The Bookshop on the Shore
A grand baronial house on Loch Ness, a quirky small-town bookseller, and a single mom looking for a fresh start all come together in this witty and warm-hearted novel by New York Times bestselling author Jenny Colgan.Desperate to escape from London, single mother Zoe wants to build a new life for herself and her son Hari. She can barely afford the crammed studio apartment on a busy street where honking horns and shouting football fans keep them awake all night. If she doesn’t find a way out soon, Zoe knows it’s just a matter of time before she has a complete meltdown. On a whim, she answers an ad for a nanny job in the Scottish Highlands, which is about as far away from the urban crush of London as possible. It sounds heavenly!The job description asks for someone capable of caring for three “gifted children”, two of which behave feral wolverines. The children’s widowed father is a wreck, and the kids run wild in a huge tumbledown castle on the heather-strewn banks of Loch Ness. Still, the peaceful, picturesque location is everything London is not—and Zoe rises to the challenges of the job.With the help of Nina, the friendly local bookseller, Zoe begins to put down roots in the community. Are books, fresh air, and kindness enough to heal this broken family—and her own…?

The Bookshop on the Shore Details

TitleThe Bookshop on the Shore
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 25th, 2019
PublisherWilliam Morrow Paperbacks
ISBN-139780062850188
Rating
GenreFiction, Womens Fiction, Chick Lit, Contemporary, Romance

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The Bookshop on the Shore Review

  • Linden
    January 1, 1970
    Zoe’s a single mom with no money living in London. Her son’s father never seems to have money to help, so when she gets a job offer in Scotland as a nanny and a bookseller, she takes 4 year old Hari, who has never spoken, to the remote Scottish village. Much to her chagrin, she learns that the children have gone through at least 6 nannies in the recent past, and are determined to be rid of the 7th as soon as they can. Jenny Colgan is a great storyteller, and I enjoyed reading about Zoe’s adventu Zoe’s a single mom with no money living in London. Her son’s father never seems to have money to help, so when she gets a job offer in Scotland as a nanny and a bookseller, she takes 4 year old Hari, who has never spoken, to the remote Scottish village. Much to her chagrin, she learns that the children have gone through at least 6 nannies in the recent past, and are determined to be rid of the 7th as soon as they can. Jenny Colgan is a great storyteller, and I enjoyed reading about Zoe’s adventures.
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Goodreads giveaway win!
  • Karen Whittard
    January 1, 1970
    Jenny colgan books are always like a massive hug in book form. The kind of hug that you desperately need and when you get that hug everything is made that little bit better and that little bit more brighter. I absolutely loved this amazing book.
  • Abi
    January 1, 1970
    Single mother Zoe is desperately struggling to make ends meet in London. Her 4-year-old son Hari is perfect, except for the fact he doesn’t speak – at all. When Zoe’s landlord raises the rent on her dismal studio flat, she realises she has nowhere to turn.When an opportunity for not one but two jobs arises in Scotland, Zoe decides this could be the change she desperately needs.Faced with her new boss Ramsay, and his 3 unruly children, Zoe begins to wonder if she’s made a terrible mistake. But th Single mother Zoe is desperately struggling to make ends meet in London. Her 4-year-old son Hari is perfect, except for the fact he doesn’t speak – at all. When Zoe’s landlord raises the rent on her dismal studio flat, she realises she has nowhere to turn.When an opportunity for not one but two jobs arises in Scotland, Zoe decides this could be the change she desperately needs.Faced with her new boss Ramsay, and his 3 unruly children, Zoe begins to wonder if she’s made a terrible mistake. But the Highlands have a way of getting under your skin and in her heart, Zoe doesn’t know whether she could ever leave.Firstly, I would like to start this review by mentioning the foreword from the author. I am not a great reader of this section usually, but I find Colgan fills hers with as much fun and wit as the rest of the book. However, this particular piece really sat with me, especially this line: “If you read…It means there are more heads to be in, more lives to be lived than simply your own.”I have loved books my whole life, having started reading from an early age, books hold some of my fondest memories. One of which is snuggling down at bedtime next to my mum for a chapter of the next great adventure. As an only child and being quite introverted, I found that by devouring stories I could live exciting journeys to faraway lands from the comfort of my home. Even now as an adult following my own adventures, and being slightly less introverted, the feeling of joy that comes from meeting new characters and discovering new places has never diminished. The sheer love of books is what ultimately shines through in this story, and that’s a plot I can wholeheartedly get behind!Colgan instantly transports the reader to the Scottish Highlands in this new book, with her delectable descriptions and faultless writing style. This is a skill I admire, and find in very few authors, the ability to show you a place/environment rather than telling you. I could clearly see and feel the haar in the mornings and the late afternoon sunshine glittering on the loch.The characters have such a mishmash of personalities, that they all brought something different to the story. At first, I wasn’t sure if I was going to warm to Zoe, but once she arrived in Scotland, I found myself liking her more and more. I think she just needed some gumption! Ramsay made me angry at first, but he grew on me as we discovered more about his life, and the children were all hilarious in their own ways. Unfortunately, the only person I disliked in this book was Nina. She always seemed ungrateful and I found that grated on me throughout.I am happy that this title was more than the boy meets girl story typical of this genre. There was a thin veil of mystery that gave this book an edge over its peers, and it was highly enjoyable.** Thanks to Little, Brown Book Group (UK), via NetGalley, for this ARC ** For more reviews, please visit: https://twiabblog.wixsite.com/theworl...
