The Daughters of Temperance Hobbs
New York Times bestselling author Katherine Howe returns to the world of The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane with a bewitching story of a New England history professor who must race against time to free her family from a curseConnie Goodwin is an expert on America’s fractured past with witchcraft. A young, tenure-track professor in Boston, she’s earned career success by studying the history of magic in colonial America—especially women’s home recipes and medicines—and by exposing society's threats against women fluent in those skills. But beyond her studies, Connie harbors a secret: She is the direct descendant of a woman tried as a witch in Salem, an ancestor whose abilities were far more magical than the historical record shows.When a hint from her mother and clues from her research lead Connie to the shocking realization that her partner’s life is in danger, she must race to solve the mystery behind a hundreds’-years-long deadly curse.Flashing back through American history to the lives of certain supernaturally gifted women, The Daughters of Temperance Hobbs affectingly reveals not only the special bond that unites one particular matriarchal line, but also explores the many challenges to women’s survival across the decades—and the risks some women are forced to take to protect what they love most.

The Daughters of Temperance Hobbs Details

TitleThe Daughters of Temperance Hobbs
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 25th, 2019
PublisherHenry Holt and Co.
ISBN-139781250304865
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, Paranormal, Witches, Fantasy

The Daughters of Temperance Hobbs Review

  • Katherine Howe
    January 1, 1970
    I mean. I'm biased.
  • Debra
    January 1, 1970
    The daughters or Temperance Hobbs picks up several years after the book The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane ends. Connie and Sam are still together and living in Boston while Connie is a young tenure track professor writing a book. Her area of expertise - the history of magic in Colonial America, focusing on home medicines and recipes and the threats against women who had these skills. Connie is also the descendant of a woman who was tried as a witch in Salem. Through her studies and research, The daughters or Temperance Hobbs picks up several years after the book The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane ends. Connie and Sam are still together and living in Boston while Connie is a young tenure track professor writing a book. Her area of expertise - the history of magic in Colonial America, focusing on home medicines and recipes and the threats against women who had these skills. Connie is also the descendant of a woman who was tried as a witch in Salem. Through her studies and research, Connie learns that Sam's life may be in danger and she undertakes a quest, if you will, to solve her family's deadly curse.The plus for me in this book was the look back in time to the female members of Connie's family. Learning about their lives, their fate, and what life was like for them was magical. These sections really set the ground work for the novel.I mentioned that this book picks up after the previous book, but this book will also serve as a stand-alone novel. But, if you have read the first, you may find that it is nice to see where these characters picked up. Speaking of characters, I found that I liked Connie more in the previous book than in this book. I can't quite put my finger on why. Another plus for this book is the amount of research the Author did. She knows her history! She also knows plants and their Latin names. Both of which were very nice touches to this book. So why three stars? BTW- 3 stars means I enjoyed the book. But for me, there was just something missing in the story. I wanted more oomph. I never felt as if anyone was in danger nor did I feel magic between Connie and Sam - not like I felt in The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane. For me, I wished there was more drama and less of the academic stuff. The academic stuff really slowed the book down for me. Thank you to Henry Holt and Co. and NetGalley who provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All the thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • ❀⊱RoryReads⊰❀
    January 1, 1970
    4 Stars. Review to follow. This one was so good; almost the perfect witchy read.
  • Corisa
    January 1, 1970
    Katherine Howe writes the exact type of book I like to read. It’s a bit historical with elements of romance, mystery, and the supernatural all rolled into one beautiful, witchy story. As a fan of the Physick Book of Deliverance Dane, I was excited to jump back into the world of Connie Goodwin. I love that Howe wrote this is as a self-contained novel instead of an outright sequel to the first book. She does a good job of summarizing events here and there so new readers won’t be lost but also answ Katherine Howe writes the exact type of book I like to read. It’s a bit historical with elements of romance, mystery, and the supernatural all rolled into one beautiful, witchy story. As a fan of the Physick Book of Deliverance Dane, I was excited to jump back into the world of Connie Goodwin. I love that Howe wrote this is as a self-contained novel instead of an outright sequel to the first book. She does a good job of summarizing events here and there so new readers won’t be lost but also answers some of the burning questions that were left to mystery in the first novel.Even though this story has action, history, and magic, at its core this is a story about family and relationships. I love the strong female friendships presented in this book, as well as the generational history of Connie’s family. The final act is beautifully executed and I learned quite a few things from history that I didn’t know before. The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane is still my favorite book from Katherine Howe, but this one didn’t disappoint.
