All That’s Dead (Logan McRae #12)
The stunning new Logan McRae thriller from No. 1 Sunday Times bestseller Stuart MacBride. Scottish crime fiction at its very best. Darkness is coming… Inspector Logan McRae was looking forward to a nice simple case – something to ease him back into work after a year off on the sick. But the powers-that-be have other ideas…The high-profile anti-independence campaigner, Professor Wilson, has gone missing, leaving nothing but bloodstains behind. There’s a war brewing between the factions for and against Scottish Nationalism. Infighting in the police ranks. And it’s all playing out in the merciless glare of the media. Logan’s superiors want results, and they want them now.Someone out there is trying to make a point, and they’re making it in blood. If Logan can’t stop them, it won’t just be his career that dies.

All That’s Dead (Logan McRae #12) Details

TitleAll That’s Dead (Logan McRae #12)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 3rd, 2019
PublisherHarperCollins
ISBN-139780008328467
Rating
GenreMystery, Crime, Fiction, Audiobook, Cultural, Scotland

All That’s Dead (Logan McRae #12) Review

  • Paromjit
    January 1, 1970
    This may be the 12th addition to the DI Logan McRae series by Stuart MacBride set in Aberdeen, but I still anticipate the newest book with an eagerness and anticipation that places me amongst the community of readers that are die hard fans of the series. At this stage, I know there is little that will surprise me, but this makes little difference to the huge level of enjoyment that I know I am guaranteed to experience. All the elements I expect are here, the humour, the comic wit, the mayhem, th This may be the 12th addition to the DI Logan McRae series by Stuart MacBride set in Aberdeen, but I still anticipate the newest book with an eagerness and anticipation that places me amongst the community of readers that are die hard fans of the series. At this stage, I know there is little that will surprise me, but this makes little difference to the huge level of enjoyment that I know I am guaranteed to experience. All the elements I expect are here, the humour, the comic wit, the mayhem, the iconic, shambolic lesbian queen that is DS Roberta Steel, and a Logan that MacBride has really put through the mill, it is nothing short of a miracle that he has managed to survive. Here, Logan is returning to work after a year of recovering from a previous stabbing. His new boss at Professional Standards, the crocheting Superintendent Julie Bevan, is easing him into work to support DI Frank King, whose past a journalist is planning to expose, and it is Logan's job to help Police Scotland manage this disastrous state of affairs.Needless to say, it turns out Logan has to do far more than support King who unravels in spectacular fashion as he hits the bottle, sinks into an all consuming depression, facing a wife that is intent on making his life a misery, and the worrying prospect of losing his job, thanks to youthful errors of judgement. In the meantime, Scotland is facing the kind of political nightmare that parallels our contemporary politics of Brexit, with a deadly battle between those who support the union between England and Scotland and the extreme Alt-Nats, intent on a independent nation, by whatever means necessary, as they create a poisonous climate of fear with gruesome and brutal murders. Professor Nicholas Wilson is a stridently prominent voice supporting the union and ridiculing independence supporters. He is a man disliked by everyone who knows him, and has been abducted from his home, leaving behind a heavily blood spattered crime scene. The perpetrator(s) display a comprehensive awareness of forensics as there is no trace left behind as it becomes clear that Wilson is not the only person abducted and in danger. The put upon Logan has to babysit King, put up with the idiots Tufty and DS Rennie, and confront a desperate police hierarchy intent on avoiding any individual blame with scapegoats lined up, bullying the lower orders as their stress levels hit sky high levels with the unfolding disasters and the never ending unwelcome pressure from the media. What can I say??? Simply a fantastic novel and a rip roaring, entertaining, character driven narrative that will be loved by fans. For those who have never read this series, I strongly urge you to give it a try. Many thanks to HarperCollins for an ARC.
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  • Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede
    January 1, 1970
    The Logan McRae series is a favorite series of mine. No one can mix crime and humor as Stuart Macbride and this book is no exception. And, it all starts with a missing body, and that's not the first body to go missing. However, Logan also has to deal with the fact that the cop that runs this investigation has, let's say a black spot on his record. And, now a journalist is threatening to reveal it all. And, to top it all Logan is the one set to help out the investigation because the powers to be The Logan McRae series is a favorite series of mine. No one can mix crime and humor as Stuart Macbride and this book is no exception. And, it all starts with a missing body, and that's not the first body to go missing. However, Logan also has to deal with the fact that the cop that runs this investigation has, let's say a black spot on his record. And, now a journalist is threatening to reveal it all. And, to top it all Logan is the one set to help out the investigation because the powers to be needs a scapegoat. And, who's better than Logan? There is so much going on in this book that I will just say this: This book is great from the beginning until the end. There are plenty of funny moments, my favorite fictional cat Cthulhu and Logan's children have great cameos. The case is interesting, and of course, Roberta Steel is there to make Logan's life worse. And, that ending... So, what are you waiting for? Go out and get a copy of this book (and the rest of the books in the series)... I want to thank the publisher for providing me with a free copy through NetGalley for an honest review!
