge group of aristocrats and hangers-on, and any of them could be guilty of the murder.The mystery turns out to be much more that it seems at first. Twists and turns take us the reader and Olive in many different directions. While complex, the author has a very comfortable writing style that allows the reader to really take the journey with these characters. At times I forgot the story is set in the 1920’s even though the author hit all the right notes for the time period. I found myself totally immersed in the tale. I did enjoy all the descriptions of fashion and hairstyles of the era.This series is off to a roaring start. A delightful look at high society London in the ’20’s. Fun characters, an extraordinary setting and a well-plotted mystery made for a truly entertaining read. I am looking forward to more High Society Lady Detective stories.
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  • JoAn
    January 1, 1970
    Murder at Archly Manor by Sara Rosett is the first book in the High Society Lady Detective series and I hope this will continue for some time.I found Ms. Rosett's writing to be descriptive and smoothly paced as the characters were introduced to the reader. I like Olive and cheered her on as she tried to find a way to make a living in London during the 1920s. Being from a higher society, but not the "upper crust", Olive has a few years of college under her belt but no marketable skills. She needs Murder at Archly Manor by Sara Rosett is the first book in the High Society Lady Detective series and I hope this will continue for some time.I found Ms. Rosett's writing to be descriptive and smoothly paced as the characters were introduced to the reader. I like Olive and cheered her on as she tried to find a way to make a living in London during the 1920s. Being from a higher society, but not the "upper crust", Olive has a few years of college under her belt but no marketable skills. She needs a job to support herself as she left home after her father remarried. Her Aunt Caroline and cousin, Gwen, hire her to establish the background on Alfred Eton who has become engaged to Violet, Gwen's sister. To learn more about him, Olive and Gwen attend a weekend party at Archly Manor. Unfortunately, the first night of the party, Alfred is pushed off a balcony and now Violet is the police's number one suspect. With a deftly plotted story, many shady characters attending the party, and enough twists and turns to cloud motive, means and even opportunity, it's an intriguing story that I was completely wrapped up until the end. It's obvious that Ms. Rosett did her homework for this historical novel and I was fascinated by the little details about the life and times of London and the countryside after the war.I voluntarily reviewed an Advance Reader Copy of this book from NetGalley. All of the above opinions are my own.
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  • Kristina
    January 1, 1970
    Murder at Archly Manor by Sara Rosett is the first book in The High Society Lady Detective series. Olive Belgrave has left her family home and struck out on her own in London. She has been unsuccessful at finding a position despite her education. She gets a desperate telegram from her cousin, Gwen Stone asking her to visit Parkview. Gwen’s flighty sister, Irene has gotten herself engaged to Alfred Eton. Violet’s mother, Caroline and Gwen are not fans of the man and he has provided few details on Murder at Archly Manor by Sara Rosett is the first book in The High Society Lady Detective series. Olive Belgrave has left her family home and struck out on her own in London. She has been unsuccessful at finding a position despite her education. She gets a desperate telegram from her cousin, Gwen Stone asking her to visit Parkview. Gwen’s flighty sister, Irene has gotten herself engaged to Alfred Eton. Violet’s mother, Caroline and Gwen are not fans of the man and he has provided few details on his background. Caroline wants to hire a private investigator, but she does not wish to associate with any unsavory types. Olive volunteers to dig into Alfred’s history and the family insists on paying her. Sebastian Blakely, society photographer and Alfred’s godfather, is hosting a weekend party which allow Olive to ask subtle questions. The party is off to roaring start until one of the guests ends up dead and Violet is the prime suspect. Olive must expose the killer before her cousin is hauled off to the hoosegow.Murder at Archly Manor gives us a lively main character in Olive. Her father recently remarried a woman who prefers Olive to be out of the house and keeps pushing her to marry the local curate (he is odious). Olive was attending college in America until her father lost the money on a scheme. Olive is smart, pretty and fashionable which is the last thing a woman of the house wants in a governess. I found Murder at Archly Manor easy to read thanks to the authors breezy writing style and steady pacing. Sara Rosett captured the era with the hairstyles, attitudes, language (slang) and fashions. I wish the author had provided more background information on Olive and key details on other characters (last names for example). The murder takes place around the thirty percent mark which I felt was a little late in the story. There are several suspects and good clues to aid readers in solving the whodunit. Murder at Archly Manor is a light, humorous historical cozy mystery that will transport you back to the roaring 20s. The next novel in The High Society Lady Detective series is Murder at Blackburn Hall.
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  • Gail C.