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  • Tucker
    January 1, 1970
    Many thanks to Henry Holt for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review. (Special thanks to the publicist at Henry Holt for being so generous with ARCs and Galleys!| Goodreads | Blog | Twitch | Pinterest |
  • Jypsy
    January 1, 1970
    The Daughters of Temperance Hobbs is my first book by Katherine Howe. Some things were a bit confusing, but some backstory was provided here and there, so I wasn't completely lost. I liked Connie. She's a strong intelligent character. I learned so much about witches from this book. The story is lively and engaging. It's a good read, and it's informative. Thanks to NetGalley for an arc in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Susan Graves
    January 1, 1970
    For lack of a better term this book was magical. This book was filled with incredible fantasy and vivid scenery. Perhaps what I loved the most was that you can visit some of the places mentioned most aptly Salem. It may be just me but when fantasy books are placed in real locations you can visit it makes the world come alive a little bit more.
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  • Shawn
    January 1, 1970
    Fans of The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane will surely love slipping back into the world of Connie Goodwin. Since the book is not set to be released until next year I wont comment on the storyline but, again, its nice to be back among the fictional world of my many times great grandmother.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    I am, without pause, a fan of Katherine Howe. I’ve read her adult and young adult novels, and enjoyed each of them. As such, it will come as little surprise that I also quite liked The Daughters of Temperance Hobbs, her latest endeavor, a book featuring many of the same characters as The Physick book of Deliverance Dane. This book, like Physick is a story about women taking power for themselves, presented in the form of a family saga which features a number of different women among Constance Goo I am, without pause, a fan of Katherine Howe. I’ve read her adult and young adult novels, and enjoyed each of them. As such, it will come as little surprise that I also quite liked The Daughters of Temperance Hobbs, her latest endeavor, a book featuring many of the same characters as The Physick book of Deliverance Dane. This book, like Physick is a story about women taking power for themselves, presented in the form of a family saga which features a number of different women among Constance Goodwin’s ancestry and their struggles to survive in a world that both venerates and condemns a cunning woman. In this book as in her others, Howe crafts a story that offers its readers history and mystery in equal measure. Through interludes, the book shows the daily lives and struggles of Connie’s female ancestors. These moments both acts as a reminder of the difficult, wonderful lives we live and also offer a nod to the general strife women have lived through to present day. It also gives us a good dose of romance, two measures of female friendship, and spoonful of mother-daughter love. In short, it was a delicious read, good enough to prompt me to set my alarm an hour early so that I could finish the book before I dressed for work. Read it.
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  • Cindi
    January 1, 1970
    I really loved the first book, The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane, and was excited to get my hands on this second installment. The story picks up a decade later with Connie and Sam, who are still together, as Connie is finishing up her book and applying for tenure at her university.The women in Connie’s family seem to be cursed, as their husband’s die once a daughter is born. When Connie finds herself with child, she fears losing Sam, but she knows she cannot live without him, so she is determ I really loved the first book, The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane, and was excited to get my hands on this second installment. The story picks up a decade later with Connie and Sam, who are still together, as Connie is finishing up her book and applying for tenure at her university.The women in Connie’s family seem to be cursed, as their husband’s die once a daughter is born. When Connie finds herself with child, she fears losing Sam, but she knows she cannot live without him, so she is determined to find a way to beat the curse and live a long and happy life together.This book is filled with more flashbacks to the women ancestors in Connie’s family that date back to the Salem Witch trials. This is another magical story from the author and was well worth the ten year wait. It makes me want to go back to Salem and spend more time tracing my own Puritan family as well.You don’t need to have read the first book, this book stands alone. But if you did read the first one, there are some wonderful little nuggets that you will be excited over as they tie in to the first book with that insider knowledge. I may just have to read them both all over again.
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  • Kelly Akemann
    January 1, 1970
    I am so happy I received a copy of this to review. I love this author so much and she did not disappoint with her new story. Such an amazing story written so well by an amazing author.
