Man-Eaters, Vol. 1
Adolescent girls can be real monsters. Maude is twelve, about the age some girls turn into flesh-eating wild cats. As her detective dad investigates a series of strange mauling attacks, Maude worries she may be the killer. Collects #1-4Includes the informative survival handbook, "Cat Fight! A Boys' Guide to Dangerous Cats." Plus never-before-published extra content.

Man-Eaters, Vol. 1 Details

TitleMan-Eaters, Vol. 1
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 5th, 2019
PublisherImage Comics
ISBN-139781534311435
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Feminism, Graphic Novels Comics, Horror, Fiction

Man-Eaters, Vol. 1 Review

  • Artemy
    January 1, 1970
    After the brilliant but short-lived run on Marvel's Mockingbird I was ready to read anything else by Chelsea Cain, so I was really happy when Man-Eaters by her and Kate Niemczyk was announced. This is a comic with an absolutely bonkers premise — what if a mutated version of Toxoplasmosis caused certain women to turn into big, wild, violent cats when they menstruate? Man-Eaters is a series that follows Maude, a young girl who is seemingly infected with such virus.The first three issues were absol After the brilliant but short-lived run on Marvel's Mockingbird I was ready to read anything else by Chelsea Cain, so I was really happy when Man-Eaters by her and Kate Niemczyk was announced. This is a comic with an absolutely bonkers premise — what if a mutated version of Toxoplasmosis caused certain women to turn into big, wild, violent cats when they menstruate? Man-Eaters is a series that follows Maude, a young girl who is seemingly infected with such virus.The first three issues were absolutely great. The book's over the top premise is a great source of sharp humour and satire, and Chelsea Cain uses it to its fullest. Unfortunately, these three issues barely set up a story, let alone an arc. For some reason, this trade is (supposedly) only going to be four issues long, and issue 4 was... a questionable choice at best. You see, issue 4 entirely consists of in-universe pamphlets, ads and little newspaper articles, a-la The Wicked + The Divine #23, or fake ads in the back of Bitch Planet issues, or one of those things Bendis did in one of his Marvel series (right now I can't for the life of me remember which series that was). Man-Eaters #4 was really annoying because it was entirely a filler, and so early in the series, too. Those articles added nothing to the main story or the world around it, and we see most of the same kinds of jokey ads that we see in the back of the regular issues anyway. The story has barely started, there really wasn't even a completed arc here, and yet we get this as a cap off for the very first volume. I'm all for experimenting with the format, but this was a really poor attempt and not a great choice by the creators.In the end, I still love Man-Eaters, and think this is one of the best new series of 2018, but I also can't deny that ending the very first story arc on such a note does not leave a great impression. As such, I can't even recommend reading it in trade format — I can recommend picking up the first three issues separately and skipping #4 entirely, though. I promise, there is nothing there that you didn't already read in the first three. Here's to hoping that volume 2 will make things right, and that the series overall will manage to get past that one misstep.
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  • James DeSantis
    January 1, 1970
    This seems to be a title that is either LOVED or HATED. I was kind of eager to see where I would fit in. I liked Mockingbird a lot from Chelsea Cain, so I was pretty excited to try this. It starts off with learning that girls, once they get their period, can transform into huge cats that tear you apart. The series isn't taking itself too serious, but at the same time, is tackling big subject matters. See, the government decides to put in these chemicals into girls drinks to prevent them from get This seems to be a title that is either LOVED or HATED. I was kind of eager to see where I would fit in. I liked Mockingbird a lot from Chelsea Cain, so I was pretty excited to try this. It starts off with learning that girls, once they get their period, can transform into huge cats that tear you apart. The series isn't taking itself too serious, but at the same time, is tackling big subject matters. See, the government decides to put in these chemicals into girls drinks to prevent them from getting their period so that they transform into these huge cats. A lot of the first volume focuses on setting up the world and the rules of it. However, we do get somewhat of a main protagonist in Maude who is getting her first period. When she gets it she keeps it hidden from her father, who is a detective trying to uncover the latest killing of a Man-eater. Good: I enjoyed the style it was going for. Very colorful and fun, except it can turn horror quick, and when doing so it makes the contrast work in its favor. I also enjoyed Maude as the main cast, and even wanted more of her, since she was a tough teen with a badass to her. Also, the rules and search are interesting, and this universe is weird but I strangely wanted more. Bad: The last issue is just filled with a shit ton of advertisements. Sure, some are pretty funny and we get the idea behind it. It's showing how these women are controlled and such. However, it felt like a huge filler issue to end the very short graphic novel on (only 4 issues). Also, some of the dialogue could be TOO on the nose, defeating the purpose of its message. Overall...I'm in the middle. I like the idea, themes, and character. But it's filler issue and trying too hard at points hurts it for me. Still, if there's another volume, I'll check it out! A 3 out of 5.