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advanced digital copy of Murder at Archly Manor by Sara Rosett from NetGalley and Kobo Writing Life in exchange for an unbiased review. This is the first book in a proposed series by Sara Rosett featuring Olive Belgave, a member of high society in 1920’s England, with one foot in the world of the “bright young things” and the other in the world of work as she tries to make her own way in the world. This is a solid new entry in the world of historical cozy fiction that introduces w I received an advanced digital copy of Murder at Archly Manor by Sara Rosett from NetGalley and Kobo Writing Life in exchange for an unbiased review. This is the first book in a proposed series by Sara Rosett featuring Olive Belgave, a member of high society in 1920’s England, with one foot in the world of the “bright young things” and the other in the world of work as she tries to make her own way in the world. This is a solid new entry in the world of historical cozy fiction that introduces what could turn into an interesting series. Olive is hired to investigate her cousin’s new fiance, Alfred Eton, and his background by her aunt who has serious concerns about the truth of who he presents himself to be. Most of her investigation centers around her attendance at a weekend house party being held by Sebastian, a famous high-society photographer and purported Godfather to Alfred. As the book unfolds, Olive witnesses Alfred’s murder by a person strongly resembling Violet, her cousin, Alfred’s fiancee. Olive and Gwen, Violet’s sister, are convinced Violet is innocent although she seems to be the primary suspect for the inspector in charge of the case. In an effort to prove him wrong and discover the identity of the real murderer, Olive pursues several lines of inquiry throughout the houseguests and in London. There are clues and red herrings sprinkled liberally throughout the book with ample opportunity for the reader to determine the perpetrator. The mystery was easy to solve, and it was interesting to continue reading to see if the solution was consistent with the clues as presented. While the book has good potential, the characters were not as fully developed as I would have liked. It was difficult to develop strong feelings toward Olive. She didn’t have enough depth to provoke any emotion within me as a reader. The same is true for the other more prominent secondary characters. It would be interesting to learn if Gwen and Violet, along with secondary characters such as Jasper, a childhood friend of Olive’s; Olive’s stepmother who presents some major changes in Olive’s life, not all of them positive; and Olive’s aunt and uncle develop more depth in future novels as at present they do not have enough depth to be compelling figures. In summary, if you like books that are set in the roaring twenties, this series may hold some interest for you, particularly if the character development continues as the books progress. I would like to read at least one more book in the series before deciding if the series is one I would want to continue reading.
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  • Betty
    January 1, 1970
    For a light and relaxing read checked out the first in the historical series featuring Olive Belgrave, a penniless socialite through a misfortune, not her fault. The series takes place in the early 1920's set in London. The writing flows easily and the There even e characters are developed. This book took me back when I was reading about Miss Silver. It is similar in style.Olive accepts an offer from an Aunt to look into the history of a gentle that her daughter, Violet is determined to marry. A For a light and relaxing read checked out the first in the historical series featuring Olive Belgrave, a penniless socialite through a misfortune, not her fault. The series takes place in the early 1920's set in London. The writing flows easily and the There even e characters are developed. This book took me back when I was reading about Miss Silver. It is similar in style.Olive accepts an offer from an Aunt to look into the history of a gentle that her daughter, Violet is determined to marry. Along with another cousin, Gwen the three of them attend is invited to a weekend house party. at a count estate. While there Violet's fiance is tossed off a balcony and is killed. Evidence points to Violet and Olive become involved with the investigation. Plenty of twists and turns to hold your attention. There is even a romance starting. Will Olive find the answer to prevent Violet from being arrested? There are several suspects with motives. I highly recommend this book.
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  • Emma Cannon
    January 1, 1970
    As Autumn nights draw in my go to genre of choice is a murder mystery. They are comforting bowl of soup and freshly baked bread on a cold day.Murder at Archly Hall totally fits the bill.Aristocratic, but down on her luck, Olive Belgrave is searching for employment in 1920’s London. Even her connections aren’t paying off when she receives a telegram to return to her family estate. Olive’s cousin Violet has become engaged to Alfred Eton, a young man whose life in the colonies and heritage remain a As Autumn nights draw in my go to genre of choice is a murder mystery. They are comforting bowl of soup and freshly baked bread on a cold day.Murder at Archly Hall totally fits the bill.Aristocratic, but down on her luck, Olive Belgrave is searching for employment in 1920’s London. Even her connections aren’t paying off when she receives a telegram to return to her family estate. Olive’s cousin Violet has become engaged to Alfred Eton, a young man whose life in the colonies and heritage remain a mystery and who may not be a suitable match. Aunt Caroline employs Olive to use her skills and social connections to investigate.Intrepid Olive heads off to an extravagant house party hosted by photographer Sebastian Blakely, Alfred’s wealthy but unlikeable godfather and friend to dig up some dirt on her cousin’s future husband, but as a firework display is underway a murder occurs.With cousin Violet as a prime suspect, Olive sets out to prove her innocence and find out exactly what has happened and why.Olive herself is by far the star of Sara Rosett’s book. Her narrative style is chatty and easy to read but doesn’t skimp on atmospheric detail. She reminds me of Daisy Dalrymple but with more fun and more sass. The story was compelling and I thoroughly enjoyed solving this country house murder. I’ll definitely look out for Olive’s future adventures and more books in the High Society Lady Detective series.Thanks to Kobo Writing Life and Net Galley for this free advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Linda Baker
