Can't Hurt Me
For David Goggins, childhood was a nightmare — poverty, prejudice, and physical abuse colored his days and haunted his nights. But through self-discipline, mental toughness, and hard work, Goggins transformed himself from a depressed, overweight young man with no future into a U.S. Armed Forces icon and one of the world's top endurance athletes. The only man in history to complete elite training as a Navy SEAL, Army Ranger, and Air Force Tactical Air Controller, he went on to set records in numerous endurance events, inspiring Outside magazine to name him “The Fittest (Real) Man in America.” In Can't Hurt Me, he shares his astonishing life story and reveals that most of us tap into only 40% of our capabilities. Goggins calls this The 40% Rule, and his story illuminates a path that anyone can follow to push past pain, demolish fear, and reach their full potential.

Can't Hurt Me Details

TitleCan't Hurt Me
Author
ReleaseDec 4th, 2018
PublisherLioncrest Publishing
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Biography, Self Help, Psychology, Personal Development

Can't Hurt Me Review

  • Christopher Lei
    January 1, 1970
    David Goggins has become the ideal in which I measure my own character and discipline. He basically has done what Jordan Peterson prescribes in his teachings in the most badass way possible. Wisdom and courage personified.
  • Tim
    January 1, 1970
    Warning: I think I missed something and, as a result, this review will not be popular.I appreciate the fact this book recharged me. It forced me to take a look around and realize where I am taking short cuts. For that, I am grateful for the individual stories of grit and determination.However, I started this book expecting, as the publisher promised, "...a path that anyone can follow to...reach their full potential." When I finished, I found that the book was only one dimensional. The stories de Warning: I think I missed something and, as a result, this review will not be popular.I appreciate the fact this book recharged me. It forced me to take a look around and realize where I am taking short cuts. For that, I am grateful for the individual stories of grit and determination.However, I started this book expecting, as the publisher promised, "...a path that anyone can follow to...reach their full potential." When I finished, I found that the book was only one dimensional. The stories demonstrate how the author achieved his full potential physically. Is that the author's full potential? What about the areas where this didn't work? Are we not going to talk about his two failed marriages? Are we not going to talk about how he failed to achieve his dreams in both the SEALs and an elite Army unit? Are we not going to talk about how most of the situations he found himself in were a result of lack of preparation? Specialization at the cost of everything else does not impress me. What impresses me is full potential in every domain. It's the individuals who never achieve the success the author did in one domain, but who are operating at full potential across every aspect of life. Show me the path of someone who excels at their job, raises their children right, contributes to their community, demonstrates classical virtues, loves their spouse, and still achieves physical goals. I want to know what path they are on.
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  •  Sarah Lumos
    January 1, 1970
    OH MY GOSH!!! DAMN. This book was such an unexpected treasure and I am shocked it does not have more ratings. Guys, you need to read this book. It was one of the best books I have ever read. I would recommend giving the audiobook a try. It is part audiobook and part podcast. In between chapters, Goggins actually gives new insight and commentaries on his extraordinary life.Goggins was not meant to amount to much. He was supposed to become another statistic. Instead, through sheer work ethic and w OH MY GOSH!!! DAMN. This book was such an unexpected treasure and I am shocked it does not have more ratings. Guys, you need to read this book. It was one of the best books I have ever read. I would recommend giving the audiobook a try. It is part audiobook and part podcast. In between chapters, Goggins actually gives new insight and commentaries on his extraordinary life.Goggins was not meant to amount to much. He was supposed to become another statistic. Instead, through sheer work ethic and will power, he became a Navy Seal, motivational speaker, and athlete. This is not your typical self-help book. I love reading self-help books like this because you know they came from a person who has lived through the struggle. He is a living example of everything he talks about in this book.I love and admire Goggins's passion, grit, and resilience. His ability to push past discomfort to be all that he can be is astounding. I know I am raving about this book like crazy, but it really was life changing. Like, OH MY GOSH!!!Anybody can benefit from this book. For instance, I was reading this book from the perspective of a student who really wants a career in academia. If I wanted to pursue something like that, it would require great self-discipline and focus. This book helped me see how I can push past discomfort to achieve my goals.I am serious when I say this book changed my life, and I know I will listen to it again in the future. I want to better absorb all the wisdom Goggins has to offer his readers. A phenomenal, life-changing book that everyone should listen to. I could not stop listening to it and I dreaded it being over. You know a book is good when you want it to last forever. :)