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  • Kyra Leseberg (Roots & Reads)
    January 1, 1970
    I discovered a surprising love of graphic novels a couple years ago thanks to the Litsy community.  There are so many books (genres, authors, publishers, etc.) that I can thank Litsy for bringing into my life.It started with the Saga series by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples and exploded from there.One of my favorite graphic novels is the two volume collection of Mockingbird by Chelsea Cain.  Cain's dark and often satirical humor never fails to make me laugh and grab my complete attention, es I discovered a surprising love of graphic novels a couple years ago thanks to the Litsy community.  There are so many books (genres, authors, publishers, etc.) that I can thank Litsy for bringing into my life.It started with the Saga series by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples and exploded from there.One of my favorite graphic novels is the two volume collection of Mockingbird by Chelsea Cain.  Cain's dark and often satirical humor never fails to make me laugh and grab my complete attention, especially with the bonus of feminine badassery.I was thrilled when I learned she had created a new comic geared toward YA about girls turning into dangerous man-eating cats at the onset of puberty thanks to a mutation in the toxoplasmosis parasite known as toxoplasmosis X.The story follows twelve-year-old Maude, a girl living with her dad, a homicide detective investigating a string of cat attacks.  Her mom is an animal vet employed by S.C.A.T. to track and study killer cats and is largely absent from Maude's life.In Volume 1 (collecting 1-4), issues 1-3 explain how toxoplasmosis X effects females during puberty and follows the investigation her parents are working while Maude worries she may be the killer.  Throughout each issue are propaganda ads and pamphlets about keeping boys safe from cat attacks. The design is completely original and creative, really adding an extra level of entertainment.The premise is over the top (in a great way!) as it satirizes the way American culture views female puberty and the strange concern it has of the effects on males.The story is just beginning to unfold in volume 1 but it didn't feel like a complete story arc because issue 4 was an entire satirical magazine full of propaganda and didn't advance Maude's story at all.  While that was frustrating, I really enjoyed the volume overall.  Cain's dark humor made me want to read Man-Eaters but right now it's the creative team designing the propaganda that will keep me reading future issues!Thanks to Image Comics and Edelweiss for providing me with a DRC in exchange for my honest review!  Man-Eaters Volume 1 is scheduled for release on March 5, 2019.For more reviews, visit www.rootsandreads.wordpress.com
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  • Laura Henry
    January 1, 1970
    WELP IM OBSESSED NOW. This book is so clever and beautiful everyone needs to read this. This is the story I didn’t know I needed. You might be a put off by the idea that young girls are turning into murderous panthers but please read it because you need this book.