    January 1, 1970
    Sara Rosett takes us back to the Roaring 20's with the first book in The High Society Lady Detective Series. Olive Belgrave is from an aristocratic background but finds herself nearly penniless and needing a job. She and her father have always been close, especially since the death of her much-loved mother. However, financial reverses and the advent of a new and managing wife have driven a wedge between them. Olive is determined to set out on her own, and not be forced into a marriage with an ob Sara Rosett takes us back to the Roaring 20's with the first book in The High Society Lady Detective Series. Olive Belgrave is from an aristocratic background but finds herself nearly penniless and needing a job. She and her father have always been close, especially since the death of her much-loved mother. However, financial reverses and the advent of a new and managing wife have driven a wedge between them. Olive is determined to set out on her own, and not be forced into a marriage with an obnoxious curate, which the new stepmother thinks is just the thing. Olive has no marketable skills and has been pounding the pavements in London, with no luck. She is wondering how she is going to manage her room rent when she gets a call from her cousin, Gwen. Gwen's flighty younger sister, Violet, has gotten herself engaged to a young man of whom no one knows anything. Alfred Eaton appears to have plenty of money, but Gwen fears that he is a fortune hunter. She implores Olive to accompany her, and Violet, to a house party at the home of Sebastian Blakely who claims to be Alfred's godfather. No one can imagine Blakely as a godfather to any child, and he has never mentioned it before Alfred's sudden appearance. Gwen wants Olive to try to find out what she can about Alfred and offers to pay her for her efforts. When a murder occurs, and Violet is the main suspect, Olive discovers detection skills she never knew she had. Murder at Archly Manor introduces a very likable and determined heroine in the person of Olive Belgrave, along with other intriguing characters that I hope to see more of in future books. There is plenty of period atmosphere and mouth-watering descriptions of the fashions of the era. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this light-hearted, historical mystery. Thanks to the author for an advance copy. The opinions are my own.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Cozy mystery. Loved everything about this story. All my guess as to who the murderer was were wrong. Would recommend. The only thing that bothered me was that the author made a mistake with a characters name.
  • Selah Pike
    January 1, 1970
    Delightful! I loved that Rosett included a list of the books she read for research—now m TBR has grown 😆
  • Rosanne Lortz
    January 1, 1970
    Olive Belgrave is out of funds. Too attractive to get taken on as a governess and too unskilled to get taken on as a typist, she eventually receives the novel offer of private detective from her aunt. The mission? To find out more about her cousin Violet's unsavory fiance, Alfred. His uncouth manners show he's hiding something, but Violet is so enamored with him she doesn't even question his vague past and lack of connections. When Olive travels to Archly Manor to monitor the shady Alfred at a h Olive Belgrave is out of funds. Too attractive to get taken on as a governess and too unskilled to get taken on as a typist, she eventually receives the novel offer of private detective from her aunt. The mission? To find out more about her cousin Violet's unsavory fiance, Alfred. His uncouth manners show he's hiding something, but Violet is so enamored with him she doesn't even question his vague past and lack of connections. When Olive travels to Archly Manor to monitor the shady Alfred at a house party, it's not long before murder ensues. Determined to protect her cousin's reputation, Olive looks for her own clues alongside the Scotland Yard inspector only to uncover selfishness, secrets, blackmail, and other sordid details that point the finger in half a dozen directions. Will a trail of broken pearls lead the way? Can she find the murderer before death strikes again?This well-crafted mystery kept me guessing till the very end. Olive is a likable protagonist with sound instincts and a commendable sense of family loyalty. Both her longtime friend Jasper (a languid society gentleman who knows where to dig up information) and the thorough Inspector Longly were sympathetic characters who, I trust, will make an appearance in the next installment of the series. I couldn't help comparing this book to Lauren Willig's The Other Daughter, which is also set during the 1920s. Olive's high society friend Jasper reminded me of Simon Montfort from Willig's book. As an outsider trying to infiltrate the Bright Young Things, Olive's own investigation was similar to the one Rachel conducted. But despite the similarities, the tone of these books was very different, with Sara Rosett penning a cohesive and compelling whodunnit while Lauren Willig's book had a far more literary and romantic quality. Both books are great examples of 1920s historical fiction. Disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley. All opinions expressed in this review are my own. 