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  • Liz Barnsley
    January 1, 1970
    Every time I review a Stuart Macbride novel I have a terrible time because honestly all I want to do is dance the awesome book dance. Yes it’s a thing in my house, the youngest did one last night having finished the fourth Harry Potter..Anyway, you can’t see me so I’ll just have to use my words…All That’s Dead is yet another fantastic addition to this series, completely gripping first page to last, irreverently hilarious and also dark as you like.Our favourite characters are back doing their own Every time I review a Stuart Macbride novel I have a terrible time because honestly all I want to do is dance the awesome book dance. Yes it’s a thing in my house, the youngest did one last night having finished the fourth Harry Potter..Anyway, you can’t see me so I’ll just have to use my words…All That’s Dead is yet another fantastic addition to this series, completely gripping first page to last, irreverently hilarious and also dark as you like.Our favourite characters are back doing their own awesome book dance alongside a truly villainous villain, a massive dose of reality and some rather horrific happenings. The plot is taut and effective as ever, it is an utter delight to read, as they all are.Is there any need to say more? Nope. Well ok, just that if you are looking for quality writing, brilliant observation and genuinely addictive plots within your crime fiction, this series and this author should be high up on your reading list.Exceptional stuff.Highly Recommended.
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  • Kirsty ❤️
    January 1, 1970
    Sometimes bloggers get a bad rep because they get books for free but these comments don't factor in that sometimes you get a book for free, love it so much that you end up going out and buying an authors entire back catalogue which is what happened with me when I read  MacBride's A Dark So Deadly at the back end of 2017. When this is released I'll be going out and adding it to the collection because it's equally as good as all the others I've read so far. I love the characterisations in these bo Sometimes bloggers get a bad rep because they get books for free but these comments don't factor in that sometimes you get a book for free, love it so much that you end up going out and buying an authors entire back catalogue which is what happened with me when I read  MacBride's A Dark So Deadly at the back end of 2017. When this is released I'll be going out and adding it to the collection because it's equally as good as all the others I've read so far. I love the characterisations in these books. I have a bit of a book crush on both Logan AND Steel (which does often make me question myself I have to say). They are just depicted so well. as are other secondary characters. It doesn't matter whether they are longstanding one's like Rennie or newer ones, all are richly described and you can see them so well. This one is all about Scottish independence (which also managed to give me some unintentional family history as my family tree shows I'm related to the real Macbeth and there's a bit of info in here about his final days that I didn't know) with anti-independence campaigners going missing. That is until various body parts of these guys start to turn up.It's as taut as the rest, the humour remains in tact and it tears along at the usual pace. If you've read the rest you do know what you're going to get but that doesn't detract from the book one bit.  I would highly recommend this series.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    Stuart MacBride can do no wrong in my eyes. His novels always feature in my top five books of the year. All That's Dead is fantastic, pure and simple, and for all of the reasons that make Stuart MacBride my favourite crime writer - outstanding, unforgettable characters; clever, witty writing; gripping, shocking mysteries; and that special indefinable something that is irresistible. Not to mention Roberta Steel. Superb. Review to follow shortly on For Winter Nights.
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  • Elaine Tomasso
    January 1, 1970
    I would like to thank Netgalley and HarperCollins UK, HarperFiction for an advance copy of All That’s Dead, the twelfth novel to feature DI Logan MacRae of Police Scotland.Logan returns to a job in Professional Standards after a year off on invalidity. To ease him in he is asked to investigate DI King who is facing exposure in the press. It should be a simple job but DI King is investigating the disappearance of staunch and combative anti independence campaigner Professor Nicholas Wilson. As Log I would like to thank Netgalley and HarperCollins UK, HarperFiction for an advance copy of All That’s Dead, the twelfth novel to feature DI Logan MacRae of Police Scotland.Logan returns to a job in Professional Standards after a year off on invalidity. To ease him in he is asked to investigate DI King who is facing exposure in the press. It should be a simple job but DI King is investigating the disappearance of staunch and combative anti independence campaigner Professor Nicholas Wilson. As Logan gets pulled into the investigation his gentle easing in turns into anything but.I thoroughly enjoyed All That’s Dead which is another fine addition to an excellent series. It made me laugh while clinging to the edge of my seat as the tension and excitement rise. There are plenty of twists and turns as Logan tries to find out what happened to Professor Wilson, many of them gory as Mr MacBride does not shy away from the violence implicit in crimes of this nature.It is an interesting subject to cover and I enjoyed the running commentary on Independence. It has been somewhat overshadowed by Brexit in the press but is still a hot button topic in Scotland. I was particularly interested in what Mr MacBride calls the Alt-Nat, the rabid pro-independence movement which surfaced during the referendum as I hadn’t realised the extent of it. It makes for interesting if shameful reading for any Scot. For non Scots the politics may not be quite as interesting but the story they shape will surely hold the attention.It is equally interesting to see the once feckless Logan MacRae turn into the voice of reason and often the only adult in the room. He has his hands full in this novel trying to corral a motley crew of colleagues, including the irrepressible DS Roberta Steele who, as ever, has a way with words and attitude that has me in stitches on a regular basis.All That’s Dead is a great read that I have no hesitation in recommending.
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  • Roy
    January 1, 1970
    While I enjoy MacBrides writing and humour mixed with his crime. I'm losing my fondness for some characters. I think I might retire this series as I feel like the series has bit a formulaic trend.