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  • *Swaroop*
    January 1, 1970
    "The Can't Hurt Me" mentality!"From the time you take birth, you become eligible to die... You also become eligible to become a warrior. I hope you are ready! It's time to go to war!!"Can't Hurt Me is all about, as the subtitle of the book states, mastering the mind and defying the odds. This book is the inspiring story of David Goggins - his struggle during childhood, hardwork and perseverance to become a Navy Seal and Army Ranger, faith and belief in himself while overcoming severe health chal "The Can't Hurt Me" mentality!"From the time you take birth, you become eligible to die... You also become eligible to become a warrior. I hope you are ready! It's time to go to war!!"Can't Hurt Me is all about, as the subtitle of the book states, mastering the mind and defying the odds. This book is the inspiring story of David Goggins - his struggle during childhood, hardwork and perseverance to become a Navy Seal and Army Ranger, faith and belief in himself while overcoming severe health challenges - and many more life lessons.Just a heads up : this is a straightforward and raw account, hence be prepared for multiple usages of the f*word. A should-be-read memoir."The most important conversations you have are the ones you have with yourself."
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  • John
    January 1, 1970
    Amazing life story. I've been soaking up all I can about David Goggins since I first saw him on Joe Rogan in August 2018. The audiobook is great: part book, part podcast... There are some extra stories in the audio version that are not in the printed book, which comes out on Dec. 4.Thank you, David!
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  • Gareth Otton
    January 1, 1970
    I'm of two minds about this book. On the one hand, it's an inspiring story of a man who has overcome a lifetime of struggle and proved that you can do anything if you're willing to push yourself. In the first half of the book especially this was a message that resonated with me and made me think about David Goggins as a man to look up to. On the other hand, it's a cautionary tale of a man who is so stubborn he can not learn from his past mistakes. He is constantly going into situations underprep I'm of two minds about this book. On the one hand, it's an inspiring story of a man who has overcome a lifetime of struggle and proved that you can do anything if you're willing to push yourself. In the first half of the book especially this was a message that resonated with me and made me think about David Goggins as a man to look up to. On the other hand, it's a cautionary tale of a man who is so stubborn he can not learn from his past mistakes. He is constantly going into situations underprepared and then pushing his body past the point of sanity in order to accomplish a goal and seemingly expecting applause for that. Were he in some life or death situation then I might just give him said applause, but instead, he is always just trying to prove something to himself which is a really unhealthy way to go through life. Overall there were two main lessons to take from Mr Goggins story. One is that if you really put your mind to a task you can achieve the impossible. The second is that there is nothing admirable about taking the path of highest resistance just for the sake of personal pride. Yes, Mr Goggins has achieved amazing things, but there are others who have achieved similar results in a more intelligent and healthy way. In the end, I came in exactly on the halfway mark in regards to how I felt about this book and I have rounded up for the sake of not wanting to give this book a 2-star review. One final note is a comment on the audiobook. Mr Goggins made the decision to insert multiple interludes that feature the narrator interviewing him. These were interesting at first but soon grew really tiresome. They felt really self-serving as each one went along the lines of the narrator expressing how in awe of David Goggins he was, and David Goggins expressing yet again how hard it was for him to achieve his goals. I could have done without 50% of these as well.
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  • Paul Petrone
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book in one day. Certainly is interesting.That said, I worry about the message. I agree with his point - to a point. But life isn’t always about just pushing yourself to the point of breakdown. It’s also about acceptance.In the last chapter, he does talk about that. But I still think he has more to go in his journey in life. He’s accomplished a lot and has done a lot of good and I sincerely thank him for his service - but I hope for his own sake he finds true inner peace.Until he doe I read this book in one day. Certainly is interesting.That said, I worry about the message. I agree with his point - to a point. But life isn’t always about just pushing yourself to the point of breakdown. It’s also about acceptance.In the last chapter, he does talk about that. But I still think he has more to go in his journey in life. He’s accomplished a lot and has done a lot of good and I sincerely thank him for his service - but I hope for his own sake he finds true inner peace.Until he does, I caution against following his advice blindly. It’s good, but only good to a point. Also rage shouldn’t fuel you - the most successful people transcend that and are fueled by love (sounds cheesy I know but it’s true).
