WOLFPACK
Based on her inspiring, viral 2018 commencement speech to Barnard College’s graduates in New York City, New York Times bestselling author, two-time Olympic gold medalist and FIFA World Cup champion Abby Wambach delivers her empowering rally cry for women to unleash their individual power, unite with their pack, and emerge victorious together.Abby Wambach became a champion because of her incredible talent as a soccer player. She became an icon because of her remarkable wisdom as a leader. As the co-captain of the 2015 Women’s World Cup Champion Team, she created a culture not just of excellence, but of honor, commitment, resilience, and sisterhood. She helped transform a group of individual women into one of the most successful, powerful and united Wolfpacks of all time.In her retirement, Abby’s ready to do the same for her new team: All Women Everywhere.In Wolfpack, Abby’s message to women is:We have never been Little Red Riding Hood. We Are the Wolves.We must wander off the path and blaze a new one: together.She insists that women must let go of old rules of leadership that neither include or serve them. She’s created a new set of Wolfpack rules to help women unleash their individual power, unite with their Wolfpack, and change the landscape of their lives and world: from the family room to the board room to the White House.· Make failure your fuel: Transform failure to wisdom and power. · Lead from the bench: Lead from wherever you are. · Champion each other: Claim each woman’s victory as your own. · Demand the effing ball: Don’t ask permission: take what you’ve earned.In Abby’s vision, we are not Little Red Riding Hoods, staying on the path because we’re told to. We are the wolves, fighting for a better tomorrow for ourselves, our pack, and all the future wolves who will come after us.

WOLFPACK Details

TitleWOLFPACK
Author
ReleaseApr 9th, 2019
PublisherCeladon Books
ISBN-139781250217707
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Leadership, Self Help, Feminism, Audiobook

WOLFPACK Review

  • Cori
    January 1, 1970
    A quick read about gratitude, leadership, transformation, and confidence. Based on soccer legend Abby Wambach's 2018 Barnard commencement speech, she inspires passion and strength, and guides us to support other women by cultivating a Wolfpack. This would be a great book to give a new graduate, but really anyone can learn from this must read. Thank you NetGalley for allowing me to read this advance copy.
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  • Kristi
    January 1, 1970
    I don't usually review books, but as I read through this book I was disappointed, here's why: -If you watched the commencement speech, you've pretty much read the book. There wasn't a lot of new information or expansion of the ideas brought up in the speech.-This book could be about half the page count if they didn't have it double spaced and a bunch of blank pages thrown in. -There were good ideas proposed but no actionable steps to get there.I feel like as a leadership book, this falls flat. A I don't usually review books, but as I read through this book I was disappointed, here's why: -If you watched the commencement speech, you've pretty much read the book. There wasn't a lot of new information or expansion of the ideas brought up in the speech.-This book could be about half the page count if they didn't have it double spaced and a bunch of blank pages thrown in. -There were good ideas proposed but no actionable steps to get there.I feel like as a leadership book, this falls flat. As a rallying cry to look at an issue it is pretty good, but if you have watched her speech, it's not new.