  • Rosemary Standeven
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! This is probably one of the best police procedural/crime novels that I have ever read. It is my first Stuart MacBride book, but it definitely will not be my last.Scotland has survived two referenda. In the first they voted against independence, believing the “Better Together” campaign. So, in the second – the EU referendum – they also voted to remain together, and were royally shafted by the English nationalists, who decided that it was OK for the English to vote to “take back control”, but Wow! This is probably one of the best police procedural/crime novels that I have ever read. It is my first Stuart MacBride book, but it definitely will not be my last.Scotland has survived two referenda. In the first they voted against independence, believing the “Better Together” campaign. So, in the second – the EU referendum – they also voted to remain together, and were royally shafted by the English nationalists, who decided that it was OK for the English to vote to “take back control”, but not the Scots. It is not a huge leap to understand that many Scots are a wee bit miffed. However, thankfully no one has yet taken their ‘disappointment’ to the extreme level of the so-called Scottish Nationalists in this book.Someone is targeting high profile, anti-(Scottish)-independence, pro-English rent-a-mouths, and they are not just throwing milkshakes and eggs. First target is Nicholas Wilson – a constitutional scholar, who is loathed by even his closest associates. So, when he goes missing, not a lot of tears are shed. However, the blood left in his home, and a macabre parcel later to delivered to BBC Scotland., make it clear, that this is no ordinary Missing Person situation. DI Frank King has been assigned to lead the investigation, and Inspector Logan McCrae, from Professional Standards (back at work after being stabbed in a previous book), has been assigned to keep an eye on DI King. King is under suspicion of having Alt-Nat terrorist links. His marriage is failing, he is drinking too much and Logan has his work cut out for him if he wants to save King’s career (and his own), and solve this crime: “the scapegoat’s scapegoat had no intention of letting the original-issue scapegoat screw things up and land him in it”.King explains: “You know how the Alt-Right is full of white supremacists, gun nuts, racists, and neo-Nazis? Well, Alt-Nats are our own home-grown version. Only without the guns and Nazis. And it’s the English they hate.”The crime, the many unexpected twists and turns before the eventual solution, are so well designed, that you are compelled to keep reading right to the bitter end. But that is just window-dressing for the real treasures in this novel: the wonderful writing and the amazing characters. The scenes are always so perfectly set, that you could be a fly on the wall. For example: “A small bark crackled out in the hallway, and Stalin hobbled through the study door. Wheezing and whining. Fading brown spots. Legs stiff with arthritis. A clockwork Jack Russell that was slowly winding down.”; “Bees bumbled their way between the flowering weeds that lined the drive, hoverflies buzzing amongst the thunderheads, house martins reenacting the Battle of Britain – jinking and swooping and diving, while a clatter of jackdaws looked on from the farmhouse roof.”; “A clipped voice came from a room off to one side, as if every word was being throttled to stop it screaming, emphasising the Highland burr.”; “Deep wrinkles slashed their way across her forehead, barely concealed by a sweaty brown fringe. Mid-forties, going on homicidal”. And then there are the Scottish dialect words, expressions and insults, which I loved discovering. Luckily each is used in a context that makes it easy for non-Scots to understand e.g. “Mrs Bag-For-Life raised a walking stick and took a wee hurpley step forward”, “one of the lippy auld wifies”. My favourite insult was the “Womble-funting dick-muppets”. There were so many great sentences, that I just had to read out to my husband. Because I had not (yet) read any of the earlier books, I missed some of the character development – and was, on the whole, presented with perfectly formed unique, believable characters (such as Logan and the intimidating, foul-mouthed lesbian, Steel), and had a little catching up to do. However, my favourite of all was the ever-cheery, ever-helpful, high-as-a-kite (on caffeine) Tufty: “like a kicked dachshund. ‘Pity poor Tufty…’ Bless his little Starfleet socks, but that lad was a complete and utter weirdo”. Tufty is severely underrated by his colleagues (“asking Tufty had always been a long shot. It wasn’t as if he was renowned for his Sherlock-Holmes-style steel-trap intellect, was it? He wasn’t completely thick – the boy was great on sci-fi trivia, so if Star Trek, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, or Battlestar Galactica came up at a pub quiz, he was your man – but actual police work? Might as well ask a drunken hedgehog to fill out your tax return”), but really is a computer whiz (“Brave Sir Tufty’s algorithmic methodology is inspired, but without more computing power, it’s like trying to push a ten-tonne blancmange uphill wearing nothing but flip-flops and an amusing hat.” ), and eventually he comes up with the goods. He also makes a habit of hacking Logan’s phone.Nationalism is a blight on every country, and in the book, nationalism is taken to obscene lengths. Steel sums up the feelings of many Scots: “I’m all for independence. But I want a Scotland of the Enlightenment; a nation of fairness and equality; a nation that cares about the smallest, weakest person living here every bit as much as the biggest, richest one. A nation that welcomes everyone: aye, even the English … What I don’t want is some sort of apartheid s****hole full of racist, moronic, ethnic cleansing w*** spasms like you.”I loved this book and can highly recommend it to everyone. I have already bought book number one in this series. My husband is scouring the library for the rest, as he is also hooked. Read and be enthralled. Ten out of five stars!.I received this copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review
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  • Siobhan
    January 1, 1970
    Why am I only now finding out we have a title?Always ready for a new McRae book.
  • gem
    January 1, 1970
    Rtc
  • peggy
    January 1, 1970
    This maybe the 12th book in the DI Logan McRae series and I still get excited when a new book is released and lands in my inbox. This is trademark Stuart McBride. Full of humour ( in my case laugh out loud), comic wit, Inspector Roberta Steele lesbian queen extraordinaire who always comes up smelling of roses. DI Logan McRae who tries desperately to keep it altogether while working with the likes of the Tuffinator and Rennie. As Logan says Its like working in a kindergarten. The one liners are p This maybe the 12th book in the DI Logan McRae series and I still get excited when a new book is released and lands in my inbox. This is trademark Stuart McBride. Full of humour ( in my case laugh out loud), comic wit, Inspector Roberta Steele lesbian queen extraordinaire who always comes up smelling of roses. DI Logan McRae who tries desperately to keep it altogether while working with the likes of the Tuffinator and Rennie. As Logan says Its like working in a kindergarten. The one liners are priceless, a spate of grisly murders to be solved. I have been thoroughly entertained while reading this book. An easy five stars and so Highly Recommended. When I am in a book rut Stuart McBride is my go to author and is one of my guilty reading pleasures. I LOVED IT!!!!!I would like to thank the author, HarperCollins UK and Netgalley for the ARC in return for giving an honest review.
