The Forgotten Hours
In this evocative debut novel, Katrin Schumann weaves a riveting story of past and present—and how love can lead us astray.At twenty-four, Katie Gregory feels like life is looking up: she’s snagged a great job in New York City and is falling for a captivating artist—and memories of her traumatic past are finally fading. Katie’s life fell apart almost a decade earlier, during an idyllic summer at her family’s cabin on Eagle Lake when her best friend accused her father of sexual assault. Throughout his trial and imprisonment, Katie insisted on his innocence, dodging reporters and clinging to memories of the man she adores.Now he’s getting out. Yet when Katie returns to the shuttered lakeside cabin, details of that fateful night resurface: the chill of the lake, the heat of first love, the terrible sting of jealousy. And as old memories collide with new realities, they call into question everything she thinks she knows about family, friends, and, ultimately, herself. Now, Katie’s choices will be put to the test with life-altering consequences.

The Forgotten Hours Details

TitleThe Forgotten Hours
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 1st, 2019
PublisherLake Union Publishing
ISBN-139781503904170
Rating
GenreFiction

The Forgotten Hours Review

  • Melike
    January 1, 1970
    I just have a lot of mixed feelings about this book and need to sort them out.
  • Obsidian
    January 1, 1970
    Please note that I got this via Amazon's Kindle First Reads. I really loved the premise of the "Forgotten Hours" (a teenage girl loses her best friend and father after a rape accusation and trial). This type of plot feels very timely. That said, I thought that the story being told in third person point of view actually pushed me away as a reader. I think if it was told in the first person point of view I would have felt more entwined with Katie and her choices. Also, if it had been first person Please note that I got this via Amazon's Kindle First Reads. I really loved the premise of the "Forgotten Hours" (a teenage girl loses her best friend and father after a rape accusation and trial). This type of plot feels very timely. That said, I thought that the story being told in third person point of view actually pushed me away as a reader. I think if it was told in the first person point of view I would have felt more entwined with Katie and her choices. Also, if it had been first person point of view, I would have given more leeway on the secondary characters (Zen, Lulu, her father, mother, brother, etc) being written so shallowly. However, writing in third person point of view, I think she could have tapped into everyone's emotions a lot more and the backstory. I needed to get into Lulu's and her father's head more. "The Forgotten Hours" goes back and forth following the events that broke up Katie Gregory's family more than 6 years ago. Katie's best friend from childhood accuses her father of rape, after two years of investigation/trial, he is found guilty. This ends up causing her family to fracture. Now that he is getting out of jail, Katie is focused on getting her family back to the way it was. There are complications however with her father wanting her to return to their family's cabin, and make it ready for him. This leads Katie down a path to figure out what really happened, and was it her fault.Katie is really the center of this story. I wish that Schumann had her come to some realizations a lot sooner. She has had to draw herself in due to what happened to her family, and I get that. However, her relationship with Zen had her being ambivalent about it for reasons dealing with her father. It's pretty obvious that Katie sees herself as her father's daughter and him being sent to jail for something she doesn't believe he did has broken some part of herself. I just wish that we had seen more interactions between her and her brother David. That character is written as being more aware of things then Katie ever did. I just wish that they had more honest conversations. The same with Katie and her mother. Back to Katie, we get more insight on what occurred 8 years ago (when Katie and Lulu were 17) and how Katie worshiped Lulu until a boy comes between them. The book flips back and forth between present day and the past.I think Lulu was written well, but I wanted more there. Her story made me sad and I think it got passed over a little too quickly. The question that Katie has is why would Lulu lie about her father. However, we are given hints here and there what was going on with Lulu and I wish that had been the story. Katie's father, John Gregory, is charismatic. There is a pull to him when we have the story in the before time period. He is the guy that everyone is drawn to, wants to make happy. Even Katie contrasts him with her mother and she finds her lacking due to her withdrawal from their family. Katie is haunted by her teen crush and I just thought that whole thing with him was a waste (the present time period). The before time period, once again, Schumman types into something when she goes back to first loves, summer days and night, and the smell of the sun and the lake on your skin. The writing was good, though sometimes a bit overworked. I have to say that I loved all of the sections dealing with Katie and Lulu showing them growing up together and their summers together. Schumann taps into being a young girl and how hard it is sometimes to be best friends with someone. We also get Lulu's longing to be part of Katie's family and how Lulu's life is so different from Katie's.When we switch back to the present time frame, I just see Katie as a pale shadow still being jerked around by Lulu. You would think that she would be separate from her at this point. We know that the two had no contact after the rape accusation besides a nasty email that Katie sent. But you have Katie wondering why Lulu never reached out to her. I just rolled my eyes a bit at that.The setting of the book bounces between New York, upper state New York, and London. I have to say that Schumman writes of New York, and summers on the lake very well. The parts in London were very thin to me. We/Katie get info dumped about some things and I just wish it was done differently.The ending was bittersweet. I wish it had ended differently because I honestly don't think that the Gregory family ever really comes to term with things. Ostriches, the lot of them.
