Thin Air (Jessica Shaw #1)
She investigates missing persons—now she is one.Private investigator Jessica Shaw is used to getting anonymous tips. But after receiving a photo of a three-year-old kidnapped from Los Angeles twenty-five years ago, Jessica is stunned to recognize the little girl as herself.Eager for answers, Jessica heads to LA’s dark underbelly. When she learns that her biological mother was killed the night she was abducted, Jessica’s determined to solve a case the police have forgotten. Meanwhile, veteran LAPD detective Jason Pryce is in the midst of a gruesome investigation into a murdered college student moonlighting as a prostitute. A chance encounter leads to them crossing paths, but Jessica soon realizes that Pryce is hiding something about her father’s checkered history and her mother’s death.To solve her mother’s murder and her own disappearance, Jessica must dig into the past and find the secrets buried there. But the air gets thinner as she crawls closer to the truth, and it’s getting harder and harder to breathe.

Thin Air (Jessica Shaw #1) Details

TitleThin Air (Jessica Shaw #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 1st, 2019
PublisherThomas & Mercer
ISBN-139781542093644
Rating
GenreMystery, Suspense, Fiction, Thriller

Thin Air (Jessica Shaw #1) Review

  • PinkAmy loves books, cats and naps
    January 1, 1970
    Missing person PI Jessica Shaw is looking for her next gig when she realizes that she is her own client. Alicia Lavelle, abducted at age three the night her mother was murdered is Jessica’s real identity. The picture of the missing girl holding the Barbie, *her* Barbie is actually Jessica which means her father lied all these years. A college student Amy Ong is missing and found butchered in a similar manner to Eleanor Lavelle, Jessica’s mother. Could there be a connection and if so, Jessica may Missing person PI Jessica Shaw is looking for her next gig when she realizes that she is her own client. Alicia Lavelle, abducted at age three the night her mother was murdered is Jessica’s real identity. The picture of the missing girl holding the Barbie, *her* Barbie is actually Jessica which means her father lied all these years. A college student Amy Ong is missing and found butchered in a similar manner to Eleanor Lavelle, Jessica’s mother. Could there be a connection and if so, Jessica may be next?THIN AIR is more mystery than thrilled. Lisa Gray hooked me in with the intriguing plot and different points of view. I couldn’t help to hope for a happy ending for Jessica, she certainly deserved it. The secretive small town cast of characters led me had no shortage of plausible suspects. Most everyone had something to hide.THIN AIR is the first in a two part series with Jessica Shaw. I can’t wait to read the sequel. What I liked about THIN AIR is that the story was complete at the end, no cliffhanger to make me buy the next book. I do not like waiting a year to finish a story so props to Gray for trusting readers will care enough to buy book two.
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  • CD {Boulder Blvd}
    January 1, 1970
    I'm mixed about this book. For the most part it was OK, sometimes interesting but I did find it easy to put down. I figured out the killer the moment the character was introduced so it was important how the investigation went that made the story work. For the most part, the investigation was OK. There was actually some footwork involved. I liked the characters of Price and his partner Medina.I thought it was extremely weird and a little too contrived that all the major players are essentially si I'm mixed about this book. For the most part it was OK, sometimes interesting but I did find it easy to put down. I figured out the killer the moment the character was introduced so it was important how the investigation went that made the story work. For the most part, the investigation was OK. There was actually some footwork involved. I liked the characters of Price and his partner Medina.I thought it was extremely weird and a little too contrived that all the major players are essentially sitting in the same chair 25 years after Jessica's mother was killed. Plus Jessica was a little TSTL at the end which was disappointing.The contents of the envelope from her "dad" was a nice tough.
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  • VJ
    January 1, 1970
    She investigates missing persons—now she is one.I really enjoyed this fast paced un-putdownable mystery/thriller with an enticing premise that delivered on the nose, and then some!The main character, Jessica Shaw, is fun and feisty- the kind of girl you want to have on your side (and definitely go for a drink with!) I can't wait for the next in the series.
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  • Suze
    January 1, 1970
    Intriguing plotMy choice of First Reads for May, the synopsis intrigued me-a picture from the past linking Jessica to a murder and a missing child. The author goes back and forth between the main characters, each with a different perspective.I try not to do spoilers, so I will just say- this story is interesting and it is the start of a series. I look forward to reading more about Jessica Shaw- I like the author's writing style.