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 StarsInspector Logan McRae returns to work after a year & hopes he’ll be able to ease back to work with an easy case. No chance!The high-profile anti-independence campaigner, Professor Wilson, has gone missing, leaving nothing but bloodstains behind. A superior officer with problems, who unravels leaving McRae to cope. Although this is the twelfth book in the series the series is still fresh & I just love the series , strong characters & a fast paced story just what I need for an 4.5 StarsInspector Logan McRae returns to work after a year & hopes he’ll be able to ease back to work with an easy case. No chance!The high-profile anti-independence campaigner, Professor Wilson, has gone missing, leaving nothing but bloodstains behind. A superior officer with problems, who unravels leaving McRae to cope. Although this is the twelfth book in the series the series is still fresh & I just love the series , strong characters & a fast paced story just what I need for an enjoyable read. I loved the mix of dark humour & tension (unlike the previous book where I felt the humour didn’t work) & read the book under a day. There are twists & turns along the way, I can highly recommend this book & the whole seriesMy honest review is for a special copy I voluntarily read
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  • Martha Brindley
    January 1, 1970
    This is a stunning read! One of my favourite crime authors who never fails to deliver. Book 12 in the Logan Mc Rae series is every bit as fresh as book one. Logan is investigating a trail of missing bodies, an investigating officer with a serious mark on his record and the character of DS Steel on the team. So much humour, great pace, tight plot and a well written tale make this a 5* read from Stuart MacBride. I just love this series and have no hesitation in recommending this book. My thanks to This is a stunning read! One of my favourite crime authors who never fails to deliver. Book 12 in the Logan Mc Rae series is every bit as fresh as book one. Logan is investigating a trail of missing bodies, an investigating officer with a serious mark on his record and the character of DS Steel on the team. So much humour, great pace, tight plot and a well written tale make this a 5* read from Stuart MacBride. I just love this series and have no hesitation in recommending this book. My thanks to Net Galley for my ARC.
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  • Book-Lover Book Blog
    January 1, 1970
    I think this author’s work is best read by Scottish people and this one especially aimed towards people that are into politics. I didn’t like it at all. It was very politically opinionated and I believe it’s from the authors perspective. There’s a fair bit of ENGLISH hating in this too and being English myself, irritated me. The story concept itself probably would have great if it was more understandable for us English people. And also would have been OK if the characters were even remotely like I think this author’s work is best read by Scottish people and this one especially aimed towards people that are into politics. I didn’t like it at all. It was very politically opinionated and I believe it’s from the authors perspective. There’s a fair bit of ENGLISH hating in this too and being English myself, irritated me. The story concept itself probably would have great if it was more understandable for us English people. And also would have been OK if the characters were even remotely likeable. Steel and King acted like 4-year-old children all the time and to be honest, in places, Logan did too. The police characters in this story ruin it for the book badly, they’re not any good at their jobs and mess up way too much. The word ‘sooked’ was used way too much and made the story rather repetitive. The amount of Scottish slang was unbearable as I couldn’t understand it. I only gave this 2 stars because the concept of the story was ok. The characters, the penmanship? Not for me. Other people may understand this story and can tolerate the bad behaviour of the characters, but not for me.
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    Long term followers of my blog, or folks you have just seen me witter on upon Twitter (or should that be twitter on ...) , will know that I am somewhat of a fan of Stuart MacBride's work. He's the kind of author I stalk Amazon for, keeping an eye on when the next book is out for pre-order, making sure I'm at the front of the queue when it comes to order pickings and the like. I have all the books in first edition - yes, I'm one of those people. So when I saw All That's Dead was up on Amazon, I p Long term followers of my blog, or folks you have just seen me witter on upon Twitter (or should that be twitter on ...) , will know that I am somewhat of a fan of Stuart MacBride's work. He's the kind of author I stalk Amazon for, keeping an eye on when the next book is out for pre-order, making sure I'm at the front of the queue when it comes to order pickings and the like. I have all the books in first edition - yes, I'm one of those people. So when I saw All That's Dead was up on Amazon, I pressed buy and didn't look back. Getting an early copy via Netgalley was just the icing on the cake.If you have read any books at all in this series, in particular the last two or three books starting with the Roberta Steel led title, Now We Are Dead, then you will know the kind of story you are going to be getting when you pick up this book. A blend of dark crime and undeniably classic MacBride humour. All of this is present in All That's Dead, a story in which Logan finds himself caught up in the investigation into the somewhat bloody disappearance of a pro-union University Professor whose hobby was to inflame arguments with Scottish Nationalists via Twitter. There is still a chance the disappearance could be entirely innocent, albeit a very slim one, one that is completely written off when an unexpected and unsavoury package arrives at the BBC ...From here, the threat, and sense of tension and jeopardy increases when another well known figure who spoke in favour of the Union disappears in similarly macabre circumstances. It makes for a perplexing case and even though Logan and co have a firm suspect, he remains frustratingly elusive, adding to the drama for both the police and the reader. It's all classic Logan McRae territory - the chase, the near misses, the very real risk of injury or worse to one or more members of the team ... It works well and, as the investigation ramps up, it really does keep you glued to the book.But ... and I really do hate to say this, for me, this was only really from the halfway point onward. This was a much slower story to develop, and to be perfectly honest, I wasn't really that empathetic towards the first victim which made it harder to really become invested in his fate. And despite the humour being one of the elements I have really enjoyed in the past few books, this time it felt, I don't know, a little forced maybe? Almost as though the book was becoming a parody of the series itself. Whereas in prior books the sarcasm and colourful language seemed to come predominantly from Steel, in this book it felt as though everyone was acting just a little too unprofessionally, even Logan's superiors, who out Steel'd Steel at times for inventive use of language. I know theirs is the kind of job in which banter is essential and gallows humour is a form of self defence, but this was fudgemonkery on steroids.Whereas normally the humour comes as