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  • PinkAmy loves books, cats and naps
    January 1, 1970
    I’d rather reread a good book than slog through a boring one.Amazon Prime First Read books aren’t what they once were. Most in recent months have been DNF, one or two stars. None of the December options interested me. We were allowed to choose two books for January, but I could only find one.THE FORGOTTEN HOURS seemed like a decent possibility, but I couldn’t get into the Katie’s narration. I was more interested in Lulu’s story, but she was barely a minor character. I skimmed to the end.
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  • Crystal King
    January 1, 1970
    Riveting. If I had to sum up this debut book in one word, that would be it. What would you do if your father went to jail for statutory rape of your best friend? Who do you side with? What if your choice might be wrong? I admit that I feel a lot of overwhelm from the #metoo news of the world today, and wasn't sure how I was going to feel about this novel, but Schumann pulls you into Katie's world and wraps you in all the emotions from each character in such a way that you literally can't put the Riveting. If I had to sum up this debut book in one word, that would be it. What would you do if your father went to jail for statutory rape of your best friend? Who do you side with? What if your choice might be wrong? I admit that I feel a lot of overwhelm from the #metoo news of the world today, and wasn't sure how I was going to feel about this novel, but Schumann pulls you into Katie's world and wraps you in all the emotions from each character in such a way that you literally can't put the book down. There are often many sides to a story and relationships can be incredibly tough and complicated and Schumann deftly shows you all that nuance. I'm going to be thinking about this book for a long time to come. Thanks, NetGalley and Lake Union for the early peek at this book!
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  • Shirley Wine
    January 1, 1970
    An okay readI bought this book from the blurb. It was touted as a book of the year, and held the promise of so much, and in parts it did deliver, but overall it wasn't anywhere near as satisfying as I expected.I found Katie, the main character, tiresome and incredibly juvenile with her constant introspection and total self absorption. As a teen this seemed reasonable, if tedious, but for a woman in her twenties, too damn naive to be believable, the deliberate way she hides her head in sand is no An okay readI bought this book from the blurb. It was touted as a book of the year, and held the promise of so much, and in parts it did deliver, but overall it wasn't anywhere near as satisfying as I expected.I found Katie, the main character, tiresome and incredibly juvenile with her constant introspection and total self absorption. As a teen this seemed reasonable, if tedious, but for a woman in her twenties, too damn naive to be believable, the deliberate way she hides her head in sand is not credible, especially as she goes to university and gains a degree and yet fails to gain any sense of self - she is still so naively trusting as to be convinced of her father's innocence and this really stretched my credibility. I kept thinking, hell at Katie's age I was a mother who had buried a child - and here's a university educated woman who deliberately shuns learning the truth of her father's trial and conviction - The other characters, Katie's mother, her brother who could all have contributed so much to the story were mere cardboard cutouts without any real substance and yet they could have added so much more richness to the story.The only character that came alive on the page was Lulu, she was painted with such vivid strokes that showed up all the characters. This book holds the threads to be so much more but for me it fell sadly flat and left me disappointed. At times I wanted to shake Katie and tell her to grow the hell up, and to kick her mother in the shins and wake her up out of her apathy, she was certainly sadly lacking as a parent to shield her children from the narcissistic tendencies of a man who was little more than a charismatic Peter Pan, a man who never wanted to grow up and be a father to his children.
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  • Barbara White
    January 1, 1970
    THE FORGOTTEN HOURS is a stunning novel that moves seamlessly between the aftermath of a trauma that shattered one family and a summer evening that ruined many lives. As current events clash with truths Katie Gregory has kept hidden—from her lover and herself—she’s forced to return to memories she’d rather forget. Memories that tug loyalty in conflicting directions and question everything she knows about trust and love. Was her father guilty of the crime for which he was convicted? Who’s lying, THE FORGOTTEN HOURS is a stunning novel that moves seamlessly between the aftermath of a trauma that shattered one family and a summer evening that ruined many lives. As current events clash with truths Katie Gregory has kept hidden—from her lover and herself—she’s forced to return to memories she’d rather forget. Memories that tug loyalty in conflicting directions and question everything she knows about trust and love. Was her father guilty of the crime for which he was convicted? Who’s lying, and how much does Katie remember of that tempestuous night when she was fourteen and fighting with her best friend over a boy? Trying to unravel the answers before the heart-pounding finish kept me up way past bedtime. A must-read for book clubs!
