The Third Daughter
From the author of Jerusalem Maiden comes a remarkable story, inspired by little-known true events, about the thousands of young Jewish women who were trafficked into prostitution at the turn of the 20th century, and whose subjugation helped build Buenos Aires.The turn of the 20th century finds fourteen-year-old Batya in the Russian countryside, fleeing   with her family endless pogroms. Desperate, her father leaps at the opportunity to marry Batya to a worldly, wealthy stranger who can guarantee his daughter an easy life and passage to America. Feeling like a princess in a fairytale, Batya leaves her old life behind as she is whisked away to a new world. But soon she discovers that she’s entered a waking nightmare. Her new “husband” does indeed bring her to America: Buenos Aires, a vibrant, growing city in which prostitution is not only legal but deeply embedded in the culture. And now Batya is one of thousands of women tricked and sold into the oldest profession in the world.As the years pass, Batya forms deep bonds with her “sisters” in the brothel as well as some men who are both kind and cruel. Through it all, she holds onto one dream: to bring her family to America, where they will be safe from the anti-Semitism that plagues Russia. Just as Batya is becoming a known tango dancer,  she gets an unexpected but dangerous opportunity—to help bring down the criminal network that has enslaved so many young women and has been instrumental in developing Buenos Aires into   a major metropolis.A powerful story of finding courage in the face of danger, and hope in the face of despair, The Third Daughter brings to life a dark period of Jewish history and gives a voice to victims whose truth deserves to finally be told.

The Third Daughter Details

TitleThe Third Daughter
Author
ReleaseSep 3rd, 2019
PublisherWilliam Morrow Paperbacks
ISBN-139780062896896
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, Literature, Jewish

The Third Daughter Review

  • Berit☀️✨
    January 1, 1970
    Talia Carner has written a raw, heartbreaking, disturbing, and important story. One of the things I like most about historical fiction is it is an engaging and entertaining way to learn about our past. This book spotlights a part of history I was not previously aware of. Thousands of eastern European women at the turn of the 20th century being tricked into moving to South America where they will work as prostitutes anti-Semitism was prevalent in Eastern Europe and these young girls and their fam Talia Carner has written a raw, heartbreaking, disturbing, and important story. One of the things I like most about historical fiction is it is an engaging and entertaining way to learn about our past. This book spotlights a part of history I was not previously aware of. Thousands of eastern European women at the turn of the 20th century being tricked into moving to South America where they will work as prostitutes anti-Semitism was prevalent in Eastern Europe and these young girls and their families were hopeful for a better life in the Americas. There is no way to paint this desolate situation in a good light, but this book handled it with a loving and gentle hand. This book was not always easy to read, but I believe it is so necessary because human trafficking is still going on. And these girl’s deserve to have their stories told. Batya and her family are living a life of poverty in Russia. When a stranger approaches offering Batya a Life of riches filled with big mansions and society events The family feels as though this could be their way out. The only thing is that young Batya will move to Argentina on her own and in a couple years at the age of 16 she will marry this man. When Batya arrives in Argentina she realizes all the promises were falls and she finds herself in a life full of beatings, rape, and prostitution. Batya was such a sympathetic character my heart could not help but break for her. She was so strong, so determined, and so angry. I loved the bond she found with the other girls in the house and I admired how she never lost her desire to reunite with her family. She was also extremely resourceful eventually finding love and even becoming a well-known tango dancer. This was such an important story about a determined girl and her relentless fight for a better life.This book in three emojis: 🌎 💃🏼 💪🏻
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  • Kymm
    January 1, 1970
    The Third Daughter is a book all historical fiction fans must read! It's the story of a young Jewish girl at the turn of the century, who at 14 leaves her impoverished family with a fast talking man, who swears to her father that he'll marry her when she turns 16. Her father desperate for his daughter, Batya to have a better life allows this man to take her to Buenos Aires to live and be his high society wife. Although, this fast talking man is no friend or future husband to Batya, he's a traffi The Third Daughter is a book all historical fiction fans must read! It's the story of a young Jewish girl at the turn of the century, who at 14 leaves her impoverished family with a fast talking man, who swears to her father that he'll marry her when she turns 16. Her father desperate for his daughter, Batya to have a better life allows this man to take her to Buenos Aires to live and be his high society wife. Although, this fast talking man is no friend or future husband to Batya, he's a trafficker taking young women out of Russia to a life of prostitution and degradation. Once in Buenos Aires Batya realizes he's lied to her and there is no fancy mansion, or life of high society, only the beatings, starvation and captivity of prostitution. With no way to escape and the fear of what would happen if she were to escape with no where to go, she begins accepting her new life and she becomes strong, independent and angry. With no way out and no money she has no choice, but to accept her fate and do what she can to live long enough to hopefully be reunited with her father and sisters in Russia. The "sisters" in the house become her only friends and she begins to learn how to play the "game" and survive. Then one day a stranger walks into the house and chooses Batya to spend time with, he's not like all the other men she realizes and he wants to help her, but she's got to break the rules and even steal from her pimp to receive this help. Can she do this? Is this stranger just another customer or is he different and really wants to help? Can she trust someone after years of not being able to trust anyone in her life? This is a period in history I'd never heard about. Thousands and thousands of young female Russian Jews are being trafficked for their use in the sex trade of South America. These girls are scared, lonely and stuck, they have no way to escape their lives of shame once kidnapped. The suicide rate among them is high. I found the author did an excellent job of describing the conditions and hardships these women lived through. The book does have some graphic rape and abuse scenes, so if you're triggered by such content this may not be the book for you. I feel the author had to be so graphic in order to convey to the reader just how bad these girls had it once kidnapped. The story is unbelievable, but based on true facts, it's heartbreaking, but also a story of survival and strength, and it's beautifully written. I've never read anything by Talia Carner, but after reading this one, I'll definitely search out others by her. She definitely did her research and I feel she's taken a horrible time in history and written a raw, emotional and moving book. I couldn't put the book down and ended up finishing it in less than a day. As disturbing as the story is, at times I feel it's an important story to share. This book will definitely stay with me for a while, this is a part of history we all need to know about, as trafficking is still prevalent in today's world and only with stories like this will we be able to understand the extent of the problem that's been going on for hundreds of years. I highly recommend this one,it will break your heart, yet show the resilience of these young women in a time when society forgot about them! Happy Reading!