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  • Bonnye Reed
    January 1, 1970
    May Kindle Prime read
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    What certainly captivated me about the plot of this book is how the protagonist is listed as a missing person and that she is totally unaware of this. The mystery that unravels surrounding her identity is pretty thrilling as the writer pulls in a parallel plot with the murder of a young girl.For a while I found it difficult to see any connection between Jessica’s story and Amy’s murder. The narrative perspective shifts between several key characters and it takes a while for readers to learn abou What certainly captivated me about the plot of this book is how the protagonist is listed as a missing person and that she is totally unaware of this. The mystery that unravels surrounding her identity is pretty thrilling as the writer pulls in a parallel plot with the murder of a young girl.For a while I found it difficult to see any connection between Jessica’s story and Amy’s murder. The narrative perspective shifts between several key characters and it takes a while for readers to learn about key events leading up to Amy’s murder, for example. However, as the plot developed, I found that I had correctly predicted the outcome of the novel, reducing the thrilling event of this read. Jessica is quite a sassy Private Investigator. Breaking locks and pulling on contacts, she is one to have on your side! However, her appearance in Eagle Rock has set the local gossips chattering and soon it becomes clear that she isn’t the only one interested in a murder and child disappearance that happened twenty-five years ago. Jessica is eventually able to solve the clues about her past and readers are treated to total closure at the end of the story. What made this a satisfying read was the fact that the writer does not leave this story on a cliffhanger. Despite being the first in a series, it is not made clear where Gray will take the story for the next instalment. Whilst this does mean this is easily read as a stand-alone novel, I certainly believe that this reduced how gripping the novel was as it reached its conclusion. It’s not a boring story, but the obvious plot development meant that for me, the story lacked a natural increase in pace towards the end. The end is simply that: Jessica has the answers to her past and moves on. As a result, I would consider other thrillers first before reading this book. This is a good read but not very suspenseful or gripping. It moves at a relatively fast pace and the end is satisfyingly conclusive. Whether I would rush out to read the next one however, remains to be seen.
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  • Judi
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first book by Lisa Gray that I have read and won't be my last. In fact, this one is a series and another one about Jessica Shaw will be coming out soon.Jessica is a Private Detective. When her father passed away, she had a hard time with his death. She sold everything, and just wanders around the country investigating missing persons and murder cases. She takes all kinds of cases though.When she is in a small town going over what case she might take on next, she gets an email from Jo This is the first book by Lisa Gray that I have read and won't be my last. In fact, this one is a series and another one about Jessica Shaw will be coming out soon.Jessica is a Private Detective. When her father passed away, she had a hard time with his death. She sold everything, and just wanders around the country investigating missing persons and murder cases. She takes all kinds of cases though.When she is in a small town going over what case she might take on next, she gets an email from John Doe. She is given a link to click on, what she finds will changer her whole life. She is on a Missing Persons Page, and the picture of a three year old girl, is her. Now Jessica, doesn't know who she is and when she finds out information on the case, she finds that the little girl was missing, when her Mother was found dead. So her whole life was lies? Who was the mother and dad that raised her?This one really moves along and didn't guess the ending..I always love that! Really great read, not to be missed. Look forward to more by this author.
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  • Vicky D.
    January 1, 1970
    SOME MAY CONSIDER THIS A SPOILER!!!!!! POSITIVES; It was a creative concept for mystery. Gray's description of Hollywood felt real. It was like the set of the series Goliath. NEGATIVES; Dropping the story of one character when something was about to be revealed in one chapter and taking up another character's perspective in the next, only made it a little confusing and did not add to the story (this works sometimes,here not so much). The answer to the main mystery could be easily guessed 1/4 of SOME MAY CONSIDER THIS A SPOILER!!!!!! POSITIVES; It was a creative concept for mystery. Gray's description of Hollywood felt real. It was like the set of the series Goliath. NEGATIVES; Dropping the story of one character when something was about to be revealed in one chapter and taking up another character's perspective in the next, only made it a little confusing and did not add to the story (this works sometimes,here not so much). The answer to the main mystery could be easily guessed 1/4 of the way through the book, the second was a good twist and nice tie into the last (it was sweet but a little late). I am not feeling the main character Jessica, she drank a lot, smoked alot, had a tattoo and pierced nose, not a lot of depth there. I read in bed before I sleep, I judge a book by how many nights it takes me to read it. I started this book ahead on my reading challenge now I am behind.
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  • Teagan C.
    January 1, 1970
    Unoriginal concept bogged down by excessive description, particularly during the first half. The characters were enjoyable and the settings were interesting. The overall mystery kept me interested as I couldn't settle on an ideal suspect so I ultimately enjoyed the finale. Unfortunately the description was my major peeve, it felt like I couldn't just imagine anything in any one scene. Hopefully there will be some changes to that in future instalments as Jessica Shaw is a very cool character.
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  • Megan BG
    January 1, 1970
    I thought the premise was good, but the book was just OK. I wouldn't consider it much of a thriller. Still interesting though when all the pieces come together.