  • Jenni
    January 1, 1970
    This was my first Katherine Howe novel. I adored Connie Goodwin and her imperfect life that is rooted in a line of witches dating back to the late 1600s. This is not a light read. It has a great deal of historical information with terminology that can be hard to follow if you do not have exposure to her former works about witchcraft. If this is a topic the reader enjoys while being intellectually stimulated, this book is perfect.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    It has been soooo long since I read The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane that at first I didn't recognize this as a continuation. I need to go back and re-read Deliverance Dane. Anyhow I love everything about this book. Taking place in the areas where my early ancestors first landed greatly drew me in. I loved the research, the history, the dual timeline(s), witchcraft, Salem, everything.I found some of the story a bit nebulous - for example that Connie was able to hide her pregnancy from Sam fo It has been soooo long since I read The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane that at first I didn't recognize this as a continuation. I need to go back and re-read Deliverance Dane. Anyhow I love everything about this book. Taking place in the areas where my early ancestors first landed greatly drew me in. I loved the research, the history, the dual timeline(s), witchcraft, Salem, everything.I found some of the story a bit nebulous - for example that Connie was able to hide her pregnancy from Sam for so long (with twins - really) (or did she?). Anyhow, I went along for the ride and would love to see more from Katherine Howe.
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  • Kat
    January 1, 1970
    #Edeweiss #TheDaughtersofTemperanceHobbsThe novel is a bit historical, romantic, and familial all rolled up into a wonderful story. I thoroughly enjoyed the female relationships in the novel. The generations of family and history of Connie Goodwin's family are one of the best pieces of the novel. Great read!
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  • Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    It’s really hard for me to corral all my thoughts into a sensible review this time. I liked some things about this book but hated others. A few parts would get 4 stars from me, but several would get 1 star, so I guess I’ll settle for 2.75 stars, rounded up. Somewhere between it was okay and I liked it.I was beyond excited to read this when I first got it. I loved The Physick Book of Deliverance Danewhen it first came out a decade ago—witches, lots of cool history, a compelling plot with love and It’s really hard for me to corral all my thoughts into a sensible review this time. I liked some things about this book but hated others. A few parts would get 4 stars from me, but several would get 1 star, so I guess I’ll settle for 2.75 stars, rounded up. Somewhere between it was okay and I liked it.I was beyond excited to read this when I first got it. I loved The Physick Book of Deliverance Danewhen it first came out a decade ago—witches, lots of cool history, a compelling plot with love and murder, all good stuff—and I couldn’t wait to find out what happened to the characters. But this book didn’t do anything new with that format. Much of it felt replicated so it feels more like I’m re-reading Physick than reading a new book. The Daughters of Temperance Hobbs was okay, I guess, but there were so many little things that kept me from truly enjoying it. First off, the story is super predictable. If you read Physick then sat down and though to yourself, “What would be the most likely plot of a sequel with these characters?” This is the book you would end up with. And that’s not the worst thing in the world. Predictable books can be calming, a retreat from the ever-changing world around us, but I would have liked at least one thing that surprised me in the plot. When I started to get a feel for where story arc was going, I said to my husband that I really hoped it wasn’t going to be what I thought. But that’s exactly what it was. The same predictable sequel plot issue that I had with A Discovery of Witches.(view spoiler)[ It especially feels like the conflict is exactly the same in this book. “Oh remember that thing you thought you fixed at the end of the last book? It’s not fixed, so we need to spend another book fixing it. Sorry for ruining the closure at the ending of Physick.” (hide spoiler)]Secondly, I ended this book with so many questions. And not important, mind-bending, “meaning of life” type questions. More like, “Um, so was that guy at the end really there or was he . . . like a wraith . . . or literally a piece of cardboard? If he wasn’t corporeal, how did his car get there?” I was confused a lot. When a character is making a potion, and two different times gets splashed in the eye with potent liquid, shouldn’t that mean something? Like that they’re going to go blind or have visions or get some cool super power? Instead, it’s just . . . for no reason. When someone says, “Oh no, did you pick this poisonous flower with your bare hands?” I think to myself, “Cool, something is finally going to happen.” But then . . . it doesn’t. It was all purposeless. If the poisonous plant wasn’t going to burn the glove-less picker, why mention it? Sometimes I wondered if things were actually getting answered and I was just missing them because of how choppy the whole book felt.