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  • Miki Mackennedy
    January 1, 1970
    This historical fiction is based on a near century long practice of a legalized union of pimps in Buenos Aires luring and kidnapping hundreds of thousands of struggling and starving girls and women from Eastern Europe under the false pretenses of marriage or employment in hopes of saving their families back home only to sell them into prostitution. This was a difficult story to read, a young girl, in desperate circumstances finds herself betrothed to man and whisked away from her family that ver This historical fiction is based on a near century long practice of a legalized union of pimps in Buenos Aires luring and kidnapping hundreds of thousands of struggling and starving girls and women from Eastern Europe under the false pretenses of marriage or employment in hopes of saving their families back home only to sell them into prostitution. This was a difficult story to read, a young girl, in desperate circumstances finds herself betrothed to man and whisked away from her family that very night to begin her journey to what they have all been led to believe will be a life of privilege and wealth.Batya, only 14, quickly learns that she and her family have been lied to and her only goal is to find a way to save her family. The reader is given a look into brothel life in Buenos Aires and the levels of corruption and contempt.This is a fast paced read and a sure-fire recommendation for any reader who loves historical fiction. Thank you to the publisher and to Edelweiss for the e-arc in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Adrienne
    January 1, 1970
    Naive is a word that has never been used to describe me, but this book shocked me. I thought it was going to be another historical fiction about hard times in Europe but was blown away by the horrors, the degradation, corruption, enslavement of young Jewish girls that actually took place. I never heard about this part of Jewish history, at all! It was sad and difficult to read but well worth it and, most definitely, unforgettable.
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  • Janice
    January 1, 1970
    I learned something I knew nothing about in reading this novel. Set first in Russia in 1889, the story tells of the young Jewish women who were taken, under very false promises, from their families in Russia, and then forced into the sex slave/prostitute role in brothels in South America, in this book, Buenos Aires. Batya is only 14 years old when the seemingly wealthy Moskowitz approached her father about wanting to marry Batya, when she turned 16 or course. Batya's family had been fleeing the I learned something I knew nothing about in reading this novel. Set first in Russia in 1889, the story tells of the young Jewish women who were taken, under very false promises, from their families in Russia, and then forced into the sex slave/prostitute role in brothels in South America, in this book, Buenos Aires. Batya is only 14 years old when the seemingly wealthy Moskowitz approached her father about wanting to marry Batya, when she turned 16 or course. Batya's family had been fleeing the czar's pogroms, and were seeking a safe place to settle, often going with little food, and working in humiliating and demeaning ways to try to earn a pittance. They became convinced that Moskowitz offers a way to find a better life for Batya, and possibly for them to follow, once she is settled in Buenos Aires. They agree to send Batya with Moscowitz, with the understanding that they will wait to marry until Batya turns 16; in the meantime she will be under the guardianship of his sister in Buenos Aires. What transpires for Batya afterward is one horror after another. Several years in Batya's life in Buenos Aires pass, and even with the shame and loneliness that are her constant companions, there are some good things in her life. She lives with a house of other young girls who are in the same circumstances, and forms some close friendships; she has enough food to eat, and pretty dresses to wear; she is kept somewhat safe from the poverty and starvation she sees elsewhere in the city; and she has a few favorites among the men who become her regular customers. As the author tells Batya's story, she also sheds light on other aspects of life in Buenos Aires during this time, especially among the Jewish community. And in her notes both before and after the book, the author states that over 150,000 young girls from Eastern Europe were forced into prostitution in South America, during the late 19th and early 20th century. She also recounts some of the in-depth research she undertook in writing this book. I am adding this one to my list of favorites for this year. I want to thank LibraryThing, the author, and William Morrow Publishers for the copy of this book I was given.