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  • Alison
    January 1, 1970
    Single mum Zoe is struggling to bring up her son Hari in a tiny bedsit in Wembley so when an opportunity arises to relocate to Loch Ness, Scotland and act as au-pair to three children whilst also running a mobile bookshop she jumps at the opportunity, envisaging herself as a modern Mary Poppins reading books to rosy cheeked cherubs. The reality is somewhat different, the bookshop's customers rely heavily on the bookshop's owner Nina to know the books they want/need and Zoe is floundering. The ch Single mum Zoe is struggling to bring up her son Hari in a tiny bedsit in Wembley so when an opportunity arises to relocate to Loch Ness, Scotland and act as au-pair to three children whilst also running a mobile bookshop she jumps at the opportunity, envisaging herself as a modern Mary Poppins reading books to rosy cheeked cherubs. The reality is somewhat different, the bookshop's customers rely heavily on the bookshop's owner Nina to know the books they want/need and Zoe is floundering. The children Zoe is supposed to look after are by turns rude, insulting and appear to exist entirely on toast and marmalade, the housekeeper is surly and unhelpful and the children's father is remote and takes little interest in his children's lives.This reminds me of a book I've read before but I can't remember the name, it's also a bit like the plot of that Sophia Loren film Houseboat. The children have run off six previous au-pairs, in fact the youngest, Patrick, says he's going to call her Nanny Seven because she won't be there long enough for him to learn her name. Nine year old Mary is just plain rude and the oldest, Shackleton, is twelve but huge and seems to do nothing but eat. The children fight constantly, verbally and physically, the kitchen is antiquated and the house looks like Mrs Danvers will come round the corner any second.This was utterly charming, you can't go wrong with surly children, small towns and books! I loved Zoe, such a capable character and good mother, the children were each individually great characters and I enjoyed the plot.Recommended holiday reading.I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in return for an honest review.Bumped for release.
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  • Jasmine
    January 1, 1970
    This one surprised me a bit. I thought it would be a quick little summer romance novel with no real plotline, but i was pleasenty surprised. This book will speak to anyone who loves books! I love how often they quote lines from other great books and Authors. The way Jenny is able to make you fall in love with Scotland, with all it's scenery , characters and local quirks shows how lovely a storyteller she is. Although it's a romance, I love how she touched on mental health issues in such a sensit This one surprised me a bit. I thought it would be a quick little summer romance novel with no real plotline, but i was pleasenty surprised. This book will speak to anyone who loves books! I love how often they quote lines from other great books and Authors. The way Jenny is able to make you fall in love with Scotland, with all it's scenery , characters and local quirks shows how lovely a storyteller she is. Although it's a romance, I love how she touched on mental health issues in such a sensitive way, and tackled the different family structural dynamics we grow up in and how they affect us.Great read and I will be starting some of her others, hope they don't disappoint!
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  • Tara
    January 1, 1970
    I have yet to read a Jenny Colgan book I haven’t adored, the woman is just magic. I always get addicted from the first page and have to drag myself away to go to bed ! This is my perfect theme as a book obsessed woman, set in a bookshop. This is heartwarming as always, well written, characters you fall in love with and want to be best friends with. A thoroughly entertaining read, perfect for anytime of the year that you want to feel good.Thanks to netgalley and the publisher for a free copy for I have yet to read a Jenny Colgan book I haven’t adored, the woman is just magic. I always get addicted from the first page and have to drag myself away to go to bed ! This is my perfect theme as a book obsessed woman, set in a bookshop. This is heartwarming as always, well written, characters you fall in love with and want to be best friends with. A thoroughly entertaining read, perfect for anytime of the year that you want to feel good.Thanks to netgalley and the publisher for a free copy for an honest opinion
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  • wellreadtraveler
    January 1, 1970
    I am a huge fan of Jenny Colgan and out of the hundreds of books I’ve read over the years, The Bookshop on The Corner will always be my favorite. I’ve used it for both my book clubs, sent many copies to friends as gifts, and even made my mom a #2 fan. (In case you hadn’t guessed it I’m #1) I am big book pusher and have been told by a sweet friend of mine that when she read The Bookshop on the Corner that the main character Nina reminded her of me. What I wouldn’t give to own my very own book mob I am a huge fan of Jenny Colgan and out of the hundreds of books I’ve read over the years, The Bookshop on The Corner will always be my favorite. I’ve used it for both my book clubs, sent many copies to friends as gifts, and even made my mom a #2 fan. (In case you hadn’t guessed it I’m #1) I am big book pusher and have been told by a sweet friend of mine that when she read The Bookshop on the Corner that the main character Nina reminded her of me. What I wouldn’t give to own my very own book mobil! I started small 2 years ago with my very own Little Free Library, and then started dragging all the books I’ve read to both my book clubs to give away. Now if I can combine these two into a refurbished ice cream truck and get to sell books instead of giving them away…life long dream come true! It really is a talent to be able to match a reader with their next favorite book!I was so excited when I heard that Jenny had a new book coming out, and I was swooning big time over the title The Bookshop on the Shore. I mean can you just picture it? A cute little bookshop right across from the beach, maybe little tables outside to sit and read, a café outside. Where is this place because I’m going there! The Bookshop on the Corner fans prepare yourself, although this book is about the main character named Zoe, she travels to a little Scottish island to be a nanny and help out with a book mobile owned by the one and only Nina! Yes, the story continues with our dear Nina, the book mobil and Nina’s boyfriend Lennox. It was like being reunited with an old friend.Zoe is a single mum living in London with her little boy. With no support from Harri’s father, Zoe is forced to accept a job in the Scottish Highlands as an au pair. The family she’ll be living with has recently lost their mother and been kicked out of school due to bad behavior. No matter what they throw her way Zoe must manage because she needs the job and a place to live. Although the house is a mansion, nothing seems to work, including the children who do whatever they want all hours of the day and night. Mrs.MacGlone is the families housekeeper and grumpier then all get out! Zoe is nanny number seven, so no one really wants to invest their time in getting to know her, especially since the kids don’t even want her around! Luckily she has become friends with Nina the local book seller. Nina is in need of some help and has asked Zoe to take over for her for a short time. Zoe loves to read so this is the perfect job for her. With Harri in nursery school Zoe spends her days selling books, and her evenings taking care of the children.Zoe is determined to help these children succeed and set up some structure at home. With their father Ramsay hiding out in his library all day, Zoe has to battle with the kids to get anything done. She realizes they are hurting and feel abandon by their mother, but they have to move on. They need to learn how to cook, clean, and actually be kids and get outside and explore. She must slowly earn their trust, and prove to them that she has no plan to leave them like all the others. Zoe wants to make Nina proud by running the book mobil just like she would, but the customers all have needs that only Nina knows about. To make matters worse, Harri’s father Jaz has showed up and wants Zoe and Harri to move back to London. Zoe has fallen in love with the island and all its charm. How can she leave the children? She’ll be like all the others who have left them in the past. Zoe needs to decide what’s best for her and Harri and where they feel the most at home.The Bookshop on The Shore goes on sale June 19th. If you haven’t read The Bookshop on the Corner then go get your copy now! I know you’ll be a fan just like me!