(view spoiler)[ What was up with there being no one working the register in that antique store? I thought that was going to be Obadiah, still alive but too old to man the till or something interesting, but it just had no purpose, again. (hide spoiler)]More than anything, I was bothered by the writing. You know how you can write a sentence, like this one, and you can interject things by putting commas, dashes, or conjunctions like “but” or “and”? Well. In this book. She just uses periods. For. Everything. When someone is speaking and they can’t figure out the right words, the dialogue reads like “Well. That’s.” And that’s the whole sentence! Can’t you use an ellipses occasionally to show that someone is trailing off? (I couldn’t help using lots of ellipses in this review.) Something other than ending these sentences so abruptly? I get it. Short sentences are cool. They make the pacing feel faster. But they also read like a homework assignment written by a second grader. The writing should be seamless, it shouldn’t constantly pull you out of the story to wonder why an author would choose to write something in such a distracting way.Just to be clear, none of these are direct quotes, only examples I have made up. I may add quotes from the book after publication, but I don’t want to post anything as a negative that gets changed before publication. I did read an “uncorrected proof” after all. Maybe the copy I got had all the ellipses removed by accident.There were a few things to like in this book, with snippets of interesting history and occasional humor. I love the look into the world of academia and the scenes where spells were cast, but I was left, more than anything, with the feeling that this was just Physick, repackaged for a new round of sales. It’s possible this author is going downhill with every novel. The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane was the peak. The House of Velvet and Glass was decent, as was Conversion, but The Daughters of Temperance Hobbs and The Appearance of Annie Van Sinderen are both not quite mediocre. I’d recommend re-reading Physick instead of reading this, unless you are obsessed with old-fashioned magic and recycled plots.I received a free copy of this book through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are mine and mine alone.(view spoiler)[And OMG what is with those names at the very end? I wanted to strangle Ms. Howe/Connie for calling those babies such atrocious things. Nasty. (hide spoiler)]
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  • Julie H.
    January 1, 1970
    I will start this review with the acknowledgment that I received a copy of this book as a First Reads Giveaway. Independent of that fact, there are two things that I simply must stress: (1) this is the most fun book I have read recently (and BTW, in grad school I did a semester paper that was a structural analysis of the 1692 Salem witchcraft deposition narratives, so my point is that I love this stuff) and (2) this is, hands down, in most regards the best/most accurate depiction of academic lif I will start this review with the acknowledgment that I received a copy of this book as a First Reads Giveaway. Independent of that fact, there are two things that I simply must stress: (1) this is the most fun book I have read recently (and BTW, in grad school I did a semester paper that was a structural analysis of the 1692 Salem witchcraft deposition narratives, so my point is that I love this stuff) and (2) this is, hands down, in most regards the best/most accurate depiction of academic life as depicted in fiction (e.g., the committee meetings, never-ending grading and class prep, the intense pressure spanning dissertation completion to job search to tenure review, etc.). In addition to these things, whoever edited this book at Henry Holt and Co. needs to be given some sort of award for exemplary editing. Seriously, we've all read those 600 page novels that had 250-300 pages worth of page-turner content and then the rest of it was non-essential. In contrast, this book weighed in at a lean 331 pages, followed by a short After Note. All told, this story is well crafted, exquisitely edited, and exercises some really nifty strategies whereby, via dialog, characters casually reference events, exchanges, and important bits of plot that vastly expedite the process. Kudos to Howe and her team for making this happen.So, for the story. Constance (Connie) Goodwin is a Harvard-educated Asst. Prof. of History at Northeastern University who is teaching, advising, researching, and frantically trying to complete her slightly overdue book manuscript against the backdrop of her tenure review year. In this same year, she learns she is pregnant, subject to a curse that will kill the very man who loves her deeply, and concludes with the fact that she is desperately in need of information that her lost-his-marbles (and now institutionalized) former mentor and dissertation advisor might be able to share. This is great stuff. With the simple exception of standing up to pompous jackass former grad student Thomas, Connie generally receives first prize for her instincts. Generally, one is not awarded tenure on the basis of a book that's been accepted for publication. Instead, it only counts if it's a done deal and can be included in one's tenure dossier. Likewise, when a potentially crazed grad student bumps into you at the library--on another university's campus--it is time to disengage quickly. In fact, a restraining order might a consideration.In sum, the specifics of the mysteries are intriguing while perhaps not earth-shattering, readers will likely decipher clues earlier than the book's characters do, but this is some every fun storytelling in which both protagonist and author efficiently get the job done. So much so, that I am eager to read more by Katherine Howe.