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  • John
    January 1, 1970
    This book is the epitome of "pulling yourself up by your own bootstraps". A decade ago when he burst onto the ultra racing scene I found Goggin's story a powerful paradigm shift in my own life. It's a testimony to what's possible, an assault on absolutely ANY excuses you can invent, and a challenge to do likewise!Don't just read this book, but when you put it down, apply the same mindset! Use it to fight your own battles and overcome your own limitations...
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  • Jarrod Kane
    January 1, 1970
    Pain =/= gain.This book is only about pushing past pain, taking pain meds, and constantly being in unbelievably stupid situations purely because he thinks "Pain" = gain.There are multiple times where if others were not around to save him, he would have died.I gave the first 25% of the book a benefit of the doubt that Goggins would get smarter, but as the book and his life progressed what you're reading is a story about someone who is never prepared, and always just pushing through pain even to h Pain =/= gain.This book is only about pushing past pain, taking pain meds, and constantly being in unbelievably stupid situations purely because he thinks "Pain" = gain.There are multiple times where if others were not around to save him, he would have died.I gave the first 25% of the book a benefit of the doubt that Goggins would get smarter, but as the book and his life progressed what you're reading is a story about someone who is never prepared, and always just pushing through pain even to his own detriment. It feels like he never actually learns.Goggins will never not take the opportunity to say that he was the first to do something.Never winning, never being the 1/40 warrior that he talks about and that's all because he does not see anything more then having to constantly push past pain as his only ability.I'm sure others will think that what he pushed through and have achieved are amazing feats of mental toughness. His pain tolerance is impressive, I won't disagree there but the fact that there's multiple times that he would have died if others had not been there for him just baffles me as to why that's a good thing?I think there are some good techniques and things that this book teaches about pushing through pain and being tough but those are not unique to this book and are better found elsewhere.
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  • Jean
    January 1, 1970
    The reason I read this book was to learn what drove a man to successfully complete the rigorous, elite training of the U.S. Navy SEALS, U.S. Army Rangers and the U. S. Air Force Tactical Air Controller (TACP).As a teen Goggins failed the Armed Service Vocational Aptitude Battery of tests twice. He tells about having to loss one hundred pounds to qualify for the SEALS’ training. He tells about using mental and physical discipline to reach his goals. First by turning his life around as a teenager The reason I read this book was to learn what drove a man to successfully complete the rigorous, elite training of the U.S. Navy SEALS, U.S. Army Rangers and the U. S. Air Force Tactical Air Controller (TACP).As a teen Goggins failed the Armed Service Vocational Aptitude Battery of tests twice. He tells about having to loss one hundred pounds to qualify for the SEALS’ training. He tells about using mental and physical discipline to reach his goals. First by turning his life around as a teenager to achieve his goal of joining the military. Second in achieving his goals in the military of being the best of the best. In some ways this is almost a self-help book rather than a memoir. A caution to readers the language can be a bit raw at times. I read this as an audiobook downloaded from Audible. The book is thirteen hours and thirty-seven minutes. Adam Skolnick does a good job narrating the book.
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  • Stefan Selea
    January 1, 1970
    MUST, absolutely must read! I do not usually leave reviews - but this may very well be the penicillin of the 21st century.Also, his podcasts with Joe Rogan are excellent (just as 99.9% of what Joe puts on YouTube is).Edit: also the audiobook has extra passages - a kind of podcast, so give that a try too.
