The King’s Evil
From the No.1 bestselling author of The Ashes of London and The Fire Court comes the next book in the phenomenally successful series following James Marwood.A royal scandal that could change the face of England forever… London 1667. In the Court of Charles II, it’s a dangerous time to be alive – a wrong move may lead to disgrace, exile or death. The discovery of a body at Clarendon House, the palatial home of one of the highest courtiers in the land, could therefore have catastrophic consequences.  James Marwood, a traitor’s son, is ordered to cover up the murder. But the dead man is Edward Alderley, the cousin of one of Marwood’s acquaintances. Cat Lovett had every reason to want her cousin dead. Since his murder, she has vanished, and all the evidence points to her as the killer. Marwood is determined to clear Cat’s name and discover who really killed Alderley. But time is running out for everyone. If he makes a mistake, it could threaten not only the government but the King himself…

The King’s Evil Details

TitleThe King’s Evil
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 4th, 2019
PublisherHarperCollins
ISBN-139780008119188
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Mystery, Fiction, Crime, Historical Mystery

The King’s Evil Review

  • Paromjit
    January 1, 1970
    This is the 3rd in the excellent historical fiction series by Andrew Taylor featuring the traitor's son, James Marwood and Cat Lovett, set in the reign of Charles II in 1667 in London. Marwood has been left with the scars of the fire on one side of his face after events that occurred in the last book. He is still serving two masters, he is clerk for William Chiffinch, a powerful man close to the King, and Joseph Williamson, Under Secretary for the Secretary of State for the South. Lord Clarendon This is the 3rd in the excellent historical fiction series by Andrew Taylor featuring the traitor's son, James Marwood and Cat Lovett, set in the reign of Charles II in 1667 in London. Marwood has been left with the scars of the fire on one side of his face after events that occurred in the last book. He is still serving two masters, he is clerk for William Chiffinch, a powerful man close to the King, and Joseph Williamson, Under Secretary for the Secretary of State for the South. Lord Clarendon has fallen out of favour in the Royal Court, his opulent home, Clarendon House, is the source of much resentment, but he still has influence, his daughter married the King's brother, James, the Duke of York. Marwood has been sent to Clarendon House where a dead body has been found in the well. The murdered man is Edward Alderley, Cat's cousin, and a man she despises for good reason. It is Marwood's dangerous task is to investigate this highly politically sensitive murder, that is to threaten the King himself, and places unwelcome pressure on a Marwood caught between the machinations, scandal and intrigue amongst the most powerful and ruthless people in London. Lady Quincy, a woman Marwood yearns for, advises Marwood to warn Cat that Alderley knows of her whereabouts, and to tell her to go into hiding. Cat is deemed to have killed Alderley, although Marwood is not so convinced. The King's Evil is the restitution of a ceremony to heal those afflicted with scrofula (tuberculosis) by the touch of Charles II which reinforces the divine right of the king. Lady Quincy has an black African child as her servant who has the disease, wanting him to be admitted to the ceremony. With Cat nowhere to be found, Marwood seeks to look out for her, knowing that to do so places him in danger. Marwood accompanies the manipulative Lady Quinn on a secretive expedition to Cambridge and the remote Fens, where he begins to get an inkling of what is going on behind the scenes in his most challenging of cases. This is an excellent addition to this series, the historical period is wonderfully depicted with its rich descriptions of London, Cambridge and the Fens. The characterisation is stellar in its development as we see Marwood infatuation with Lady Quincy play out and the complicated position it puts him in, whilst his compassion and loyalty to his friends and acquaintances marks him out as a man of substance. Cat's role is smaller here, but no less significant in the action that takes place, plus she is marrying her elderly employer, Simon Hakesby, architect and builder, in an effort to counter the precariousness of her position. This is a hugely compelling piece of historical fiction, which shows a politically adept monarch utilising the adage of keeping his enemies close, and a Marwood subject to the whims and orders of those with substantially more power than him, requiring all his skills to negotiate his way through the political quagmire he is faced with. Highly recommended. Many thanks to HarperCollins for an ARC.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    This excellent series just gets better and better. I would recommend that you read them in order because The King's Evil, in particular, expects you to know what Marwood and Cat have been going through as they circle each other in this decadent and glamorous, curiously ugly and corrupt period of Charles II's reign. I really loved the descriptions of London at the time, especially Piccadilly. Review to follow shortly on For Winter Nights.