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  • Justin Longino
    January 1, 1970
    I had the fortunate chance to read an advance readers copy. Wow! I was immediately pulled back into the world of Connie Goodwin. Howe does not disappoint with this thrilling chase to solve a centuries long curse.The novel starts out 10 years later with Connie approaching tenure at a university while completing her book. The story interweaves the present day and interludes in the 1800s. Connie has a secret she is holding back from Sam. This secret could be detrimental to Sam's well being. We see I had the fortunate chance to read an advance readers copy. Wow! I was immediately pulled back into the world of Connie Goodwin. Howe does not disappoint with this thrilling chase to solve a centuries long curse.The novel starts out 10 years later with Connie approaching tenure at a university while completing her book. The story interweaves the present day and interludes in the 1800s. Connie has a secret she is holding back from Sam. This secret could be detrimental to Sam's well being. We see Connie's best friend Liz come back. The introduction of Zazi, a grad student that Connie is working with. Thomas comes back and unseemlying follows in the footsteps of a sinister past figure. We get to visit Cambridge and the Milk Street House in Marblehead.I felt this novel was superb. Katherine Howe continues to deliver history with a twist felt for you to determine if its supernatural or a trick of the eye. In my opinion, it slows down a little bit but its world and character building durning this time.The Daughters of Temperance Hobb is a must read for new and old enthusiast of the witch trials or Howe's previous lovers of her work.
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  • Julie Privett
    January 1, 1970
    A big thanks to Netgalley and Henry Holt and CO for giving me the chance to read this book in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own.This is a follow up to The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane and it did not disappoint! Having been a big fan of that book I was a little worried that I would not like this one but it was very good, I did not want to put it down! It has it all, magic, romance, suspense. Overall 5 stars, I would definitely recommend this book!
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  • Kathleen
    January 1, 1970
    I knew when I started this book it was by the same author that wrote The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane, which I just loved back 20 years ago. What I didn't know was this book is a continuation of that book, and when I started to think the characters and the setting seemed familiar, and then made the connection - I was SO psyched! And I was not disappointed. When I see a book about witches I want old school, Salem witch type witches and I want magic, and spells and herbs and stones and all thi I knew when I started this book it was by the same author that wrote The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane, which I just loved back 20 years ago. What I didn't know was this book is a continuation of that book, and when I started to think the characters and the setting seemed familiar, and then made the connection - I was SO psyched! And I was not disappointed. When I see a book about witches I want old school, Salem witch type witches and I want magic, and spells and herbs and stones and all things witchy. This book delivered all those things in droves. It's told in an alternating story line between the 1600s and modern day, which normally I don't love, but in this case kept me very firmly grounded in the book's witchy-ness. I can't fully express how happy I have been to read this, all I can say is, if you loved The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane then you will probably love this. And if you haven't read The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane, I highly suggest you hurry up and read it so you can enjoy this one as much as I did.A very, very huge thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with an advanced copy to read in exchange for my honest opinion.
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  • Nicole Evelina
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars rounded up. I really, really liked this book. I found the last few chapters a little unsatisfying, which is why I took off half a star. But overall this book is great - very vivid and definitely a page-turner. Thanks to the publisher for a free copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    Savored and loved.
  • Iryna KL
    January 1, 1970
    I rarely DNF a book, but I had to with this one. I tried, but it’s 36% and NOTHING and I mean ABSOLUTELY NOTHING has happened. This reads like a journal of post grad students complaining about how hard post grad is, fighting for primary sources and living on ramen noodles. I am very disappointed - I really enjoyed the previous book but this one, it’s repeating what we already know from book one 10 years later - that is it.
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  • Alison
    January 1, 1970
    Just as strange and satisfying as the first book.
  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Constance "Connie" Goodwin is back in this follow-up to the Physick Book of Deliverance Dane. I adored the everyday magic of being a woman that really shaped this story. Not to mention the ephemeral terrier familiars. An urgent quest for discovery, academic squabbling, fascinating history, and a little petty malfeasance sets this plot bubbling. With some wonderful new characters on the rise this sequel is not to be missed, and I hope this coven keeps cooking. Perfect for fans of Alice Hoffman or Constance "Connie" Goodwin is back in this follow-up to the Physick Book of Deliverance Dane. I adored the everyday magic of being a woman that really shaped this story. Not to mention the ephemeral terrier familiars. An urgent quest for discovery, academic squabbling, fascinating history, and a little petty malfeasance sets this plot bubbling. With some wonderful new characters on the rise this sequel is not to be missed, and I hope this coven keeps cooking. Perfect for fans of Alice Hoffman or Deborah Harkness.