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  • Bibliovoracious
    January 1, 1970
    A gripping memoir, and I LOVE it when authors swear up and down like they would in conversation, but I suppose we can give Adam Skolnick credit for preserving that authenticity in the voice.I'm not down with the philosophy, though. This is the story of an elite athlete and a man who has tempered his mind to endure extreme pain, but it read like a horror story or cautionary tale to me. I don't want to do those things, be like that, think like that, and I sure don't want to be in a relationship wi A gripping memoir, and I LOVE it when authors swear up and down like they would in conversation, but I suppose we can give Adam Skolnick credit for preserving that authenticity in the voice.I'm not down with the philosophy, though. This is the story of an elite athlete and a man who has tempered his mind to endure extreme pain, but it read like a horror story or cautionary tale to me. I don't want to do those things, be like that, think like that, and I sure don't want to be in a relationship with someone who does (seems neither did his wives). I don't want to be at war with myself, have a calloused mind, and certainly not to have an "unrelenting voice in my head". I just have different goals, and they include mental peace and human connection.
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  • Marc
    January 1, 1970
    This is THE BOOK if you want to conquer yourself, your mind and personally achieve what you're been meaning to achieve. This is THE BOOK if you want to become a tough ass motherfucker. I first heard of David Goggins somewhere in 2016 when Jesse Itzler promoted his book about living with a Navy SEAL and thought to myself "huh, that must be hard" and didn't think about it for longer. THEN, in 2017 I randomly found an interview with him on a Tom Bilyeu. When I heard his introduction, I literally sa This is THE BOOK if you want to conquer yourself, your mind and personally achieve what you're been meaning to achieve. This is THE BOOK if you want to become a tough ass motherfucker. I first heard of David Goggins somewhere in 2016 when Jesse Itzler promoted his book about living with a Navy SEAL and thought to myself "huh, that must be hard" and didn't think about it for longer. THEN, in 2017 I randomly found an interview with him on a Tom Bilyeu. When I heard his introduction, I literally said out loud "WHAT THE FUCK? Who is this guy??". Now I was on the lookout for this dude. Then he came on Rich Roll's podcast, and holey moley, was this guy intense. But this wasn't enough and I wanted MORE. Finally David Goggins appeared on the Joe Rogan Experience (not once, but twice!) and announced he had a book coming out! I had mixed feelings about this - I've heard him tell his story multiple times and thought that the book would just be another retelling. AT THE SAME TIME, I knew he's an inspirational guy so it wouldn't hurt to get some additional motivation/inspiration. Oh man, it was not inspiration I got from this...I listened to the audiobook which had additional comments and Q&A from the ghost writer/narrator and David Goggins so I got more insight to what was going on in the story. I sort of have mixed feelings about him, now that I've heard his story. I'll start with the negative (which aren't that much of a negative). Although I understand that this is from personal experience, I couldn't help but feel like a lot of the times he went on a charade of "me me me me" and "look what an amazing feat I did that no one could". Then again, when you're writing a book about mastering YOUR OWN mind, it's impossible not to bring yourself as an example, especially when you've actually done feats like he has. And his interactions with people was quite repugnant to say the least. He has admitted to it in the book about how he behaved with other people and I understand him.Now, for the positive bits. Let me get it out of the way - David Goggins is a Badass Motherfucker. He curses like a motherfucker, runs across states and back, passes the toughest SOF trainings in three branches of the US Armed Forces (x3 Hell Weeks!). A truly inspirational story. Ever since a child, he has defied the odds and has come on top, even inspite of all the hurdles life has thrown at him. NOT ONCE, has he put himself in the fetal position and cried "boohoo poopy pants muh oppression". He implored a better technique of "taking souls" of those who come in his way of achieving whatever he wants - showing them that nothing can stop him, not even the greatest of the challenges they(instructors, racists) can think for him.I won't be paraphrasing any of his goals because one must experience this oneself, either through the book or audiobook with the comments (book first then the audiobook would be the best of combos). But I do want to share one thought that stuck with me through this. It is that this struggle is not with a finish line, there is no "finally I can rest" moment. No. This is an ongoing struggle. There can be rest points but we must always be working towards something, some goal. We can make a quick rest here and there in between but never stop. Our fuel should be our passion that we've phrased properly to ourselves and can use whenever we feel like we want to quit. Don't use motivation because that is a fleeting source of fuel. When you think you're at your endpoint, you've only done 40% of the work! You've got more in you than you think!GET AFTER IT!PS! I've read some reviews about this book that there's too much cursing. If this offends or bothers someone, then this book is not aimed towards you. Try Tony Robbins.