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  • Caz
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars/B+The King’s Evil is the third book in Andrew Taylor’s series of historical mysteries set in and around Restoration London in the year or so following the Great Fire of 1666.  As was the case with the previous two books – The Ashes of London and The Fire Court - this latest release in the Marwood and Lovett series is a detailed and intricately plotted historical mystery in which the author vividly evokes the sights, sounds and smells (!) of post-Fire London, putting the reader firmly 4.5 stars/B+The King’s Evil is the third book in Andrew Taylor’s series of historical mysteries set in and around Restoration London in the year or so following the Great Fire of 1666.  As was the case with the previous two books – The Ashes of London and The Fire Court - this latest release in the Marwood and Lovett series is a detailed and intricately plotted historical mystery in which the author vividly evokes the sights, sounds and smells (!) of post-Fire London, putting the reader firmly amid the filthy, crowded streets occupied by the ordinary folk trying to eke out an existence and clearly setting out the political posturing and jostling for position rife throughout Charles II’s court.  I was pulled into the story right away and was fully engrossed, eagerly turning the pages right until the end.It’s been over a year since London burned, and James Marwood has come a long way from the humble clerk he was when we first met him.  He’s prospering in the employ of two masters, one of whom, Mr. Chiffinch, is Keeper of the King’s Private Closet and Page of the Backstairs, one of the most powerful men at court because he controls private access to the king.  Chiffinch directs Marwood to investigate a murder which occurred at the London home of the former Lord Chancellor, Lord Clarendon, who has recently fallen from favour, but who nonetheless retains some influence at court owing to the fact that one of his daughters is married to the king’s brother, James, Duke of York.When the book opens, Marwood is attending a ceremony at Whitehall wherein the king lays hands on those suffering from the King’s Evil, or scrofula, (a disease we now call tuberculosis); it was believed that the monarch’s touch could heal the disease.  Marwood has been directed there in order to meet with Lady Quincy (formerly Mistress Alderley and Cat Lovett’s aunt) and to do as she directs; during their conversation she tells him that her stepson, Edward Alderley, has discovered Cat’s whereabouts and is intent on taking his revenge upon her for the wound she inflicted on him when she attacked him before fleeing the family home.  Marwood and Cat met on the night of the fire and have formed an odd friendship (of sorts); they’ve saved each other’s lives and have worked together on a couple of investigations, but she has never revealed the reason she left her home.  When Marwood tells her about Alderley and urges her to leave London for a while, she finally tells him the truth – her cousin raped her and she went for him with a knife (and he lost an eye as a result) – and Marwood is sickened by her tale.  Cat, who is a talented draughtsman but is precluded from following that profession because of her sex, is pursuing it in secret while also hiding behind the identity of Jane Hakesby, cousin and maidservant to the architect Simon Hakesby, a much older and feeble man whose offer of marriage Cat has accepted, seeing it as a way of achieving safety and financial security.She’s a prickly young woman – intelligent, fiercely independent and unwilling to show weakness - and at first she is at first adamant that she won’t leave London.  And by the time, a few days later, Marwood discovers she has left after all, the situation has become a lot worse, because Alderley’s is the body found at Clarendon House – drowned in a well – and Hakesby was one of the architects supervising the building work currently underway in the grounds.  It doesn’t take long for suspicion to fall upon Cat – but Marwood can’t believe she’s guilty of murder, and chooses to keep his connection with her to himself while he tries to find out who killed her cousin, even though he knows that trying to keep Cat safe and proving her innocence may well prove dangerous for him.Cat’s involvement in this novel is somewhat smaller than in the earlier books, but her presence is strongly felt throughout as Marwood struggles with divided loyalties and to see clearly through the web of lies and manipulation that are being woven around him.  He faces some of his toughest challenges yet as he is subjected to the manipulations and orders of those in positions of power and has to use all his wit and skill to carefully pick his way through the political minefield facing him, while somehow retaining the compassion and personal integrity that marks him out as different from so many of those around him.  Part of that minefield is the complication added by his infatuation with the calculating but lovely Lady Quincy, especially when Marwood pieces all the clues together - which point towards the existence of a treasonous conspiracy.Although the third in a series, the novel can be read as a standalone; I’d suggest, however, that readers will better understand the complicated relationship between Marwood and Cat by reading the first two books as well (and they’re both excellent, so that’s definitely recommended).The King’s Evil is a fast paced, densely plotted and full of fascinating historical detail that brings Restoration London vividly to life in all its splendid, ugly glory.  It’s a terrific read, and one I found hard to put down; fans of historical mysteries won’t want to miss it, and I’m eagerly awaiting Marwood and  Lovett ’s next investigation!