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  • Devann
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC copy of this book from Edelweissactual rating: 3.5AKA I really wish this was better. Look ...I like the general idea of this and even SOME of the execution, but it's basically a watered down YA version of Bitch Planet and it really shows. I can see how that might actually be the point because there are probably teen girls whose parents won't let them read Bitch Planet simply because of the word Bitch in the title, but for me as an adult this falls a little bit flat.The premise I received an ARC copy of this book from Edelweissactual rating: 3.5AKA I really wish this was better. Look ...I like the general idea of this and even SOME of the execution, but it's basically a watered down YA version of Bitch Planet and it really shows. I can see how that might actually be the point because there are probably teen girls whose parents won't let them read Bitch Planet simply because of the word Bitch in the title, but for me as an adult this falls a little bit flat.The premise is ...out there. I get that they wanted to use cats because women are often called catty and there's 'cat-fights' and all that stuff ...but the basis of this title is that the bacteria in cat poop that makes people sick somehow mutated to make people turn into giant cats and attack people ...except it's only women who are in their child-bearing years for some reason. I get that they wanted to use the change into a cat as a period allegory ...but the 'science' here is not really explained well and what is explained doesn't make sense. Like beyond the general WHY [and also HOW adding certain chemicals to the water supply suppresses the disease], what effect does this have on people getting pregnant? If you're delaying puberty in girls or stopping it altogether then what effect does this have on them biologically and also do they have to stop drinking the water in order to get pregnant? When they're pregnant are they still turning into giant cats? What effect does that have on the baby? At first I thought maybe it was just teen girls but the period metaphor and some random one-off line makes it seems like ALL women who have gone through puberty but not through menopause are affected ...Also the entirely of issue 4 is a fake satire magazine. Things like this were already sprinkled throughout the main issue and while enjoyable and funny in small doses I do not think we needed an entire issue devoted to it, especially when there is so little plot development already. I honestly didn't even read most of it. There's some good stuff in here, but it definitely needs to be work-shopped a bit more because mostly it was just making me wish there was more Bitch Planet out.
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  • Paz R.M.
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsFuuuuuck. I wanted to love this. Issue 1? Great. Issue 2 & 3? Good. Issue 4? Ugh. Listen I love my weird in-universe propaganda. Most of the time they are original and satirical AF. Loved them at the end of every issue here, loved them for example in Bitch Planet. But guys, issue 4? 20+ pages of a fictional magazine that doesn't add anything new, not to the story, plot or tone of this book.Felt like a waste of time and money cause, like I said, the same kind of propaganda was alread 3.5 starsFuuuuuck. I wanted to love this. Issue 1? Great. Issue 2 & 3? Good. Issue 4? Ugh. Listen I love my weird in-universe propaganda. Most of the time they are original and satirical AF. Loved them at the end of every issue here, loved them for example in Bitch Planet. But guys, issue 4? 20+ pages of a fictional magazine that doesn't add anything new, not to the story, plot or tone of this book.Felt like a waste of time and money cause, like I said, the same kind of propaganda was already used in the previous issues. What's worst, issue 3 ends with a cliffhanger and then there's NO development, it's completely ignored and when the issues are monthly, gosh, it's a bit frustrating.Also, if volume 1 collects issues 1-4, I'm sorry to tell you that there's barely a set up for a story.Dunno, this started with such great promise, but I've lost all excitement to keep reading it.
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  • Katy
    January 1, 1970
    This is probably the most feminist thing I've read in a while. I loved every second of it!
  • Erin Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    I NEED MORE STARS.
  • Anna (Bananas)
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 reallyMan Eaters has an amusing concept (girls turn into angry, violent cats when their periods start), but the first volume is light on plot progression. It feels more like world-building than a story arc. That being said, it’s promising. It’s essentially an inversion of toxic masculinity into the dangers of “toxoplasmosis X.” The comic touches on patriarchy, rape culture, and mysogyny, both directly and indirectly: pre-teen boys fearing girls, water fountains marked Girls Only, fake ads ai 3.5 reallyMan Eaters has an amusing concept (girls turn into angry, violent cats when their periods start), but the first volume is light on plot progression. It feels more like world-building than a story arc. That being said, it’s promising. It’s essentially an inversion of toxic masculinity into the dangers of “toxoplasmosis X.” The comic touches on patriarchy, rape culture, and mysogyny, both directly and indirectly: pre-teen boys fearing girls, water fountains marked Girls Only, fake ads aimed at boys trying to protect themselves from girls, estrogen water, measures taken to eradicate periods, and the not-unrealistic ways that girls are treated differently than boys in general, even though it’s shown through the lens of an exaggerated world....There are also two direct Trump quotes that fit perfectly into this imaginary world. And Hillary posters in the girls lounge. The creators can do a lot with these concepts. I just hope they do something interesting going forward, something unique. It reminds of the first volume of Bitch Planet so far - great concept, lots of tongue-in-cheek references to the real world, but not enough heart and plot.