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  • RedRedtheycallmeRed
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 STARSIt took too long for things to get moving. The book is so focused on Katie, and she's such a frustrating character! It would have been better for the story to be set further in the past, it just didn't seem believable that Katie was so sheltered and naive about everything that happened. As it was, the chapters set at the lake house felt like they could have been from the 70's.Katie's a woman in her mid-20's, a college graduate, and yet she comes across as someone unable (maybe just unwi 2.5 STARSIt took too long for things to get moving. The book is so focused on Katie, and she's such a frustrating character! It would have been better for the story to be set further in the past, it just didn't seem believable that Katie was so sheltered and naive about everything that happened. As it was, the chapters set at the lake house felt like they could have been from the 70's.Katie's a woman in her mid-20's, a college graduate, and yet she comes across as someone unable (maybe just unwilling?) to think like an adult. She never heard anything about the trial? She never looked anything up online? She never once thought to not blindly trust in her father? She was exhausting!So much focus on Katie meant that other interesting characters got shortchanged: namely Lulu, Katie's mom and Katie's brother. I would have liked some chapters from their POV. I'm a little disappointed in the ending, I thought what happened with Katie's dad was kind of taking the easy way out.
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  • Bridgett
    January 1, 1970
    So much waiting, so little pay-off. I truly wanted to love this book. The powerful #MeToo movement our country has seen surface the past few years had me desperately wanting to root for Lulu...but it was so hard. Her character was fake, belligerent, and a tad narcissistic. I know others will disagree, and that's okay. I just had a hard time feeling anything about her at all. As for Katie...yuck. She was aggravating. In this day and age, when EVERYTHING is splashed all over the internet, we're r So much waiting, so little pay-off. I truly wanted to love this book. The powerful #MeToo movement our country has seen surface the past few years had me desperately wanting to root for Lulu...but it was so hard. Her character was fake, belligerent, and a tad narcissistic. I know others will disagree, and that's okay. I just had a hard time feeling anything about her at all. As for Katie...yuck. She was aggravating. In this day and age, when EVERYTHING is splashed all over the internet, we're really supposed to believe she didn't even know who testified at her father's rape trial? Really? Unless she's an ostrich with her head buried in the sand, it's simply not plausible. I don't mind suspending belief a bit, but come on. Charlie and David could have added so much texture and insight, but the author instead chose to make them meaningless, secondary characters who added nothing at all to the tapestry of the story. The main problem for me? The book was just horribly boring and anti-climatic. Nothing happened except page after page of Katie's internal dialogue--long, rambling, tedious passages. The story also jumps back and forth over multiple time periods, but the changes aren't identified in any way at the start of the chapters. Makes for a bit of confusion. Overall, I give this book 1.5 stars. I had such high hopes, but what a disappointment.
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  • eiva
    January 1, 1970
    “Don’t all girls say no at first?” THE FORGOTTEN HOURS is a novel that shifts between the aftermath of a trauma that ultimately becomes the destruction of Katie Gregory and her family and the summer evening that triggered it all. Six years on and Katie Gregory has kept her father’s secret from everyone new in her life, even going as far as changing her last name (although she believes in her father’s innocence without question at the start of the book?) only to then be forced to return to memo “Don’t all girls say no at first?” THE FORGOTTEN HOURS is a novel that shifts between the aftermath of a trauma that ultimately becomes the destruction of Katie Gregory and her family and the summer evening that triggered it all. Six years on and Katie Gregory has kept her father’s secret from everyone new in her life, even going as far as changing her last name (although she believes in her father’s innocence without question at the start of the book?) only to then be forced to return to memories she’d rather forget when her father’s release date is mere weeks away. Memories that overshadow her unwavering loyalty, blurring the lines between reality and fiction and suddenly, without warning, Katie’s questioning everything she knows about trust, love and truth that belies it all.(view spoiler)[Was her father guilty of the crime for which he was convicted? Who’s lying, and how much does Katie remember of that night when she fought with her best friend Lulu over a boy? How reliable is the testimony of a teenage girl when she’s accusing someone thirty years her senior of rape? How can an educated twenty-four year old woman have next to no knowledge of the trial that sent her father to prison for six years?This book is touted as a #MeToo novel that intricately displays the concept of consent and the consequences that can unravel in the aftermath—except, in reality, it’s not. Consent or the lack of it hardly pays a part in this novel at all. It’s briefly talked about; a paragraph here and there as Katie struggles to find a grip on the catalyst that tore her family apart (not that there was much of a family to destroy in the first place—her father was a serial cheat, liar and unreliable in every instance and yet to her, completely trustworthy?) For a book to rely on the #MeToo message to attract a particular reader, then I’d almost expect a much broader discussion on consent, the consequences of the word NO and far less victim-blaming (which was definitely in abundance, although albeit subtle in its projection).Not to mention that Katie Gregory is by far the worst character I’ve ever had the displeasure of reading about, let alone seeing the world through her tinted, and yet very biased, eyes. She is a rather tiresome character and incredibly juvenile in her warped thoughts and feelings based around a trial she has very little evidence and knowledge of. She’s far too naive for a woman in her twenties, with the way she constantly sidelines the reason behind her father’s sentencing and fails to acknowledge—almost to the very end of the novel—that there is always two sides to every story. Surely no one can blindly trust someone else, regardless of who they are to you. It’s reckless and entirely immature.(At one point, there’s even a section where it’s insinuated that maybe Lulu invented the rape as revenge for Katie stealing Lulu’s crush away but let’s not get into that or I’ll be here all night.)With the blurb and previous reviews, this novel held the promise of so much, and in parts, the writing was astounding—rape is a topic that should be addressed with care while also raising the subject of consent—but it wasn’t blown away with it. Part of it fell rather flat and to me, I simply can’t enjoy a book like this where the real victim is nothing more than a secondary character while Katie Gregory is the one that parades herself around like the victim. (hide spoiler)]