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  • Kirsty
    January 1, 1970
    Thoroughly lovely. Exactly as expected from Jenny. I loved the new character but also loved seeing Nina again.
  • Agi
    January 1, 1970
    Zoe is a single mum, struggling to bring up her son Hari in a tiny bed-sit in Wembley. Hari is a lovely 4 - year - old boy, but he can't speak - at all. His father never seems to have money to help, so when Zoe's landlord raises the rent on the flat and then the opportunity of a job as a nanny and a bookseller in the remote Scottish village arises, she doesn't hesitate long. However, Zoe quickly learns that the three children she should look after have recently gone through 6 nannies and are det Zoe is a single mum, struggling to bring up her son Hari in a tiny bed-sit in Wembley. Hari is a lovely 4 - year - old boy, but he can't speak - at all. His father never seems to have money to help, so when Zoe's landlord raises the rent on the flat and then the opportunity of a job as a nanny and a bookseller in the remote Scottish village arises, she doesn't hesitate long. However, Zoe quickly learns that the three children she should look after have recently gone through 6 nannies and are determined to get rid of the 7th, immediately. The bookshop's customers simply rely on Nina, the owner, to know which books they want to read and Zoe has no idea. Was this a mistake to move so far away from her old life?Jenny Colgan is one of the best storytellers ever, period. Her writing style is exceptional, chatty and so natural, and there is always so much humour and wisdom in her words. Each time when reading her book I simply feel better, as if the book and characters were hugging me, making me feel better and more optimistic. It is also her unique talent to transport the reader into the setting of her stories, this time to the beautiful, wild Scottish Highlands - the descriptions are incredibly gorgeous and vivid and you immediately feel like being there, seeing rather than reading.The characters, as always, were a perfect mix of personalities, all with such distinctive voices and all bringing so much to the story. I loved reading about Zoe and Hari, even though their lives are not like a garden full of roses. I actually immediately warmed to her and she was instantly growing on me more and more. The children were simply hilarious, in their own ways, all already struck by the reality of life in different ways and Zoe is determined to help them all to get out of their shells, to enjoy life, even though it's not too easy, especially at the beginning, and she has to struggle to earn their trust. She quickly realises that the children simply feel abandon and they are hurting, and their father is so remote that he might as well not be there at all. She knows that what the children need is love and attention, and I loved how right she was in her assumptions, and how much she tried to give them boundaries, rules and love.What I also adored so much in this story is the sheer love of books and reading shining through the pages. There are so many quotes from some great books and it was brilliant, and the books really felt like characters of their own.The element of the mystery was there as well, and the author also touches upon mental health issues, of course in a sensitive, gentle way, but she also writes about those things as if they were the most normal things in the world - which they are. There is also the issue of a patchwork family dynamics, the way it can affect us all but also how much it can give us, and really, no matter what Jenny Colgan writes about, it is simply brilliant."The Bookshop on the Shore" was charming, uplifting and so incredibly poignant story with quirky and sharp characters and there is so much more to it then a simple romance: problems, troubles, mayhem and humour, struggles of being a single parent, particularly to a child with some issues, about unconditional love and simply being strong. I loved every single word of this book and I can't recommend it highly enough!Copy provided by the publisher in return for an honest review.
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  • Allison
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book. Loved! I read Book Shop on the Corner on a whim and have been making my way through Colgan’s works ever since. If you are book lover and a romance lover I am fairly certain you will love this one too. I feel like the books are a character themselves. And she has this magical way of adding these wonderful details that you didn’t even know you wanted to know. But as it turns out these details are so intensely gratifying to know it feels almost magical.
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  • Bibliothekerin
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.It is the first book I’ve read by this author, and I absolutely LOVED it. This story has it all—romance, mystery, and adventure, and an everyday man and woman who become hero and heroine to their children by facing extraordinary challenges head-on. It’s a heartwarming story, full of humor and quirky characters. I discovered that the author wrote a book before this, however (The Bookshop on the Corner), that shares the same set I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.It is the first book I’ve read by this author, and I absolutely LOVED it. This story has it all—romance, mystery, and adventure, and an everyday man and woman who become hero and heroine to their children by facing extraordinary challenges head-on. It’s a heartwarming story, full of humor and quirky characters. I discovered that the author wrote a book before this, however (The Bookshop on the Corner), that shares the same setting and many of the same characters, so I find it strange that they were not given their own series. The setting—the Highland village of Kirrinfief—and Nina—the former librarian who drives the blue book van—are the common denominators.Zoe O’Connell is a young single mother in London who makes great sacrifices to give her young son a better life. She has a University degree, but as a new mum, alone, cannot work full-time without daycare, which she cannot afford. Her job pays next to nothing, so she can barely afford a dilapidated studio flat in Wembley, Her landlord has just raised her rent so she has to move, but where?Her 4-year-old son Hari was not exactly planned, but ever since he arrived, he’s become her whole life; she can’t imagine loving anyone more. Hari’s Papa is another story. You’d have to search far and wide to find a guy more shallow and vain than Jaz. He fashions himself a DJ, though gigs are few and far between. He constantly takes selfies for instagram followers. He rarely visits Hari, who idolizes him, and this breaks Zoe’s heart. He always seems to be “skint,” unable to pay child support, yet can afford flash new clothes. When Jaz’s sister Surinder learns that she is an “Auntie-ji”, she visits London to meet her darling nephew. When she meets Zoe, she sees how tired she is, and what a dump they have to live in. She wants to help, so she asks Zoe if she likes books (yes) and would she be interested in filling in for her friend Nina in Scotland? Driving a book van in the clean air of Scotland sounds a lot better than her current life. What can she lose?Nina