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not regurgitate the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it.Based on her inspiring, viral 2018 commencement speech to Barnard College’s graduates in New York City, New York Times bestselling author, two-time Olympic gold medalist and FIFA World Cup champion Abby Wambach delivers her empowering rally cry for women to unleash their individual power, uni received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not regurgitate the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it.Based on her inspiring, viral 2018 commencement speech to Barnard College’s graduates in New York City, New York Times bestselling author, two-time Olympic gold medalist and FIFA World Cup champion Abby Wambach delivers her empowering rally cry for women to unleash their individual power, unite with their pack, and emerge victorious together.Abby Wambach became a champion because of her incredible talent as a soccer player. She became an icon because of her remarkable wisdom as a leader. As the co-captain of the 2015 Women’s World Cup Champion Team, she created a culture not just of excellence, but of honour, commitment, resilience, and sisterhood. She helped transform a group of individual women into one of the most successful, powerful and united .wolfpacks of all time.In her retirement, Abby’s ready to do the same for her new team: All Women Everywhere.In Wolfpack, Abby’s message to women is:We have never been Little Red Riding Hood. We Are the Wolves.We must wander off the path and blaze a new one: together.She insists that women must let go of old rules of leadership that neither include or serve them. She’s created a new set of Wolfpack rules to help women unleash their individual power, unite with their Wolfpack, and change the landscape of their lives and their world: from the family room to the board room to the White House.· Make failure your fuel: Transform failure to wisdom and power. · Lead from the bench: Lead from wherever you are. · Champion each other: Claim each woman’s victory as your own. · Demand the effing ball: Don’t ask permission: take what you’ve earned.In Abby’s vision, we are not Little Red Riding Hoods, staying on the path because we’re told to. We are the wolves, fighting for a better tomorrow for ourselves, our pack, and all the future wolves who will come after us.Okay, that is a very long and overly detailed description for a book: in some ways, why read the book when you have read the synopsis? Here is my picky point: if you do not admit that you do not have POWER then why would you need to power up (sorry, pun time) and get it? Okay, maybe that was bitchy but I did not really get much out of this book: sure, it inspiring, but it was a rant to me I said that my review would be honest: the book was just not MY cup of tea!As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I love emojis (outside of Instagram and Twitter) so let's give it some cups of matcha: 🍵🍵p.s. side note; my wee nephew wanted to know why it wasn't the wombat pack ... he kept misreading the author's name. LOL.
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  • Nan Goerlitz
    January 1, 1970
    Quick, short read. I really enjoyed it, especially because it was easy to digest. Even with that, it was packed with insightful content.
  • Brooke Smith
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! Wow! Wow! A fierce and powerful read about all relevant issues! How to stand by your side, and finding your tribe. Quick read that is honest and humble! I'm reading it with my kids, giving it to my friends! Thank you, Abby for your message!
  • Kristen Mcknight
    January 1, 1970
    This was a short book and a quick read. While I agree with many of her principles, in my opinion it doesn't deserve to be a book (I'm glad I checked it out of the library and didn't purchase it). It's more like a pamphlet with some principles to motivate women.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    It's a short book, but a book doesn't have to be long to be powerful. I read this, curious, because a co-worker was super excited about it - then I saw her talking with Trevor Noah. I found myself underlining one passage in each section - not for myself as much, but for my 12yo daughter. She is a competitive gymnast, can be afraid of her power and her fear of failure - and Abby says a lot about both of those in this book. She's right - as women, we far too often find ourselves *grateful* for wha It's a short book, but a book doesn't have to be long to be powerful. I read this, curious, because a co-worker was super excited about it - then I saw her talking with Trevor Noah. I found myself underlining one passage in each section - not for myself as much, but for my 12yo daughter. She is a competitive gymnast, can be afraid of her power and her fear of failure - and Abby says a lot about both of those in this book. She's right - as women, we far too often find ourselves *grateful* for what we have, devaluing ourselves and our work in the process. We deserve better, we can be better, and together we can make that happen.
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  • Sage Donnell
    January 1, 1970
    I have a secret to tell you. Even though I enjoy books with a sports setting, I'm not actually much of a sports fan. I live in Portland where the Thorns rule and are extremely popular, but I rarely attend matches. They're exciting and fun for about the first 15 minutes. Athletic women running around a field? Yes, please. However, then it's just more of the same and I loose interest. So, what do like about the books, say, a soccer setting? It's the hard work, drive, and teamwork that go into a su I have a secret to tell you. Even though I enjoy books with a sports setting, I'm not actually much of a sports fan. I live in Portland where the Thorns rule and are extremely popular, but I rarely attend matches. They're exciting and fun for about the first 15 minutes. Athletic women running around a field? Yes, please. However, then it's just more of the same and I loose interest. So, what do like about the books, say, a soccer setting? It's the hard work, drive, and teamwork that go into a successful athletic venture that really sucks me in. Because of all this, even though I recently tore though the Girls of Summer series, I don't know much about big soccer names. So, why did I pick this one up?It came to my attention at an opportune time. I had just been reading the Girls of Summer when I saw an interview by Trevor Noah with Abby Wambach about this book. I thought, "What the heck?" and put a hold on the audio version at my library. I was super surprised by how short it was.That said, I liked it. I'd give it maybe 3.5 stars. I realized pretty close to the start that it was basically a fleshed out version of the graduation speech she gave at Barnard College that went viral. At the end, I realized it wasn't much more fleshed out. Still, it has some good and empowering ideas behind it and, if you, like me, haven't heard the speech, this is a good way to do it. It's also read by Abby.It was also interesting because, having "met" Abby, I realized that the character of Ellie was modeled on her. So, for me, it added more depth to books I love.I'd say if you go in knowing it's short, and are interested in soccer or even in books about soccer, or in the mood for some women power, this is worth the listen. Or read.
