Finders (Firstborn, Lastborn #1)
Cassilde Sam is a barely solvent salvage operator, hunting for relics in the ruins left by the mysterious Ancestors—particularly the color-coded Elements that power most of humanity’s current technology, including the ability to navigate through hyperspace. Cassilde is also steadily fading under the onslaught of Lightman’s, an incurable, inevitably fatal disease. She needs one last find big enough to leave a legacy for her partner and fellow salvor Dai Winter. When their lover and former colleague Summerlad Ashe reappears, offering them a chance to salvage part of an orbiting palace that he claims contains potentially immense riches, Cassilde is desperate enough to take the gamble, even though Ashe had left them both to fight on the opposite side of the interplanetary war that only ended seven years ago. The find is everything Ashe promised. But when pirates attack the claim, Cassilde receives the rarest of the Ancestors’ Gifts: a change to her biochemistry that confers near-instant healing and seems to promise immortality. But the change also drags her into an underworld where Gifts are traded in blood, and powerful Gifts bring equally powerful enemies. Hunted for her Gift and determined to find Gifts for her lovers, Cassilde discovers that an old enemy is searching for the greatest of the Ancestral artifacts: the power that the Ancestors created and were able to barely contain after it almost destroyed them, plunging humanity into the first Long Dark. Haunted by dream-visions of this power whispering its own version of what happened, Cassilde must find it first, before her enemy frees it to destroy her own civilization.

Finders (Firstborn, Lastborn #1) Details

TitleFinders (Firstborn, Lastborn #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseDec 10th, 2018
PublisherCandlemark & Gleam
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Fantasy, Science Fiction Fantasy