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    This is an immersive tale where the protagonist finds her family loyalties and trust are put to the test. At first I was reluctant to read this book based on the subject matter revealed in the blurb, but I am so glad that I did.This novel draws you in from the beginning, with the Prologue establishing the setting for the fateful night where Katie’s life crumbles. Cleverly written in the present tense, this is a reflection of how Katie continues to relive these memories and cannot let go. This is This is an immersive tale where the protagonist finds her family loyalties and trust are put to the test. At first I was reluctant to read this book based on the subject matter revealed in the blurb, but I am so glad that I did.This novel draws you in from the beginning, with the Prologue establishing the setting for the fateful night where Katie’s life crumbles. Cleverly written in the present tense, this is a reflection of how Katie continues to relive these memories and cannot let go. This is because she firstly cannot believe what it did to her family and her relationship with her best friend, but also because, deep down, she is trying to understand the bigger truth about what happened. Such haunting memories continue throughout the novel until the climax at the closing so that we, as readers, are journeying on the same path of discovery as Katie. I don’t normally pull quotes from novels in my reviews, but I think the following reflects the plot beautifully: “to move forward, she was going to have to keep going backwards”. As Katie returns to the lake to prepare for her father’s return, she uncovers more information about his trial. Katie is determined to learn the real truth about what happened between her father and her best friend, Lulu, and, once she begins reading the interrogation scripts from court, does she find that something is not quite right. Katie’s relationships are tested throughout the story and this mirrors her difficulty in coping with her father’s imprisonment, to the extent that it is significantly impacting her currently relationship with Zeb, her causal boyfriend. Like Katie, readers also want to know the truth. It is easy to understand why Katie is so reluctant to uncover this because it tests everything she has believed in. Schumann carefully covers the issue of rape and it does not make you feel uncomfortable at all, instead allowing you to immersive yourself in the thrilling plot. With the prevalent #metoo campaign, you cannot help but sympathise with Lulu, particularly as more is revealed about her difficult childhood. You can only hope that some resolution is met between the two girls, and Schumann leaves readers until the epilogue to discover whether this actually happens.Smoothly moving between the past and present, you feel the internal conflict that Katie experiences with her feelings towards her father. He is her hero, wrongfully accuses of something he could not have done. Therefore, her reluctance to find about more simply reflects her natural reluctance to question her father’s role in her life. I could not put this novel down as the story progressed. At the same time, I didn’t want to read it too quickly because I was enjoying it so much! The revelations at the end and the plot development made me actually gasp out aloud, and I think this is a sign of a great read. A powerful journey to find the truth, I really enjoyed this immersive, thrilling read and felt the ending was as satisfying as it could have ever been. A brilliant read.
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  • Gina
    January 1, 1970
    Meh. So much hype, equally much disappointment. Schumann writes very well in some instances but struggles with character development in others. Charlie and David were very one-dimensional and could have added so much more depth to the dynamics of the story. Katie was absolutely annoying as an adult and seemed to be stuck in childhood, refusing to move forward and grow up. The Jack storyline and 'big reveal" fell flat for me and was just another indicator of Katie's immaturity and stunted develop Meh. So much hype, equally much disappointment. Schumann writes very well in some instances but struggles with character development in others. Charlie and David were very one-dimensional and could have added so much more depth to the dynamics of the story. Katie was absolutely annoying as an adult and seemed to be stuck in childhood, refusing to move forward and grow up. The Jack storyline and 'big reveal" fell flat for me and was just another indicator of Katie's immaturity and stunted development. I felt that Lulu was the strongest character but I couldn't really connect with any of them. But the book gets a lot of rave reviews, so you still may want to check it out. If you do, stop back and let me know what you think!
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of the January First Reads. It had a lot of potential with a meaty story about a girl whose dad goes to jail for the rape of her best friend. Lulu, the best friend, was a wonderfully drawn character but the main character Katie was rather frustrating. She was rather immature and self-involved. The dad is is richly drawn and complex but the other family members are cardboard cutouts. It went downhill toward the end and stopped grabbing my interest. It still had it's thought-provoking This is one of the January First Reads. It had a lot of potential with a meaty story about a girl whose dad goes to jail for the rape of her best friend. Lulu, the best friend, was a wonderfully drawn character but the main character Katie was rather frustrating. She was rather immature and self-involved. The dad is is richly drawn and complex but the other family members are cardboard cutouts. It went downhill toward the end and stopped grabbing my interest. It still had it's thought-provoking moments. I would recommend for Kindle Unlimited subscribers.