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  • 4cats
    January 1, 1970
    3rd in the spectacular Ashes of London series. It's now 1667 and James Marwood is called upon by his royal master to investigate a possible murder. A man's body has been found at Clarendon House, Lord Clarendon has a close connection to the KIng, his daughter is married to the King's brother the Duke of York (the future James II). Marwood recognises the body of that of Edward Alderley, the cousin of Cat Lovett, she is disappeared and Marwood finds himself caught up in court intrigue whilst tryin 3rd in the spectacular Ashes of London series. It's now 1667 and James Marwood is called upon by his royal master to investigate a possible murder. A man's body has been found at Clarendon House, Lord Clarendon has a close connection to the KIng, his daughter is married to the King's brother the Duke of York (the future James II). Marwood recognises the body of that of Edward Alderley, the cousin of Cat Lovett, she is disappeared and Marwood finds himself caught up in court intrigue whilst trying to protect Cat as it has been suggested that she maybe guilty of murder.As with the previous 2 Marwood/Lovett books, the plot moves along with pace and grace, the history is fascinating and the characters leap off the page, taking you along with them as if you are part of the action. I must say this series just keeps getting better and better, I now have a long wait for the fourth in the series (I hope there will be further adventures to be had!).
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  • Connie
    January 1, 1970
    Book 3 in the Marwood and Lovett series.James Marwood has been tasked by his masters to cover up a murder. The victim is Edward Alderly - the cousin of Catherine Lovett (Cat). When Cat vanishes the evidence suggests that she is the killer. Can Marwood find the killer and save Cat from the noose?This has been a superb series, full of conspiracy, plots and court intrigue.Keep your friends close and your enemies closer.
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  • Jo
    January 1, 1970
    Marwood returns for his third outing, this time investigating the death of a young gentleman found drowned in a well. He must entangle the knots that lead back to various lords and ladies and even to the king himself. Taylor consistently writes intelligent novels that are a pleasure to read.
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  • Margaret
    January 1, 1970
    This is the third book in Andrew Taylor’s series following James Marwood and Cat (Catherine) Lovett. I loved the first two – The Ashes of London (set in 1666) and The Fire Court (set in 1667, eight months after the Great Fire of London), so I was delighted when Felicity Denham at HarperCollins asked me if I’d like a proof copy of The King’s Evil to review. It is not necessary to read the earlier books as I think they all work well as standalones, but I think it helps if you do.The King’s Evil ca This is the third book in Andrew Taylor’s series following James Marwood and Cat (Catherine) Lovett. I loved the first two – The Ashes of London (set in 1666) and The Fire Court (set in 1667, eight months after the Great Fire of London), so I was delighted when Felicity Denham at HarperCollins asked me if I’d like a proof copy of The King’s Evil to review. It is not necessary to read the earlier books as I think they all work well as standalones, but I think it helps if you do.The King’s Evil carries on from where The Fire Court ended. Seven years after the restoration of the monarchy it’s still a time of political and social change. Whilst Charles II still had immense power as the King a new middle class, both professional and administrative, was evolving. James Marwood is a government agent in Whitehall, working as a clerk for William Chiffinch, one of the commissioners of the Board of Red Cloth. Chiffinch was also Keeper of the King’s Private Closet and Page of the Backstairs, an important position as he controlled private access to the King. In addition Marwood also works under Joseph Williamson, the Undersecretary to the Secretary of State for the South, one of Charles’s most powerful ministers.Charles had reinstated the ceremony of ‘touching for the King’s Evil’ as a demonstration of his divine right to rule – a ceremony in which the monarch touched those people suffering from scrofula, a disease, now known as tuberculosis, that caused the swelling of the bones and lymphatic glands in the neck (the book cover illustrates the ceremony). It was believed that the King’s touch cured the disease.The novel begins as Marwood is in the Banqueting Hall at Whitehall watching