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  • Sue Em
    January 1, 1970
    Sara Rosett has switched gears from writing article enjoyable cozy series about a contemporary military wife to a post-WWI English high society traditional mystery. My high expectations for this new series were exceeded in Murder at Archly Manor.Olive Belgrade is penniless due to disastrous investments of her father. Compounded by the fact that he has just remarried and she has been pushed from the nest. Looking for gainful employment with no skills except a high intelligence has proven to a dis Sara Rosett has switched gears from writing article enjoyable cozy series about a contemporary military wife to a post-WWI English high society traditional mystery. My high expectations for this new series were exceeded in Murder at Archly Manor.Olive Belgrade is penniless due to disastrous investments of her father. Compounded by the fact that he has just remarried and she has been pushed from the nest. Looking for gainful employment with no skills except a high intelligence has proven to a disappointment. Called back to her cousin's estate, she becomes enlisted, and paid for, in looking into the origins of the dubious fiancee of Violet, the younger sister. Of course, there's a house party and a murder, and Olive needs to prove Violet's innocence.Fun, well-written and a great start to a new series! Thanks to netgalley and the publisher for the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Katreader
    January 1, 1970
    MURDER AT ARCHLY MANOR by Sara RosettThe First High Society Lady Detective BookUnable to live with her domineering step-mother, Olive Belgrave moves to London, assured she can easily find a job and support herself. Unfortunately, Olive soon learns that jobs are much harder to find, even for an educated young lady in 1923. A call for assistance from a wealthy cousin turns into a job. After all, why pay a detective to ferret out information on a shady looking suitor when the money can be kept in t MURDER AT ARCHLY MANOR by Sara RosettThe First High Society Lady Detective BookUnable to live with her domineering step-mother, Olive Belgrave moves to London, assured she can easily find a job and support herself. Unfortunately, Olive soon learns that jobs are much harder to find, even for an educated young lady in 1923. A call for assistance from a wealthy cousin turns into a job. After all, why pay a detective to ferret out information on a shady looking suitor when the money can be kept in the family. Soon Olive is crashing a house party to glean information on the wily fiance. Circumstances change however when Olive sees a blonde woman shove him over a balcony to his death. Now instead of looking into his life, she's investigating his death and trying to prove her cousin innocent of his murder.The juxtaposition of the wealthy, the penniless aristocrats, and the hangers on, gives a compelling look at 1920s high society. Those Bright Young People with their fancy house parties and their questionable morals, extravagance, and superficial views of the world force readers to contemplate their own part in society. It's all a lark, or is it?The first High Society Lady Detective book takes a fascinating look at society in the 1920s while providing a clever mystery. I love the maps at the start of the book, certainly a nod to the Golden Age of Detective Fiction. With read herrings, plenty of suspects, and disreputable characters MURDER AT ARCHLY MANOR is a solid start to a new series.FTC Disclosure – The publisher sent me a copy of this book in the hopes I would review it.
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  • Kaitlyn Dunnett
    January 1, 1970
    A fast, enjoyable read but I'm wasn't convinced that Olive has a vocation as a private detective. I'll have to wait for the next book in the series to see if she can pull it off when the client isn't a member of her own family.
  • FangirlNation
    January 1, 1970
    In Murder at Archly Manor by Sara Rosett, Olive Belgrave is busy trying to find a job in London, but in 1923, there are few jobs available for beautiful upper class young ladies. Just as she runs out of ideas, her aunt decides to hire her to investigate the new fiancé of Olive’s cousin, Violet Stone. Alfred Eton, recently arrived from India, where his father had been a nabob, seems suspicious to the Stone family. However, Violet is so taken with him that the family’s only hope to break the engag In Murder at Archly Manor by Sara Rosett, Olive Belgrave is busy trying to find a job in London, but in 1923, there are few jobs available for beautiful upper class young ladies. Just as she runs out of ideas, her aunt decides to hire her to investigate the new fiancé of Olive’s cousin, Violet Stone. Alfred Eton, recently arrived from India, where his father had been a nabob, seems suspicious to the Stone family. However, Violet is so taken with him that the family’s only hope to break the engagement seems to be to do a full background check on Alfred. Olive gets herself invited, along with Violet and Alfred, to a weekend party of Bright Young Things at the home of Sebastian, the famous photographer who is Alfred’s godfather.Read the rest of this review and other fun, geeky articles at Fangirl Nation
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  • Annie
    January 1, 1970
    Originally published on my blog: Nonstop Reader. Murder at Archly Manor is the first novel in the High Society Lady Detective series by cozy maven Sara Rosett. Released 15th Oct 2018 by the author, it's 256 pages and available in paperback, ebook and audio formats.I love English country house mysteries. Golden age is a definite plus for me. This book was maybe a little more 'cozy' style than Marsh or Christie, but it was such a lovely read. The settings are well described and the plotting never Originally published on my blog: Nonstop Reader. Murder at Archly Manor is the first novel in the High Society Lady Detective series by cozy maven Sara Rosett. Released 15th Oct 2018 by the author, it's 256 pages and available in paperback, ebook and audio formats.I love English country house mysteries. Golden age is a definite plus for me. This book was maybe a little more 'cozy' style than Marsh or Christie, but it was such a lovely read. The settings are well described and the plotting never drags. I like that Olive (lead character) is intelligent and brave and plucky.The murdered man is a cad and a blackguard (another nice golden age touch - the corpse 'had it coming'). There's a stately home absolutely full of suspects and it's up to Olive to sort them out, since the local plod has his eye firmly fixed on Olive's cousin, the dead man's fianceé.This book is well researched and it shows in the details of setting, dress, and dialogue. I was actually impressed at how seamlessly it worked within the time period.I will absolutely look out for the next books in the series (second book is already released, third is to come in April 2019).The language and narrative are very clean; no bad language or sexual content. There is some brief mention of drug abuse, but it's not graphic or glamorized.Well worth a look for mystery lovers and fans of the golden age. I really enjoyed it.Five stars.Disclosure: I received an ARC at no cost from the author/publisher for review purposes.