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  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    I love Goggins, so I picked this up as soon as I heard about it, and it went right to the top of my TBR.I wasn't exactly disappointed. The book delves into his life in ways that his various interviews and anecdotes could not, and all of that was a welcome addition to his mythos. The problem is, the interviews and stories are so good already, and cover most of the same ground, that this book wasn't enough of a step forward to be amazing.I get it. I understand that it is so much easier to hand som I love Goggins, so I picked this up as soon as I heard about it, and it went right to the top of my TBR.I wasn't exactly disappointed. The book delves into his life in ways that his various interviews and anecdotes could not, and all of that was a welcome addition to his mythos. The problem is, the interviews and stories are so good already, and cover most of the same ground, that this book wasn't enough of a step forward to be amazing.I get it. I understand that it is so much easier to hand someone a book than it is to try to get them to listen to various podcasts and watch some YouTube videos. As a strategic move, the book makes a lot of sense.Make sure to get the extra commentary from the man himself in the audio book.
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  • Mario Tomic
    January 1, 1970
    This book was amazing and captivating. It was hard to stop listening to it. I'm glad I picked up the audiobook version because of the format and the extra bits. The story is a real-world example of the hero's journey. Don't get intimated by the length, time flies when you're listening about all the crazy inspiring stuff David Goggins has been through in his life so far. I 100% recommend this book to everyone. 10/10
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  • Lady Alexandrine
    January 1, 1970
    From time to time I enjoy reading an autobiography that inspires me and gives me new ideas for personal development. “Can't Hurt Me: Master Your Mind and Defy the Odds” by David Goggins was a great choice. I found his life-story engaging and a great example of resilience and strength of a human mind. It is worth appreciation when someone shares his point of view and knowledge with others. David Goggins is a retired Navy SEAL and a formidable athlete that ran in the most challenging competitions From time to time I enjoy reading an autobiography that inspires me and gives me new ideas for personal development. “Can't Hurt Me: Master Your Mind and Defy the Odds” by David Goggins was a great choice. I found his life-story engaging and a great example of resilience and strength of a human mind. It is worth appreciation when someone shares his point of view and knowledge with others. David Goggins is a retired Navy SEAL and a formidable athlete that ran in the most challenging competitions that I have ever heard of. In the book he shares what he went through as a child and a teenager, how he fought to achieve his life goals and conquered the odds. He gives advice on how optimize your daily schedule and shares techniques how to stay focused on your aims. I liked how honest and straightforward the author’s voice and advice was. The techniques he uses to discipline the mind need practice and dedication, but they work. The book inspired me to prioritize daily tasks, to look critically at my busy schedule and to find more time for the things I love doing. Now, I am more conscious that I shouldn’t waste my time and energy on watching TV or pointless chatter when I could do something much more useful and valuable with my time. I think that many readers will find some useful piece of advice in this book.On a side note: there is quite a lot of cursing in this book, so if you really mind cursing read the book at your own peril :)
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  • Nathnael S
    January 1, 1970
    This book is the most inspiring book I have ever read. It shows what a man is capable of despite mental and physical limitations. Although I wouldn’t want to define David Goggins, he seems to be a cross of CT Fletcher and Peter Attia. Having the relentlessness of one with the intelligence of the other.I was left with awe every time I finished a chapter, the first-hand accounts in this book captured the raw intensity of the authors life vividly and the amazing progression of how his mindset chang This book is the most inspiring book I have ever read. It shows what a man is capable of despite mental and physical limitations. Although I wouldn’t want to define David Goggins, he seems to be a cross of CT Fletcher and Peter Attia. Having the relentlessness of one with the intelligence of the other.I was left with awe every time I finished a chapter, the first-hand accounts in this book captured the raw intensity of the authors life vividly and the amazing progression of how his mindset changed as he grew through his experiences. Experiences including three hell-weeks at the Navy SEALs and several ultra-long-distance races. It inspired me to sign up for my first ½ marathon and open my mind about the possibilities of what I am capable of. For all the reasons above, I give it 5 stars and highly recommend the book.
