Amazons, Abolitionists, and Activists
A bold and gripping graphic history of the fight for women's rights The ongoing struggle for women's rights has spanned human history, touched nearly every culture on Earth, and encompassed a wide range of issues, such as the right to vote, work, get an education, own property, exercise bodily autonomy, and beyond. Amazons, Abolitionists, and Activists is a fun and fascinating graphic novel-style primer that covers the key figures and events that have advanced women's rights from antiquity to the modern era. In addition, this compelling book illuminates the stories of notable women throughout history--from queens and freedom fighters to warriors and spies--and the progressive movements led by women that have shaped history, including abolition, suffrage, labor, civil rights, LGBTQ liberation, reproductive rights, and more. Examining where we've been, where we are, and where we're going, Amazons, Abolitionists, and Activists is an indispensable resource for people of all genders interested in the fight for a more liberated future.

Amazons, Abolitionists, and Activists Details

TitleAmazons, Abolitionists, and Activists
Author
ReleaseJan 1st, 1970
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Nonfiction, Feminism, History, Comics, Graphic Novels Comics

Amazons, Abolitionists, and Activists Review

  • Laurie Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    Should be a standard in classrooms and libraries. There are SO MANY incredible women in this book!!! Put this in the hands of all readers!
  • Ruby
    January 1, 1970
    This book. Man. So much information, so much suffering and pride. So much history...it profiles sooo many hard-working women but the profiles are are short so I know it could have been ten times as long.We've come so far. And yet so far to go.(I did tear up at some parts.)
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  • Jamie (ReadsinTrees) Dacyczyn
    January 1, 1970
    A pretty good look at the history of women's rights, with special attention paid to women of color, women with disabilities, queer women, and transwomen. I appreciate that problematic outdated views (like being pro-eugenics or racist) from some iconic figures weren't smoothed over, but openly acknowledged.My only quibbles are that occasionally the transition from one woman to the next didn't always flow smoothly, there were occasional references to things in the background that I wish were A pretty good look at the history of women's rights, with special attention paid to women of color, women with disabilities, queer women, and transwomen. I appreciate that problematic outdated views (like being pro-eugenics or racist) from some iconic figures weren't smoothed over, but openly acknowledged.My only quibbles are that occasionally the transition from one woman to the next didn't always flow smoothly, there were occasional references to things in the background that I wish were explained or noted, and I'm a smidgen disappointed that I didn't see any pink pussy hats (though I haven't examined every single page Where's Wanda style). Overall, definitely worth reading.
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  • Carolyn
    January 1, 1970
    SO MUCH information here, so many names and faces and ideas and movements and moments and...And too much.Liked it a lot, think I have some students who will get a lot out of it, but at a certain point, you start to feel like you are just reading a list. I wish they had gone for more depth and less breadth. Or that there were followup mini graphic novels for each woman mentioned! Now that would make a great set, ha. Yes, impossible.But still: it's worth that they're bringing up names and SO MUCH information here, so many names and faces and ideas and movements and moments and...And too much.Liked it a lot, think I have some students who will get a lot out of it, but at a certain point, you start to feel like you are just reading a list. I wish they had gone for more depth and less breadth. Or that there were followup mini graphic novels for each woman mentioned! Now that would make a great set, ha. Yes, impossible.But still: it's worth that they're bringing up names and introducing people who maybe you haven't heard before (maybe you only knew the major players) but once there's that many of them, you don't get much information on each person. So it's a bit of a tossup.Definitely worth reading, definitely a great addition to a classroom library.