the ceremony. Chiffinch had told him to attend on the orders of the King to meet Lady Quincy and do whatever she commanded. Lady Quincy, accompanied by a small African child, her footboy suffering from scrofula, tells Marwood to meet her outside the church near the Tower of London. She also warns him that Edward Alderley, her step-son, is out for revenge on Cat Lovett because of what she had done to him. (This refers to events in The Fire Court). In order to keep her identity secret Cat, whose father had been one of the Regicides, is going by the name of Jane Hakesby. She had been working for Simon Hakesby, a surveyor and architect, on a garden pavilion project in the grounds of Clarendon House. Then Alderley is found dead in the well in the garden pavilion.Marwood is asked to look into the circumstances of Alderley’s death, under the King’s authority. He decides to keep his connection with Cat to himself, whilst he tries to find out where she has gone and who was responsible for Adderley’s death. Was it an accident, was it suicide, or was it murder? After Chiffinch received an anonymous letter naming Cat as the murderer, he sent officers to arrest her, but she had disappeared. So this was taken as a confession of her guilt. Marwood was afraid that this could implicate him too if it became known that he had told her that Alderley knew her whereabouts.In addition, Lord Clarendon is convinced that Alderley was involved in a conspiracy against him and also suspects that someone in his household is involved in the plot. He is out of favour with Charles, and had recently been removed from the office of Lord Chancellor. But he’s still potentially politically powerful as his daughter is married to Charles’s brother, James, the Duke of York. His grandchildren, the Princesses Mary and Anne, are the next heirs in the line of succession if Charles remained childless.Marwood tries to find Cat, and also escorts Lady Quincy to Cambridge on a secret mission. Eventually his investigation into Alderley’s death leads him to discover who is behind the plot against Clarendon, and also to uncover a potential royal scandal in which Lady Quincy and the Duke of Buckingham, one of Charles’s favourites who had supplanted Clarendon, play important roles. I loved the characterisation and all the details of the setting, bringing to life scenes at the royal court as well as in the refugee camps that housed the homeless as the work of rebuilding London continued. Andrew Taylor is a supreme storyteller, combining fact and fiction – his novels are full of historical details that slot seamlessly into his stories. The King’s Evil is historical fiction at its best, full of suspense and tension, an intricate and tightly plotted murder mystery, enhanced by the intrigue of a royal scandal. I loved it.
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  • Keith Currie
    January 1, 1970
    Skeletons in the cupboardAndrew Taylor’s latest thriller set in Restoration London and the Cambridgeshire Fens in the years following the Great Fire does not disappoint. The nicely ambiguous title refers to the reputed power of the English monarch to heal sufferers of Scrofula with the touch of his hand.This the third of the Marwood and Lovett stories and is a huge success, just like the others. The death of Cat Lovett’s cousin in suspicious circumstances leads to the accusation of his murder la Skeletons in the cupboardAndrew Taylor’s latest thriller set in Restoration London and the Cambridgeshire Fens in the years following the Great Fire does not disappoint. The nicely ambiguous title refers to the reputed power of the English monarch to heal sufferers of Scrofula with the touch of his hand.This the third of the Marwood and Lovett stories and is a huge success, just like the others. The death of Cat Lovett’s cousin in suspicious circumstances leads to the accusation of his murder laid against her. James Marwood is asked to investigate and is determined to solve the crime to prove her innocence. But this is also a tale of past indiscretions in the royal House of Stuart, indiscretions which have the power to bring down a dynasty. Who is the mysterious girl kept in seclusion in a Fenland estate? Why is she important to so many important men? And what will Marston do with the dangerous knowledge when he finds out?What I like most about this series of novels is how the author takes such care to set them in a convincing context. Women, however spirited and talented, have limited outlets for their abilities, and an investigator such as Marwood, even if commissioned by the government authorities, is despised and exploited, his position precarious and is life often endangered.