  • Jeff
    January 1, 1970
    I don't hand out five star ratings too frequently. But Thin Air kept me gripped all the way to the end. I got this book as part of Amazon's Kindle First program. As an Amazon Prime member, each month I get to choose on of at least six titles for no additional charge. This month I chose Thin Air. The surprising part is that I actually read it. I have over nine hundred books on my Kindle (probably nothing compared to some people), and when I finish a title, I normally go back to the oldest title i I don't hand out five star ratings too frequently. But Thin Air kept me gripped all the way to the end. I got this book as part of Amazon's Kindle First program. As an Amazon Prime member, each month I get to choose on of at least six titles for no additional charge. This month I chose Thin Air. The surprising part is that I actually read it. I have over nine hundred books on my Kindle (probably nothing compared to some people), and when I finish a title, I normally go back to the oldest title in my library. So I have yet to read one of my Kindle First titles. Until this one.Prologue: The book begins with a murder. Written in first person from the perspective of the killer. We have no clue who it is, other than the indication that the person murdered seems to know the murderer.Jessica Shaw is a private investigator. Originally hailing from New York (or so she thinks), she has left there and travels around, living out of cheap hotels, wherever she can find a job to work. She specializes in missing persons.One day, as she sits in a diner, in Simi Valley, trying to figure out where to go next, she gets an email from a "John Doe," simply titled "Your next case?" She opens the email, which included only a link to a missing persons website. She clicks on the link and sees the photo of a missing person, a two or three year old kid. She had seen the photo before.Because the kid was her.Now there's a plot line I've never seen before. I am instantly hooked! From this point, the story shifts back and forth between several people. One of them is Amy Ong, the girl who is murdered in the prologue. As the story unveils, we get bits and pieces of what has happened to her and why. We are also introduced to an LAPD detective named Jason Pryce. The thing is, Jessica had seen him before, too. She finally realized that she had seen him at her father's funeral a few years back.As this story unfolds, the connections get more and more complex. There are unexpected twists and turns that simply leave the reader almost gasping for air. Perhaps I'm being overly dramatic, but it really felt that way. There were quite a few, "Oh, my GOSH!" moments in the story. Those are the things that keep me reading. There would, no doubt, be some who would disagree with me, but I would put this story right up there with The Girl On the Train. It kept me that interested. And the ending, well, lets just say I didn't see that coming.I will definitely be on the lookout for more of Lisa Gray's work.
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  • Beth Brackett
    January 1, 1970
    Worth readingI quite enjoyed this book. It was fairly well written. The story held my interest. I do think some of the actions taken by several of the characters were a bit hard to believe. And so many people having such clear memories of events that happened 25 years ago are unbelievable.
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  • Laurie Buchanan
    January 1, 1970
    I read a lot, and I've never read a book with this premise. THIN AIR is unique. And the way the author, Lisa Gray, pulls it off is exceptional. I enjoyed the clever twists and turns that led to an incredibly satisfying end. I highly recommend this book.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    Read thanks to amazon first reads. The idea that a PI is investigating her own missing persons picture intrigued me. I've read a few mysteries and thrillers, crime books and PI books and I was pleasantly surprised not to be able to guess the end result. Maybe I should have seen connections earlier. Oh well. Not a nad intro into a new series. I look forward to the next.
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  • Mandy
    January 1, 1970
    I think the plot/storyline had a lot of potential, but the writing itself was just OK. It obviously wasn’t all bad because I did see it through to the end and it did have a couple of surprises for me throughout, which was good! I would have liked the author to show me more about what was happening for a better experience, rather than telling me. There were times when even the dialogue felt a bit forced. I noticed that this is book one in the Jessica Shaw series, so I’d like to give book two a sh I think the plot/storyline had a lot of potential, but the writing itself was just OK. It obviously wasn’t all bad because I did see it through to the end and it did have a couple of surprises for me throughout, which was good! I would have liked the author to show me more about what was happening for a better experience, rather than telling me. There were times when even the dialogue felt a bit forced. I noticed that this is book one in the Jessica Shaw series, so I’d like to give book two a shot when it comes out. Overall, a decent choice for a May Kindle First book.
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  • Mary L.
    January 1, 1970
    Who's the killer?This was a total surprise to me! I'll let you read the book to learn the answer. There are other questions that come up also. My only problem with the book was figuring out how she even managed to think clearly at all with the amount she drank.