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  • Krista
    January 1, 1970
    I was looking forward to this so much that I pre-ordered it, and for the most part it lived up to my extremely (possibly unfairly) high expectations.This book covers a *lot* of ground and many many women and events, so it can't go into much depth about any of them and it can't touch on everything, due to space constraints. It will probably whet your appetite for more. That's a good thing, even if it's mildly frustrating! This is meant to be a primer and it is one. Some parts are USA-heavy which I was looking forward to this so much that I pre-ordered it, and for the most part it lived up to my extremely (possibly unfairly) high expectations.This book covers a *lot* of ground and many many women and events, so it can't go into much depth about any of them and it can't touch on everything, due to space constraints. It will probably whet your appetite for more. That's a good thing, even if it's mildly frustrating! This is meant to be a primer and it is one. Some parts are USA-heavy which was fine with me because that's where I live, and so do the authors.The graphic novel format really worked for me, and I think my kids will want to read it because of that. The pages feel nice and sturdy and the artwork is solid, with an especially gorgeous cover. This book doesn't shy away from tough topics and some violence is shown in the artwork, but not in a scary or glorifying way.I found some of the transitions and jumping around a bit jarring, but I also can't think of a better way to cover so much material succinctly. Overall the framing device works well: we virtually travel through time and around the world along with a class learning women's history from a futuristic, personified AI program. The students pose questions to the AI and talk a bit with each other, too, but most of the text is the AI character narrating historical events and giving brief biographies.I wish this book included pronunciation guides for all of the names, both for read-aloud purposes and just for my own edification. Maybe as footnotes in a future edition? I appreciate the index at the back and can envision this being used as a classroom and family resource, as well as being readable as a story. It's not easy to accomplish both of those things in one book, but this one balances them pretty well, and looks good doing it. I hope there is a sequel soon.
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  • Doris Raines
    January 1, 1970
    LOVE THIS TITLE AND BOOK WE ALWAYS GOT ONE MORE FIGHT LOVE THIS TITLE AND BOOK WE ALWAYS GOT ONE MORE FIGHT👊🏽👊🏽👊🏽👊🏽👊🏽👊🏽👊🏽👊🏽👊🏽👊🏽👊🏽👊🏽👊🏽
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Interview with the author: https://www.wbez.org/shows/reset/chic...
  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    INCREDIBLE
  • Ben Truong
    January 1, 1970
    Amazons, Abolitionists, and Activists: A Graphic History of Women's Fight for Their Rights is a graphic novel written by Mikki Kendall and illustrated by Anna D'Amico, which traces the history of women's rights around the globe in graphic novel format.When their purple-skinned, white-haired AI instructor introduces the subject of women's rights, the class of six young women breaks out in argument. The instructor responds by transporting them across time and space to show them the history of Amazons, Abolitionists, and Activists: A Graphic History of Women's Fight for Their Rights is a graphic novel written by Mikki Kendall and illustrated by Anna D'Amico, which traces the history of women's rights around the globe in graphic novel format.When their purple-skinned, white-haired AI instructor introduces the subject of women's rights, the class of six young women breaks out in argument. The instructor responds by transporting them across time and space to show them the history of women's rights. Starting with ancient Sumer and slowly proceeds to the present day. Along the way, the instructor exposes the reader to influential women from diverse backgrounds by highlighting the struggles and achievements of nearly 200 individuals who were leaders in a variety of areas of pursuit. The content is both historical and up to the minute, with relevance to current issues, covering, among other topics, colonization, suffrage, civil rights, redress movements, the wage gap, sexual harassment, reproductive rights, and LGBTQ rights.Amazons, Abolitionists, and Activists: A Graphic History of Women's Fight for Their Rights is written and constructed rather well. The earliest chapters suffer from confusing panel layouts and stiff illustration, but this awkwardness gives way to lavish depictions of the fight for suffrage. Kendall and D'Amico manage the challenge of inclusivity with aplomb. Lesser-known black activists, disability rights advocates, and Native American leaders are portrayed with the same fulsome treatment as household names, all with an accessible tone and striking portraiture.All in all, Amazons, Abolitionists, and Activists: A Graphic History of Women's Fight for Their Rights is a wonderful graphic novel about the history of women's rights.
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  • Gina
    January 1, 1970
    The frustrating thing about the book is that it goes so quickly, just skimming the surface of so many interesting stories. Given the thousands of years involved and the global focus, that would be inevitable. This is the first comic book I have seen with an index, and that is absolutely something that it should have.There are plenty of options for more research, and this can be a jumping off point for further personal reading. I could also see it working well as part of the curriculum for a The frustrating thing about the book is that it goes so quickly, just skimming the surface of so many interesting stories. Given the thousands of years involved and the global focus, that would be inevitable. This is the first comic book I have seen with an index, and that is absolutely something that it should have.There are plenty of options for more research, and this can be a jumping off point for further personal reading. I could also see it working well as part of the curriculum for a college course on women's studies or activism. Fans of Jason Porath's Rejected Princesses and Tough Mothers should also enjoy it.Taking such a long and broad view emphasizes how the fight for rights is not static. Many societies were more equal and accomplished various things that were undone. All the way to the US Voting Rights Act, passage just started challenges against it. Losing ground is always possible. In addition, it covers that there are other vectors, to that racism and disability rights and fighting against other forms of bias is constantly necessary, and that it can be done through many different means: protest, yes, but also art and music and sports. It ends on a hopeful note, because there are many ways to be involved and help, but it should also be sobering remembering how much there is to do.