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  • Elaine Carass
    January 1, 1970
    Good little mystery.
  • Vivienne
    January 1, 1970
    My thanks to Harper Collins U.K. for an eARC via NetGalley of Andrew Taylor’s ‘The King’s Evil’ in exchange for an honest review.London 1667. When a body is found in a pavilion in the grounds of Clarendon House, the palatial home of one of Charles II’s highest courtiers, James Marwood is ordered to cover up the murder. Yet when the identity of the victim is revealed suspicion falls upon his friend Cat Lovett. Marwood investigates and also becomes involved in other intrigues associated with the R My thanks to Harper Collins U.K. for an eARC via NetGalley of Andrew Taylor’s ‘The King’s Evil’ in exchange for an honest review.London 1667. When a body is found in a pavilion in the grounds of Clarendon House, the palatial home of one of Charles II’s highest courtiers, James Marwood is ordered to cover up the murder. Yet when the identity of the victim is revealed suspicion falls upon his friend Cat Lovett. Marwood investigates and also becomes involved in other intrigues associated with the Royal Court.This is the third in Taylor’s Marwood and Lovett series set in Restoration England. While I had bought the previous books, ‘The Ashes of London’ and ‘The Fire Court’, I haven’t read them yet so was kicking myself a little once I realised this novel was part of a series and found that I had no time to catch up.However, this proved no barrier to my enjoyment as Taylor has provided enough background and included a very handy list of main characters with occupations at the beginning. I was astonished by how excellent this novel was. Throughout I felt totally immersed in the storyline and the period. Restoration London came vividly alive through his words.I enjoyed it so much and found it very hard to put down. I also find that I have become very attached to both Cat and Marwood though of course now have the pleasure of reading both of the earlier novels. I am also hoping for further books in this series. Certainly highly recommended.
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    The third book in the historical series featuring James Harwood and Cat Lovett. The historical setting is really well done. The plot is exciting, tense and intriguing with multiple plot twists. The story flows well and the characters are well-developed. Possibly the best book yet in the series. Andrew Taylor's writing is, as always, beautiful and intelligent. Highly recommended.II received a free review copy of the book from the publisher in exchange for my honest and unedited review.
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  • Sandra Danby
    January 1, 1970
    A body is discovered in the wrong place. A murder is worrying at any time, but in the turmoil of 1667 in the court of Charles II it is inconvenient too; further death is likely to follow. ‘The King’s Evil’ is third in Andrew Taylor’s ‘Fire of London’ series. As London rises from the smoldering ruins of the fire, government administrator turned investigator James Marwood is called yet again to do the king’s secret bidding… to move the body somewhere less inflammatory.Wondering why he gets into th A body is discovered in the wrong place. A murder is worrying at any time, but in the turmoil of 1667 in the court of Charles II it is inconvenient too; further death is likely to follow. ‘The King’s Evil’ is third in Andrew Taylor’s ‘Fire of London’ series. As London rises from the smoldering ruins of the fire, government administrator turned investigator James Marwood is called yet again to do the king’s secret bidding… to move the body somewhere less inflammatory.Wondering why he gets into these situations, Marwood must find away to get through the following days without being murdered, by one side or the other. Complicating matters is that the man murdered is Edward Alderley, the nasty cousin of Cat Lovett who was forced to flee the dangerous Alderley in ‘The Ashes of London’. Marwood, unable to forget the fact that Cat has a very good reason for wishing her cousin dead, sets out to identify the real murderer. Complicating things are the obtuse instructions of royal insider Mr Chiffinch; the tensions at court between the King’s brother, the Duke of York, and the Duke of Buckingham; and the sensuous but manipulative Lady Quincy.‘The King’s Evil’ gains an extra star from me for the return of Cat. Though the plotting at times threatened to head up a dead end street, Taylor pulled it around again. At times I wondered when the ‘threat to the royal family’ would become evident. Marwood is sent on errands by the tight-lipped Mr Chiffinch and the waters are often muddied. Only in the last few chapters does the significance of small events at the beginning of the book become clear.All three books in this series have fascinated me, this is a historical period about which I shamefully know little. Taylor has the uncanny ability to write fast-moving stories with period detail, showing wounded London re-emerging as scaffolding climbs into the sky, a believable place with traces of today’s city. Is this the last of a trilogy, or the third of a series? I don’t know.Read more of my book reviews at http://www.sandradanby.com/book-revie...