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  • Kathleen Gray
    January 1, 1970
    Know in advance that this includes graphic scenes of the rape and abasement of Batya, a Russian Jew sold by her unwitting father to a pimp who will force her into prostitution in Argentina. Set at first in Russian in the late 19th Century, it then moves to a Buenos Aires I suspect few know about where Jewish women trafficked from Russia and Eastern Europe were enslaved by a cabal of Jewish pimps. Batya's father saw Yitzak Moskowitz as a savior- he promised not to marry 14 year old Batya until sh Know in advance that this includes graphic scenes of the rape and abasement of Batya, a Russian Jew sold by her unwitting father to a pimp who will force her into prostitution in Argentina. Set at first in Russian in the late 19th Century, it then moves to a Buenos Aires I suspect few know about where Jewish women trafficked from Russia and Eastern Europe were enslaved by a cabal of Jewish pimps. Batya's father saw Yitzak Moskowitz as a savior- he promised not to marry 14 year old Batya until she turned 16 and that she would stay with his sister, thus keeping at least one member of the family safe from starvation and pogroms. That promise did not last long. Batya is a survivor, though and even as she is enslaved and abused, she is constantly thinking and planning. She also has an advantage over many women of her time- she can read. She also is wily enough to find a way to communicate with home and then, marvelously, as a result of her facility with the tango, she meets Sergio. Theirs is not a love story but it's how Batya finds her way. This will tug at your heart and you will root not only for her but also for the other women in the brothel. It is important to note that some of the Jews not involved in the trafficking were complicit in keeping the unfortunates oppressed because they turned their heads and refused these women access to places of worship and shops. I did not know about this shameful episode in history = it is absolutely horrifying. To her credit, Carner does not spare the details but she also doesn't overwhelm the story with them. Thanks to Edelweiss for the ARC. It's hard to know how to recommend this (there's not a snappy way to describe it) but fans of historical fiction should definitely read it. It's beautifully plotted and written.
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  • Cori
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars.The Third Daughter is an important historical fiction read. Oftentimes historical fiction is written about WWII. Although those books are important too, this book focuses on a different period of history; although it still deals with Jewish oppression. In the 1800s and early 1900s, Zwi Migdal, a Jewish crime organization, found vulnerable Jewish girls and shipped them overseas to South America. Once the girls arrived in South America, they were forced into sexual slavery and prostituti 4.5 stars.The Third Daughter is an important historical fiction read. Oftentimes historical fiction is written about WWII. Although those books are important too, this book focuses on a different period of history; although it still deals with Jewish oppression. In the 1800s and early 1900s, Zwi Migdal, a Jewish crime organization, found vulnerable Jewish girls and shipped them overseas to South America. Once the girls arrived in South America, they were forced into sexual slavery and prostitution. These girls were lulled to South America with the promise of a better life; a life free from poverty and persecution. The girls’ families back home were left to assume that the girls ended up living a happy life in America with a loving husband, when in fact they were forced into a brutal hell in South America, overseen by soulless pimps. This book follows Batya, a young Jewish girl hoping to marry, travel to America (“where the streets are paved in gold”), and save enough money to rescue her family from Russian exile. Unfortunately for Batya she meets the same fate that many other poor Jewish women met before her; physically forced into prostitution, beaten, and degraded. This is Batya’s journey. A journey of immense suffering, yet a profound never-ending strength. From the description, I’m sure you can assume that this is a very tough read. Major trigger warnings – there is aggressive sexual assault. This book is based on true events though and I think it’s important to know that part of history. To be aware of the sins that were committed in the past and to learn to be better human beings and to never take our freedom for granted. A tough but important read which I highly recommend.thank you tlcbooktours and William Morrow for my free review copy.
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  • Christina
    January 1, 1970
    I was fortunate enough to win a proof of this book through the GoodReads contest with the condition that I would leave an honest review."The Third Daughter" by Talia Carner, a historical fiction novel, was so compelling that even during times between reading it, I was thinking about it. The horrors of forced prostitution and how they arrived at that point, combined with the girls' efforts to live these new lives, was mind-blowing. Depicted throughout were both the protagonists and antagonists lo I was fortunate enough to win a proof of this book through the GoodReads contest with the condition that I would leave an honest review."The Third Daughter" by Talia Carner, a historical fiction novel, was so compelling that even during times between reading it, I was thinking about it. The horrors of forced prostitution and how they arrived at that point, combined with the girls' efforts to live these new lives, was mind-blowing. Depicted throughout were both the protagonists and antagonists losses, strengths, and fortitudes. This is definitely a must-read. And, I venture to say that any book written by Talia Carner would be worthwhile. I'm on a hunt for more now!