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  • Ray Moon
    January 1, 1970
    After A Rocky Start, A Good ReadThe novel opens with the vicious murder of a young mother with her child upstairs. Now, twenty-five years later, the heroine, a private investigator Jessica Shaw, is sitting in a small diner looking for another job by reviewing missing persons to see if any interests her. She believes that missing adults fell into two categories, dead or didn’t want to be found. While searching she receives an e-mail from a John Doe asking if this would be her next case. Jessica r After A Rocky Start, A Good ReadThe novel opens with the vicious murder of a young mother with her child upstairs. Now, twenty-five years later, the heroine, a private investigator Jessica Shaw, is sitting in a small diner looking for another job by reviewing missing persons to see if any interests her. She believes that missing adults fell into two categories, dead or didn’t want to be found. While searching she receives an e-mail from a John Doe asking if this would be her next case. Jessica reviewed it and discovered a third category that she had never considered. The novel takes off as Jessica drives to the Eagle Rock area of Los Angeles where all those years ago, the murder occurred.Jessica found quite a few people who remember the events of that era. She also finds much unwanted attention from a Black SUV and a reporter working the same story. Then, a second storyline starts with the brutal murder of a young Asian coed in a seedy motel. The main storylines take off from here.The main storylines proceed and merge and diverge. There are twists and turns as Jessica tries to find out about who she is, and the murder investigation proceeds. After the start, the novel did capture my attention, and I enjoyed reading it through to the end.The B-storyline essentially develops as the Jessica storyline proceeds. The reader learns what her questions about herself are, and how she discovers the answers. Unfortunately, some of her present personality is not explained especially her use of snarky remarks. The rocky start refers to the second chapter where the heroine, Jessica, is introduced. Her remarks about the waitress were overly snarky. I have a thick skin as, after all this is a fictional character, but this language pierced my thick skin. I was bothered by it. After this chapter, Jessica’s snarky remarks lowered to a level that didn’t bother me.There are two violent scenes but the violence wasn’t emphasized. While the main storylines had major figures, both male and female, involved prostitution. There is only one situation that was starting to get out of control sexually, but it stopped abruptly. There are a few f-bombs and other lesser vulgar language. I believe that unless the reader is very sensitive, the above would not pose an issue to enjoy reading this novel.What I liked is that I was caught up with the main storyline and with each reveal, I was thinking what did this information meant that I needed to change my opinion of who was responsible for what. At the end, all of the loose ends were all tied up. The last loose end was tied up literally on the last page of the novel. The editing was good with only one questionable incident where the press photographers were using flash bulbs! What I did not like was provided above.Overall, the novel did capture my attention which is my major criteria for a high star rating. The rocky start and the over use of snarky remarks did not allow me to rate it with five starts. I rate it with four stars. If the issues I described do not pose a problem for the reader, this novel can be an enjoyable read. I do recommend reading this novel.
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  • Schuyler Wallace
    January 1, 1970
    Lisa Gray is a Scottish writer who started her career by freezing her butt off as a football (soccer, in Europe) reporter for 14 years before settling in as a content writer for a national newspaper. Her first book, “Thin Air,” is well done and the first of what promises to be interesting reading about sassy Jessica Shaw, a tattooed and pierced private detective, who investigates missing persons, an familiar occupation to crime story readers but with a new persona.Shaw discovers a photo of a thr Lisa Gray is a Scottish writer who started her career by freezing her butt off as a football (soccer, in Europe) reporter for 14 years before settling in as a content writer for a national newspaper. Her first book, “Thin Air,” is well done and the first of what promises to be interesting reading about sassy Jessica Shaw, a tattooed and pierced private detective, who investigates missing persons, an familiar occupation to crime story readers but with a new persona.Shaw discovers a photo of a three-year-old kidnapped little girl from twenty-five years ago. She realizes the photo is of herself. Desperate for answers to the mystery about her own life, she heads for the gritty streets of Los Angeles. She discovers that her biological mother was murdered the night of her kidnapping but the case has been all but forgotten by the LAPD. She continues her search.She meets up with LAPD detective Jason Pryce, who’s in the middle of his own current murder case, and she realizes he is reluctant to talk with her and appears to be hiding something about her mother’s killing and her own kidnapping. As she works to uncover the secrets behind her family history, she finds darkness lurking there along with almost unbearable pain. She finds herself getting more and more entangled in murky memories and grimy people having their own secrets.In Gray, I found a writer who really immerses herself in her story. She gets the words right and the emotions jump off the pages to grab the reader. As an early reader she was really into crime fiction and wanted to write the genre. However, as many writers do, she was talking about it more than actually putting words to paper. Her biggest fear was of failing until she realized that it was worse to not even try. Her manuscript, after being rejected time and again, was eventually shuttered in a drawer. After subsequent efforts at writing were unsuccessful, she pulled up the original, saw what she was doing wrong, corrected it, and this time, when submitted, it was well received and published. I’m glad because patience has revealed a promising career.
