Proud Boys and the White Ethnostate
A critical exploration of the core ideas of the alt-right--necessary reading for all who seek to counter its appeal and expansion.From a loose movement that lurked in the shadows in the early 2000s, the alt-right has achieved a level of visibility that has allowed it to expand significantly through America's cultural, political, and digital landscapes. Yet it is also mercurial and shape-shifting, encompassing a spectrum of ideas and believers that resonate with white supremacy, right-wing nationalism, and anti-feminism. The alt-right offers a big and porous tent to those who subscribe to varying forms of race- and gender-based exclusion and endorse white identity politics.To understand the contemporary moment historian, Alexandra Minna Stern knew she needed to get under--to excavate--the alt-right memes and tropes that had erupted online. In Proud Boys and the White Ethnostate, she does just that, applying the tools of the scholar to explore the alt-right's central texts, narratives, constructs, and insider language. She explains the key ideas and strategies of metapolitics and "red-pilling," reveals why the tag line for their most prominent publisher is "books against time," looks closely at the paramount fantasy of the white nirvana, the ethnostate, and reveals how gender essentialism unveils the similarities between the alt-right and the alt-light. Lastly, she takes stock of the alt-right's concerted attempts to normalize the movement, by casting off the vestiges of neo-Nazism and 20th-century white power movements and seeking respectability.Proud Boys and the White Ethnostate shows us the underlying concepts and constructs that guide the alt-right and provides a tool for all who wish to combat its overlapping forms of racism, xenophobia, transphobia, and deep-seated anti-egalitarianism.

Proud Boys and the White Ethnostate Details

TitleProud Boys and the White Ethnostate
Author
ReleaseJul 16th, 2019
PublisherBeacon Press
ISBN-139780807063361
Rating
GenrePolitics, Nonfiction, Race, North American Hi..., American History, Psychology

Proud Boys and the White Ethnostate Review

  • Peter Mcloughlin
    January 1, 1970
    A study of Alt-right and its adjuncts of the Alt-light including the proud boys and their campaign to mainstream racist ideology and ethnonationalism and dream of an ethnostate. The movement has all the ingredients of far-right racist ideology that has been in America for a long time. Now stoking fears changing demography and fears of losing majority status it is working to change the culture which it sees as downstream of politics. It allies itself with antifeminism and anti-LBGTQ especially Tr A study of Alt-right and its adjuncts of the Alt-light including the proud boys and their campaign to mainstream racist ideology and ethnonationalism and dream of an ethnostate. The movement has all the ingredients of far-right racist ideology that has been in America for a long time. Now stoking fears changing demography and fears of losing majority status it is working to change the culture which it sees as downstream of politics. It allies itself with antifeminism and anti-LBGTQ especially Transgender people who it sees as a particular threat to its categories of male dominance and "natural " or traditional gender roles. It is one thing alt-right and alt-light publicly agree on. By attempting to hide the Larpers and put forth a clean-cut image it is trying to worm its way into the mainstream and largely succeeding. Covers this movent for the past decade and takes things up until very recently.Interview with the author.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ZPFE...
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    At this point I can only make a comment. Here it is.When I came across this book on Eidelweiss today I thought it looked relevant to our politics in 2019 and downloaded it. Adding it to my to-be-read queue, I see only a single one-star review. Comparing my books with the reviewer's books, I get the feeling I'll probably like it a lot, since my tastes are diametrically opposed to theirs when it comes to political books.
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  • Matt Fitz
    January 1, 1970
    Set aside two other books to read this when my hold became available from the library as this seemed both timely and I had a time-restriction. I had a friend who I admire although we are political opposites and VERY different beliefs on race/gender, or as he likes to tell me - race cards and identity politics. Last week (before I had this book) he told me he was a "nationalist" and challenged me to find something wrong with that. I believe he was red-pilling me. If you don't know what that means Set aside two other books to read this when my hold became available from the library as this seemed both timely and I had a time-restriction. I had a friend who I admire although we are political opposites and VERY different beliefs on race/gender, or as he likes to tell me - race cards and identity politics. Last week (before I had this book) he told me he was a "nationalist" and challenged me to find something wrong with that. I believe he was red-pilling me. If you don't know what that means, this book may help. If you don't know what it means, it's time to learn.This book (following the Proud Boys arriving en masse to PDX over the weekend) is incredibly helpful. I felt the author was a bit erudite and academic in her prose - which I suspect will turn off many of the more casual readers who still seek to be informed). However, if one stretches beyond that, this information is very helpful to understand the ethno-nationalists, their history, their end-game, and how the arrived at their current strategy.At the end of the day, I have little interest in direct confrontation with them. That is part of their strategy towards their end game and they use violence and vitriol against them to prove their point. Instead, I think better energy is spent building a mental and emotional bulwark and simply countering their message, speaking truth to their screeds, and sticking to the progressive long-game. As Sun Tzu teaches, know your enemy and know yourself. This book helps one understand the movements and distinctions in the ethno-nationalist Venn Diagram (e.g., Proud Boys, Vanguard, Identity Evropa, etc) and how they keep transforming. It explains how and why they arrived in Charlottesville VA, but also how so much of it self-imploded and also how they were early users of the internet and social media, how they lure young and impressionable young men, and (surprisingly) how they attract women to their cause(s).The author spent a lot of time attempting to plumb the depth of the dark corners of the internet where these folks reside (4chan, 8chan, private FB groups, Reddit subgroups, etc), pointing to a lot of their own work to undermine them and inform the reader. Helpful tools when one wants to dissect the manifestos of the Christchurch or El Paso murderers. They aren't interested in the politics of race/culture. They are interested in the metapolitics. Their long game is culture-change; but their fear is they are running out of time.Misinformation is one of their more profound weapons in the digital age. Whether it be use of fascist irony (memes, adoption of innocuous hand gestures) or direct appeals to one's own future racial extinction, or appeals to a bygone era that never truly existed but they'd like to see "again" - equip yourself with information and build a solid base of knowledge. They aren't going away and their actively recruiting. They believe that multiculturalism and diversity are existential threats - and some are taking that thereat to be immediate and requiring lethality, so no, I do not take this problem lightly and will not lighten up.That friend who I believe is trying to red pill me? I'm not giving up on him. He's also helping me stress-test my bulwark.
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  • Katherine Coble
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of those Current Events Sociology books that is useful if you haven’t necessarily followed the subject in real time. If you’re a reader who has been engaged elsewhere this book is a good overview to get you up to speed on who the alt-right are, what they believe and how those beliefs drive their styles of engagement. If you’ve been following along in real-time, however, there’s not a real need for you to read this. It’s more of a recitation of facts already in evidence. It’s not a ba This is one of those Current Events Sociology books that is useful if you haven’t necessarily followed the subject in real time. If you’re a reader who has been engaged elsewhere this book is a good overview to get you up to speed on who the alt-right are, what they believe and how those beliefs drive their styles of engagement. If you’ve been following along in real-time, however, there’s not a real need for you to read this. It’s more of a recitation of facts already in evidence. It’s not a bad book; it’s only of use to those who were coming into the read uninformed. I suspect all of the 1-star reviews are politically motivated.
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  • Michelle Nijhuis
    January 1, 1970
    Very useful “emergency scholarship” - the context provided here could not be more timely.
  • Kathy Brosnan
    January 1, 1970
    Careful analysis of important issues. Terrifying but essential reading.
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