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  • Joan
    January 1, 1970
    This is a tough book. The kidnap, repeated brutal rape, and enslavement of a 14 year old girl isn't easy to read. There were times when I had to take a break, times when I considered not finishing; but not to read this story would dishonor the memory of the thousands of Jewish girls and women who were entrapped in this Argentinian hell. Although necessarily graphic, Carner didn't devolve into lurid. Description was necessary to capture the horror but wasn't more explicit than required--a relief. This is a tough book. The kidnap, repeated brutal rape, and enslavement of a 14 year old girl isn't easy to read. There were times when I had to take a break, times when I considered not finishing; but not to read this story would dishonor the memory of the thousands of Jewish girls and women who were entrapped in this Argentinian hell. Although necessarily graphic, Carner didn't devolve into lurid. Description was necessary to capture the horror but wasn't more explicit than required--a relief.This government-sanctioned enslavement of women bound to prostitution was a complete surprise to me. I've lived for 63 years without having the slightest inkling that this had occurred. The business of prostitution, the brotherhood of pimps, their control of the growing city, the systematic luring of innocents, the complete lack of rights or resources of these girls and women, the inevitability of dying in an ever-worsening state, the despair--and despite all this, Batya's courage, faithfulness and perseverance; this is a book of tribulation and triumph.If for nothing else than to learn about this, the book should be on your to-read list. But it's much more than a history lesson. This is a compelling, moving story that I highly recommend. 4.5 stars.My thanks to the author, her publisher and GoodReads for providing an advanced readers copy. This author will be one I follow and read going forward. Highly recommended.
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  • Brenda
    January 1, 1970
    It feels strange to tell people what a great book this is because the subject matter is so heartbreaking, but if you're interested in true, little known historical events you will love The Third Daughter. Talia Carner's vivid and descriptive writing plunges the reader into the fear and desperation felt by Batya and her family as they attempt to flee to some semblance of safety, and lulls us into the same sense of false hope that they eagerly reach for. Batya's life becomes the stuff of nightmare It feels strange to tell people what a great book this is because the subject matter is so heartbreaking, but if you're interested in true, little known historical events you will love The Third Daughter. Talia Carner's vivid and descriptive writing plunges the reader into the fear and desperation felt by Batya and her family as they attempt to flee to some semblance of safety, and lulls us into the same sense of false hope that they eagerly reach for. Batya's life becomes the stuff of nightmares, but through it all she draws on an inner strength anchored in the love of her family in order to survive. Devastating and ultimately uplifting, The Third Daughter is a testament to the resilience of the human spirit in the face of unthinkable persecution.
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  • Evie Weaver
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book so much, I really wasn't expecting to enjoy this book as much as I did, but from the minute I picked it up I was enthralled by Batya and her culture along with the her lifestyle in Buenos Aires. 100% do reccomend if you are looking for a historical fiction book that hasn't been written before and isn't cookie cutter!
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  • Katie/Doing Dewey
    January 1, 1970
    Summary: Definitely a case of 'it's not you, it's me'. Well-written story about a fascinating time period, but just too dark for me.I have to admit that I messed up with this one. I saw that it was historical fiction by an author I had previously enjoyed and jumped on the tour. I did not realize in advance that it was about a young Russian Jewish girl tricked into leaving her family only to be trapped in an Argentinian brothel. I've avoided reading a book on such a dark topic before. This book c Summary: Definitely a case of 'it's not you, it's me'. Well-written story about a fascinating time period, but just too dark for me.I have to admit that I messed up with this one. I saw that it was historical fiction by an author I had previously enjoyed and jumped on the tour. I did not realize in advance that it was about a young Russian Jewish girl tricked into leaving her family only to be trapped in an Argentinian brothel. I've avoided reading a book on such a dark topic before. This book convinced me that I should continue to avoid similar books in the future. It's not completely fade-to-black for the worst scenes, but could be significantly more graphic. However, the main character's age and naivety made this too heartbreaking for me to enjoy. If it's a topic you think you can handle, I do think there's a lot to recommend this book.As with the author's previous book, Hotel Moscow, this was about a fascinating period in history. The author also did a great job incorporating Jewish traditions and Argentinian culture into the story. She used just the right amount of Yiddish and Spanish to enhance the setting, without obscuring meaning. This is also as gripping as her previous book. Although i personally struggled to enjoy this, I still found myself wanting to know what would happen next. The book was well written and the main character was easy to admire. She did a great job adjusting to or taking control of her circumstances, as required to survive. I think a lot of people will love this story of a strong, inspiring girl. It just wasn't for me.For other opinions, please check out the other stops on the TLC book tour. You can also learn more on the Harper Collins website.This review was originally posted on Doing Dewey
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  • Chava
    January 1, 1970
    What a compelling read! Truth is often stranger than fiction, and this historical fiction based on actual events held my attention and evoked the gamut of emotions from anger to sadness to happiness.The book starts much like a Sholom Aleichem story with a dairy man, his daughters and wife running from a pogrom. He converses with God on a regular basis, and he and his wife bicker lovingly. This was a little too "Fiddler on the Roof" for me.But once Batya's story gets going, a story where hope for What a compelling read! Truth is often stranger than fiction, and this historical fiction based on actual events held my attention and evoked the gamut of emotions from anger to sadness to happiness.The book starts much like a Sholom Aleichem story with a dairy man, his daughters and wife running from a pogrom. He converses with God on a regular basis, and he and his wife bicker lovingly. This was a little too "Fiddler on the Roof" for me.But once Batya's story gets going, a story where hope for a better life is taken advantage of and Batya ends up as a prostitute in Buenos Aires, I could not put the book down. Kidnapped at age fourteen and sent across the ocean, she chooses life when others are committing suicide. Very graphic in many places, the novel exposed the plight, then and now, of young girls being exploited and abused. Batya grows up and accepts her plight, but she is ever hopeful to reunite with her family, which eventually happens. The ending was a little sappy, with the family reunited in Israel, but in a way the reader wants Batya to have a fairy tale ending after all that she suffered.Reading this over the High Holidays, it is horrible to see what Jews did to other Jews to make a profit for themselves. The "pimps' union" operated internationally with impunity until World War II made it impossible to travel through Europe to procure more girls.