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  • Ariadna Sanz
    January 1, 1970
    Exceptional work, really fun and rich, full of feminist statements. Loved the use of side elements such as propaganda to explain the environment in which these girls are growing up. The constant correlation to our reality is scary.
  • Mia Vicino
    January 1, 1970
    teen girls turning into killer cats is a BRILLIANT premise!! sadly hampered by typical white/liberal feminist execution :/
  • Jaclyn Hillis
    January 1, 1970
    This book is so much fun!
  • Molly
    January 1, 1970
    I actually read the four individual issues since the collected volume isn’t out yet. Regardless: SO GOOD. Super excited to see where Chelsea Cain takes this next.
  • Sharon Jo
    January 1, 1970
    This is the best comic I've ever read. It was so silly.
  • Tabor
    January 1, 1970
    3 1/2 stars. Girls turn into murderous panthers as a result of their period and terrified of this possibility, society/men have taken some precautions. First, hormones have been placed in the water to eradicate periods and men constantly live in fear of their significant others and female family members turning and killing them all. The graphic novel is littered with ads featuring various products and even classes geared towards men protecting themselves. This is brilliant and further showcased 3 1/2 stars. Girls turn into murderous panthers as a result of their period and terrified of this possibility, society/men have taken some precautions. First, hormones have been placed in the water to eradicate periods and men constantly live in fear of their significant others and female family members turning and killing them all. The graphic novel is littered with ads featuring various products and even classes geared towards men protecting themselves. This is brilliant and further showcased in the relationship between Maude's parents, who are divorced. The thing that I really liked about this story was how it empowered periods and I know that's a strange thing to say but honestly, it did. I'm glad to see that periods are being normalized and shown as something that women want to have, instead of being ashamed. In fact and spoilers ahead, Maude, who is tired of hiding, decides to take matters into her own hands and leaves us with a chilling conclusion. Personally can't wait to see where this series goes. Also, my other favorite part was the corgi squad that tracks down big cats for the police. Actual favorite.
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  • Danielle
    January 1, 1970
    Oh gosh, did I miss Chelsea Cain's humor. MOCKINGBIRD was my favorite (cancelled) run of Marvel comics so I was crazy excited to get my hands on this volume!Without the restrictions of capes, Cain creates a unique story with all the funny background details evident in her earlier works. Friendly nods to pop culture references - my favorite is the BITCH PLANET poster in one panel - and a context familiar to our world, readers will enjoy how this tale of teen girls turning into killer big cats sat Oh gosh, did I miss Chelsea Cain's humor. MOCKINGBIRD was my favorite (cancelled) run of Marvel comics so I was crazy excited to get my hands on this volume!Without the restrictions of capes, Cain creates a unique story with all the funny background details evident in her earlier works. Friendly nods to pop culture references - my favorite is the BITCH PLANET poster in one panel - and a context familiar to our world, readers will enjoy how this tale of teen girls turning into killer big cats satirizes male phobia of menstruation. Zany, fun, and totally nudge-nudge-wink-wink to all the ladies, I look forward to seeing how the twist at the end of Vol. 1 plays out!
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  • Rory Wilding
    January 1, 1970
    I never owned a cat growing up, so my views toward the feline species is through funny cat videos or their occasionally creepy presence as depicted in Stephen King’s Pet Sematary. Following their acclaimed but short-lived run on Mockingbird, creators Chelsea Cain and Kate Niemczyk explore the idea of cats as figures of horror through satirical humor in Image Comics’ Man-Eaters.Please click here for my full review.