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  • Bethany
    January 1, 1970
    Amazons, Abolitionists, and Activists is graphic nonfiction that depicts the mostly-chronological history of women's rights. While I applaud Kendall for being cognizant and inclusive of all races, all sexual and gender orientations, and all abilities, this book is still heavily USA-centric. Yet, this makes sense as the intended audience is for American (and perhaps other English-speaking European) readers. I did not like how didactic it is, though. I fully support being confident and Amazons, Abolitionists, and Activists is graphic nonfiction that depicts the mostly-chronological history of women's rights. While I applaud Kendall for being cognizant and inclusive of all races, all sexual and gender orientations, and all abilities, this book is still heavily USA-centric. Yet, this makes sense as the intended audience is for American (and perhaps other English-speaking European) readers. I did not like how didactic it is, though. I fully support being confident and not-backing-down in what some view controversial material, but it doesn't sit well with me. Additionally, I would have liked information on how to learn more about getting involved (i.e. a list of websites to visit on how to support Planned Parenthood (which isn't ever named!!), ACLU, Women's March (which wasn't mentioned either!)), as well as a list of potential discussion questions, like a book club conversation guide that is sometimes present in fiction books. While there is an index, there was some supplementary information that was left out.
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  • Carly Thompson
    January 1, 1970
    Nonfiction graphic novel about famous women throughout history. The beginning gives a brief overview of the role of women in ancient society before moving chronologically through history. The information on each women is brief - only about a paragraph - and will inspire readers to seek out more information on the women profiled. A purplish alien creature narrates to a group of teen/young adult women. A good option for teen readers. I didn't find the artwork that compelling but overall, this is Nonfiction graphic novel about famous women throughout history. The beginning gives a brief overview of the role of women in ancient society before moving chronologically through history. The information on each women is brief - only about a paragraph - and will inspire readers to seek out more information on the women profiled. A purplish alien creature narrates to a group of teen/young adult women. A good option for teen readers. I didn't find the artwork that compelling but overall, this is an informative, fun read.
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  • Berni Phillips
    January 1, 1970
    This was pretty amazing. I had heard of maybe a third of the women featured in this book. It was informative and entertaining. The artwork is lovely, and both writer and artist are careful to be inclusive of just about every woman there is. I can't wait for my great-nieces to grow up a bit more so they will be ready for this.
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  • Mia
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent overview into women’s activism and intersectionality. This should be in all school libraries. I did find myself wishing it dove deeper when reading about someone’s work, but that’s the nature of it, right? There’s so much ground to cover - all of human history! It’s a great starting point for me to read more about these amazing women and is a good push towards becoming an accomplice.
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  • Pili
    January 1, 1970
    Amazing graphic novel, with a lot of information that I didn't have previously. Awesome read!
  • Herminia Chow
    January 1, 1970
    About the book: It’s a graphic novel, exploring the history of women’s rights, starting from the past and concluding at the present.I received an advanced review copy from Penguin Random House in exchange for an honest review.First impressions: I enjoy reading about history, so I couldn’t wait to delve into this book. I like the alliteration in the title, and it also gives readers an idea of what the book is about.Content: I love the illustrations. The colours are beautiful and they complement About the book: It’s a graphic novel, exploring the history of women’s rights, starting from the past and concluding at the present.I received an advanced review copy from Penguin Random House in exchange for an honest review.First impressions: I enjoy reading about history, so I couldn’t wait to delve into this book. I like the alliteration in the title, and it also gives readers an idea of what the book is about.Content: I love the illustrations. The colours are beautiful and they complement the text. Both the author and artist are extremely talented.“How can we expect righteousness to prevail when there is hardly anyone willing to give himself up individually to a righteous cause?”Writing: I think there’s a great balance of words and pictures. Learning more about the issues women faced around the world put a lot of things into perspective for me. It’s such an eye-opening, educational read at less than 200 pages.Final thoughts: I highly recommend Amazons, Abolitionists, and Activists: A Graphic History of Women’s Fight for Their Rights to just about everyone.
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  • Melissa Smith
    January 1, 1970
    This was a good graphic novel . The art work was good
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