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  • Lynda Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    I can't really make my mind up about this one......it was one of my Kindle First choices this month. It brought to mind a true-life case I read about once which was fascinating. I found it dragged quite a bit for the first part and then seemed to get going and get more interesting as it progressed. I read till the end and things weren't as they seemed and there were surprises along the way but it was all a bit too deep for my liking. There seemed to be a LOT of writing and not much happening, if I can't really make my mind up about this one......it was one of my Kindle First choices this month. It brought to mind a true-life case I read about once which was fascinating. I found it dragged quite a bit for the first part and then seemed to get going and get more interesting as it progressed. I read till the end and things weren't as they seemed and there were surprises along the way but it was all a bit too deep for my liking. There seemed to be a LOT of writing and not much happening, if you know what I mean. It might've gripped me more if it was condensed a little or had more dialogue. It all got a bit touchy-feely towards the end. I didn't really like Katie all that much; she came across as a little too insipid for my liking, though I think this is how the author meant her to be. I didn't warm to her dad very much, either. It was also never really made clear as to WHY Lulu stayed with the Gregorys all summer every summer !! I found that pretty peculiar.I thought it was odd, too, that The Spotlight Team were mentioned near the start as I was under the impression they were the people investigating the Catholic priests......There were a few mistakes.....this sentence didn't need the but...."Though Katie couldn't remember now what she'd asked, but she could feel the grit.....," there were a handful of apostrophe mistakes, dream self needs hyphenating, close in should be closing in, this sentence lost the, "It was the strangest thing, having her father move around in space next to her," but for a debut novel there weren't tons of errors, which was good. It's interesting she references another couple of books I've tried but just didn't get on with (and I packed both of them in) since I ended up being in two minds about this one as well.
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  • Goth Gone Grey
    January 1, 1970
    The complexity and raw emotion make this a compelling read. Katie, at the start, is a young teen with her best friend, Lulu, at the summer lake house. She adores her father and Lulu, and Jack, a boy both girls are interested in. The summer is contains one of the pivotal moments of her life, the next chapter switching to years later and slowly unfolding from there between both times, in memories both clear and hazy. Katie's recollections, allegiances, and world are shaken and torn asunder as she The complexity and raw emotion make this a compelling read. Katie, at the start, is a young teen with her best friend, Lulu, at the summer lake house. She adores her father and Lulu, and Jack, a boy both girls are interested in. The summer is contains one of the pivotal moments of her life, the next chapter switching to years later and slowly unfolding from there between both times, in memories both clear and hazy. Katie's recollections, allegiances, and world are shaken and torn asunder as she discovers the truth of what happened. While there is a hopeful ending, this is an emotionally rich book that may be difficult for some to read. The women and girls are often treated as many often are, in times and societies past as well as now - given only information they need, and there for the men's amusement. Katie's discovery of the many truths of this is brutal yet rings with such sincerity that it's a compelling read. The characters are not entirely one sided by gender, which is a nuanced blessing some authors forget. Some women are good but long suffering, others neutral or awful. Some men are abusers, others are the rescuers. Much is revealed along the way, showing monsters in many forms as well as forgiveness. I'd like to read more from this author. The novel is a rich psychological look at so many aspects of society: sexuality, marriage, friendship, abuse, the court system, and more. An example of the writing: "But she had not been tempted to look him up back then. She’d become accustomed to the sense of herself as separate from all others, and there was something comforting about that. It was best to keep the past just out of reach, hovering a little more than arm’s length away. While she knew it was there, could sense it, she carefully kept those memories out of her grasp, and she sometimes seemed to forget the past entirely. But that was an illusion. Her memories of Jack, of Lulu—of life before—were not actually gone and forgotten; they lived on inside her, shadows of a bleached-out stain."