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  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    When a college professor who specializes in witchcraft discovers her husband’s life is in danger, she begins piecing together an age old spell to protect him.3.5 stars - A magical story that follows the characters introduced in The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane and expands on the compelling true, dark history of Salem, Massachusetts.With the possible exception of Alice Hoffman, Katherine Howe has written the most enjoyable, and authentic, “witch” novels I’ve ever read.
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    While conducting research for the book she's writing, Connie, a professor of domestic healing arts (aka witchcraft!), uncovers a secret from her past that could endanger the life of her boyfriend, Sam. You see, all but one of the husbands in her family's long line of ancestors died young in tragic accidents. Will Connie be able to save her beloved before it's too late? Or, is he doomed to die young just because he loves her? "Daffodils," Sam said softly. "First sign of spring. It's how you know While conducting research for the book she's writing, Connie, a professor of domestic healing arts (aka witchcraft!), uncovers a secret from her past that could endanger the life of her boyfriend, Sam. You see, all but one of the husbands in her family's long line of ancestors died young in tragic accidents. Will Connie be able to save her beloved before it's too late? Or, is he doomed to die young just because he loves her? "Daffodils," Sam said softly. "First sign of spring. It's how you know everything is about to change."First of all, even though this was #2 in a series, it read just fine as a standalone. Secondly, I've been wanting to read a book about witches, so the timing was perfect. Not only did it quench my thirst for magic, it also provided an interesting look at the history of witchcraft in the Massachusetts area. Lastly, I liked how the story unfolded like a mystery while alternating between Connie in 2000 and a few of her ancestors in 1661, 1778, 1788 and 1816. I'd recommend this one for fans of paranormal fantasy (specifically witches) and/or historical fiction. "I guess I see witchcraft as kind of a catch-all term. That encompasses many different forms of folk spiritual practice. It's a way for people—often women and people of color—to claim power for themselves." - ZaziLocation: England (Easthorpe Essex) and Massachusetts (Belmont, Boston, Cambridge, Marblehead, and Salem)I received an advance copy of this book. All opinions are my own.
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  • Judy
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky and received an ARC of this book through Net Galley in exchange for an honest review. I read this in one day because I was so intrigued to find out what happened to Connie in the present and all of her relatives in the past. I read the Deliverance Dane book years ago and passed it around to everyone I knew. I enjoy Ms. Howe's writing style because it flows along so nicely and takes you into the world of the characters without overkill on the adjectives. I especially liked the way the I was lucky and received an ARC of this book through Net Galley in exchange for an honest review. I read this in one day because I was so intrigued to find out what happened to Connie in the present and all of her relatives in the past. I read the Deliverance Dane book years ago and passed it around to everyone I knew. I enjoy Ms. Howe's writing style because it flows along so nicely and takes you into the world of the characters without overkill on the adjectives. I especially liked the way the characters from the past were woven into the story and that the ending was not just added on, it built up through the final chapters and had a very satisfying conclusion. Yes, there were times when I wanted to shake Connie for not just confiding in those around her but of course that would have ruined the story. I definitely recommend this book, especially to those who enjoy reading books by Paula Braxton and Deborah Harkness.
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  • Kristi
    January 1, 1970
    It rallied at the end, bringing this to a 3.25. The first 75% of the book, however, was more a story of academia, which wasn't what I signed on for (at least not THAT much of it)! Finally, in the last 50 pages, we started to hit on some magic, which is what I was waiting on the entire novel. My biggest bone of contention comes in a scene approximately 2/3 through the book, between Connie and her friend, Liz. Now, not to get too dragged down by the details, these women are both well respected his It rallied at the end, bringing this to a 3.25. The first 75% of the book, however, was more a story of academia, which wasn't what I signed on for (at least not THAT much of it)! Finally, in the last 50 pages, we started to hit on some magic, which is what I was waiting on the entire novel. My biggest bone of contention comes in a scene approximately 2/3 through the book, between Connie and her friend, Liz. Now, not to get too dragged down by the details, these women are both well respected historians. When something comes up that would, by today's standards be unseemly, Liz freaks out, just going on about how it's too weird and she doesn't want anything to do with it. This is an academic professional with a PhD in medievalism, and she's icked out by something that is more than 200nyears old. Where is the academic perspective? Ugh...if it hadn't gotten better from here, it would have been a 2-2.5 for me.