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  • Vicki Ferrara
    January 1, 1970
    I have read Talia Carner’s 3 previous books, and enjoy them thoroughly! I feel as though I have been educated. The historical parts of her stories are so well incorporated that I feel enriched when done. I am sad to finish a book that engrossed me as hers do. I listen to audio books every day on my 1.5 hour walk. Although I had read “Third Daughter” in print....I wanted to listen to it again. The reader you chosen to narrate was phenomenal! I have found the reader can make a huge impact on the a I have read Talia Carner’s 3 previous books, and enjoy them thoroughly! I feel as though I have been educated. The historical parts of her stories are so well incorporated that I feel enriched when done. I am sad to finish a book that engrossed me as hers do. I listen to audio books every day on my 1.5 hour walk. Although I had read “Third Daughter” in print....I wanted to listen to it again. The reader you chosen to narrate was phenomenal! I have found the reader can make a huge impact on the acceptance of the words. I already knew how powerful Talia Carner’s words were, and with the narrator’s reading it made it that much better! Well done. I cannot wait for the next book.
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  • Kathy Raines
    January 1, 1970
    Outstanding!
  • Meg - A Bookish Affair
    January 1, 1970
    In "The Third Daughter," Batya's family is struggling. The Russian Czar is trying to boot all of Jews out of Russia. Batya's family has faced tragedy after tragedy and life is hard. When a stranger appears offering the promise of a new life in America for Batya, her family doesn't think twice about marrying her off in order for her to have a brighter future. Looks can be deceiving though and this stranger has no intention of bringing Batya to America but to South America to be sold into sexual s In "The Third Daughter," Batya's family is struggling. The Russian Czar is trying to boot all of Jews out of Russia. Batya's family has faced tragedy after tragedy and life is hard. When a stranger appears offering the promise of a new life in America for Batya, her family doesn't think twice about marrying her off in order for her to have a brighter future. Looks can be deceiving though and this stranger has no intention of bringing Batya to America but to South America to be sold into sexual slavery in Buenos Aires. This was a fascinating and wonderfully detailed story of resilience and strength about a time and place that I had very little familiarity with!One of the things that I most love about historical fiction is the doors that it opens to events that I am not familiar with. In the late 1800s, there were thousands of Eastern European girls that were trafficked to Buenos Aires by Zwi Migdal, a union of pimps in Buenos Aires. The Union was basically allowed to do whatever it wanted with implicit permission of the Argentinian government, who often seemed all too willing to look the other way as the union systematically ruined these young women's lives and stole them away from home.This book is filled with wonderful characters, including our main character, Batya. Batya is only 14 years old when she is taken away from her family. She is so very young and while trafficking is always a difficult subject to read about, I was particularly struck by it happening to someone so young. Batya is absolutely terrified when she is first separated from her family. She faces so many terrible situations on the way from Europe to Buenos Aires but her inner strength keeps her afloat and she does what she needs to do to survive and eventually get a happy ending.The events in the book are pretty dark but I am so happy that there are books like this to shed light on some of the darker parts of our shared history. The detail in this book is great and really brings Batya's and so many girls like her stories to life. While the story itself is really great, make sure you read the Author's Note at the end where the author shares her inspiration for the story. Overall, this was a great book!
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  • Csimplot Simplot
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent book
  • Donna
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a compelling historical fiction written about a time just before the turn of the 20th century. The main character, Batya, is a character you will come to admire and empathize with, for her courage and determination, as well as her love of her family. The story revolves around Zwi Migdal, and its crimes against young women and girls. The characters are both well defined and complex. While the story itself is fiction, the history of the sex slave market perpetrated by the organization This book is a compelling historical fiction written about a time just before the turn of the 20th century. The main character, Batya, is a character you will come to admire and empathize with, for her courage and determination, as well as her love of her family. The story revolves around Zwi Migdal, and its crimes against young women and girls. The characters are both well defined and complex. While the story itself is fiction, the history of the sex slave market perpetrated by the organization of Zwi Migdal, is all too true. At times, this is a very tragic story, but ultimately, it is a story of survival against almost insurmountable conditions. It is an important book that sheds light on a very dark time in history. I would definitely read this author again. I did receive an ARC of this book from the publisher.