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  • Christie72
    January 1, 1970
    Great beginning to what promises to be a fantastic historical mystery series!!!!Rosett had me intrigued with her first few lines of the book. I knew I was going to enjoy the story and the main character, Olive. I was right!!!! It far exceeded all my expectations. Olive has left her aristocratic home to find work in London as a writer for a newspaper. Home isn’t home with her father’s new wife. However, the job prospects for a woman aren’t all that great. When her aunt asks her to look into the b Great beginning to what promises to be a fantastic historical mystery series!!!!Rosett had me intrigued with her first few lines of the book. I knew I was going to enjoy the story and the main character, Olive. I was right!!!! It far exceeded all my expectations. Olive has left her aristocratic home to find work in London as a writer for a newspaper. Home isn’t home with her father’s new wife. However, the job prospects for a woman aren’t all that great. When her aunt asks her to look into the background of her daughter, Violet’s beau, Alfred, she agrees. She has no clue she will become involved in a murder investigation. She has no choice when Violet is suspected of murdering Alfred. This is the beginning of a fantastic murder mystery full of twist and turns and insights into the upper class at that time period. Olive was quite interesting. She was a woman ahead of her time, not wanting to rely on her family’s money, but she wanting to rely on herself. That wasn’t always easy for a woman in the 1920s. She was somewhat of an outsider who was trying desperately to find exactly where she did fit in. Rosett created such an intelligent, witty and very resourceful character in Olive. I can’t wait to see what other mysteries she solves in the future. The book was extremely well-written and well-researched! Make sure to check out “The Story Behind the Story” at the end of the book. It will give you insight into how Rosett created this story and her characters. If you like historical mysteries with a strong, intelligent heroine, you won’t want to miss this one!!!!
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  • Helen Howerton
    January 1, 1970
    Sara Rosett recalls, in her author’s note to Murder at Archly Manor, that in writing her Murder on Location modern mystery series she became intrigued by what was happening in the 1920s at the same location. Thus, her High Society Lady Detective series was born. Now, there are many historical mysteries series out there with the same sort of theme, but Ms. Rossett adds to the oeuvre with fully realized characters, settings and language that fit the times and the situations. I especially appreciat Sara Rosett recalls, in her author’s note to Murder at Archly Manor, that in writing her Murder on Location modern mystery series she became intrigued by what was happening in the 1920s at the same location. Thus, her High Society Lady Detective series was born. Now, there are many historical mysteries series out there with the same sort of theme, but Ms. Rossett adds to the oeuvre with fully realized characters, settings and language that fit the times and the situations. I especially appreciated the time she takes with the women’s clothing, a special favorite of mine. Olive Belgrave needs a job, and she’s exhausted all the usual avenues. When given the opportunity to look into the background of her younger cousin’s fiancé, she figures, “Why not? An easy chance to make some easy money.” The “job” comes with some perks: attend a High Society Soiree, mingle with the Bright Young Things of the time, and ask some questions. What she didn’t expect to do was witness a murder. Not usually The Thing, but what’s a girl to do? Well, figure out the killer, of course, because it’s coming frightfully close to home.And she does, after the usual scratching of head and false leads: Who was where? Who has an alibi? Who’s looking especially guilty? There’s a few run-ups to London, and some squaring off with a Scotland Yard inspector (no flirting there, our author has someone else in mind). To Ms. Rosett’s credit, she doesn’t make it easy for Olive, who thinks she has it all figured out – and then the truth takes a twist. An entertaining beginning to a promising series. Looking forward to the next.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    Despite her aristocratic upbringing, Olive Belgrave is penniless. She has traveled to London in hopes of finding a job, but things are looking bleak. But when her aunt Caroline and cousin Gwen ask her to look into the background Alfred, the fiance of her other cousin, Violet.The family is sure that Alfred is a bounder, but they can't prove it. It's up to Olive to come up with evidence of his misdoings. But when he's killed at a party at Archly Manor, Olive's job changes from investigating his ba Despite her aristocratic upbringing, Olive Belgrave is penniless. She has traveled to London in hopes of finding a job, but things are looking bleak. But when her aunt Caroline and cousin Gwen ask her to look into the background Alfred, the fiance of her other cousin, Violet.The family is sure that Alfred is a bounder, but they can't prove it. It's up to Olive to come up with evidence of his misdoings. But when he's killed at a party at Archly Manor, Olive's job changes from investigating his background, to trying to find his murderer before the killer claims a second victim.Set in 1923 in London and the town of Nether Woodsmore, Murder at Archly Manor is the first in the High Society Lady Detective series.I enjoyed meeting Olive, an independent woman intent on living her life on her own terms. She is bright, and willing to take on a job to which most ladies of her station would turn up their noses. But Olive has always been the curious one, and she works her ways through the clues, asking questions and discovering things that even Scotland Yard did not see.I loved the feel of this book, the setting of the "long weekend" house party, and the characters that made up the cast of suspects.Murder at Archly Manor is rich in detail, and the mystery was expertly plotted. I look forward to Olive's second adventure in Murder at Blackburn Hall.I read a digital copy of this book provided by the publisher through NetGalley.