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  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 rounded up for 'Weather Work'This story is about a Northeastern professor, Connie, her familial connection to witchcraft and a 'curse' that threatens the man she loves. At first I was really impressed with the world building and the authentically of life as an academic / PhD student / mentor; but at times it felt like it was a book about how much being an academic / PhD student / mentor sucks. For me, it took away from the story which was very slow to begin with. The last act was great! I on 3.5 rounded up for 'Weather Work'This story is about a Northeastern professor, Connie, her familial connection to witchcraft and a 'curse' that threatens the man she loves. At first I was really impressed with the world building and the authentically of life as an academic / PhD student / mentor; but at times it felt like it was a book about how much being an academic / PhD student / mentor sucks. For me, it took away from the story which was very slow to begin with. The last act was great! I only wish that the rest of the book held that intensity and urgency. It was beautifully well-executed and exciting. The scenes with Connie's hippie mother, Grace, were of my favorites. I largely enjoyed the scene at the antique shop with their "honor" system. Lots of well-written female friendships! Overall, I could have used more witch-y mythology and less babble about dissertations and book deadlines. Many thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for my digital copy.
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  • Lynne Thompson
    January 1, 1970
    This book is the sequel to Katherine Howe's "The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane," which was a book I dearly loved when I read it a couple of years ago. "Temperance Hobbs" is a worthy follow-up. It can be read and enjoyed as a standalone, but since the book won't be officially released until June, why not take the time and read "Deliverance Dane" in the meantime? Why deny yourself?Temperance Hobbs takes place several years after the conclusion of Deliverance Dane. Connie Goodwin is now a profes This book is the sequel to Katherine Howe's "The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane," which was a book I dearly loved when I read it a couple of years ago. "Temperance Hobbs" is a worthy follow-up. It can be read and enjoyed as a standalone, but since the book won't be officially released until June, why not take the time and read "Deliverance Dane" in the meantime? Why deny yourself?Temperance Hobbs takes place several years after the conclusion of Deliverance Dane. Connie Goodwin is now a professor at Northeastern University, well along the tenure track. The same group surrounds her, notably her boyfriend Sam, her dog Arlo, and her mother, Grace. There's friends from her graduate school days and some new ones along for the ride.Connie's life is entirely devoted to her students, her teaching, and gaining tenure, which leaves no time for anything else, she thinks. Until one day, she finds out that she is pregnant. And right after that, Connie learns that the Goodwin women's husbands never live for very long, as there appears to be a curse placed upon them; a curse that extends for generations. However, Connie's research uncovers that one of the women, Temperance Hobbs, was able to defeat the curse, and her husband outlived her. How Temperance accomplished that, and Connie's discovery of her methods, is the crux of the book.As you might have figured out (if you didn't know already) Connie is herself a witch, albeit a reluctant one. She doesn't like to use her powers unless she absolutely has to. In this case, she feels she has no choice if she wants to keep the love of her life alive.This book is a galloping good tale - the story moves swiftly along as Connie, her mother, and her friends race to uncover the mystery and secrets that Temperance has kept hidden for generations. There's plenty of intrigue and skulduggery along the way. Connie turns out to be pretty immature for someone in her early 30s; the immense workload and pressure to first secure a job in her field, and then gain tenure have left her continuing to live her 20-something grad school existence, both physically and emotionally. She is forced to confront her limitations and grow into a mature young woman, ready to face and handle the next chapter in her life.I loved following Connie's next chapter, along with her old friends and new ones. I'm not giving this book 5 stars, as Sam, Connie's boyfriend, is given short shrift in this novel. He was one of the best things in Deliverance Dane, and I sorely missed him this time around. He's there, but pretty passive, left to wonder what the hell is going on. I'm hoping that if there is to be a third book (and I really hope there is) that Sam will step up to the plate and be a major player again. He's too wonderful to lose!I received an Advance Reader's Edition, in exchange for an honest review.
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