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. First of all, Schumann is an excellent writer. Second, trigger warnings: Statutory rape (graphically described in court documents), neglect, and child abuse. This story features difficult family dynamics, lots of drinking (underage and adult), drugs, language, and sex. Schumann does an incredible job at exploring how blind loyalty can lead to an inability to see or recognize the truth. In the book, Katie is in her twenties, the only one in her family who is regularly visiting and speaking w Wow. First of all, Schumann is an excellent writer. Second, trigger warnings: Statutory rape (graphically described in court documents), neglect, and child abuse. This story features difficult family dynamics, lots of drinking (underage and adult), drugs, language, and sex. Schumann does an incredible job at exploring how blind loyalty can lead to an inability to see or recognize the truth. In the book, Katie is in her twenties, the only one in her family who is regularly visiting and speaking with her father who is in jail for the statutory rape of Katie's best friend, Lulu. Katie stopped speaking to Lulu after the accusations came to light, and has fiercely defended and supported her father. Through various flashbacks and vignettes of Katie's current life, we watch as she makes the difficult journey of discovery while simultaneously preparing for her dad's release from prison. It can be a difficult book to read, though it was very compelling. I had a hard time putting the book down to go to sleep.I knocked off a star for what happens to Katie's father in the end. (view spoiler)[In some ways it's a sort of satisfying comeuppance for the erstwhile villain, but to me, it felt too tidy. I know that's an awful thing to say about a human being's untimely death, but real life is messier. If this were a memoir, the author would be writing about distancing herself (and her new family) from his toxic behaviors and learning to grapple with his ongoing antics, not having the problem of his existence wiped out so soon after his release from prison. I know books aren't real life, but this book could have been an artful sort of memoir and the ending kind of spoiled it for me, though it was satisfying to see Katie more happily settled. (hide spoiler)]
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  • Monique
    January 1, 1970
    Thought-provokingWow. This book was a really good read. Reading from Katie’s POV really puts you in the middle of the story and makes you feel what she’s feeling. I liked reading how bit by bit her willful ignorance melts away and how she’s forced to confront the truth. It couldn’t have been easy thinking that either her father was a rapist or that her best friend lied about it. When she started to really see the truth you were hyperventilating with her. Not wanting to see the truth that her fat Thought-provokingWow. This book was a really good read. Reading from Katie’s POV really puts you in the middle of the story and makes you feel what she’s feeling. I liked reading how bit by bit her willful ignorance melts away and how she’s forced to confront the truth. It couldn’t have been easy thinking that either her father was a rapist or that her best friend lied about it. When she started to really see the truth you were hyperventilating with her. Not wanting to see the truth that her father was a drunk who had multiple affairs and slept with his underage daughter’s best friend. Even I wasn’t sure what I believed to be the truth.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    The Forgotten Hours is brilliantly written by Katrin Schumann. Katrin has managed to combine a fascinating and page turning storyline with a beautiful writing style. Normally when I finish a novel, I move on to the next, this book stayed with me and made me think about it over and over. The devastating effects of one evening to a young girl is haunting and powerful given today's "Me Too" Climate.One of the best books I have read in a long time!
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  • Ellie
    January 1, 1970
    I really think the author tried to make her writing too flowery. Every time I was drawn into the characters in the book the author would start describing the scenery, etc. or go backwards in time. I found that very frustrating. The story was a good one and generally the writing was beautiful I just found myself scanning some of the descriptions that had nothing to do with the story line.
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  • Nichole
    January 1, 1970
    Not what I was expectingThe ending fell a little flat for me, but overall the way the story wraps up was not what I was expecting. It was an enjoyable read and quite a quick one too. I'd be interested to read other works by Katrin Schumann.
  • Elle Esse
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come
  • Suellen
    January 1, 1970
    Kindle Unlimited - January 2019
  • Cari
    January 1, 1970
    The Forgotten Hours was my second Kindle First selection for the month of January 2019.
  • Whitney Scharer
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this powerful novel that delves into issues of consent, loyalty, childhood friendships, and family obligation. The narrator's father goes to jail for statutory rape of the narrator's best friend--a riveting topic that feels tailormade to be a part of today's #metoo conversation. Like all good fiction, this novel brings the issues to life through its beautiful characterization and evocative language. I read this in just a few days and had trouble putting it down. A wonderful read. Thanks I loved this powerful novel that delves into issues of consent, loyalty, childhood friendships, and family obligation. The narrator's father goes to jail for statutory rape of the narrator's best friend--a riveting topic that feels tailormade to be a part of today's #metoo conversation. Like all good fiction, this novel brings the issues to life through its beautiful characterization and evocative language. I read this in just a few days and had trouble putting it down. A wonderful read. Thanks to Lake Union for the early copy.
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  • Katherine Riley
    January 1, 1970
    The Forgotten Hours captures the deep enchantment of intimate childhood relationships, and how this quality often disappears in adulthood and not even filial or sexual ties can maintain or fully recreate it. In Katie’s case, the fractures to her childhood bonds are even more painful and tragic, pulling off the flesh with which she has constructed her adult self. This is a novel of self-reckoning expertly crafted around a crime that is all too real, and a criminal whose treachery strikes us all t The Forgotten Hours captures the deep enchantment of intimate childhood relationships, and how this quality often disappears in adulthood and not even filial or sexual ties can maintain or fully recreate it. In Katie’s case, the fractures to her childhood bonds are even more painful and tragic, pulling off the flesh with which she has constructed her adult self. This is a novel of self-reckoning expertly crafted around a crime that is all too real, and a criminal whose treachery strikes us all too close to home.