welcome relief from the dark subject matters MacBride excels in writing, certainly for the first hundred pages or so I found myself hoping that someone's head would show up in a box all Seven-stylee, just to add some of the darkness that I missed so much. I'm not a monster (not entirely at least), but that perfect blend of light and shade was what won me over to the series in the first place. Cold, dark, grey, granite tough, Aberdonian murder and madness. You know - the stuff that makes you (me) smile? Too much analysis of Logan's fish finger sandwich and not enough on the actual victims of the crime perhaps, objectionable as they were. Or perhaps, tenure in Professional Standards aside, Logan is just too damned happy these day. I do kind of miss the melancholy old sod of yesteryear. Now what you do get in abundance is Mr MacBride's brilliant ability to bring the setting, and the characters, to life. There are many old and familiar faces to welcome back, as well as few new ones to get to know and potentially loathe. Notably in this book it is DI King who becomes the focus of everyone's attention, for all the wrong reasons, and not just because he's struggling to solve the case. He's under pressure from all sides and although I didn't especially like him as a person, as a defective detective I really did. Regarding setting, I think anyone who is from the area, or who has ever had the dubious delight of trying to traverse the city or fight their way up past Bridge of Don to head on North, will recognise the sense of futility and subsequent resignation which accompanies the frequent car journeys that poor Logan and co have to make. It's that sense of place, that feeling of "I know exactly where you mean', that really brings the story to life. Even if you don't know Aberdeen, you can still picture it quite clearly. That ability to capture the location on the page is the author's forte, and something I don't believe will ever change or fade.There is a strong socio-political theme throughout this book - pro v anti independence for Scotland, even pro v anti Brexit - and although the author stops short of ever showing the reader Logan's feelings on the subject, many other characters, King included, nail their colours to the mast. No pun intended there to those in the know btw ... ;) It is highly topical, particularly because of the Brexit fiasco which is still ongoing and the rise in intolerance which has come in its wake. The story certainly strikes a chord, although hopefully nobody, no matter their political bias, would go as far as the villains in this particular piece.I really wanted to be able to rave about this book, and was as excited about reading it as I have been all the others. And I didn't not like it, I just didn't love it as much as I'd wanted to either. It's a great story, and I found the second half of the book really drew in me and the time spent reading just flew by. It did make me laugh, as well as frustrate me at times, so maybe the problem is really more with me than with the book. Who knows? What drove me crazy, others will adore. Reading is all subjective anyway, right?Because there were those typically MacBride moments of 'ewww, gross ... teehee', the ones that you always find in his books that keep the macabre murder lover (fictional) in me quite contented. And there is absolutely no doubt that Stuart MacBride is a master story teller, and king of the quip. But I'm just hoping that in the next book as least one of the police team takes the investigation just a touch more seriously, and that we have a few more moments of rationality to contrast against the inevitable, and quite frankly well needed, madness. I'll admit though, that when it comes to writing about British politics right now, that would be a tall order for any author, even one as good as Stuart MacBride.
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  • Mary Picken
    January 1, 1970
    If you’re not reading this series, you are missing a massive treat. Like others in the series, All That’s Dead can very well be read as a stand-alone, but the characters, their interplay and development, all make for a reading of this series from the beginning to enjoy watching them grow and to follow their progress. Because these are characters you are invested in; people you care about, from the annoying, irrepressible, on overdrive PC Quirrel, universally known as Tufty, to D.S. Roberta Steel If you’re not reading this series, you are missing a massive treat. Like others in the series, All That’s Dead can very well be read as a stand-alone, but the characters, their interplay and development, all make for a reading of this series from the beginning to enjoy watching them grow and to follow their progress. Because these are characters you are invested in; people you care about, from the annoying, irrepressible, on overdrive PC Quirrel, universally known as Tufty, to D.S. Roberta Steele, the permanently vaping, never quite finding a bra that fits, fabulously foul mouthed detective.In All That’s Dead, Logan McRae is back to Professional Standards after a 12 month absence on sick leave following a stabbing. Though he wasn’t expecting a party, McRae is disconcerted to find that they’ve given his desk away. His new boss, Superintendent Bevan, is all first names, team birthday cards and home baking – not at all what Logan is used to.Julie, as Bevan insists that McRae calls her, plans to ease him back in to work, assisting D.I. Frank King who is a struggling with a collapsing marriage and who is investigating the disappearance of an academic known for his staunch anti-independence stance.At once MacBride plunges us into the murky world of extreme Scottish politics; a world where there are no shades of grey and you are a traitor to one side of the debate, whichever side you are on. You would not necessarily think this is the best platform for snappy dialogue and wisecracking, but of course it is in adversity that Logan’s team come into their own, exchanging excruciating and sparkling observations, accompanied by a range of astonishingly queasy food options that add to more than one stomach churning moment in this book.As Logan begins his stint on the investigation into the abduction of Professor Nicholas Wilson, he soon realises that the team is up against a perpetrator who knows how to avoid leaving trace evidence and soon the team are facing a series of similar abductions and chasing their tails to find and catch the perpetrator, have to face the fact that they are getting nowhere as body parts start to arrive in the mail.To make matters worse, D.I. King is starting to disintegrate in front of his eyes. The media are in hot pursuit, eager to pin Police Scotland to the wall for any mistakes they may make, and one journalist in particular has King’s youthful indiscretions in his sights.As the investigation heats up, McRae has to contend with not only the mess that is a faltering King, but also Tufty in serious overdrive, the idiot that is DS Rennie and a host of superior officers whose only concern is that they are not held responsible for any fall out from a botched investigation.The joy of all of this is that not only do we get a fabulously plotted, gloriously characterised crime novel with a devious perpetrator and a gory campaign plan, but we get it in a smart talking, witty and clever wrapper that makes us laugh out loud and extends our liking for these characters a hundredfold.Verdict: I loved this book. All That’s Dead is a cracking story, brilliantly told. MacBride is on top form and this is a blistering must read.