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  • Carlin
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this first in the High Society Lady Detective myhstery series by Sara Rosett. It is set in 1920s England near where the author set her contemporary. Murder on Location series. The protagonist, Olive, is a debutant who, because of family financial difficulties, is forced to find employment with few marketable skills. She is recruited by an older relative to delve into the life of her cousin Violet's mysterious fiancé. Violet's sister arranges for Olive to join a weekend party at Archly Ma I loved this first in the High Society Lady Detective myhstery series by Sara Rosett. It is set in 1920s England near where the author set her contemporary. Murder on Location series. The protagonist, Olive, is a debutant who, because of family financial difficulties, is forced to find employment with few marketable skills. She is recruited by an older relative to delve into the life of her cousin Violet's mysterious fiancé. Violet's sister arranges for Olive to join a weekend party at Archly Manor where she can begin making enquiries about Alfred. However, Alfred is pushed off a balcony and falls to his death. Violet is the obvious suspect so ... Olive now has to prove her cousin's innocence while tracking down the real killer. This is a classic mystery where all the principals are confined to the manor house for a weekend. It ever has a drawing showing the location of all the characters' bedrooms (shades of Agatha Christie!). At the end of the book the author describes her research into the flapper era including clothing, cars, communications (no cell phones!) and even slang (she even has a Pinterest page when the reader can view photos/drawings representing life in the era. I look forward to seeing what is next in Olive's life as a detective who is part of the social class where she finds her cases. In some ways this book reminded me of the Phrynie Fisher mystery series set during the same era but located in Melbourne, Australia, one of my favorites.
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  • SS
    January 1, 1970
    It’s a high-society weekend in the country. All is going splendidly; everyone is waiting for the celebratory fireworks to begin when Olive Belgrave notices a scuffle on a balcony. Olive has been commissioned by her aunt to dig up the dirt on Olive’s cousin’s fiancée, Alfred. The scuffle is taking place on Alfred’s balcony. When the worst happens, Olive begins investigating in earnest. She learns that there’s much more to Alfred than anyone suspected. Murder at Archly Manor is filled with a delig It’s a high-society weekend in the country. All is going splendidly; everyone is waiting for the celebratory fireworks to begin when Olive Belgrave notices a scuffle on a balcony. Olive has been commissioned by her aunt to dig up the dirt on Olive’s cousin’s fiancée, Alfred. The scuffle is taking place on Alfred’s balcony. When the worst happens, Olive begins investigating in earnest. She learns that there’s much more to Alfred than anyone suspected. Murder at Archly Manor is filled with a delightful cast of characters, from the snooty sister of their host, to the drug user, to the cook in the kitchen, everyone is well thought out and serves a purpose. I kept thinking that I knew who committed the crime, but the twisty path to the real culprit found me surprised. This book is a period piece, set in the early 1920s. There are still rules, but the can be bent, if not broken. You get the feel of the Roaring Twenties, the elegance of the surroundings, and the personalities of the characters. There is a bit of class differentiation, for Olive is a working girl amongst the socialites, but her family is as high ranking as the others. It was a delight to watch Olive dig up and work through the clues, watch as her suspicions move from suspect to suspect, and then see her discard each to pick up another. Olive is wonderful in every way. I was pleasantly surprised by the narrator. She offered an excellent performance. Her voices and pacing suited the various characters and the situations. I recommend this book to anyone who might enjoy this type of cozy mystery. I received this audio book for free from the author. Her generosity is appreciated, but had no influence on opinions expressed in this review. Those expressed opinions reflect my honest response to listening to this audio book.