then hears of a part-time nanny job in Kirrinfief that offers free room & board—perfect for Zoe. So she tells Surinder, who tells Zoe, and they're off—heading to the Highlands on a bus with everything they own in two bags. When they arrive, it’s late, they’re exhausted, and “The Beeches” is the creepiest place Zoe has ever seen.The laird is Ramsay Urquart—technically a duke, but he doesn’t stand on ceremony. His three children are Shackleton, Mary, and Patrick, ages 12, 9, and 5. Zoe finds out early the next morning that (A) the dad is rarely around, (B) there is no mother (surprise!) and (C) there is no food other than toast and breakfast cereal, because that’s all the kids will eat. They live in their pajamas, in the kitchen all day, munching toast while they play games on their tablets—or fight. The reason they’re not at school? Mary was suspended for biting, and Shackleton for defending her. This is a complicated family, with some dark secrets.So before Zoe can even start driving the van for Nina, she must referee the kids and find some real food to cook for dinner—which burns, because no one told her the ancient stove was a safety hazard. There is no dishwasher, no coffee machine, and the hoover (vacuum cleaner) is ancient, as is the plumbing. There is never enough hot water, but that doesn’t bother the children because they don’t care for baths anyway. At least Zoe has a car at her disposal for trips to the village shops, and housekeeper Mrs MacGlone is there during the day.The first time Zoe tries to drive the van, it stalls and rolls backward, getting stuck in the mud. It takes five men to get it unstuck. But Nina needs Zoe, because she is enceinte, and feeling more unwell by the day. Thank God Zoe is there one day to call for help.The “part-time” nanny job takes all of Zoe’s energy, because the number of challenges is astronomical. Five-year-old boy genius Patrick, the youngest Urquart child, dubs her “Nanny Seven” because he figures she won’t last any longer than the previous six, so why bother to remember her name? Patrick is thrilled however to meet Hari, and they become fast friends. Kirrinfief may only have four streets, but it has more than its share of quirky, memorable characters. My favorite is the airy-fairy daycare provider who doesn’t believe in discipline and holds a “meditation circle”, which is about as successful as one would imagine with rambunctious preschoolers. Zoe’s situation reminded me of Maria’s in “The Sound of Music”: each has no idea of what to expect, no formal training, yet feels confident enough to meet any challenge. Each is faced with several children, who have no mother, and a father so remote he might as well not be there. Zoe, like Maria, instinctively knows that the children need love and attention more than anything, guidance from a responsible adult who will set boundaries and rules to provide structure, nourishing food, and the security of at least one parent home at all times.Zoe sees past Mary’s bad behavior to the pain she tries so desperately to hide. Mary craves a mother’s love and attention, as does Patrick. He never knew his mother, has never had a bedtime story, or a mother’s kiss goodnight. Mary wears a nightgown all day because she has outgrown most of her clothes. These kids need parents who will provide for their physical as well as their emotional needs. Parents who will always be there, and show patience and understanding.Ramsay needs help as much the kids do; he needs a partner and lover who loves his kids. Zoe does love them, and he is profoundly grateful for the extraordinary difference she has made in their lives. : Each of them has blossomed under the sunshine of her love. This story is so much more than a simple romance. There is mystery and adventure, and a boatload of memorable characters.
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  • Alison
    January 1, 1970
    It feels like forever since I've read a Jenny Colgan and I'd kind of forgotten just how much I love her writing. Like all of her novels there's something very comforting about sinking into The Bookshop on the Shore and it made for perfect holiday reading. It's a quick and easy read that's sweet and funny but it also has some depth to it, something I wasn't wholly expecting.I think I was anticipating the standard romcom fare but while there is some romance in this it's much more about family. Mai It feels like forever since I've read a Jenny Colgan and I'd kind of forgotten just how much I love her writing. Like all of her novels there's something very comforting about sinking into The Bookshop on the Shore and it made for perfect holiday reading. It's a quick and easy read that's sweet and funny but it also has some depth to it, something I wasn't wholly expecting.I think I was anticipating the standard romcom fare but while there is some romance in this it's much more about family. Main character Zoe is the struggling single mother of a four year old boy with selective mutism who ends up moving to the Scottish Highlands to work in a mobile bookshop and as an au pair for Ramsey Urquart, father of three very unruly children. Parents and children are all damaged in some way and in need of help.There's a bit of a mystery around what happened to Ramsey's wife who mysteriously disappeared a few years ago but the story very much focuses on the initially difficult relationships between Zoe, Ramsey and the children. It's a little reminiscent of Jane Eyre or The Sound of Music (both of which are jokingly referred to) but with a contemporary Scottish Highland setting. Zoe is no Jane or Maria though but I thought she was a wonderful character. There's something instantly likeable about her, she's struggling but she's absolutely devoted to son Hari and will do anything to protect him. I loved the portrayal of the bond between mother and son and I also loved how she also slowly developed relationships with each of the three Urquart children who have been allowed to run wild. There may be quite a bit of conflict between them as Zoe starts trying to set boundaries but there's also a lot of humor which I loved. I also really loved the setting and all of the local characters that Zoe meets. The descriptions make it easy to imagine yourself there (although as a Scot it's probably not too much of a stretch for me) and I could certainly recognise a lot of the bookshop customers and tourists.Where I struggled though was with Ramsey, I know he's supposed to be mysterious and distant but I'm afraid his reserved and quiet nature meant I never really warmed to him. Even now having finished the book and understanding him more, I'm still not wholly convinced I like him and I didn't really buy into the supposed connection between him and Zoe. He has reasons for being how he is but I'm not sure they really justify some of his actions.Thankfully however the focus isn't too heavily on the relationship between Ramsey and Zoe but seems to be much more about the children which I loved. Patrick stole pretty much every scene and made the whole story so warm and funny. Overall this was a wonderful read that I'd recommend to anyone looking for a cozy and warm story about families in all shapes and sizes.Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with an advance copy. This in no way influenced my review.