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  • Elmar Aliyev
    January 1, 1970
    As someone who experienced racism and bullying as a teen almost every single day, being called bunch of derogatory words and fighting all the time I found myself relating to some parts of Mr. Goggins story. Having to deal with all that at early age makes you wonder about a lot of things in life and dig deep. Not having enough intelligence at that age to confront them with words rather than your fists, not being able to find the right solution, makes you become someone you weren't meant to be, bu As someone who experienced racism and bullying as a teen almost every single day, being called bunch of derogatory words and fighting all the time I found myself relating to some parts of Mr. Goggins story. Having to deal with all that at early age makes you wonder about a lot of things in life and dig deep. Not having enough intelligence at that age to confront them with words rather than your fists, not being able to find the right solution, makes you become someone you weren't meant to be, but a cold, scared inside, socially awkward being and makes you feel uncomfortable in your own skin. You start to lie to everyone and first and foremost to yourself by creating a mask and hiding behind it, because it give you a sense of protection. You have a choice to make: stay that way or change. That's when “Accountability mirror” comes to play. It’s about having the courage to look at yourself at your lowest, accepting all you fears, regrets, mistakes and weaknesses, because only by accepting them we can start the journey and work on them. I have experienced this road and partly overcame it and gotten stronger by looking at that mirror and facing it by working and not hiding anymore. And I didn't even have near the same horrific childhood Mr. Goggins had, and had a lot of people supporting me, but this book is for anyone who is looking for that extra fire that they always can find within themself. This book is about pulling all those negative experiences from inside yourself and using it to reach your physical and mental potential. Break the limits that your brain sets for you and apply self discipline. Being on the constant lookout for self improvement and staying driven all the time instead of this never lasting thing we call motivation. We are either getting better or worse. Thanks to Mr. Goggins for sharing his story, which is not an easy thing to do.
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  • Philip Joubert
    January 1, 1970
    David has an awesome story but his book dragged on a bit - most likely because it's quite preachy. His core message is gold though: unlock your potential through introspective, obsession and insanely hard work. Comfort is the enemy, always be pushing harder. If you think you're at your maximum you're probably only at 40%.
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  • Sumit
    January 1, 1970
    Right from the first time I read an article about David Goggins I get very intrigued by his achievements, I considered him superhuman by what he was able to do. But after reading his story I now have even more respect for David goggins, how he took drive from so much pain and suffering and then becoming one of the world's strongest man.His story is very inspiring, he don't give fluffy BS stuff that today's so called self help gurus keep chanting. he follows different mindset which is apparent fr Right from the first time I read an article about David Goggins I get very intrigued by his achievements, I considered him superhuman by what he was able to do. But after reading his story I now have even more respect for David goggins, how he took drive from so much pain and suffering and then becoming one of the world's strongest man.His story is very inspiring, he don't give fluffy BS stuff that today's so called self help gurus keep chanting. he follows different mindset which is apparent from book. He himself is epitome of inspiration and motivation.
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  • Ludwik C. Siadlak
    January 1, 1970
    This book will not get you motivated. This book will get you DRIVEN. I do read a lot, but this book literally and absolutely changed the way I perceive my limits. Fact that David Goggins is always referring to any injury not as "I was broken" but "MY BODY was broken" completely changes the perspective. On top of that, the audiobook is amazing - listening to David and his ghostwriter commenting on each chapter is a pure added value and makes you listen even more carefully. For me, this is 10/10 b This book will not get you motivated. This book will get you DRIVEN. I do read a lot, but this book literally and absolutely changed the way I perceive my limits. Fact that David Goggins is always referring to any injury not as "I was broken" but "MY BODY was broken" completely changes the perspective. On top of that, the audiobook is amazing - listening to David and his ghostwriter commenting on each chapter is a pure added value and makes you listen even more carefully. For me, this is 10/10 book. This is the first book I've read this year (2019) and it will be extremely hard to find any other just like it. Thank you, David Goggins, for going through the sewer of your childhood to share this story with me.