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  • Sally
    January 1, 1970
    The Logan McRae Novels by Stuart MacBride are captivating and addictive. They are always on my pre-order list, as is anything else MacBride writes. So to say I was thrilled with the opportunity to receive an advance copy of All That’s Dead would be an understatement. And it did not disappoint. As always, Logan McRae and the rest of the cast of characters go through a lot – a LOT: horrific crimes, murders, serial killers. With a lot of humor and craziness thrown in. And a lot of eating. I am alwa The Logan McRae Novels by Stuart MacBride are captivating and addictive. They are always on my pre-order list, as is anything else MacBride writes. So to say I was thrilled with the opportunity to receive an advance copy of All That’s Dead would be an understatement. And it did not disappoint. As always, Logan McRae and the rest of the cast of characters go through a lot – a LOT: horrific crimes, murders, serial killers. With a lot of humor and craziness thrown in. And a lot of eating. I am always hungry for sausage and chips when reading and I am about ready to travel to Aberdeen to try a bacon butty and visit the Lobster People from the Planet Too-Ginger-to-Be-in-the-Sun.Police Scotland Inspector Logan McRae is just back to work after a year of recovery from almost being killed. He’s not all that thrilled to be assigned to Professional Standards but he is looking forward to some simple cases to work his way back into things. Well, that’s not going to happen. He’s assigned as more or less an observer of the officer in charge of solving the disappearance of the high-profile anti-independence campaigner, Professor Wilson, but the powers to be want results quickly and decide that Logan is the one to get them.While Logan was off recuperating, author MacBride was kind enough to give us an in-between standalone featuring Detective Sergeant Robert Steel. She used to be Detective Chief Inspector Roberta Steel and Logan’s boss until she got caught breaking the rules. She is infuriating. Uncouth, crude, always with the bra strap, has such a mean streak, but there’s also some softness trying to get out. I waited with bated breath until she showed up in All That’s Dead. I love her and Logan and all the rest – Tufty, Milky, Rennie, Tara, Susan, the whole lot of them. They are like a family, a very dysfunctional family.All That’s Dead is an exciting, thrilling mystery, with a fast-moving plot and a lot of danger, twists and turns and surprises. Because of Logan’s often sarcastic, pessimistic attitude I sometimes forget just how good a detective he really is, how proficient. It’s a joy watching him sort through all the facts and inch toward the murderer. The infighting in the police ranks and battles for and against Scottish Nationalism add depth to the story.This is the 12th book in the Logan McRae series but you can jump in anytime in any book; they all standalone. But – you shouldn’t. You should start at the beginning and take Logan’s journey with him or you’ll miss out on so much: his up and down career, his many injuries, his lost loves and heartbreak, and his hope and recovery, the depth of his relationship with Steel and much more.Thanks to author Stuart MacBride, publisher Harper Collins and NetGalley for providing an advance copy of All That’s Dead for my reading pleasure and honest review. Read any one of his books and you’ll be like me, impatiently waiting for the next.
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  • Keriann Davey
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars, review to followThank you to Harper Colins for sending this to me for review via Netgally.This was one of my most anticipated reads of a year! I jumped for joy when I heard Stuart MacBride was bringing out and new book in the Logan Mcrae series and jumped even higher when I got approved for an e arc via Netgally.This is book 12 in the series so if you haven't read the others then look away now as I don't want to spoil anything but you really should go back and read book one!.We see Lo 3.5 stars, review to followThank you to Harper Colins for sending this to me for review via Netgally.This was one of my most anticipated reads of a year! I jumped for joy when I heard Stuart MacBride was bringing out and new book in the Logan Mcrae series and jumped even higher when I got approved for an e arc via Netgally.This is book 12 in the series so if you haven't read the others then look away now as I don't want to spoil anything but you really should go back and read book one!.We see Logan back to work after the events of book eleven and trying to get back into the swing of things after a year off. Logan is still with professional standards and is assigned his first case to baby sit DI King who is hell bent on self destruction after the break down of his marriage and the revelation he was involved in a terrorist corp! soon anti independence campaigners are turning up dead and it's up to Logan, King and their team of dead beats to find out who is doing this before it is too late.Now I did enjoy this book although it took me a long time to get into it. I don't actually like Logan being part of professional standards and feel like we loose a lot of the dark grittyness because of it, I'd rather he was just back in his normal role as a police officer, I didn't quite get why Logan was investigating this crime if I'm honest as really it's not his job, he should really just be making sure King is a good boy. I didn't find this book as funny as previous books and found Steel slightly annoying. That being said I did get sucked into this book midway through and did enjoy it it's just one of the weaker in the series.