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  • Zita
    January 1, 1970
    A captivating involved, complex mystery…This is the first book in the Jessica Shaw series that be read as a stand-alone.The blurb is quite informative so I won’t elaborate further on the plot other than to say it was an involved, complex, mystery with many secrets seeking the light of day, inclusive of the past and the present. What captured my attention about the blurb was the coincidence implied in it. What is the probability that a person would be of the profession concentrating on missing pe A captivating involved, complex mystery…This is the first book in the Jessica Shaw series that be read as a stand-alone.The blurb is quite informative so I won’t elaborate further on the plot other than to say it was an involved, complex, mystery with many secrets seeking the light of day, inclusive of the past and the present. What captured my attention about the blurb was the coincidence implied in it. What is the probability that a person would be of the profession concentrating on missing persons and then find they are one themselves? I found that an intriguing thought which brought to mind that this heroine was always destined to find the truth that had been hidden from her. There are many lies in life but some lies inevitably seek exposure.Private Investigator Jessica Shaw was lost after her father’s death and she traveled the country finding the missing. Why she got into this aspect of the profession was never revealed. It had always just been the two of them, her mother having died when she was a child and she has no memories of her. Seeing a picture of a missing child from years ago that she immediately recognizes as herself her world is again upended and Jessica has no choice but to embark on what turns out to be a dangerous journey seeking the answer to who she really is. And there was someone directing her to what she needed to know. Will they turn out to be friend or foe? Being so alone it would be wise of her to trust no one.The heroine was strong, intelligent, with a sassy nature yet she was emotionally vulnerable due to her personal loss and the shock of the revelation about her very beginnings. But she’s a survivor who coped with what was thrown at her better than most would. She exhibited much growth and a persistence in solving the puzzle of her life even if it meant damaging the image in her mind of the father that she loved. The disclosure at the end was the perfect ending. This was a new author for me and I look forward to the next book in this series, I want to see where Jessica goes next.An advanced reading copy was obtained from Amazon’s First Reads program.4.5 stars
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  • Adam Richard
    January 1, 1970
    The premise of this book is compelling. A private detective is sent a missing persons case, that turns out to be her! While it is set in Los Angeles, which is de rigueur for neo-noir, and which this is squarely attempting to be, it feels less like the lived-in LA of Connell's Bosch novels, and more like the LA you see on TV, making it feel more like a pastiche of a modern crime novel, rather than an actual entry in the genre.All of this is not to say it isn't a thoroughly enjoyable novel, and I The premise of this book is compelling. A private detective is sent a missing persons case, that turns out to be her! While it is set in Los Angeles, which is de rigueur for neo-noir, and which this is squarely attempting to be, it feels less like the lived-in LA of Connell's Bosch novels, and more like the LA you see on TV, making it feel more like a pastiche of a modern crime novel, rather than an actual entry in the genre.All of this is not to say it isn't a thoroughly enjoyable novel, and I got the A-ha! moment of the mystery at exactly the moment the author wanted me to. Jessica Shaw is a character with potential, but I wonder how much I'll care about her when she's not investigating a case that is so integral to who she is as a person?The dialogue is a little unimaginative, and cliched at times, and the rest of the prose, while it has the efficiency that is the hallmark of the LA neo-noir crime novel, it has none of the urgency. I also had trouble discerning which male character was which based solely on their very forgettable names. Few of them had a nickname or a distinguishing feature, and I had to flip back through the book (well, click on the name and hit search) to jog my memory of which men were relevant to which other characters. The women were all incredibly distinct, however, but there are only a handful of them, including the protagonist, and two of them are murder victims whose tales are told in flashback chapters (they're dead at the start of the novel, I'm not spoiling anything here...) If I was giving notes to Lisa Gray, I'd tell her to make the living characters as vital and interesting as the victims. I know I've had a lot of gripes, but it's not a bad book, but it's not amazing either. It's the kind of thing you could read on a holiday or a long flight and happily disengage your brain with. I didn't hate it (like another book I got from the first reads list) but I didn't love it either.