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  • Kelly Van Damme
    January 1, 1970
    Great graphics, colouring & story, alternating with pictures and "advertisements". Full of criticism on the patriarchy, funny, lush and entirely unique. Recommended for cat lovers and readers who like their graphic novels with a twist.
  • Danika at The Lesbrary
    January 1, 1970
    I loved Mockingbird, and I found this intriguing, but I didn't feel like I got a lot out of this volume other than the premise. I'll pick up the next volume, but I didn't feel like this was a story in itself.
  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent. Can't wait for more.
  • Bárbara
    January 1, 1970
    A very weird and funny way to talk about feminism.
  • Ardent
    January 1, 1970
    Hilarious, and so on point it hurts.
  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    YessssssRead it Love itBite Back
  • Alex Sarll
    January 1, 1970
    Chelsea Cain and Kate Niemczyk's Mockingbird run did a fabulous job of giving man-babies a fit of the vapours, and now they reunite for a similarly unapologetic creator-owned series. The high concept: a toxoplasmosis mutation which means that, along with the troubles already attendant on the onset of menstruation, teenage girls start turning into rampaging were-cats. So yes, essentially it's another update of Cat People, again keeping it in step with the twists and turns society's fascinated fea Chelsea Cain and Kate Niemczyk's Mockingbird run did a fabulous job of giving man-babies a fit of the vapours, and now they reunite for a similarly unapologetic creator-owned series. The high concept: a toxoplasmosis mutation which means that, along with the troubles already attendant on the onset of menstruation, teenage girls start turning into rampaging were-cats. So yes, essentially it's another update of Cat People, again keeping it in step with the twists and turns society's fascinated fear of sexuality has taken in the interim – but I liked both takes on Cat People, so that's not a problem for me. I don't necessarily buy every detail here (if there are hormones in the water intended to prevent menstruation, how does that affect fertility? How come tampons are so easy for a kid to find when even without the were-cat issue, some girls have such difficulties?). But it's clearly intended more as a satirical farce than a seamless piece of worldbuilding, and on that level, every in-world poster and every awkward interaction contributes to making this a perfect scrappy little sister to Bitch Planet. For all of three issues.Four issues would be on the short side for a first collection anyway, but the final issue here is, in its entirety, an in-world publication. That's not necessarily a bad idea in itself - WicDiv being one recent example of a comic which did an excellent one. But that was much further into the run, and felt much more substantial than this rather flimsy and filler-ish effort. There's the seed of something brilliant, fun and timely in those opening issues, but to then drop the ball so drastically and so soon doesn't bode well.(Edelweiss ARC)
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  • The Lost Dreamer
    January 1, 1970
    I read issue #1 in a train, while I was taking my commute, and the lady that sat beside me didn't seem to understand why I couldn't stop laughing. But this is just so good. One of the comics I've enjoyed the most in this 2018. Women start becomig homicidal cats when they have their periods and what's society's reaction? Ban menstruation. It just so brilliant. I love this crazy premises that seem so plausible.And I love Chelsea Cain's sense of humor. I fell in love with her run on Mockingbird, Vo I read issue #1 in a train, while I was taking my commute, and the lady that sat beside me didn't seem to understand why I couldn't stop laughing. But this is just so good. One of the comics I've enjoyed the most in this 2018. Women start becomig homicidal cats when they have their periods and what's society's reaction? Ban menstruation. It just so brilliant. I love this crazy premises that seem so plausible.And I love Chelsea Cain's sense of humor. I fell in love with her run on Mockingbird, Vol. 2: My Feminist Agenda and the sarcasm here is not that different. I've enjoyed everything about Man-Eaters: from the crazyness of the situation to the art. And, of course, all the twisted propaganda. Issue #4 is just delightfull. So real and intelligent I'd like to hang every single page in my wall. As a woman, this comic is relatable and smart. The victimisation of males is a fiction perfect for the times we live in, when many of them claim to live under a feminist dictatorship. A perfect not so unvelievable dystopia.