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  • Pat
    January 1, 1970
    This is a horrifying fictionalized look into the history of Buenos Aires when a legal union of pimps lured over 200,000 girls mainly from eastern Europe into a life of prostitution under the guise of taking them to America for purposes of marriage in the late 19th century. Unbelievably, it went on for 70 years.Batya's family is struggling to survive when the pogroms begin against the Jews in Russia, and they are forced to leave their home with virtually nothing. Their struggles intensify until t This is a horrifying fictionalized look into the history of Buenos Aires when a legal union of pimps lured over 200,000 girls mainly from eastern Europe into a life of prostitution under the guise of taking them to America for purposes of marriage in the late 19th century. Unbelievably, it went on for 70 years.Batya's family is struggling to survive when the pogroms begin against the Jews in Russia, and they are forced to leave their home with virtually nothing. Their struggles intensify until they meet a wealthy man who declares he wants to marry a virtuous Jewish girl like Batya and take her to America despite the fact that she is only 14 years old. Her family reluctantly agrees, and thus her hellish existence in a brothel begins. The nod to Fiddler on the Roof is incidental and perhaps unnecessary to this story.Thank you to LibraryThing and the publisher for the opportunity to review this book.
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  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book! I predict it will be a bestseller. Wonderfully written historical fiction about a period in time unknown to me before I read this book. Rio de Janero in the 1890's was a hotbed for sex slavery. Most of the girls were Jewish and stolen from Eastern Europe. Just as these people were being ripped from their homes by pogroms, insidious men were promising these young women marriage and wealth in the America's only to enslave them into a life of prostitution. This is the story of Ba I loved this book! I predict it will be a bestseller. Wonderfully written historical fiction about a period in time unknown to me before I read this book. Rio de Janero in the 1890's was a hotbed for sex slavery. Most of the girls were Jewish and stolen from Eastern Europe. Just as these people were being ripped from their homes by pogroms, insidious men were promising these young women marriage and wealth in the America's only to enslave them into a life of prostitution. This is the story of Batya and her fight to free herself from this life.
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    Batya and her family flee their hometown in the Russian countryside, the only survivors of another pogrom.  After pushing their belongings through the countryside and living off the kindness of others, a wealthy foreign Jewish man, Reb Moskowitz enters the family's life and takes an interest in 14 year-old Batya.  Moskowitz offers Batya's father money for her betrothal to him and promises her plenty of food, a nice home and a fortune in America.  However, Batya quickly learns that Moskowitz is n Batya and her family flee their hometown in the Russian countryside, the only survivors of another pogrom.  After pushing their belongings through the countryside and living off the kindness of others, a wealthy foreign Jewish man, Reb Moskowitz enters the family's life and takes an interest in 14 year-old Batya.  Moskowitz offers Batya's father money for her betrothal to him and promises her plenty of food, a nice home and a fortune in America.  However, Batya quickly learns that Moskowitz is not the good man he portrays.  Batya is sold into prostitution in Buenos Aires, Argentina.  After being abused, locked up, tortured and starved, Batya comes to terms with her predicament and focuses on survival.  She becomes a sought out girl in her brothel and is trusted by Moskowitz.  Batya's hopes are focused on bringing her family over from Russia and a mysterious new client may help Batya escape slavery and saver her family. I absolutely adore historical fiction that is able to open my eyes to a period of history that I knew nothing about.  I was certainly not aware of the very long time span that prostitution was legal in Argentina and fueled by the Zwi Migdal, a ring of Jewish men and women who kidnapped young girls and widows for their own profit.  The writing deftly portrays the horror as well as the hope in Batya's story.  It was obvious that the author delved into the research of this hidden history, from the way Batya was lured away from her family, to the conditions on her journey to Argentina and how she was treated in the brothel to the rhythms, dances and food in Buenos Aires, everything was reflective of the experience of the women and the time period.  I was very interested in how involved the Zwi Migdal was in Argentinian politics and culture and just how hard it was to bring them down.  I was amazed at Batya's bravery helping to provide evidence against Moskowitz in kidnapping women and especially the real woman, Raquel Liberman who risked it all to save other women from her fate. This book was received for free in return for and honest review. 