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  • Kristen
    January 1, 1970
    I have been on a bad roll with some of my book choices lately. I don't know, maybe it's me. Maybe I am excessively hard to please. I don't feel like I am, but I am willing to consider that it's me. Or, maybe I'm just misunderstanding the descriptions of some of my book choices. I like strong female characters. I like characters who pull up their bootstraps and get on with things, despite negative things happening to them, and in their lives. I like characters who don't whine. I feel like I didn' I have been on a bad roll with some of my book choices lately. I don't know, maybe it's me. Maybe I am excessively hard to please. I don't feel like I am, but I am willing to consider that it's me. Or, maybe I'm just misunderstanding the descriptions of some of my book choices. I like strong female characters. I like characters who pull up their bootstraps and get on with things, despite negative things happening to them, and in their lives. I like characters who don't whine. I feel like I didn't get that here.To be fair, I only made it to chapter 6 of this book. By that point I realized I did not like, or connect with a single character in this book. Everyone I met to that point was either whiny, obnoxious, or sad and pathetic. We hadn't even gotten to the murder, and I already didn't care who got murdered, by whom, or why. I just could not spend another moment with anyone I met in this book.I hate writing bad reviews, but I have to offer my truthful reaction to the books I read. I honestly believe that lots of people would very much like and connect with Olive, and will probably enjoy this book. It was not, however, a fit for me.
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  • Cassidy
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this book, which transports the reader back almost a century to the era of flappers and vaudeville. The author did a fine job of creating a mystery set in British society in the 1920s. The descriptions of the clothing and settings gave a good feel for the times without getting long-winded.From the onset of the story, I found myself rooting for Olive as she struggles to support herself in a time when well-bred, independent working females – or should I say ladies – were not the n I really enjoyed this book, which transports the reader back almost a century to the era of flappers and vaudeville. The author did a fine job of creating a mystery set in British society in the 1920s. The descriptions of the clothing and settings gave a good feel for the times without getting long-winded.From the onset of the story, I found myself rooting for Olive as she struggles to support herself in a time when well-bred, independent working females – or should I say ladies – were not the norm. Olive is sweet and spunky at the same time, and very loyal to her cousins, who are better situated in life. Quirky and mysterious characters, secrets that must be kept at all costs, and an interesting, somewhat unpredictable plot made for a very enjoyable read. I look forward to reading more about Olive and her adventures in the future.Disclosure: I received an advance review copy of this book without obligation and have voluntarily chosen to share my honest review.
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  • Darcysmom
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Murder at Archly Manor is an impressive beginning to a new cozy mystery series. The elements of a good story were all in place and worked together very well. I was interested from the first page and remained completely engaged to the last word.Olive is a whip-smart main character. I particularly liked that she was part of proper society, but down on her luck, so that she had to rely on her wits - and a little help fr I received an ARC of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Murder at Archly Manor is an impressive beginning to a new cozy mystery series. The elements of a good story were all in place and worked together very well. I was interested from the first page and remained completely engaged to the last word.Olive is a whip-smart main character. I particularly liked that she was part of proper society, but down on her luck, so that she had to rely on her wits - and a little help from her extended family.Archly Manor was an excellent setting for a murder - an isolated manor filled with potential suspects. Every time I thought I had figured out the culprit, I was wrong - this made the unveiling of the killer very satisfying. I set the mood for reading by listening to this playlist on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/user/1273770...I recommend the book and the playlist for an immersive reading experience.
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  • Margaret
    January 1, 1970
    So excited to have a new cozy series that I enjoyed this much! If you are a fan of Sara Rosett's "Murder on Location" series, this book also features Nether Woodsmoor and Parkview Hall only in the 1920s! Due to the financial aftermath of the Great War, Olive needs to find employment despite being from a family with some standing in society. When traditional avenues fail her, she agrees to aid her aunt in looking into the sketchy background of her cousin's fiance. There are several twists and tur So excited to have a new cozy series that I enjoyed this much! If you are a fan of Sara Rosett's "Murder on Location" series, this book also features Nether Woodsmoor and Parkview Hall only in the 1920s! Due to the financial aftermath of the Great War, Olive needs to find employment despite being from a family with some standing in society. When traditional avenues fail her, she agrees to aid her aunt in looking into the sketchy background of her cousin's fiance. There are several twists and turns that add complexity to the mystery as well as helping us to get to know the main characters better. It's obvious a lot of research went into this book. I've read other cozies set in previous decades that have glaring time period errors that jar you out of the flow of the story. This one settled right in and let you immerse yourself in the Roaring 20s without making the details of the era the focus of the book. I'm already looking forward to Book 2.