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  • Lee Grant
    January 1, 1970
    While David's language is oftentimes chauvinistic, his message is positive and inclusive: Everyone can attain more than they know if they persevere through the suffering. In fact, it is consistent and deliberate suffering that allows humans to do amazing things. Through a series of reflections on his life experiences, told sometimes chronologically and other times thematically, he shares one lesson per chapter. Each chapter ends with a reiteration of the lesson, and tips for applying it to the r While David's language is oftentimes chauvinistic, his message is positive and inclusive: Everyone can attain more than they know if they persevere through the suffering. In fact, it is consistent and deliberate suffering that allows humans to do amazing things. Through a series of reflections on his life experiences, told sometimes chronologically and other times thematically, he shares one lesson per chapter. Each chapter ends with a reiteration of the lesson, and tips for applying it to the reader's life. The lessons and stories were inspirational; I found myself repeating the mantras throughout the day. I borrowed the book for a friend, and may buy it for myself to continually reference the tips.
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  • Cole Biehl
    January 1, 1970
    I have a degree in Neuroscience and Behavior, but learned more about the brain from this book!David Goggins’ life story should be read by anyone that enjoys running, pushing their own limits, and or endurance sports. He is an incredible role model and an incredibly inspiring and gifted writer. I am grateful that people like him take the time to compose their thoughts and to share them with the world. I can’t wait to apply the lessons I’ve learned in this book in my own life and journey.
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  • Alexander Temerev
    January 1, 1970
    A "self-help porn" book, a reasonably good one. The main idea I got from it is radical acceptance of your challenges and limitations. Self-pity is comforting, but rarely actionable.
  • Satish
    January 1, 1970
    This guy, this fucking guy. Man, calling him a super human is still somehow an understatement. His sheer mental toughness is awe-inspiring. From holding the record for highest no of pull-ups (4200* in 24 hrs) to completing close to 60 ultra-marathons, his tolerance to pain and mental toughness is awe-inspiring. Perhaps, the most interesting thing about him is his way of treating failures as an opportunity to learn from the mistakes. I liked his idea of After Action Reports (AARs), where he notes This guy, this fucking guy. Man, calling him a super human is still somehow an understatement. His sheer mental toughness is awe-inspiring. From holding the record for highest no of pull-ups (4200* in 24 hrs) to completing close to 60 ultra-marathons, his tolerance to pain and mental toughness is awe-inspiring. Perhaps, the most interesting thing about him is his way of treating failures as an opportunity to learn from the mistakes. I liked his idea of After Action Reports (AARs), where he notes what factors contributed to his failure and how he could improve upon them. The important thing one can learn is that, there is no substitute to struggle and pain. That is how he did it and that is how he thinks anyone will be able to do what he did.If you plan to read just one biography this year, read this.
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  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    Who cannot admire David’s story? Anyone who went through hell as a child, faced and overcame seemingly insurmountable obstacles, pushed himself to insanely extreme lengths to achieve goals, and worked hard to help others—that man or woman is worthy of acclaim. He is encouraging, motivating, positive.And there’s the other, more menacing side of the story. “Show me a hero,” F. Scott Fitzgerald once said, “and I’ll write you a tragedy.” There’s plenty of tragedy here, too. As someone who’s had two Who cannot admire David’s story? Anyone who went through hell as a child, faced and overcame seemingly insurmountable obstacles, pushed himself to insanely extreme lengths to achieve goals, and worked hard to help others—that man or woman is worthy of acclaim. He is encouraging, motivating, positive.And there’s the other, more menacing side of the story. “Show me a hero,” F. Scott Fitzgerald once said, “and I’ll write you a tragedy.” There’s plenty of tragedy here, too. As someone who’s had two failed marriages, like David, I bear those scars, as I assume he must, too. There’s the 15-year period when he cut his brother out of his life. And, as much as I admire someone who’s pushed himself emotionally, physically, and intellectually, if there’s no giving of thanks to the God who gave him his mind and body and heart, then in the end, there’s a gaping hole in the story.I don’t write any of this to judge David. We all have wounds, regrets, failures, shortcomings. God knows I do. None of us are superhuman. I’m simply at the point in my life where I’m not as impressed by extraordinary actions, but by a long, steady commitment to the ordinary. Often, it’s there that we discover the extraordinary beauty and peace in life.