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  • Lou
    January 1, 1970
    All That's Dead is the twelfth book in the DI Logan McRae series and although most series' would be running out of steam at this point, this is as fresh and captivating as the first ones. The dark sardonic humour is as great as ever and helps break up the brutal crimes and investigation into the two killers by giving the reader some light relief. MacBride has an army of devotees who appreciate the character-driven narrative he creates and each member of the cast is detailed and three-dimensional All That's Dead is the twelfth book in the DI Logan McRae series and although most series' would be running out of steam at this point, this is as fresh and captivating as the first ones. The dark sardonic humour is as great as ever and helps break up the brutal crimes and investigation into the two killers by giving the reader some light relief. MacBride has an army of devotees who appreciate the character-driven narrative he creates and each member of the cast is detailed and three-dimensional. He is one of the best at crafting incredibly real, believable and relatable characters in the crime fiction genre.I rarely comment on dialogue included in a story, but MacBride does a superb job of moving the narrative forward in a very natural way. It's a highly entertaining read with a complex plot and a variety of threads which are woven together cleverly. Once you pick it up you're guaranteed a good time; I read it in a single sitting and was on the edge of my seat for most of it. I found myself laughing out loud many times throughout this cracking read too. The ragtag crew of McRae, Tufty, Rennie and Steel are as strange, intriguing and unusual as they have always been, but you never get tired of them due to their idiosyncrasies. They are foul-mouthed and wonderful, but although not essential I'd advise reading the previous novels first. This is a fast-paced, high-octane, politically-influenced police procedural and is well worth the time of all crime readers. Many thanks to HarperCollins for an ARC.
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  • Breakaway Reviewers
    January 1, 1970
    Detective Inspector Logan McRae is back.The 12th book in the McRae series. Logan is back with Professional Standards after a year off. He is assigned to support DI King who the Scottish Daily Post is threatening to expose as being part of a Scottish National terror group. He catches up with DI King at a potential crime scene at the home of Professor Wilson who is nowhere to be found, but his kitchen looks like a blood bath. The first of many. Random murders occur, and messages are posted in grue Detective Inspector Logan McRae is back.The 12th book in the McRae series. Logan is back with Professional Standards after a year off. He is assigned to support DI King who the Scottish Daily Post is threatening to expose as being part of a Scottish National terror group. He catches up with DI King at a potential crime scene at the home of Professor Wilson who is nowhere to be found, but his kitchen looks like a blood bath. The first of many. Random murders occur, and messages are posted in gruesome ways, are these murders politically motivated or not? The DIs are under pressure from above to resolve quickly, and their jobs are on the line. Things are complicated by King’s behaviour and personal life, and the threat of exposure hanging over the department, true or not heads will roll.This is my first McRae book, it started well, but then it just seemed to plod along, it did not grip me. Although an independent story, I am sure knowing the back story of the characters would have added to the enjoyment of the book, and I did struggle a little with the Scottish accents. One thing I really liked was the descriptions of the characters as they were introduced, they were humorous and brought the characters to life in front of your eyes. I am sure fans of the good Detective will enjoy his latest case which ends on a high.Taramindo.Breakaway Reviewers received a copy of the book to review
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  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    DI Logan McRae is a slightly grumpy, but dedicated detective at the police of Scotland. Back on the job after a year away from the force and still recovering from a stab wound to the abdomen, Logan is looking for a simple case to solve while easing back into work. His new boss, Julie Bevan, is busy crocheting, collecting well wishes on greetings cards for staff members and organising pot luck dinners. Professor and anti-independence campaigner Nicholas Wilson has vanished, leaving behind a pool DI Logan McRae is a slightly grumpy, but dedicated detective at the police of Scotland. Back on the job after a year away from the force and still recovering from a stab wound to the abdomen, Logan is looking for a simple case to solve while easing back into work. His new boss, Julie Bevan, is busy crocheting, collecting well wishes on greetings cards for staff members and organising pot luck dinners. Professor and anti-independence campaigner Nicholas Wilson has vanished, leaving behind a pool of blood at his house, and his ageing dog and no traces of the kidnapper. The only leads point to an anonymous online mob, with which Professor Wilson engaged in fierce debates, making the hunt for the killer exceedingly difficult. Once the media gets wind of Wilson’s disappearance, as well as the political past of DI King of the police of Scotland, the pressure mounts. The thriller unfolds against the backdrop of political turmoil and presents an intriguing and suspenseful plot. Appearances by Logan’s flamboyant and extravagant friends in the film business and Tufty, a shy, but over-caffeinated hacker employed by the police force, make for quite a few humorous moments. The characters are well developed, although, as others have rightly pointed out, the language used by characters was a bit coarse at times. This is the 12th book in the DI Logan McRae series, but the first book of the series that I have read. I would read other book in this series. Thank you to NetGalley, Stuart MacBride, and HarperCollins for this ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Hazel
    January 1, 1970
    Reading Stuff 'n' ThingsHaving read and thoroughly loved one of Mr MacBride's previous outings starring Logan McRae - A Dark So Deadly - I was thrilled to be accepted by the publisher, HarperCollins UK, HarperFiction, via NetGalley to read and review "All That's Dead" before publication in return for an honest and unbiased review.This instalment had a lot to live up to and, overall, it hit the mark with it's dark humour, the fantastic characters, the setting, the twists and all wrapped up in an Reading Stuff 'n' ThingsHaving read and thoroughly loved one of Mr MacBride's previous outings starring Logan McRae - A Dark So Deadly - I was thrilled to be accepted by the publisher, HarperCollins UK, HarperFiction, via NetGalley to read and review "All That's Dead" before publication in return for an honest and unbiased review.This instalment had a lot to live up to and, overall, it hit the mark with it's dark humour, the fantastic characters, the setting, the twists and all wrapped up in an excellent plot amongst the backdrop of domestic terrorism and the independence movement in Scotland which although results in a fair bit of English-bashing, does mirror Brexit (oh how I hate that word!) in many respects which makes it topical and current too!I did have a few niggles that did irritate me somewhat ... one or two of the characters who were supposed to be Police Officers did not come across as very believable; they were overly childish and not very good at their jobs. In addition, I found the word "sooked" extremely annoying for some reason - not sure why but it just wound me up.I am absolutely certain that it would be better to read the series in order, it does work as a standalone pretty successfully and although the niggles prevented me from awarding this a 5 star read, I would still recommend it.