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  • Lesley
    January 1, 1970
    I was sent a copy of The King’s Evil by Andrew Taylor to read and review by NetGalley.I was really excited to be reading another historical novel by Andrew Taylor with characters James Marwood and Cat Lovett, protagonists from his previous two brilliant novels The Ashes of London and The Fire Court. While I really enjoyed this novel for me it didn’t have quite the same intensity and strength that the previous two had. The story was good but the intrigue didn’t seem quite so compelling and while I was sent a copy of The King’s Evil by Andrew Taylor to read and review by NetGalley.I was really excited to be reading another historical novel by Andrew Taylor with characters James Marwood and Cat Lovett, protagonists from his previous two brilliant novels The Ashes of London and The Fire Court. While I really enjoyed this novel for me it didn’t have quite the same intensity and strength that the previous two had. The story was good but the intrigue didn’t seem quite so compelling and while it was well written there were times when the author reiterated previous passages in further chapters which I thought could have been hinted at rather than fully explained – I don’t like to be spoon fed! Don’t get me wrong I read this book at every available opportunity and finished it within a couple of days and would definitely recommend it but it didn’t quite match the 5 star rating that I previously gave the other two.
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  • Alison Vicary
    January 1, 1970
    Firstly thanks to netgalley and the publishers for a copy of this book for an honest review. This is the third book in the brilliant historical fiction series featuring Harwood and Cat Lovett. This time Harwood investigates a highly sensitive murder which also includes a journey outside of London to Cambridge. The last 2 books have been addictive reading and this book does not disappoint. The relationship between Harwood and Cat continues to develop even though Harwood is unsure how involved Cat Firstly thanks to netgalley and the publishers for a copy of this book for an honest review. This is the third book in the brilliant historical fiction series featuring Harwood and Cat Lovett. This time Harwood investigates a highly sensitive murder which also includes a journey outside of London to Cambridge. The last 2 books have been addictive reading and this book does not disappoint. The relationship between Harwood and Cat continues to develop even though Harwood is unsure how involved Cat is in the series of events this book covers. This series has become one of my favourite historical crime fiction books. In part because the period this covers 1667 is not as well known as the Tudor period that is so commonly written about. It does help to read these books in order however if you are looking for a fantastic read that keeps you guessing till the end then look no further than these wonderful books by Andrew Taylor.
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  • Ben Jammin'
    January 1, 1970
    Like the other two in this series, it was fine. Lots of historical easter eggs, and equally silly historical inaccuracies. The story is all there, the plot, the intrigue, the action... It took me a while to realise why there's no tension. And looking back I can now see this was the thing that stopped me giving the other two 4 stars too; despite the page turner pace, there is very little sustained drama between any two characters, and almost never any scenes between three characters. I think with Like the other two in this series, it was fine. Lots of historical easter eggs, and equally silly historical inaccuracies. The story is all there, the plot, the intrigue, the action... It took me a while to realise why there's no tension. And looking back I can now see this was the thing that stopped me giving the other two 4 stars too; despite the page turner pace, there is very little sustained drama between any two characters, and almost never any scenes between three characters. I think with a book about intrigue this is a very important element to have because it lets the reader draw their own conclusions about other characters reactions to each other. They're all fun, readable crime novels, nonetheless.