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  • Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    Read Harder 2019: Business BookThis book is super short (<100 pages) and a very fast read, but I really enjoyed reading a book on leadership from a uniquely female perspective. Many of the ideas Wambach outlines are ways that I (hopefully) already lead. And I finished the book feeling reminded that I need to seek out my pack - I need to work to feel less lonely and surround myself with women who are learning their own best way to lead.I especially like Wambach's assertion that just like envir Read Harder 2019: Business BookThis book is super short (<100 pages) and a very fast read, but I really enjoyed reading a book on leadership from a uniquely female perspective. Many of the ideas Wambach outlines are ways that I (hopefully) already lead. And I finished the book feeling reminded that I need to seek out my pack - I need to work to feel less lonely and surround myself with women who are learning their own best way to lead.I especially like Wambach's assertion that just like environmentalists were worried about introducing wolves into Yellowstone - only to find the whole ecosystem flourished with them, our world is afraid of the power of women and it's exactly what our world needs to flourish.If this book had been longer - with perhaps some concrete suggestions for how to implement some of these ideas - I would have given it four stars. Even as is, it merits three stars for the way these ideas encouraged and inspired me.
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  • Kate (kate_reads_)
    January 1, 1970
    Wolfpack is a quick, powerful read with some very strong messages for women. The book grew out of Abby Wambach’s 2018 commencement speech to Barnard’s graduating class.This book would make a great graduation gift or “just because” gift to women you know who need a quick pep talk and reminder of their power and leadership. To end with a quote from the book:“There is a wolf inside of every woman. Her wolf is who she was made to be before the world told her who to be. Her wolf is her talent, her po Wolfpack is a quick, powerful read with some very strong messages for women. The book grew out of Abby Wambach’s 2018 commencement speech to Barnard’s graduating class.This book would make a great graduation gift or “just because” gift to women you know who need a quick pep talk and reminder of their power and leadership. To end with a quote from the book:“There is a wolf inside of every woman. Her wolf is who she was made to be before the world told her who to be. Her wolf is her talent, her power, her dreams, her voice, her curiosity, her courage, her dignity, her choices - her truest identity.”Thank you to Netgalley and Celadon for the advance copy in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    Fuck yeah, Abby. Listen to this while you clean your refrigerator, when you can't sleep at night, when men are men, when you're eating ice cream; whatever."The entire landscape changed all because of the wolves presence. See what happened there? The wolves, who were feared by many to be a threat to the system, became the system's salvation. Now look around you today, see what's happening here...we are the one's we've been waiting for."
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  • Katy
    January 1, 1970
    If I could give this 10 stars, I would.
  • Vicky Griffith
    January 1, 1970
    I am obsessed with Abby’s in-real-life Wolfpack so these stars are for her extraordinary efforts to raise up women. The book is just an intro.
  • Colleen
    January 1, 1970
    I pre-ordered my copy of Wolfpack so that it was delivered the day it was released, which was today, by the way. And not 10 minutes after it arrived on my doorstep, I was already reading it. This book is teeny, tiny. I read it in like an hour. But it's contents are huge. Abby Wambach has incredibly important things to share with this world. It's definitely worth taking the time to read this powerful little message.