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  • Caotico09
    January 1, 1970
    Thin Air follows Jessica Shaw- a transient alcoholic who makes a living as a private investigator. One day, while looking through missing persons reports (for reasons that are not revealed), she sees a picture of a little girl who vanished 20+ years ago. Jessica immediately knows that the girl is herself... because like who believes in Occams razor nowadays. Jokes, and minor plot holes aside, Thin Air is a pretty average mystery. If the synopsis sounds interesting, you will probably like it. If Thin Air follows Jessica Shaw- a transient alcoholic who makes a living as a private investigator. One day, while looking through missing persons reports (for reasons that are not revealed), she sees a picture of a little girl who vanished 20+ years ago. Jessica immediately knows that the girl is herself... because like who believes in Occams razor nowadays. Jokes, and minor plot holes aside, Thin Air is a pretty average mystery. If the synopsis sounds interesting, you will probably like it. If you want perfect writing and tight error-proof plots, then look elsewhere.Positives:+ Characters. Jessica is interesting. I liked the setup with the journalist as well.+ General Plot Arc. Neutral:+/- Short. Not a ton of leads etc. Minimum investigations and suspects.Negatives:- Plot holes. Un-explained actions. Cops doing stuff without warrants. etc.- Writing. The writing is not bad. But it could stand improvement. The two reoccurring issues that stood out to me were, 1) Off/on mechanical writing, Jessica did x, then did y, then did z. 2) Misplaced descriptions. This was something that i saw in almost every chapter. While the descriptions themselves were fine, their placement in the novel messed up the flow.For example: (jessica is on a phone call) "What was the name of the school?"The line was already dead.Jessica booted up her laptop. No one tried to jimmy the door or pick the lock during the night as far as she could tell.In this example the description/world building details have no connection to the two previous paragraphs or to the starting sentence of that paragraph. There is no transition. This information would of worked better before the phone call, or after a transition sentence.
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  • Frankie
    January 1, 1970
    A fast-paced mystery-thriller from a talented new author.Originally, I was very intrigued when I had first heard of this debut novel. This is an honest review in receiving a giveaway. Thanks to goodreads and the author, I had an amazing time reading this and look forward to the next book in this new series involving Jessica Shaw!I’m a whodunnit fan who is always looking for a new mystery-thriller or police procedural series. The intriguing synopsis of “Thin Air” piqued my curiosity and interest. A fast-paced mystery-thriller from a talented new author.Originally, I was very intrigued when I had first heard of this debut novel. This is an honest review in receiving a giveaway. Thanks to goodreads and the author, I had an amazing time reading this and look forward to the next book in this new series involving Jessica Shaw!I’m a whodunnit fan who is always looking for a new mystery-thriller or police procedural series. The intriguing synopsis of “Thin Air” piqued my curiosity and interest. The strong, smart and compelling protagonist—missing persons PI Jessica Shaw—drew me into the story. I was hooked when Jessica discovered that she had been reported as a missing person 25 years ago, in Los Angeles.She always thought her beloved dad, who died two years ago, was her only family. He’d lied to her. Her life in Queens, New York was built on lies.As Jessica heads to Los Angeles, LAPD Detectives Jason Pryce and Vic Medina are investigating the brutal murder of a young woman in Hollywood. Jessica sees detective Pryce talking to reporters on TV news, and she remembers seeing him at her father’s funeral in NY. How is Pryce connected to her dad?This well-written mystery-thriller is intricately plotted to keep the twists coming. There are a few dubious coincidences, but this fast-paced book kept me reading.Note to readers who don’t like present tense books: only the prologue is present tense.Freddie MachineBtw, soon as I recieved this, I devoured it in one day. That's how much I enjoyed it!!
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  • Peggy Sah
    January 1, 1970
    I got five chapters in before I had to stop. Jessica is the epitome of "cynical female detective" stereotypes: she's running away from something in her past, she's drifting along looking for odd jobs to pay the bills, she stays at a motel where all she needs is a "soft bed and hard liquor." She "doesn't play by the rules." I found her characterization to be incredibly thin for the main character that I, presumably, should be invested in.I also found the mystery to be thin. I have not guessed who I got five chapters in before I had to stop. Jessica is the epitome of "cynical female detective" stereotypes: she's running away from something in her past, she's drifting along looking for odd jobs to pay the bills, she stays at a motel where all she needs is a "soft bed and hard liquor." She "doesn't play by the rules." I found her characterization to be incredibly thin for the main character that I, presumably, should be invested in.I also found the mystery to be thin. I have not guessed who the murderer is at this point because I, frankly, do not care. The premise sounds spectacular but I'm not sold on the emotional impact that it has on the MC and the author has failed to make the mystery more interesting as she reveals more details.(view spoiler)[In fact, it seems like several hook moments that should pull me deeper into the mystery were ruined by the pacing. Oh, it turns out her mother did not just pass away but was murdered??? Well, the prologue told me that. Also, it doesn't speak well to Jessica that she couldn't figure that out. It's probably the first thing that comes up on google.I haven't gotten there yet, but at some point the author is going to tie together the threads of Lisa Ong and Jessica's childhood and it will land like a relief (oh, finally, I know why I'm reading about this other girl at all--presumably they share a murderer in common) rather than a tantalizing new detail about the mystery. (hide spoiler)]
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  • Hillary
    January 1, 1970