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  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    Amazon have been generous to their Prime members this month with not one but two free books each for their 'first reads' customers. I'm not sure I'd have picked this if I'd been restricted to just one, but I recognised the author's name (I used to play ice hockey with her when we were students more than 30 years ago) and wanted to know if she was any good. Thankfully, I liked the book a lot - as it's always embarrassing if you need to patronise an old friend and 'damn with faint praise'. No need Amazon have been generous to their Prime members this month with not one but two free books each for their 'first reads' customers. I'm not sure I'd have picked this if I'd been restricted to just one, but I recognised the author's name (I used to play ice hockey with her when we were students more than 30 years ago) and wanted to know if she was any good. Thankfully, I liked the book a lot - as it's always embarrassing if you need to patronise an old friend and 'damn with faint praise'. No need for that in this case.Katie seems to have it all. A nice apartment, a good job, an older artist boyfriend who adores her. Unfortunately she also has a slightly sordid past - not for what she has done herself but by association with her father who is coming to the end of a 6 year sentence for 'statutory rape' (or sex with a minor - in this case, Katie's old best friend Lulu). Whilst her father, John, was in prison, her mother divorced him and found a new man. Katie was a 'daddy's girl' and refused to believe that her father could have been at fault, that he could have had sex with Lulu, and that Lulu must have been lying - perhaps out of some kind of jealousy of Katie's family and their seemingly perfect lives.When her father asks her to go back to the cabin on the lake where the family spent their summers during her childhood, she's reluctant. He wants her to prepare the cabin so he can live there after prison. The place has too many painful memories - of the destruction of her relationship with Lulu and the events that led to her father's incarceration.This is a beautifully written but rather slow-paced novel. If you're looking for cliff-hangers and an all-action adventure, this isn't the one for you. Instead, the book moves along slowly, pondering life's big questions - about family loyalty, about friendship, and about the things we choose to believe despite all evidence to the contrary. Katie goes looking for answers to questions she's previously refused to ask. What happened that night in the cabin whilst she slept on the sofa with her father and Lulu nearby? What did her then teen-crush observe through the cabin windows and later reveal in court? Did Lulu 'ask for it', lead her Katie's father on, or blame him for an attack by somebody entirely different? There are a lot of angles that could have been taken - and surprisingly weren't. In our 'me too' times, Schumann could have resorted to some heavy topics - victim shaming, men being led astray by Lolita types, women crying wolf and accusing their alleged attackers. Instead we gradually come to realise ...... well unfortunately, it's impossible to really say what we realise without giving too much away. Some reviewers have criticised the character of Katie, saying she's immature and too naive. I'd say 'So what!? She's in her mid-20s, what do you expect?' With a perfect idyllic childhood wrecked by her friend's accusations, she's no more naive or foolish than many young women of her age. These kind of domestic dramas are not really my normal genre, but I enjoyed this one. I appreciated the carefully constructed prose, the great descriptions that made those endless summers of sunshine and swimming in the lake 'zing' off the page, and the observations of what it was like to be a teen with so much ahead of you and so much to learn. Well done Katrin. I would read her again.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    This book. Man. I am not sure how I feel about it. I struggle to read any book that deals with or insinuates child molestation of any sort. It’s a real event that happens to real people, but I don’t know that it should ever be romanticized in books or movies for that matter. For those who are victims it can bring up traumatic feelings again (I also recognize that it could be therapeutic for some people), and for people who struggle with inappropriate thoughts towards it — books like that just gr This book. Man. I am not sure how I feel about it. I struggle to read any book that deals with or insinuates child molestation of any sort. It’s a real event that happens to real people, but I don’t know that it should ever be romanticized in books or movies for that matter. For those who are victims it can bring up traumatic feelings again (I also recognize that it could be therapeutic for some people), and for people who struggle with inappropriate thoughts towards it — books like that just grossly feed the beast. All that said - I obviously finished the book. It was written well. The author does a great job reminding you of the power of memories. The quote below reminded me of every high school crush and romance. When every single thing you do is instinctual somehow. “He hoists himself up onto the edge of the shed, his feet in battered leather flip-flops. He doesn’t need to say, Come sit here with me; she knows he wants her to, and so she does.” The author also tackles how fallible our minds are. “...feelings were not facts, memories lied, and people were not who you thought they were.”Who we are is based on our perspective of what’s around us, and our perspective is completely dependent on our interpretation. The whole system is biased, and therefore nothing is every truly truth. Truth in human terms is relevant. My truth can only be based on what I know to be true. <—— that is the very foundation of this book. In my opinion the characters, setting, and dialogue were are very surface level, not a lot of detail. None of it got too deep or too relatable. But the vagueness of those things allowed her bigger point to be more clear. Memories are questionable. Emotions are misleading. We see what people want us to see. My favorite line is the one right before the epilogue. “Her voice was far from perfect, but she discovered that she knew all the words to the songs, and that felt good.”The expectations we hold on to are often unrealistic for others and ourselves. Our beauty truly begins to shine when we let go of perfection and embrace the simplicity of authenticity.