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  • Cheese
    January 1, 1970
    Unfortunately I got the audio version. Couldn’t get passed the idiot voicing Goggins’ life. Only Goggins should do this and as Joe Rogan pointed out he should have narrated it. Plus it’s over 12 hours long!!I’d rather have a sound bite of Goggins just saying “get it done! Stop being a bitch!” That would be more rewarding than this audio book.
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  • Jacques Bezuidenhout
    January 1, 1970
    I first got introduced to David Goggins in Living with a SEAL: 31 Days Training with the Toughest Man on the Planet. Although I wasn't really impressed by Jesse Itzler in that book, I loved the character of Seal (whom doesn't get revealed as Goggins in the book).So I was really excited when I saw this book.I listened to the audiobook, which took on a really exciting format. It gets narrated by Adam Skolnick, but after each chapter, there is a podcast type discussion around everything that happen I first got introduced to David Goggins in Living with a SEAL: 31 Days Training with the Toughest Man on the Planet. Although I wasn't really impressed by Jesse Itzler in that book, I loved the character of Seal (whom doesn't get revealed as Goggins in the book).So I was really excited when I saw this book.I listened to the audiobook, which took on a really exciting format. It gets narrated by Adam Skolnick, but after each chapter, there is a podcast type discussion around everything that happened in the chapter. Here you got first hand description of events from Goggins, allowing you to feel what he went through and was thinking at the time. In my opinion, this made the book. If I had tot read the book and not have this context, I probably would've hated it.There are a lot of things contributing to me not liking this book as much as others.This by no means takes anything away from the struggles Goggins went through, and the achievements he had. Which is absolutely unimaginable.Also I have been going through a personal transformation for the last give or take year and a half. So a lot of the take-away information is already part of my life.Having read lots of books that has to do with endurance and the ultra marathon scene, I cannot help but to compare them. Since most of the other guys' books also has an element of personal struggle they went through.I did love the overlap of previous information I had, to expand the context around certain races/events.I could find a lot of truth in things he said, as I'm busy training for my first ultra marathon. I did tend to call out the absolutely stupid things he did as well.There is specific mention of Scott Jurek.I first got introduced to Scott in Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen and then later read his bookEat and Run: My Unlikely Journey to Ultramarathon Greatness. His book focused a lot on things going well, and didn't dig so deep into where things went wrong like Goggins did.I do like the different perspectives of the Badwater 135 race though, and how Goggins perceived Scott. I can't recall picking up anything about Goggins in Scott's book though.Another great book was Ultramarathon Man: Confessions of an All-Night Runner from Dean Karnazes. There wasn't any mention of Dean here, but they moved in the same scene, and the book is very comparable. I loved Dean's book. And if you are into these type of books, it will be worth your time.Finally I really enjoyed Goggins's concept of callusing your mind. And it rings true. I've done a book which addresses the flip side of this Endure: Mind, Body, and the Curiously Elastic Limits of Human Performance from Alex Hutchinson. This book however addresses the science behind what the limits of the human body is. And they also had some unexplained phenomena where science couldn't explain why one athlete / instance would out perform another. Which comes back to the mind, like Goggins explains it. All in all I respect Goggins for what he has achieved, and he is one badass mofo.If I have heard his story first, I probably would've been way more impressed.But I think there are a whole bunch of these badass mofos out there.For people that enjoyed the other Ultra running related books. This book is more focused on Goggins's life and what drove him to do things, and how he overcame his obstacles. Also some nice lessons on how you can apply things to your life. You will only enjoy parts of this book if you are just interested in the Ultra running part. There is more in this book related to his military career though. Going through Seals, Rangers, DevGru, Delta Force, all for the next challenge.
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  • Mitch Allan
    January 1, 1970
    An incredible story. If this doesn’t get you fired up to do something you have no pulse.
  • Pete Davis
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely mental. Shows what is achievable through will power and a strong mindset. Really enjoyed this book and David Goggins has lead and extraordinary life. 8/10
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