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  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    What a delightful historical mystery. Bringing two of my favourite genres together. Our lead character Olive is a bit of an outsider to the money rich young folk of the 1920's enjoying weekends in grand country houses. Flapper fashions and pastimes of music, croquet and bridge keep them occupied.This is a tale of a murder at Archly Manor on one of these weekends. Albert is a rascal - living a lie and with many people who could have a motive to kill him. Olive is already doing her aunty a favour What a delightful historical mystery. Bringing two of my favourite genres together. Our lead character Olive is a bit of an outsider to the money rich young folk of the 1920's enjoying weekends in grand country houses. Flapper fashions and pastimes of music, croquet and bridge keep them occupied.This is a tale of a murder at Archly Manor on one of these weekends. Albert is a rascal - living a lie and with many people who could have a motive to kill him. Olive is already doing her aunty a favour in covertly researching Albert as he has become the fiancé of love blind Violet. So once Violet becomes prime suspect in his murder, Olive is on hand to investigate....she is like a dog with a bone and keenly unravels the secrets of the house guests.I look forward to reading more instalments in this historical mystery series.Murder at Archly Manor by Sara Rosett. #MurderAtArchlyManor #NetGalley
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  • Jackie M
    January 1, 1970
    Murder at Archly Manor by Sara Rosett, Kobo Writing Life, 2018.Miserable at home with her new stepmother now in charge, Olive leaves only to find herself unqualified for suitable paid employment. She first agrees to investigate her cousin’s fiancé, suspected of being an imposter, and then finds herself investigating a murder. Murder at Archly Manor is set in and around 1920s London with most of the action taking place at a high class house party. Compared with other UK crime fiction of the perio Murder at Archly Manor by Sara Rosett, Kobo Writing Life, 2018.Miserable at home with her new stepmother now in charge, Olive leaves only to find herself unqualified for suitable paid employment. She first agrees to investigate her cousin’s fiancé, suspected of being an imposter, and then finds herself investigating a murder. Murder at Archly Manor is set in and around 1920s London with most of the action taking place at a high class house party. Compared with other UK crime fiction of the period, e.g. that of Charles Todd, it is a light hearted, easy read.This book is well written, the dialogue and narrative are well balanced, the descriptions and characterizations combine to make it interesting and ejoyable. I look forward to reading more in this new series.Disclosure: I received a review copy of Murder at Archly Manor free via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this mystery! Historical mysteries are not a common read for me, I certainly gravitate more to contemporary mysteries, but I really enjoyed this one.As a fan of The Great Gatsby, I suppose I shouldn't be too surprised that I like the reading about the 1920s. This story was an artful blend of aristocratic and the working class in England after the Great War. The mystery unfolded in a natural way with clues pointing to everyone! The story was easy to follow with enough characters I really enjoyed this mystery! Historical mysteries are not a common read for me, I certainly gravitate more to contemporary mysteries, but I really enjoyed this one.As a fan of The Great Gatsby, I suppose I shouldn't be too surprised that I like the reading about the 1920s. This story was an artful blend of aristocratic and the working class in England after the Great War. The mystery unfolded in a natural way with clues pointing to everyone! The story was easy to follow with enough characters to keep interest, without confusion. I hope there will be plenty more stories about Olive and her investigations.I plan on reading more of this author's mysteries.Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for allowing me to read an advanced copy of this book.
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  • Maria Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this cozy mystery audio book. The narrator did a great job. The characters were interesting and a nice variety of personalities. Olive was a fun character with her curious mind. She remained remarkably calm as she worked to figure out who dunnit. And the time period was a fun change from what I usually read. I didn't think the killer was obvious. In the end I did call it on who was guilty but it wasn't because it was obvious. It was just because I didn't like the person and accused bas I enjoyed this cozy mystery audio book. The narrator did a great job. The characters were interesting and a nice variety of personalities. Olive was a fun character with her curious mind. She remained remarkably calm as she worked to figure out who dunnit. And the time period was a fun change from what I usually read. I didn't think the killer was obvious. In the end I did call it on who was guilty but it wasn't because it was obvious. It was just because I didn't like the person and accused based on nothing more than that. There were plenty of potential candidates so it wasn't obvious. This was the first book in the series and I'd enjoy reading the rest of them. No sex or language.Violence: a murder but nothing graphic.
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  • Jessi
    January 1, 1970
    Olive's new stepmother has pushed her rather forcibly out of her father's house. Unfortunately, Olive has no skills. Her father spent her college money on some scheme. And, unfortunately, his schemes never come out. She's rather desperate when her cousin asks her for help. It seems her other cousin, Violet, is engaged to a man who is wholly ineligible. Or at least he seems so at first glance. Olive agrees to look into the man's past for a slight fee.Invited to a party at Alfred's godfather's hou Olive's new stepmother has pushed her rather forcibly out of her father's house. Unfortunately, Olive has no skills. Her father spent her college money on some scheme. And, unfortunately, his schemes never come out. She's rather desperate when her cousin asks her for help. It seems her other cousin, Violet, is engaged to a man who is wholly ineligible. Or at least he seems so at first glance. Olive agrees to look into the man's past for a slight fee.Invited to a party at Alfred's godfather's house, Olive finds herself among the fast set. And it gets even faster when Alfred is thrown off a balcony. Violet immediately becomes the most likely suspect. Especially since she was one of the only people upstairs at the time of the murder.I really liked this story and look forward to the next in the series.
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