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  • Claire Talbot
    January 1, 1970
    A small book that packs a powerful punch - women are strong, capable, and deserving. Inside every one of us is a born leader, a person with unique gifts, a person able to transform their own life and the lives of others. Wolfpack is based on the commencement speech Abby gave to Barnard college in 2018 and builds upon it, her four rules in the speech grow to eight. The message is the same - women should not only be grateful for the opportunities in our lives - we should demand what we deserve: eq A small book that packs a powerful punch - women are strong, capable, and deserving. Inside every one of us is a born leader, a person with unique gifts, a person able to transform their own life and the lives of others. Wolfpack is based on the commencement speech Abby gave to Barnard college in 2018 and builds upon it, her four rules in the speech grow to eight. The message is the same - women should not only be grateful for the opportunities in our lives - we should demand what we deserve: equality. I really liked the story about Abby winning the ESPN icon award with Kobe Bryant and Peyton Manning. "Then the applause ended and it was time for the three of us to exit stage left. And as I watched those men walk off the stage, it dawned on me that the three of us were stepping away into very different futures. Each of us, Kobe, Peyton and I—we made the same sacrifices, we shed the same amount of blood sweat and tears, we’d left it all on the field for decades with the same ferocity, talent and commitment—but our retirements wouldn’t be the same at all. Because Kobe and Peyton walked away from their careers with something I didn’t have: enormous bank accounts. Because of that they had something else I didn’t have: freedom. Their hustling days were over; mine were just beginning." This really drove home the point for me - "Over time, the pay gap means women are able to invest less and save less so they have to work longer. When we talk about what the pay gap costs us, let's be clear. It costs us our very lives." Wolfpack challenges us to rise up and reclaim our lives. It challenges us to support other women in their moments of success, to smash the illusion of fewer opportunities for women, to create a bigger table, that seats more women in places of power. This is a great book to read with other women, and then challenge yourself to how you can make the ideas within it's covers work in your own lives. It's time to howl. It's time to find our pack. It's time to lead. Let's go! Thank you to MacMillan for providing me a copy of the book to review.
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  • Alisa
    January 1, 1970
    Short book more like a hardback expanded version of her now viral 2018 commencement address at Barnard College. Using the allegory of a wolfpack, Abby sets up the methods by which women can seize their power, unite with other women, and redefine the standards of success. It's a powerful, well-thought out message, and she uses her experience as a world class athlete to illustrate her point. Much of this can apply to anyone, however she deftly and accurately points out that the rules and norms whi Short book more like a hardback expanded version of her now viral 2018 commencement address at Barnard College. Using the allegory of a wolfpack, Abby sets up the methods by which women can seize their power, unite with other women, and redefine the standards of success. It's a powerful, well-thought out message, and she uses her experience as a world class athlete to illustrate her point. Much of this can apply to anyone, however she deftly and accurately points out that the rules and norms which define success are historically created by and for men which has institutionalized the power dynamic and social control of women. Particularly for women, achieving success means breaking through those traditional barriers and with this treatise she sets out to create new rules that allow for women to seize their full potential and become leaders. In essence, she redefines the rules of leadership to be fully inclusive. Here here!My problem with rating this is the execution of the book. It's just okay, very short (it might take an hour to read), and left me wanting more. Maybe I read too much nonfiction where there is a bibliography or footnotes, and I get that inspirational pieces don't always have that. This is written from the heart, based on personal experience, and at that it succeeds nicely. Apparently I expect more of something like this in book form so maybe that's my problem that should not impact my rating, but there you have it. I heard Abby Wambach speak/in conversation in conjunction with the release of the book, and absolutely loved the power of her message and her personal magnetism and energy. It probably helped that the audience was filled mostly with women including lots of girls and teens who clearly idolize her. Abby is the first person to admit she is not perfect, but she really owns her accomplishments and credits her pack. The audience questions she took from young girls and her warmhearted and genuine response to them was very cool.Great message and messenger, but conflicted about the medium.