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  • Alaina
    January 1, 1970
    I snagged this because I saw 'girls turn in to monstrous cats and eat people' and was like 'sign me the hell up' but....it's soheavyhanded.Even for concepts I like! Using advertisements and articles and stuff to help world build! I love that! But other stuff just felt like....things I've already seen before, I guess? Turning into a literal monster when you get your period? I watched Ginger Snaps in the early 2000's already. It's a trope I still think is great! I just didn't think it was that wel I snagged this because I saw 'girls turn in to monstrous cats and eat people' and was like 'sign me the hell up' but....it's soheavyhanded.Even for concepts I like! Using advertisements and articles and stuff to help world build! I love that! But other stuff just felt like....things I've already seen before, I guess? Turning into a literal monster when you get your period? I watched Ginger Snaps in the early 2000's already. It's a trope I still think is great! I just didn't think it was that well executed here. Spunky, smart middle school girl with a pink hat? Molly from Runaways is right there and she'd probably LOVE to turn into a giant cat.IDK, I'll probably read the next TBP when I get it from the library, but I think that, aside from a couple cool concepts, it's just not for me.
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  • Amit Verma
    January 1, 1970
    This graphic novel is a satire on society inclined to discriminate based on sex and physical features.It is humorous, innovative and hard hitting.Artwork is excellent and Colors are very good.Captions are very funny.12 years old Maude wants to face reality of periods and wants to make sense of everyday world which appears weirded to her.His father is a forensic detective inspecting few big cat murders in the city.Funny, fast, page-turner and innovative graphic novel..Thanks edelweiss plus and au This graphic novel is a satire on society inclined to discriminate based on sex and physical features.It is humorous, innovative and hard hitting.Artwork is excellent and Colors are very good.Captions are very funny.12 years old Maude wants to face reality of periods and wants to make sense of everyday world which appears weirded to her.His father is a forensic detective inspecting few big cat murders in the city.Funny, fast, page-turner and innovative graphic novel..Thanks edelweiss plus and author for review copy.
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  • S.
    January 1, 1970
    This is a blast! I read Mockingjay and knew I'd enjoy Man-Eaters, too (though I imagined it would be about big cats eating the trolls who attacked Chelsea Cain for her version of Mockingjay). Just like Mockingjay, it has Doctor Who references...and corgis.I'm looking forward to the next volume.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    Should be compulsory reading for incels and neck-beards throughout the Western world- although I fear this is far too subtle for them to understand.Thanks to a virus in cat poop, Puberty and mensturation is turning young girls into large killer cats, and men- folk are petrified. From the geeky easter-eggs to the adverts and magazine issue, Man-Eaters is a complete joy. Funny, visceral, satirical and incredibly timely, it hits the spot without feeling forced or preachy. Also scores major points f Should be compulsory reading for incels and neck-beards throughout the Western world- although I fear this is far too subtle for them to understand.Thanks to a virus in cat poop, Puberty and mensturation is turning young girls into large killer cats, and men- folk are petrified. From the geeky easter-eggs to the adverts and magazine issue, Man-Eaters is a complete joy. Funny, visceral, satirical and incredibly timely, it hits the spot without feeling forced or preachy. Also scores major points for a realistic father/daughter relationship within a divorced family.One for anyone who cares about female issues, sexual politics, and cats. (Shout-out to the brilliant corgis though).* Review copy recieved via publisher in exchange for an honest review. *
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  • Tabrizia Jones
    January 1, 1970
    I actually really enjoyed this one. It tackled the stereotypes that young girls face and still face to this day about puberty. It portrays a clear message while making it an enjoyable and funny graphic novel. The artwork was also very good, very intricate in its horror details. I also thought it was creative to include real looking advertisements towards the end of the book. It looked so real you couldn't tell if it wasn't the real thing.
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