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  • Danielle
    January 1, 1970
    The Bookshop on the Shore continues the story of Nina Redmond, a Librarian we met in The Bookshop on the Corner. Colgan returns to the town of Kirrinfief in Scotland, but this time the story focuses on a young woman named Zoe. Zoe is a single mom to an adorable boy named Hari. She is struggling to make ends meet in London as Hari's deadbeat dad continues to come up with excuses for why he can't help take care of his son, why he can't tell his family about Hari, and why they can't make their rela The Bookshop on the Shore continues the story of Nina Redmond, a Librarian we met in The Bookshop on the Corner. Colgan returns to the town of Kirrinfief in Scotland, but this time the story focuses on a young woman named Zoe. Zoe is a single mom to an adorable boy named Hari. She is struggling to make ends meet in London as Hari's deadbeat dad continues to come up with excuses for why he can't help take care of his son, why he can't tell his family about Hari, and why they can't make their relationship work for Hari's sake. At the end of her rope and unable to afford her rent, Zoe accepts a job offer in Kirrinfief. She will be acting as au pair to a well-established, though mysterious, family while also assisting Nina with the book van. Zoe has experience working with children and loves books...plus, she's desperate, so this has to work out.So, of course, it doesn't work out at all. The children of the Urquart family are little hellions. She is not their first au pair and they want her gone. Their mother has left them and their father is absolutely no help at all and the housekeeper isn't go to throw Zoe any bones. The one redeeming factor was supposed to be helping Nina with the book ban, but the citizens of Kirrinfief don't know what they want in a book and they don't want anything Zoe suggests for them. Hari's father is still falling down on his responsibilities. Zoe's at her limits and then, things get even worse.This book is Jenny Colgan as her readers have come to expect. There's humor, there's romance, there's plenty of unexpected mayhem caused by the very nature of the Scottish weather and people. Zoe is definitely given the fish out of water treatment by the locals. Colgan conveys some of the struggle of being a single parent, particularly to a child with some peculiarities with beautiful poignancy while not weighing the story down too much. Zoe's life is hard and it wouldn't be a stretch to understand how she could give up on herself and her dreams, but you know that she will always keep fighting for Hari. This story is about a mother's unfailing love for her child and the strength of that same women when life throws everything it's got at her.The writing is clean and precise. The colloquialisms are easy to gather from context (at least they were for this American reader) and the interspersed cultural details about Scotland and it's traditions will inspire readers to want to learn more. This book is an easy read. It doesn't hit the reader over the head with the romance, and in fact I consider that the least important element to the story. Zoe is a triumph who will inspire so many people to get back up when life has bowled them over. This book was lovely while still dealing with the harsh realities many women face when it comes to motherhood and making a living.
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  • Claire Mc Partlin
    January 1, 1970
    Oh I do love a Jenny Colgan book, and the minute I started this I knew it was going to be as lovely as all her other books. Her characters are just so interesting, and we get to revisit the Scottish Highlands from one of her other books, 'The Little Shop of Happy Ever After' (or 'The Bookstore on the Corner' depending on what country you're in - dual titles being something that really irritates me so hopefully it won't happen with this book!).Zoe is a single Mum to Hari and struggling to make en Oh I do love a Jenny Colgan book, and the minute I started this I knew it was going to be as lovely as all her other books. Her characters are just so interesting, and we get to revisit the Scottish Highlands from one of her other books, 'The Little Shop of Happy Ever After' (or 'The Bookstore on the Corner' depending on what country you're in - dual titles being something that really irritates me so hopefully it won't happen with this book!).Zoe is a single Mum to Hari and struggling to make ends meet in London when her (sort of) sister-in-law (Hari's father's sister) throws her a lifeline, telling her of a job in the Highlands of Scotland, looking after some children part-time and running a book van for her friend who is pregnant and finding it too hard right now.So Zoe decides she has nothing to lose and both her and Hari travel to Scotland. But the children she is looking after are a complete nightmare, excluded from school and doing exactly what they want to do, and Nina (book van owner) isn't really that friendly to Zoe as she's finding it hard to give up the van because of her pregnancy.I felt so sorry for Zoe, she was really having a hard time and thrown in at the deep end on both jobs. But she eventually starts to win the children around, and cheer up their (pretty useless to be honest) father too, and brighten up their beautiful manor house on the edge of a loch. It sounded a fabulous location, if a bit chilly!There were a few harder-hitting issues going on too, Hari was four but not talking (very funny bit about this late in the book), and one of the nightmare children definitely had some psychotic issues, very sad as she was only nine, but as it turned out probably inherited from her Mother.One of those stories that I wanted to keep reading, but didn't want to finish. Jenny Colgan is definitely an automatic buy for me, her stories are just so fabulous! Wonderful book.
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  • gemsbooknook Geramie Kate Barker
    January 1, 1970
    ‘Desperate to escape from London, single mother Zoe wants to build a new life for herself and her son Hari. She can barely afford the crammed studio apartment on a busy street where honking horns and shouting football fans keep them awake all night. If she doesn’t find a way out soon, Zoe knows it’s just a matter of time before she has a complete meltdown. On a whim, she answers an ad for a nanny job in the Scottish Highlands, which is about as far away from the urban crush of London as possible ‘Desperate to escape from London, single mother Zoe wants to build a new life for herself and her son Hari. She can barely afford the crammed studio apartment on a busy street where honking horns and shouting football fans keep them awake all night. If she doesn’t find a way out soon, Zoe knows it’s just a matter of time before she has a complete meltdown. On a whim, she answers an ad for a nanny job in the Scottish Highlands, which is about as far away from the urban crush of London as possible. It sounds heavenly!The job description asks for someone capable of caring for three “gifted children”, two of which behave feral wolverines. The children’s widowed father is a wreck, and the kids run wild in a huge tumbledown castle on the heather-strewn banks of Loch Ness. Still, the peaceful, picturesque location is everything London is not—and Zoe rises to the challenges of the job.With the help of Nina, the friendly local bookseller, Zoe begins to put down roots in the community. Are books, fresh air, and kindness enough to heal this broken family—and her own…?’This book was beautiful.As soon as I saw this book I knew it would be my kind of book and I wasn’t wrong. I pretty much devoured this book. I was hooked from the first page and completely engrossed until the final page.Jenny Colgan did a fantastic job with this book. The writing was amazing, the characters were real, the story was wonderful and the setting was beautiful.I loved the characters in this book. The were so human and flawed and that made it so much easier to get behind them and follow their journey’s.As I said as soon as I saw this book I wanted it. Any book that contains a book shop is the book for me. The book shop or van was just the start of amazing plot points in this story. I think the way Jenny Colgan tied all of these pieces together was truly magical.Jenny Colgan’s writing has a real cinematic quality to it that made this story come to life. The characters and emotions just radiated off the pages and as for the setting and her descriptions; they just completely captivated me.This book is easily one of the best books I have read this year. If you are looking for a book to escape into then look no further.The Bookshop On The Shore by Jenny Colgan is a must read for anyone who wants to fall into a book and lose themselves completely.Geramie Kate Barkergemsbooknook.wordpress.com
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  • Sheri
    January 1, 1970
    A new book by Jenny Colgan is always a treat - there’s just something so engaging about her characters and plots, despite the formulaic titles (as Jenny herself points out in an introduction, authors don’t necessarily get to pick the titles...) So although it may sound like yet another version of Cream Buns at the Little Teashop on the Corner Next to the Bookshop of Happy Dreams, The Bookshop on the Shore was a lovely read.A sequel, of sorts, to The Little Shop of Happy Ever After (*sigh*) it fe A new book by Jenny Colgan is always a treat - there’s just something so engaging about her characters and plots, despite the formulaic titles (as Jenny herself points out in an introduction, authors don’t necessarily get to pick the titles...) So although it may sound like yet another version of Cream Buns at the Little Teashop on the Corner Next to the Bookshop of Happy Dreams, The Bookshop on the Shore was a lovely read.A sequel, of sorts, to The Little Shop of Happy Ever After (*sigh*) it features some of the same characters but revolves mainly around new characters - single mum Zoe, who is forced by circumstances to flee London and move with her non-speaking young son Hari to the Scottish Highlands, to work both as an au pair to the peculiar family at the “big house” and provide maternity cover at the eponymous bookshop. Despite the title, the bookshop doesn’t play that big of a role, with the main focus being on the family - alarming children Shackleton, Mary and Patrick, their not-really-coping dad Ramsay and mysteriously absent mother, and dour housekeeper Mrs McGlone. The bones of the plot are pure Mills and Boon, but it works. I loved Zoe, Hari and the children, especially the delightful and always entertaining Patrick. And even though there were no huge surprises about where things were going, it was fun getting there. I appreciate how Jenny’s books are always wonderfully diverse and don’t skate over some difficult issues, particularly regarding Mary’s storyline (she had a distinctly Secret Garden vibe for me, maybe because of her name).A great read which definitely won’t disappoint Jenny Colgan’s many fans.