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  • Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not a fan of soccer, but I saw Abby Wambach's interview on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah and just knew I needed to read this book. And I'm so glad I did. This is not really a self-help book or a road map of how to get from point A to point B. It is instead a call to all women - all people really, to change the "game" by changing the rules. For example: Chapter 6's "lesson": Old Rule: Play it safe. Pass the ball.New Rule: Believe in yourself. Demand the ball. "When you stand up and demand t I'm not a fan of soccer, but I saw Abby Wambach's interview on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah and just knew I needed to read this book. And I'm so glad I did. This is not really a self-help book or a road map of how to get from point A to point B. It is instead a call to all women - all people really, to change the "game" by changing the rules. For example: Chapter 6's "lesson": Old Rule: Play it safe. Pass the ball.New Rule: Believe in yourself. Demand the ball. "When you stand up and demand the ball, you give others permission to do the same. The Wolfpack's collective power begins by unleashing the power of each individual Wolf." This book is more like a manifesto than a blueprint of how to make changes in the world, because in reality, until women start demanding and accepting their right to be leaders in this world, we are not going to see the sweeping changes that can be made for the betterment of the entire world - just like the wolves in Yellowstone National Park.
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  • Veronica
    January 1, 1970
    Less than a year ago, Abby Wambach took the stage at Barnard's commencement and gave a speech that shook many, including myself, to the core. Her speech went viral. Earlier this month Abby released the speech in book form.Wolfpack: How to Come Together, Unleash Our Power, and Change the Game is short (less than 100 pages) but is much more than just her speech. You get a peek into how the speech came together and why she said everything. And because the book is short and is an expanded speech, it Less than a year ago, Abby Wambach took the stage at Barnard's commencement and gave a speech that shook many, including myself, to the core. Her speech went viral. Earlier this month Abby released the speech in book form.Wolfpack: How to Come Together, Unleash Our Power, and Change the Game is short (less than 100 pages) but is much more than just her speech. You get a peek into how the speech came together and why she said everything. And because the book is short and is an expanded speech, it moves quickly. I feel that it moves with the same ferocity that Abby use to move down a soccer field. And you might find yourself cheering as she takes you through the story. Read the rest at my blog.
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  • Leslie Lindsay
    January 1, 1970
    Powerful, inspiring read about gratitude, leadership, passion, and so much more. I LOVED this book and will give to everyone. Abby Wambach is a household name around here. My daughter has been playing soccer since she was three and has dreams to be a professional women's soccer player. She just might. So when WOLFPACK (Celadon, April 2019) came to my attention, I knew I had to have it.Not only did I get the book, but I heard--and saw--Abby speak about it at a local event. And I love Abby Wambach Powerful, inspiring read about gratitude, leadership, passion, and so much more. I LOVED this book and will give to everyone. Abby Wambach is a household name around here. My daughter has been playing soccer since she was three and has dreams to be a professional women's soccer player. She just might. So when WOLFPACK (Celadon, April 2019) came to my attention, I knew I had to have it.Not only did I get the book, but I heard--and saw--Abby speak about it at a local event. And I love Abby Wambach's message. She's fierce, she's strong, she's honest, and humble. Abby has struggled, too. With addiction, with her sexuality, and probably professionally, too. In fact, I know she has. We all have. She's very open about how it felt to be benched at her last World Cup. She said, "It was a hard decision my coach and I had to make...but basically, I wasn't a starter anymore, I was on the bench...but that didn't matter, I was still a leader on the bench." WOLFPACK is a fast read. Seriously, I plowed through this little gem in just over an hour. But it's one that I will go back to again and again because it offers so much. There are little truths, tiny pep talks on each page. Sometimes I need to hear it all, other times, I just need a word or sentence or two to keep me going. This is a fantastic book for just about anyone--professional athletes, yes--high school and junior high athletes, too; but it's also for corporate America, it's for moms, for writers, for kids; it's for new grads and dads and teenagers, too. Give it to your coach, your best friend, your grandma. For all my reviews, including author interviews, please see: www.leslielindsay.com|Always with a Book.
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  • Rosa
    January 1, 1970
    Full disclosure, I'm an Abby Wambach fan. I remember watching the premise for this book go viral when she gave her commencement speech at Barden University. The rules from this book should be memorized. I can't wait to have my teenage daughter listen to it. We are either "rushing or pointing"--I might actually get this tattooed because we've got to remember that scarcity mentality is killing us!! I'm such a believer in the foundational elements of the book, which allow us to re-write the rules ( Full disclosure, I'm an Abby Wambach fan. I remember watching the premise for this book go viral when she gave her commencement speech at Barden University. The rules from this book should be memorized. I can't wait to have my teenage daughter listen to it. We are either "rushing or pointing"--I might actually get this tattooed because we've got to remember that scarcity mentality is killing us!! I'm such a believer in the foundational elements of the book, which allow us to re-write the rules (ask for the ball) and lead with compassion.Listened to an audiobook. Going to buy a copy, maybe a couple of them.A MUST READ for men and women.