    Maybe 2.5 stars? I enjoy a good mystery/detective story from time to time. The two interwoven stories were promising, and as this was an Amazon first read for May, I decided to go for it.My first impression? There was some good suspense, and cliffhanging ends of chapters.My second impression? The story primarily takes place in LA, but it's clear an English author wrote this. (Turns out she's a Scot.) How do I know? From the multiple Britishisms throughout the book. For something that is supposed Maybe 2.5 stars? I enjoy a good mystery/detective story from time to time. The two interwoven stories were promising, and as this was an Amazon first read for May, I decided to go for it.My first impression? There was some good suspense, and cliffhanging ends of chapters.My second impression? The story primarily takes place in LA, but it's clear an English author wrote this. (Turns out she's a Scot.) How do I know? From the multiple Britishisms throughout the book. For something that is supposed to be quintessentially American, it's pretty off. Where was the editor? Americans receive a package in the mail, not a "parcel." Americans don't talk about "that lot," but rather a bunch, or a group or a pile, etc. Very few Americans call their mother "mum." Of course, I had no problem understanding, but it all just rang false.The writing was a bit clunky, too. Everything detail was explained, just in case the reader couldn't figure it out on her own (or "work it out"). And the older character, the mail carrier who remembered Eleanor, talked like a novelist. Not that a mail carrier can't have that kind of vocabulary and speaking style, but it's not common.And why is the title "Thin Air?" What's the connection?So, the price was right, the ending was fairly satisfying and I'm not at all a fan of the writing.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    Gotta admit, didn't see that comingI'm not sure what I feel about the ending, but overall, an interesting story. Two seemingly unrelated mysteries that intersect. A murder and kidnapping that was never solved twenty five years ago and a murder of a young college girl with no ties to the woman killed long ago. A police officer assigned to one case, but linked to the older one. Jessica was struggling to get past the death of her father, as a result, she leads a nomadic lifestyle. She uprooted hers Gotta admit, didn't see that comingI'm not sure what I feel about the ending, but overall, an interesting story. Two seemingly unrelated mysteries that intersect. A murder and kidnapping that was never solved twenty five years ago and a murder of a young college girl with no ties to the woman killed long ago. A police officer assigned to one case, but linked to the older one. Jessica was struggling to get past the death of her father, as a result, she leads a nomadic lifestyle. She uprooted herself from home with only the barest essentials, traveling around solving missing persons cases. As a PI, she isn't tied to any one location so when an anonymous email indicates that she herself was a kidnapped child, she finds herself partnering with a reporter to learn the circumstance around her real mother's death and if the man who raised her was innocent of any wrongdoing.I had a hard time really connecting with her. I understand loss and loneliness, but she didn't want to let anyone in. Now Holliday, him I understood. The snake. She was warned to be careful with him. He wasn't a murderer, but still. Then when she is ready to change, she picks the wrong person to try to connect with. A complete about face from what we knew of her. That just really surprised me. I would have thought Pryce was a better fit.The clues where there, but I didn't put them together until literally right when she opened the door to the killer. The pace was good and kept me reading so yes, I did actually enjoy the story, but just wish Jessica wasn't still wandering alone.
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  • M
    January 1, 1970
    A fast-paced mystery-thriller from a talented new author. I’m a whodunnit fan who is always looking for a new mystery-thriller or police procedural series. The intriguing synopsis of “Thin Air” piqued my curiosity and interest. The strong, smart and compelling protagonist—missing persons PI Jessica Shaw—drew me into the story. I was hooked when Jessica discovered that she had been reported as a missing person 25 years ago, in Los Angeles.She always thought her beloved dad, who died two years ago A fast-paced mystery-thriller from a talented new author. I’m a whodunnit fan who is always looking for a new mystery-thriller or police procedural series. The intriguing synopsis of “Thin Air” piqued my curiosity and interest. The strong, smart and compelling protagonist—missing persons PI Jessica Shaw—drew me into the story. I was hooked when Jessica discovered that she had been reported as a missing person 25 years ago, in Los Angeles.She always thought her beloved dad, who died two years ago, was her only family. He’d lied to her. Her life in Queens, New York was built on lies. As Jessica heads to Los Angeles, LAPD Detectives Jason Pryce and Vic Medina are investigating the brutal murder of a young woman in Hollywood. Jessica sees detective Pryce talking to reporters on TV news, and she remembers seeing him at her father’s funeral in NY. How is Pryce connected to her dad? This well-written mystery-thriller is intricately plotted to keep the twists coming. There are a few dubious coincidences, but this fast-paced book kept me reading. Note to readers who don’t like present tense books: only the prologue is present tense. 4.5 stars bumped up to 5
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  • Ryan
    January 1, 1970
    Jessica Shaw - Is a missing persons Detective. One day while going through files at a local diner she recieves am email from a John Doe. Upon opening the email she notices it is the mussing person's file of a 2-3 year old child named Alicia Lavelle. Looking at the childs picture Jessica goes into shock as the child in the photo is her. How can this be ? How is she listed as missing when she is right there ? Was her entire life a lie & Tpny Shaw not her real father ? Holliday - A journalist w Jessica Shaw - Is a missing persons Detective. One day while going through files at a local diner she recieves am email from a John Doe. Upon opening the email she notices it is the mussing person's file of a 2-3 year old child named Alicia Lavelle. Looking at the childs picture Jessica goes into shock as the child in the photo is her. How can this be ? How is she listed as missing when she is right there ? Was her entire life a lie & Tpny Shaw not her real father ? Holliday - A journalist whp offers to help Jessica solve the murder of Eleanor Lavelle as well as the disappearance of her daughter Alicia. But there is a catch he will only give her the files if she tells him what she knows. Will Jessica help him ? Can he be trusted ? Who really is this Holliday guy ? What happens when each of them get closer to the truth ? Is Jessica really Tony Shaw & Eleanor Lavelle's daughter ? Why was Elenor murdered ? This is a great read and I highly recommend it.