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  • Jo
    January 1, 1970
    Can I make a polite suggestion?  Please read the previous books.  I am quite sure that, apart from being great stories to read, there is a wealth of back story that will assist with understanding some of the interpersonal dynamics here.So, to the story.  The narrative, shot through with humour, nevertheless delivers on tension at a somewhat frenetic pace.  There is a real sense of the police running to catch up here, and this is apparent both in the interactions between colleagues, as well as th Can I make a polite suggestion?  Please read the previous books.  I am quite sure that, apart from being great stories to read, there is a wealth of back story that will assist with understanding some of the interpersonal dynamics here.So, to the story.  The narrative, shot through with humour, nevertheless delivers on tension at a somewhat frenetic pace.  There is a real sense of the police running to catch up here, and this is apparent both in the interactions between colleagues, as well as their superiors, who are not portrayed favourably. The bad guys become apparent reasonably early on in the book, and although there are some surprising twists, the straightforward nature of that plot thread really served to provide a steadiness against the feeling of chaos in the police investigation.In summary, although this was a book which left me a little bamboozled at times with the sheer number of characters, it was still an enjoying, suspenseful read.I voluntarily reviewed an advanced reader copy of this book.
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  • Nuala Ward
    January 1, 1970
    The latest Logan Macrae novel is always something I look forward to.Stuart MacBride has created a wonderful cast of characters, realistic and very very funny.They also happen to be very good at their jobs, if a little unconventional at times.Logan is looking to ease back to work after long term sickness but that's never likely to happen....This story revolves around the extremes of the Scottish Independence debate.Extreme unionist, Professor Wilson goes missing and a manhunt ensues. More high pr The latest Logan Macrae novel is always something I look forward to.Stuart MacBride has created a wonderful cast of characters, realistic and very very funny.They also happen to be very good at their jobs, if a little unconventional at times.Logan is looking to ease back to work after long term sickness but that's never likely to happen....This story revolves around the extremes of the Scottish Independence debate.Extreme unionist, Professor Wilson goes missing and a manhunt ensues. More high profile Unionists are abducted along the way as the team try to track down the guilty parties.All the usual elements are present and correct here. A brilliant story well told, humour, character development and roller coaster page turning excitement.Stuart MacBride is one of my favourite authors and I'm already looking forward to the next instalment.
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  • Fiona
    January 1, 1970
    I liked the plot of this book but I was really put off by the constant similies/metaphors. It’s just never ending and I found it quite irritating. I found most of the characters quite odd too, particularly the police. There is absolutely no respect between colleagues, the author doesn’t seem to like any of his characters, even ones only mentioned in passing. I’m probably on my own here, there are plenty of 5 Star reviews, but I’m afraid it wasn’t really for me. My thanks to Netgalley for this co I liked the plot of this book but I was really put off by the constant similies/metaphors. It’s just never ending and I found it quite irritating. I found most of the characters quite odd too, particularly the police. There is absolutely no respect between colleagues, the author doesn’t seem to like any of his characters, even ones only mentioned in passing. I’m probably on my own here, there are plenty of 5 Star reviews, but I’m afraid it wasn’t really for me. My thanks to Netgalley for this copy.
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  • Sarah Baines
    January 1, 1970
    When I found out I'd been approved for this book I nearly hyperventilated I was that excited. I've read all of Stuart Macbride's books and while they're all absolutely brilliant, All That's Dead has got to be my favourite! I was genuinely laughing out loud so many times. It's hilarious and brilliant and I love it. The characters are all wonderful as always but I have to say this - Tufty needs his own book!!!!Thanks to NetGalley and Publishers for my ARC of this awesome book.
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  • Christine Rennie
    January 1, 1970
    With thanks to Netgalley and the publishers for the ARC, which was very entertaining.All That’s Dead by Stuart MacBride is vastly entertaining and enjoyable. It was more about the police characters than any crime that was committed. For followers of the Logan McRae series you were entertained by McRae, Steel, Rennie and Tufty in all of their idiotic synchronicities. I found it extremely funny and entertaining.Highly recommended.
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  • Rosalind
    January 1, 1970
    I have read most of the Logan MCrae series, but this one did not match up to the others.It took a little time to get going and at times it was really repetitive and somewhat tedious.Tufty was fun, but how did he get away with doing nothing much but playing on his phone/computer.I think the time has come to retire Logan and Steel.My copy was provided by NetGalley.
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  • Tracy Collier
    January 1, 1970
    Another fantastic book from Stuart MacBride in the Logan McRae series. Great characters and a great storyline that has you hooked right until the end. Roll on the next book!
  • Teresa Mills-clark
    January 1, 1970
    My first Stuart MacBride novel and it won't be my last. Great fun.
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