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  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    I have to preface this review with a warning that this subject matter may be difficult for some readers. Sex trafficking is a revolting topic and this story is about one woman’s traumatic experience. It is not widely known that at the turn of the 20th century, desperate Jewish women and girls were lured away from their homes in Russia and Eastern Europe with the promises of work or a lucrative marriage. Little did they know they would be forced into prostitution in Buenos Aires. Batya was only 1 I have to preface this review with a warning that this subject matter may be difficult for some readers. Sex trafficking is a revolting topic and this story is about one woman’s traumatic experience. It is not widely known that at the turn of the 20th century, desperate Jewish women and girls were lured away from their homes in Russia and Eastern Europe with the promises of work or a lucrative marriage. Little did they know they would be forced into prostitution in Buenos Aires. Batya was only 14 when she left her family on the arm of a wealthy suitor (or so she thought), believing that once she settled into her new life as a rich bride, she could send for her family. As soon as she departed, the rape and torture began. This is heavy stuff.What’s so sad is that her family in Russia continued to believe that Batya was rich enough to buy them passage to America, when in truth she was a slave. For the next several years, “…her fairy tale about her wonderful married life had worked against her…” There were not many options for these disgraced Jewish girls, and many contemplated or committed suicide. The conditions were horrific, though Batya was “lucky” enough to be housed in one of the “nicer” brothels. The things Batya had to endure are beyond comprehension. But her strong character and a small glimmer of hope sustained her. Her horrific story was well told; it was moving without being too sentimental or emotional and while it wasn’t overly graphic, it was still shocking. Despite the depressing subject, Carner captured the atmosphere of Buenos Aires, Batya’s despair and fortitude, and gave a voice to the thousands of women who were victims of the odious trade.I received a complimentary copy of this book via TLC Blog Tours.
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  • Alina
    January 1, 1970
    "The Third Daughter" is a powerful story of courage, hope, and determination.Pogroms have progressed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries in Russian, and many Jewish families found themselves fleeing their homes. Batya's family was one of them. On their way to the Jewish colony, they run into a wealthy jew, whom after only a few days offered to take young Batya to Buenos Aires and make her his wife.As you already guessed, Batya's happiness was short-lived. Soon after being taken away from h "The Third Daughter" is a powerful story of courage, hope, and determination.Pogroms have progressed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries in Russian, and many Jewish families found themselves fleeing their homes. Batya's family was one of them. On their way to the Jewish colony, they run into a wealthy jew, whom after only a few days offered to take young Batya to Buenos Aires and make her his wife.As you already guessed, Batya's happiness was short-lived. Soon after being taken away from her family and on the way to Buenos Aires, the young girl has been raped, beaten, and starved. Upon reaching her destination, Batya's spirit has been broken. And instead of promised life of freedom and luxury, she ended up in an upscale brothel and in a heart of Jewish mafia. Despite her unbearable situation, Batya never gave up hope of helping her family escape the horrors of Russia, and due to her patience and strong will power, the faith brought her new hope in the face of a fellow Jew.The novel covers multiples subjects as corruption, kidnapping, sex trafficking, and suicide. It was hard to read at times, however, it was wonderfully edited and fitted into the story. In my opinion, the novel was too long and I wish there were more details shared about Batya's family and their lives in Russian, also more details envolving Moscowitz and Co. Thank you GoodReads and William Morrow publishers for a free and advanced copy of the novel.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Little known period in history I was surprised and horrified to learn about Jewish sex trafficking in Buenos Aires from the lat 1800s into the early 1900s. Batya's story of being sold (promised to a wealthy man) at age 14 by her father is beyond sad. The author tells the story of a shtetl town in Russia that’s extremely well known, typical, including a father who talks to God like Tevye. Thinking she’s going to America to live with Mr.Moskowitz's sister until she’s 16, she discovers Moskowitz is Little known period in history I was surprised and horrified to learn about Jewish sex trafficking in Buenos Aires from the lat 1800s into the early 1900s. Batya's story of being sold (promised to a wealthy man) at age 14 by her father is beyond sad. The author tells the story of a shtetl town in Russia that’s extremely well known, typical, including a father who talks to God like Tevye. Thinking she’s going to America to live with Mr.Moskowitz's sister until she’s 16, she discovers Moskowitz is no future husband and her cruise to South America is a breaking-in of her future life as a prostitute. His sister is the madam. We learn of the network of Jewish white slave traders who buy and sell, abuse and mistreat young girls, especially in Argentina and Brazil, where it’s legal. How is Batya going to be able to escape? Learn to endure? Help her family? She meets two men with offers of help. Are they real? Will she help to bring down this network known as Zwi Migdal? Can she rescue her family?
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  • Miriam
    January 1, 1970
    A Book Of Courage!This is a book about a young girl who was caught in a sex trafficking scheme. She went from a warm Jewish family living in a shtetl in Russia to a house of prostitution in Argentina. This is a book of fiction, although it is historically accurate. Prostitution was legal in Argentina and many of the men who ran the houses were Jewish themselves. The girls and women were virtually kidnapped into this life and were prisoners.The heroine in the novel survived by planning to rescue A Book Of Courage!This is a book about a young girl who was caught in a sex trafficking scheme. She went from a warm Jewish family living in a shtetl in Russia to a house of prostitution in Argentina. This is a book of fiction, although it is historically accurate. Prostitution was legal in Argentina and many of the men who ran the houses were Jewish themselves. The girls and women were virtually kidnapped into this life and were prisoners.The heroine in the novel survived by planning to rescue her family and bring them to a better life. I gave this book 5 stars because this author was extremely skilled in making the heroine come alive, sharing thoughts and feelings that were believable.The one criticism I have is with the title. It does not do justice to this very special book.