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  • Tere Fredericks
    January 1, 1970
    Mysteries Don't Get Any Better What a deal Prime First can be. This was my choice for May 2019. An excellent choice I believe.Jessica Shaw is a private investigator. When her best friend/father died, her life in the town where she grew up died as well. Jessica takes to the road, finding enough work to get her to her next place, wherever that may be.She gets an email from an unknown source (what are the odds John Doe is the sender's real name?) that turns her world upside down.As she tries to mak Mysteries Don't Get Any Better What a deal Prime First can be. This was my choice for May 2019. An excellent choice I believe.Jessica Shaw is a private investigator. When her best friend/father died, her life in the town where she grew up died as well. Jessica takes to the road, finding enough work to get her to her next place, wherever that may be.She gets an email from an unknown source (what are the odds John Doe is the sender's real name?) that turns her world upside down.As she tries to make sense of the email, she ends up in the grimier side of the town where, hopefully, she will get answers. And she does get answers, which raise deeper and, perhaps, life and death questions.An absolute maze of a mystery. Just when you agree with the protagonist as to what really happened when she was a baby, a crumb, a morsel is given for understanding that nothing known was true.I hope to see another Jessica Shaw book very soon. I like her style.
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    Thin Air by Lisa Gray has an intriguing premise: a message about investigating a missing child leads PI Jessica Shaw on an investigation that is intensely personal.from description: Private investigator Jessica Shaw is used to getting anonymous tips. But after receiving a photo of a three-year-old kidnapped from Los Angeles twenty-five years ago, Jessica is stunned to recognize the little girl as herself.Shifting points of view keep the reader adding information a little at a time.Thin Air was a Thin Air by Lisa Gray has an intriguing premise: a message about investigating a missing child leads PI Jessica Shaw on an investigation that is intensely personal.from description: Private investigator Jessica Shaw is used to getting anonymous tips. But after receiving a photo of a three-year-old kidnapped from Los Angeles twenty-five years ago, Jessica is stunned to recognize the little girl as herself.Shifting points of view keep the reader adding information a little at a time.Thin Air was an Amazon Prime First Read book. The author has a second book planned, and I'd be interested in seeing what happens next in Jessica's life. I had a few problems with Jessica's character, but the mystery kept my interest. I'm curious to see what I think of Jessica and of the writing in the next book. Mystery/Private Detective. June 1, 2019. Print length: 288 pages.
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  • S.M.Eves
    January 1, 1970
    Reality of lifeI was absolutely lying on the edge of my bed I was very ill, when I read this ,,what could be reality. How folk lick against life because of his life has treated them with harder times than others. It is going on in the younger generation these dzys, so very sad for them but so hurtful to those they kick against.Thank you for the magnificent plot and reality written. It made me sit up and wonder about many every day horrors that are going on and how young folk can be helped to tun Reality of lifeI was absolutely lying on the edge of my bed I was very ill, when I read this ,,what could be reality. How folk lick against life because of his life has treated them with harder times than others. It is going on in the younger generation these dzys, so very sad for them but so hurtful to those they kick against.Thank you for the magnificent plot and reality written. It made me sit up and wonder about many every day horrors that are going on and how young folk can be helped to tunnel their strong hatred into getting a better life for themselves. So many people are helping in many ways with success but there are so many confused young people with no thought for their future.Please write another book but with some advice e what many people would appreciate.Thank you so much for writing this book.
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