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  • Diane
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky enough to get a signed advanced copy of the book for an honest review from Celadon Books. With that being said I loved Abby’s 2018 commencement speech at Barnard College. Since this book was based off that speech it goes without saying that I enjoyed her book as well. The messages of leadership, humbleness, encouragement and motivation are wonderful for women and young girls to hear, but also messages that can benefit all humankind. The world would be a better place if we were confid I was lucky enough to get a signed advanced copy of the book for an honest review from Celadon Books. With that being said I loved Abby’s 2018 commencement speech at Barnard College. Since this book was based off that speech it goes without saying that I enjoyed her book as well. The messages of leadership, humbleness, encouragement and motivation are wonderful for women and young girls to hear, but also messages that can benefit all humankind. The world would be a better place if we were confident in who we are, fought for what we believe in and were proud to not only support others but truly be happy in their success as well. #Mudita #Wolfpack
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this short book! I totally missed Abby's viral commencement speech from 2018, so I'm glad she expanded it a bit into this book. I love her main message and her "new rules":New Rules:1. Create your own path.2. Be grateful for what you have AND demand what you deserve.3. Lead now, from wherever you are.4. Failure means you're finally in the game.5. Be FOR each other.6. Believe in yourself, demand the ball.7. Lead with humanity; cultivate leaders.8. You are not alone, you've got your pack.
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  • Molly
    January 1, 1970
    This is a great, little inspirational read to be devoured in one quick sitting. I never watched or read her commencement address that precipitated and inspired this, but I certainly will now. And as a coach of my eight year old daughter's soccer and softball teams, I am inspired to share some of the "rules" and messages Wambach shares with my young players. I'll admit it sort of left me with an easier said than done type of feeling, but inspiring nonetheless.
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  • Denise Cormaney
    January 1, 1970
    Love her, love the commencement speech that inspired this book. There are some gems in here that you could live your life by. That said, I was a tad disappointed. The book is clearly the result of a publisher who saw a speech go viral and thought “ca-ching!” There’s not enough here to make up a full book. This is a really, really good TED Talk put on paper. It’s worth reading, but I felt a little cheated. Go watch her 2018 Barnard Commencement speech instead; it really is stellar.
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  • Chris Heffernan
    January 1, 1970
    I’m sure that a lot of reviews will talk about how every little girl needs to read this book. And they should.But so should every little boy.And teenage boy.And man.We should all read this because the rules Abby puts out there could apply to anyone who has ever been put down and not given the respect s/he deserves.
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  • Jennifer Bernauer
    January 1, 1970
    Will take like 45 min to read. Put it in your library cue and it will come up. Especially if you have daughters or young women in your life that you mentor , coach and encourage. Inspiring and she is great champion on leadership and reminders to women they belong , have value and deserve to be heard. Really love her chapter about leading from bench.
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  • Molly Hanson
    January 1, 1970
    Read this. Tell your daughters, sisters, mothers, brothers and friends to read this. You don't have to love soccer or team USA to love this book, but it will make you cry more if you do. Abby is a hero more now than ever.
  • Jeimy
    January 1, 1970
    After retiring from soccer and marrying fellow author Glennon Doyle, Wambach is asked to give a commencement speech. Ruminating on the momentous occasion, she wanted to deliver an memorable speech. Little did she know that she would inadvertently start a movement.
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  • Tyra Fox
    January 1, 1970
    Must readI’ve never been more excited and compelled to be a woman that shows up. I am a wolf. We are wolves.
  • Mehrsa
    January 1, 1970
    This is a nice long speech or article--it's much too short for a book, but I do love Abby Wambach and I love her idea of supporting other women!
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