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  • Board inMalibu
    January 1, 1970
    Terrific read. Having read Taylor’s two previous Marwood and Lovett novels, I really enjoyed this latest installment. THE KING’S EVIL takes place about 3 months after THE FIRE COURT, left the reader with a huge cliffhanger. It’s 1667 London. Taylor’s detail to this period novel is breathtaking. Not my usual genre but Taylor writes beautifully and it’s a compelling mystery. As with the other books in this series, there is more than one mystery. I liked the layering of the storylines. Highly recom Terrific read. Having read Taylor’s two previous Marwood and Lovett novels, I really enjoyed this latest installment. THE KING’S EVIL takes place about 3 months after THE FIRE COURT, left the reader with a huge cliffhanger. It’s 1667 London. Taylor’s detail to this period novel is breathtaking. Not my usual genre but Taylor writes beautifully and it’s a compelling mystery. As with the other books in this series, there is more than one mystery. I liked the layering of the storylines. Highly recommend; would suggest reading the series in order.
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  • Lacer
    January 1, 1970
    Not my favourite Marwood and Lovett book, not helped by me having trouble remembering what had happened previously in the beginning, although the story does pick up towards the end. In this one, Marwood is drawn back into the world of Lady Quincy, who has a (to me) not that believable thing for. Lady Quincey is interested in scrofula (the King’s Evil). Meanwhile, Lovett’s evil cousin is murdered and Marwood is instructed to investigate.
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  • Roz DeKett
    January 1, 1970
    Another tremendous story immersing the reader in the politics and life of London in the 1660s, and really well-written too. The ongoing characters get deeper and stronger with each novel. Historical crime fiction at its best.
  • Alice-Anne
    January 1, 1970
    I'm always sad when I finish a Marwood and Cat Lovett book. This third book in the series is as richly detailed and compelling as the first two. Next one soon please, Mr Taylor!
  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    Fabulous 3rd in the series - I think James Marwood may be my latest literary crush Shame I've to wait so long for the next in the series, please hurry up & publish it Andrew
  • Lis
    January 1, 1970
    A historical mystery and intrigue, taking place in London in the late 1600s. Charles II is King (the. Monarchy restored after Cromwell was defeated.) A god read.
  • Phil Brett
    January 1, 1970
    Good fun.
  • Daphne Sharpe
    January 1, 1970
    This is the third outing in this Restoration period series, and the standard of writing and research, shows no signs of flagging. We are back with familiar friends, James Marwood, a sleuth for King Charles the second, and Cat Lovett, a feisty acquaintance ,whom James has complicated feelings towards. A body is found in a well, at the house of Lord Clarendon, who is a courtier at the Royal Court. The victim is identified as Edward Alderley, who happens to be the cousin of Cat Lovett, and there is This is the third outing in this Restoration period series, and the standard of writing and research, shows no signs of flagging. We are back with familiar friends, James Marwood, a sleuth for King Charles the second, and Cat Lovett, a feisty acquaintance ,whom James has complicated feelings towards. A body is found in a well, at the house of Lord Clarendon, who is a courtier at the Royal Court. The victim is identified as Edward Alderley, who happens to be the cousin of Cat Lovett, and there is no love lost between them, in fact she has previously threatened to kill him, so it comes as no surprise to learn that she is suspected of his murder. James has the job of hiding and protecting her, whilst serving his master , the King. Marwood becomes sidetracked by Lady Quincey, Cats stepmother, she and James go to Cambridgeshire to collect a young girl, who is suffering from the titular illness of The Kings Evil, or Scrofula. Today, this is known as Tuberculosis ,and then ,it was believed that the ceremony of the laying on of hands ,by the King, could provide a cure for this disease. Marwood suspects that Lady Quincey is the mother of this child, and that the secret of the missing father, is tied in to various attempts on Marwoods life and other murders.I found this to be an exciting story, with many informative nuggets of information. There are fascinating glimpses of the Restoration court,that contrast sharply with the filth and burnt out quarters of London, following The Great Fire, covered in the previous two books. Who knew the meaning of the word, Picadilly? It's not a period covered in schools these days, but reading this,helps you understand so much. The descriptions of the Lincolnshire Fens, and Cambridgeshire marshes are very atmospheric, all mists and aromas, and can be quite spooky! I have lived in these areas for most of my life, and when those sea fogs come rolling in, it can be very scary and there are so many isolated villages thereabouts ,it was the perfect setting to hide a young girl from curious eyes.These books are best read in their written order, they are very addictive, and I am hoping for a fourth in this series, there is still much of this period to investigate. I highly recommend this book and give it five stars.
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