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  • Ceecee
    January 1, 1970
    A solid 3. Amazon Kindle First for January 2019. First of all, this is a very promising debut novel. However, it’s not an easy book to review as reading it resembled the peaks and troughs of the isobars that have the knack of lurking around the UK. The start was a trough - it took so long to get going that I wondered whether I’d made a wise choice in picking this as my AKF. I also questioned why Katie took so long in trying to establish the truth of her fathers conviction for the rape of her fri A solid 3. Amazon Kindle First for January 2019. First of all, this is a very promising debut novel. However, it’s not an easy book to review as reading it resembled the peaks and troughs of the isobars that have the knack of lurking around the UK. The start was a trough - it took so long to get going that I wondered whether I’d made a wise choice in picking this as my AKF. I also questioned why Katie took so long in trying to establish the truth of her fathers conviction for the rape of her friend Lulu several years previously. I found her frustrating as a character as her lack of decisiveness and burying her head in the sand for so long was an irritant. I also found the flitting backwards and forwards through time broke the flow but I think the author shows genuine potential and so I would think that with more books under her belt she will be able to develop techniques that allow a book to be more seamless. There was also a lot of unnecessary detail especially about the landscape which didn’t add to the story. I think the focus on Katie was perhaps a mistake as I would have been intrigued to hear more from Lulu. So what of the peaks? There were some really lovely descriptions and some that I felt were very original. There were some sections that were really good. When her father met Zev for the first time, when they were all at the cabin, when she begins to uncover the truth through the court transcripts to name but a few. So then the pace would pick up nicely but unfortunately it wasn’t consistent enough. Overall, the concept of the book was good and I would say it’s worth reading to see a promising author at the beginning of her literary journey.
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  • Shari Ring Wolf
    January 1, 1970
    Meaningful story, so-so endingI loved the way the story showed empathy for the many perspectives across very thin lines of age, consent, sexual fulfillment, freedom. Heavy subject matter was written in an easy to follow way where most authors would have made it dense and too intense. I didn’t like the ending because I didn’t understand the type of “closure” it presented. I never understand some types of closure depicted in fiction. It only makes sense to me in theory. Still I give 5 stars becaus Meaningful story, so-so endingI loved the way the story showed empathy for the many perspectives across very thin lines of age, consent, sexual fulfillment, freedom. Heavy subject matter was written in an easy to follow way where most authors would have made it dense and too intense. I didn’t like the ending because I didn’t understand the type of “closure” it presented. I never understand some types of closure depicted in fiction. It only makes sense to me in theory. Still I give 5 stars because overall it’s a great story. I tend to give most reviews 5 stars. If they are awful books I don’t read them and I don’t like reviews on books the reviewer didn’t even finish. I realize good writing is a very hard job. Not just the plot, structure, character development, dialogue and pacing, but the grind of putting words together to convey so much. Knowing how to SPELL and punctuate is vitally important to me. No editor can fix all this. I encourage all writers who have intelligence and talent to keep writing. Reviews mean a lot.
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  • Barbara Turkdal
    January 1, 1970
    This book was not what I expected. It was deep, in that the trouble an accusation can cause disrupts/destroys a family unit. The main point of this story is more the loving close relationship of the girls and how the resulting breakup effects of their closeness, their bond, their dependency. Even more than even the evil deed that was alleged! Then add the adoring, albeit excessive (IMHO), relationship the daughter has for her father! ~ The main character was sheltered from getting too close to t This book was not what I expected. It was deep, in that the trouble an accusation can cause disrupts/destroys a family unit. The main point of this story is more the loving close relationship of the girls and how the resulting breakup effects of their closeness, their bond, their dependency. Even more than even the evil deed that was alleged! Then add the adoring, albeit excessive (IMHO), relationship the daughter has for her father! ~ The main character was sheltered from getting too close to the issue at hand and that did not quite ring true for me. My experience with teens are that they go the extra mile to dig and discover the truth, no matter the outcome. I am sure there are instances where one could be so enamored of and blind-sided by a person so as not to question things to keep the boat on an even keel. I am glad I read this book. The characters were interesting. This book gave me a thoughtful perspective.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely riveting story centered around truth and loyalty, reality and perception. The smoldering structure of the novel was perfect for the story, alternating between the protagonist Katie's current life in New York as she prepares for her father to be released from prison after serving a six-year sentence for statutory rape and her time at the family's summer retreat ten years earlier, where she and her best friend--a local girl named Lulu--stumble into their sexually charged teenage years t Absolutely riveting story centered around truth and loyalty, reality and perception. The smoldering structure of the novel was perfect for the story, alternating between the protagonist Katie's current life in New York as she prepares for her father to be released from prison after serving a six-year sentence for statutory rape and her time at the family's summer retreat ten years earlier, where she and her best friend--a local girl named Lulu--stumble into their sexually charged teenage years together yet heartbreakingly separate. When Lulu reveals a sexual encounter with Katie's father, what seems like a stable family structure falls to pieces. In the weeks before her father's release, Katie must reconcile what she remembers with what she was told and what she decided to believe. An important story about sexual consent, honor and decency, and the nature of shame that needs to be told (again and again). Bravo to Katrin Schumann for telling it and telling it so well!
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