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  • Jesika
    January 1, 1970
    What a sweet book! I have really enjoyed reading this book and being lost in the Highlands - I haven't been to Loch Ness since I was a child but it has made me want to go back - road trip, anyone? *I mainly want to go if I can visit both the Loch and the book van, won't lie.Zoe is one of those unexpectedly tough characters that I really love - she has that thing about her that makes other people think that nothing fazes her, that she can cope with anything. In reality, what Zoe has is a great de What a sweet book! I have really enjoyed reading this book and being lost in the Highlands - I haven't been to Loch Ness since I was a child but it has made me want to go back - road trip, anyone? *I mainly want to go if I can visit both the Loch and the book van, won't lie.Zoe is one of those unexpectedly tough characters that I really love - she has that thing about her that makes other people think that nothing fazes her, that she can cope with anything. In reality, what Zoe has is a great deal of resilience and in a week where I was worrying about a lot of things - and my worry is usually plain to see for all in the vicinity - I took a lot from this. Must be more Zoe-ish.The children of this novel are hurt, struggling souls and between them they really carve out a place in your heart for themselves - I want to try Shackleton's shortbread, I want to give Mary a hug, I reckon that if I were to have a child it would be Patrick and Hari's progress over the course of the book was something that I was rooting for wholeheartedly. The difficulties these children, and the adults around them, have are matched so well by the wide, open, wild landscape surrounding them which giv es them room to run, explore and grow.This book is also a love letter to the medicinal power of books - of how just being around them can make a reader feel instantly happier, of how we come to inherently trust someone whose book recommendations we can rely on with absolutely everything in our lives, of how they can remind us of our strength, and of how they can help us to engage with the world again. I truly enjoyed how well this shone through the novel.I recommend this as a lovely summer read, particularly if dreaming of Scotland will bring you joy (It will, I promise).
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  • Annette
    January 1, 1970
    I love books so this was a perfect title for me. In fact there are references to many books within the story and this novel demonstrates how books have the power to heal and help with problems that seem insurmountable both for adults and children.Zoe is a single mother to 4 year old Hari who is a wonderful child who just will not talk, something which Zoe constantly worries about. He’s been to see a consultant about his lack of speech but Zoe is told there’s nothing wrong and one day it will jus I love books so this was a perfect title for me. In fact there are references to many books within the story and this novel demonstrates how books have the power to heal and help with problems that seem insurmountable both for adults and children.Zoe is a single mother to 4 year old Hari who is a wonderful child who just will not talk, something which Zoe constantly worries about. He’s been to see a consultant about his lack of speech but Zoe is told there’s nothing wrong and one day it will just happen.When her landlord raises the rent and her feckless boyfriend, Hari’s father, will not help, Zoe is given the opportunity to move to Scotland to help Nina in her travelling bookshop and be a nanny to Ramsay’s 3 motherless children.However Ramsay is often absent and his house is huge and cold. His children are wild and extremely difficult and it takes all of Zoe’s skills to even get them to eat anything other than toast.This is a heartwarming story and had me hooked right from page one where the author sets the scene.Little Hari seems to flourish in the wilds of Scotland and Zoe gradually begins to feel part of the community. There is a even the prospect of romance on the horizon when something awful happens and Zoe might have to start over again.This is a feel good book and will appeal to readers who enjoy slightly more literary chic lit. It’s easy to read and kept me amused on holiday and on the flight home.This is my first Jenny Colgan but it certainly won’t be my last.Thanks to NetGalley and the publishers for my arc in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    I've read and loved Jenny Colgan for a long time, and I generally pick up whatever new thing she has out pretty sharpish. I've found her books generally to be quite sweet and frothy, but that's not always the case. There's grit, sometimes.This is one of those times. Zoe's situation at the beginning of The Bookshop on the Shore is far from ideal, and her son Harri - who is mute - is no better off. That's until a friend finds her a job in the Scottish highlands, and the future slowly becomes a lot I've read and loved Jenny Colgan for a long time, and I generally pick up whatever new thing she has out pretty sharpish. I've found her books generally to be quite sweet and frothy, but that's not always the case. There's grit, sometimes.This is one of those times. Zoe's situation at the beginning of The Bookshop on the Shore is far from ideal, and her son Harri - who is mute - is no better off. That's until a friend finds her a job in the Scottish highlands, and the future slowly becomes a lot brighter. The key word here is slowly, because it takes a long, long time for things to come right.Zoe takes on two new jobs - the first covering Nina's maternity leave (if you read The Little Shop of Happy Ever After, then you know all about Nina. If you haven't, then you need to. Right now! Go!) There's a side-plot here that continues Nina's story, and that's kinda nice. The second job involves working as an au pair for a single father in a huge old house. A house that contains three very damaged children; one perhaps more so than the others. Zoe's romance (because there's always a romance worth rooting for in a Jenny Colgan) is with the father - her employer - Ramsay. It's not at all the central plot focus, though - and it doesn't really come to fruition at all until pretty much the closing pages. It's a very slow burn indeed.I enjoyed Zoe's story immensely, and I hope Jenny takes us back to The Beeches at some point in the future. There are stories here that are - like many in her world - ripe for continuation. I do feel there's less romance in Jenny's newer books than there used to be, but in some ways that's no bad thing. It's still delightfully easy-reading, and perfect feel-good fare for the summer! An absolute joy of a book, and well worth a read.