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  • Kerry
    January 1, 1970
    I received this uncorrected proof in a Goodreads contest and am under no obligation to post a favorable reviewThe Third Daughter by Talia Carner is a thought provoking, sad novel that brings to light a horrible time in history . Unfortunately, the disturbing fact of sex slaves and trafficking is an ongoing problem even today. Carner builds a frightened young child sold into prostitution into a strong courageous woman willing to risk her life in order to help others suffering the same horrors as I received this uncorrected proof in a Goodreads contest and am under no obligation to post a favorable reviewThe Third Daughter by Talia Carner is a thought provoking, sad novel that brings to light a horrible time in history . Unfortunately, the disturbing fact of sex slaves and trafficking is an ongoing problem even today. Carner builds a frightened young child sold into prostitution into a strong courageous woman willing to risk her life in order to help others suffering the same horrors as she experienced. Not necessarily an easy read because of the subject matter; I often put book down and read other less intense novels but I was always drawn back to see how Batya was doing and my heart kept hoping for the "happy ending". This is an excellent read.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    4 1/2 stars for sure.Thank you to the publisher for my advanced copy."No one leaves home unless homes is the mouth of a shark.""I do not know where I am going, where I have come from is disappearing...I am unwelcome and my body is burning with the shame of not belonging."-Warren ShireMy knowledge of the Jewish faith and of Jewish customs is admittedly limited, and I hope that Talia Carner was accurate in her depictions. That being said, this is an extremely well written novel that brings to ligh 4 1/2 stars for sure.Thank you to the publisher for my advanced copy."No one leaves home unless homes is the mouth of a shark.""I do not know where I am going, where I have come from is disappearing...I am unwelcome and my body is burning with the shame of not belonging."-Warren ShireMy knowledge of the Jewish faith and of Jewish customs is admittedly limited, and I hope that Talia Carner was accurate in her depictions. That being said, this is an extremely well written novel that brings to light a history that I was not familiar with and is a reminder that even though we as humans have progressed, we still have a long way to go. Highly recommended!
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  • Alexandria
    January 1, 1970
    The Third Daughter is a great book in this book you will meet fourteen-year-old batya who leaves her old life behind as she is whisked away to a new world.But will have a long journey trying to get to america due to her father who wants her to be wealthy and have a new life in america. But soon she discovers that she’s entered a waking nightmare a different world completely from the one she's use too.This book is brilliant, its a powerful story Batya must find courage while facing danger, and sh The Third Daughter is a great book in this book you will meet fourteen-year-old batya who leaves her old life behind as she is whisked away to a new world.But will have a long journey trying to get to america due to her father who wants her to be wealthy and have a new life in america. But soon she discovers that she’s entered a waking nightmare a different world completely from the one she's use too.This book is brilliant, its a powerful story Batya must find courage while facing danger, and she must find strength and hope in the face of despair and misery.love reading this book thanks for my copy appreciate it !!
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    From the 1870s until 1939 an estimated 140,000 to 220,000 girls, teenagers and young women from Eastern Europe were coerced and kidnapped by the Zwi Migdal organization and sold into slavery and prostitution in Argentina. Talia Carner tells this brutal story through the eyes of Batya, a 14-year-old girl who is lured to Buenos Aires with the promise of marriage to a wealthy, successful Jewish man after a progom devastates her shtetl. Well researched, well-written, heart-breaking and hopeful, this From the 1870s until 1939 an estimated 140,000 to 220,000 girls, teenagers and young women from Eastern Europe were coerced and kidnapped by the Zwi Migdal organization and sold into slavery and prostitution in Argentina. Talia Carner tells this brutal story through the eyes of Batya, a 14-year-old girl who is lured to Buenos Aires with the promise of marriage to a wealthy, successful Jewish man after a progom devastates her shtetl. Well researched, well-written, heart-breaking and hopeful, this is an important story that brings one of the most shameful (and unknown) chapters in Jewish history to light.
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  • Leslie
    January 1, 1970
    In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, it's estimated that over 150,000 women from Eastern European countries were kidnapped (by incredibly duplicitous means) from their countries into forced prostitution in South America. At the heart of this novel is Batya and this novel is told from her POV so you really get to know her and root for her as she tries to take down the vast criminal network that enslaved so many women. It's a triumphant novel that really sheds light on a little-known part of In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, it's estimated that over 150,000 women from Eastern European countries were kidnapped (by incredibly duplicitous means) from their countries into forced prostitution in South America. At the heart of this novel is Batya and this novel is told from her POV so you really get to know her and root for her as she tries to take down the vast criminal network that enslaved so many women. It's a triumphant novel that really sheds light on a little-known part of Argentina's history.
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