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  • Mandy
    January 1, 1970
    I love Jenny’s books, she’s one of my favourite authors. Her stories reel me in from the first few pages and I often have to force myself to put the book down so that I can sleep.Zoe is struggling as a single mum in London, and feels that her beautiful boy, Hari, should be brought up somewhere better. He has selective mutism and this worries Zoe greatly. When her landlord increases her rent, she becomes desperate, and a friend suggests that she moves to Scotland to run a mobile bookshop while th I love Jenny’s books, she’s one of my favourite authors. Her stories reel me in from the first few pages and I often have to force myself to put the book down so that I can sleep.Zoe is struggling as a single mum in London, and feels that her beautiful boy, Hari, should be brought up somewhere better. He has selective mutism and this worries Zoe greatly. When her landlord increases her rent, she becomes desperate, and a friend suggests that she moves to Scotland to run a mobile bookshop while the owner, Nina, is on maternity leave. There’s also a second job as an au pair to a single dad with three almost-feral children who live in a big mansion.Is this really a better situation than the one Zoe and Hari were in down in London? Importantly, Hari makes his first ever friend, so Zoe must take this into consideration when she decides whether to stay or go.I loved seeing mention of Wallace, Francis, and Delphine, and I ABSOLUTELY LOVED Hari and Patrick.A lovely, heartwarming read to relax on a sun-lounger with!Thank you to NetGalley and Little, Brown for an advance reader copy in return for an honest review.
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  • Mandy
    January 1, 1970
    I love Jenny’s books, she’s one of my favourite authors. Her stories reel me in from the first few pages and I often have to force myself to put the book down so that I can sleep.Zoe is struggling as a single mum in London, and feels that her beautiful boy, Hari, should be brought up somewhere better. He has selective mutism and this worries Zoe greatly. When her landlord increases her rent, she becomes desperate, and a friend suggests that she moves to Scotland to run a mobile bookshop while th I love Jenny’s books, she’s one of my favourite authors. Her stories reel me in from the first few pages and I often have to force myself to put the book down so that I can sleep.Zoe is struggling as a single mum in London, and feels that her beautiful boy, Hari, should be brought up somewhere better. He has selective mutism and this worries Zoe greatly. When her landlord increases her rent, she becomes desperate, and a friend suggests that she moves to Scotland to run a mobile bookshop while the owner, Nina, is on maternity leave. There’s also a second job as an au pair to a single dad with three almost-feral children who live in a big mansion.Is this really a better situation than the one Zoe and Hari were in down in London? Importantly, Hari makes his first ever friend, so Zoe must take this into consideration when she decides whether to stay or go.I loved seeing mention of Wallace, Francis, and Delphine, and I ABSOLUTELY LOVED Hari and Patrick.A lovely, heartwarming read to relax on a sun-lounger with!Thank you to NetGalley and Little, Brown for an advance reader copy in return for an honest review.
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    Jenny Colgan's books always have great locations and a wide range of characters. She is talented at bringing both to life, so that you can picture living in the places that she writes about, and you feel like you really get to know the characters.This book is set in the Highlands of Scotland, and features Nina and her book van from the previous novel ,The little shop of Happy Ever After. This book is not a sequel, and you do not need to have read the previous book. This book features Zoe, a stru Jenny Colgan's books always have great locations and a wide range of characters. She is talented at bringing both to life, so that you can picture living in the places that she writes about, and you feel like you really get to know the characters.This book is set in the Highlands of Scotland, and features Nina and her book van from the previous novel ,The little shop of Happy Ever After. This book is not a sequel, and you do not need to have read the previous book. This book features Zoe, a struggling single mother, who lives in London with her young Son Hari who has never talked. Desperately in need of somewhere to live, she finds herself moving to Scotland to help Nina with her book van during maternity leave, as well as being a live-in au pair for three children who have a reputation for being out of control.Once I started to read this book I quickly became engrossed and found it hard to put down. There were some difficult subjects in this book, which I thought were dealt with well and sympathetically. There were a few tense moments, as well as some heartwarming moments, and also some humour.There were a lot of references to books and reading, which I absolutely love to read about. I genuinely loved this book, and I highly recommend it.
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  • ~☆clockwork
    January 1, 1970
    God i love Jenny's books so much they are always without fail amazingly good!!! Literally read this in a few hours could not put it down, like all good stories was genuinely gutted when i reached the end!! Loved all the characters in this and was nice reading about some of my past favourites, Zoe was incredibly relatable especially being a mum myself and although i was never a single one i was an incredibly poor one for a good time. I often found myself laughing out loud reading this and then fe God i love Jenny's books so much they are always without fail amazingly good!!! Literally read this in a few hours could not put it down, like all good stories was genuinely gutted when i reached the end!! Loved all the characters in this and was nice reading about some of my past favourites, Zoe was incredibly relatable especially being a mum myself and although i was never a single one i was an incredibly poor one for a good time. I often found myself laughing out loud reading this and then feeling completely sympathetic the next an awesome read cannot wait to devour Jenny's next book!! Which i believe is lessons and not long to go😀😀😀
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  • Heidi Wahlstrom
    January 1, 1970
    I raced through this book! Zoey's struggle to find where she belongs and her willingness to change her entire life to help her son Hari makes for a great novel. She struggles with the heavy oppression of city life without realizing its weight until she arrives in Scotland. The clean air and quite help revive her spirit as she discovers what she is really made of. As she contends with not one new job but two she is never more exhausted but satisfied with her days as she watches her son become mor I raced through this book! Zoey's struggle to find where she belongs and her willingness to change her entire life to help her son Hari makes for a great novel. She struggles with the heavy oppression of city life without realizing its weight until she arrives in Scotland. The clean air and quite help revive her spirit as she discovers what she is really made of. As she contends with not one new job but two she is never more exhausted but satisfied with her days as she watches her son become more independent and healthy. The book reads well on its own but there are a few returning characters from The Bookshop on the Corner which is the first book in the series. I loved that the author placed the setting on Loch Ness and that she did her research on the ancestral homes of the clans surrounding it. Ramsey, the distracted father of three, is part of the Urquhart clan who's picturesque castle still graces the banks of Loch Ness. As a bookseller I enjoyed seeing the differences between Nina and Zoey as they both worked to keep the book van up and running. Overall the book was an enjoyable read that will stick with me for a while.
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  • Ginny
    January 1, 1970
    Jenny Colgan books come into my life magically when I don't even know I need them. And this one popped up on Netgalley for Librarians, so thanks to NG and the publisher! This book is a semi follow up to Booshop on the Corner in that Nina and her van are in the story, but not the main focus-instead we are introduced to Zoe who shows up in Scotland to be an au pair for three children who are basically being neglected. Can Zoe perform some sort of Mary Poppins miracle on those kids? I liked this bo Jenny Colgan books come into my life magically when I don't even know I need them. And this one popped up on Netgalley for Librarians, so thanks to NG and the publisher! This book is a semi follow up to Booshop on the Corner in that Nina and her van are in the story, but not the main focus-instead we are introduced to Zoe who shows up in Scotland to be an au pair for three children who are basically being neglected. Can Zoe perform some sort of Mary Poppins miracle on those kids? I liked this book, but it is not my favorite of Jenny Colgan's. It did also take me a little longer to get into the book and become invested into Zoe, the kids, and Ramsay. By the end though, I still had my big sappy smile on my face and that happy warm feeling that I love when reading her books. Still highly recommend!
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  • Jackie Robins
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you so much to William Morrow for my copy of this book. I love Jenny Cogan and I was so happy to have an advance copy. This book, while related to her previous book “The Bookshop on the Corner”, is not a sequel. In fact, I felt that this book was a departure from her previous work. It dealt with some issues that are definitely more serious and delved into these issues in her unique way. The book felt light and easy to read even though it had some more serious issues without trivializing th Thank you so much to William Morrow for my copy of this book. I love Jenny Cogan and I was so happy to have an advance copy. This book, while related to her previous book “The Bookshop on the Corner”, is not a sequel. In fact, I felt that this book was a departure from her previous work. It dealt with some issues that are definitely more serious and delved into these issues in her unique way. The book felt light and easy to read even though it had some more serious issues without trivializing them. despite the length of the book( 400+ pages), I really wish the ending was longer. I loved the character development and wanted more. I’m hoping there is a sequel!
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  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    Another wonderful Jenny Colgan! I recommend her books to readers at my library pretty frequently and they always seem to hit the mark with readers. While this is the second in the Scottish Bookshop series, it could be read, and enjoyed, without reading the first. The Bookshop on the Shore is a wonderful story and I can't wait to see what's up next from Jenny Colgan! This book was given to me free from the publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Sally Tyrer
    January 1, 1970
    Jenny Colgans books are always a delight to read and this one is no different!An irresistible tale of single mother Zoe and her mute son harri who are struggling to survive in London due to financial worries and lack of support from Harri’s dad. The opportunity to change circumstances by moving to remote wild Scotland to run a book bus taking over from Nina a previous character of Jenny’s books, seems too good to be true! Zoe finds herself as an au pair for an eccentric unhappy family of three c Jenny Colgans books are always a delight to read and this one is no different!An irresistible tale of single mother Zoe and her mute son harri who are struggling to survive in London due to financial worries and lack of support from Harri’s dad. The opportunity to change circumstances by moving to remote wild Scotland to run a book bus taking over from Nina a previous character of Jenny’s books, seems too good to be true! Zoe finds herself as an au pair for an eccentric unhappy family of three children and their father!Despite many setbacks, unfriendliness and sheer dismay, Zoe achieves the impossible and over time becomes indespencible to both Nina and Ramsey the Children’s father! What follows next is truely heartwarming as Zoe warms the hearts of this poor neglected family gaining trust and loyalty from the damaged children , falling for thief father and wonderfully her son finding his voice! A gorgeous read with a lovely happy ending will thoroughly recommend! Thank you net galley for this early copy.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    The Bookshop on the Shore transports readers to Scotland once again in this charming, heartwarming novel. Single mother Zoe is desperate: rent on her London flat is going up and there’s no way she can pay it without help. Jaz, father of their son Hari, claims he doesn’t have any money to spare. His sister Surinder, however, might just have a plan. She sets Zoe up to be the au pair at a manor on the shore of Loch Ness, and to assist Surinder’s friend Nina with her bookshop van during the day. It The Bookshop on the Shore transports readers to Scotland once again in this charming, heartwarming novel. Single mother Zoe is desperate: rent on her London flat is going up and there’s no way she can pay it without help. Jaz, father of their son Hari, claims he doesn’t have any money to spare. His sister Surinder, however, might just have a plan. She sets Zoe up to be the au pair at a manor on the shore of Loch Ness, and to assist Surinder’s friend Nina with her bookshop van during the day. It sounds ideal, but when Zoe and Hari arrive they find three sullen, underfed, almost feral children with a borderline abusively neglectful father living in a dusty, outdated mausoleum of a house. Disheartened, but with no other options, Zoe sets about putting the house, and as a byproduct, the lives of those within, in order.The Bookshop on the Shore is a charming story that picks up a few months after The Bookshop on the Corner, but while there are overlapping characters the story itself centers on Zoe rather than Nina or Surinder. The new characters are well drawn, inspiring sympathy and curiosity from the reader. As with all of Colgan’s books, the prose is evocative yet down to Earth, carrying the reader through the wilds of Scotland and into a musty baronial mansion. I highly recommend this hard-to-put-down novel to fans of women’s fiction and romance.
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