Finders (Firstborn, Lastborn #1) Review

  • K.J. Charles
    January 1, 1970
    Melissa Scott space opera! A trio of salvage experts who also used to have a poly relationship find themselves at the heart of a storm relating to life-changing nanotech left behind by the Ancestors. This is another book proving the dictum that all current SFF is about climate change: the story is of humanity destroying itself with tech and war not once but twice, and the desperate efforts of thinking people not to do it again. Lots of strangeness and adventure with an intense human heart, and b Melissa Scott space opera! A trio of salvage experts who also used to have a poly relationship find themselves at the heart of a storm relating to life-changing nanotech left behind by the Ancestors. This is another book proving the dictum that all current SFF is about climate change: the story is of humanity destroying itself with tech and war not once but twice, and the desperate efforts of thinking people not to do it again. Lots of strangeness and adventure with an intense human heart, and beautifully written.
    more
  • Tansy Roberts
    January 1, 1970
    An action-packed space adventure with so much heart. Finders is an intense exploration of impending mortality, mystical immortality, and how both of these things can put pressure on your relationships. Cassilde is a space scavenger in a romantic triad with two men: her long-time partner Dai and their former third, Ashe, who left their relationship years ago and has now returned dragging trouble in his wake.As the crew of the spaceship Carabosse, the three of them are swept up in a dangerous ques An action-packed space adventure with so much heart. Finders is an intense exploration of impending mortality, mystical immortality, and how both of these things can put pressure on your relationships. Cassilde is a space scavenger in a romantic triad with two men: her long-time partner Dai and their former third, Ashe, who left their relationship years ago and has now returned dragging trouble in his wake.As the crew of the spaceship Carabosse, the three of them are swept up in a dangerous quest for the Gifts of their Ancestors. These alien artefacts offer healing and in some cases immortality. This is of particular interest to Cassilde and her lovers, not only because she is dying from a debilitating disease, but also because they all keep getting shot at.Some spoilers: I was hesitant at first about the “magical cure” aspect of the story, but it is handled in a complex and thoughtful way which addresses many of the concerns that I had about this trope. The Gift comes with a range of risks and costs, many of which the user does not discover until it’s too late. Cassilde is particularly uncomfortable with the way that holders of Gifts become addicted to tracking down more, in a complex “game” that takes over their life. She never stops questioning the ethical, personal and philosophical aspects of the Gift that cures her condition early on in the story, and continues to fear that her new health and vitality is going to disappear again at any moment. (Not all of her concerns are fully addressed in the book, which I felt was a good thing — she is left with many unanswered questions about her future as is true of many people who survive a dangerous illness or medical condition)The story does not just address Cassilde’s reservations about the Gifts at the heart of the plot: we also see the impact of ill health and mortality as well the possibility of immortality on Cassilde’s relationship with Dai and Ashe, which is also strained by tensions stemming from their long estrangement, the class/cultural differences between them, and their different opinions on whether living forever is a good thing.Finders is more “Killjoys” than “Star Trek,” with a strong focus on interpersonal relationships and the flawed society around them as much as the tech and the planetary politics. There’s an intimate domesticity here, balancing out the gritty slice-of-life working habits of space scavengers. This thought-provoking, crunchy science fiction novel comes with deep conversations, technological wonders, and plenty of spaceship sex.
    more
  • Catherine
    January 1, 1970
    Here's what I said in my blurb since it's not out and about yet: "Melissa Scott’s Finders is an epic tale set in a universe of hostile AIs and social collapse in the aftermath of a devastating intergalactic war. Cassilde and her lovers, Ashe and Dai, are salvagers and explorers, sifting through the remains of the high tech civilizations that have left their mark on the galaxy around them. Cassilde’s illness, Ashe’s previous betrayal and an implacable foe threaten their chosen family, their livel Here's what I said in my blurb since it's not out and about yet: "Melissa Scott’s Finders is an epic tale set in a universe of hostile AIs and social collapse in the aftermath of a devastating intergalactic war. Cassilde and her lovers, Ashe and Dai, are salvagers and explorers, sifting through the remains of the high tech civilizations that have left their mark on the galaxy around them. Cassilde’s illness, Ashe’s previous betrayal and an implacable foe threaten their chosen family, their livelihood and their lives. Can they succeed with the help of the Ancestors’ Gifts? Scott’s science fiction has always been remarkable for its world-building and Finders is no exception. Once you read this thrilling new science fiction saga with its unforgettable characters, you’ll be wanting more."
    more
  • Kalamah
    January 1, 1970
    So, having read the kindle sample, I can say that the plot looks interesting enough and the worldbuilding is intriguing, but...- I bounced off some of Ms. Scott's other books, so I'm wary. Including the highly recced Astreiant series. Just wasn't for me.- There isn't enough gay for me. The main ship was poly m/f/m, with the second man being optional/it's complicated. I'm frankly just not interested in reading about m/f, especially when the relationship is entwined with the plot the way this one So, having read the kindle sample, I can say that the plot looks interesting enough and the worldbuilding is intriguing, but...- I bounced off some of Ms. Scott's other books, so I'm wary. Including the highly recced Astreiant series. Just wasn't for me.- There isn't enough gay for me. The main ship was poly m/f/m, with the second man being optional/it's complicated. I'm frankly just not interested in reading about m/f, especially when the relationship is entwined with the plot the way this one seems to be. And I'm less interested in the m/m as well, because it thus far happens off-page. It might change, yeah, but the m/f is mentioned rather too frequently in just the sample. It's off-putting for this lesbian.I'm shelving this as a "maybe eventually" for now.
    more
  • Peter Tillman
    January 1, 1970
    Here's a link to the author's post about her new novel:https://mescott.livejournal.com/--scroll down to Finders!, Oct 5, 2017" ... it’s been a joy to get back to far future, high science SF."I liked her short story "Firstborn, Lastborn" a lot: A remarkably dense far-future story. It’s AI vs. Human, or maybe posthuman, and revenge for an old hurt. 4+ stars, and I need to read it again. Reprinted in Dozois #34. Also part of the new novel is her 2o13 novelette "Finders", a good story (3 stars) abou Here's a link to the author's post about her new novel:https://mescott.livejournal.com/--scroll down to Finders!, Oct 5, 2017" ... it’s been a joy to get back to far future, high science SF."I liked her short story "Firstborn, Lastborn" a lot: A remarkably dense far-future story. It’s AI vs. Human, or maybe posthuman, and revenge for an old hurt. 4+ stars, and I need to read it again. Reprinted in Dozois #34. Also part of the new novel is her 2o13 novelette "Finders", a good story (3 stars) about salvaging nanotech from a fallen human civilization, reprinted in Dozois #31. Not obvious how these two story-lines will fit together. The blurb (above) is promising, if she can pull it off. Here's an interview with the author, where she talks about the two story-kernels and how they fit into her WIP. This will be her first new standalone SF novel since 2000, I think. Great to see her writing high-concept SF again! Note to self: ask for a review copy.
    more
  • K8
    January 1, 1970
    okay, I don't think I've read anything by her, but apparently she usually writes lots of LGBT+ character so I'm !!!!!!!
  • Evenstar Deane
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t know which I liked the best in this book, the world building or the characters. Melissa Scott has created a fascinating universe where humans are climbing their way out of a second fall of civilization, scavenging remnants from the ancestors without fully understanding if they’re dealing with science or magic. Cassville and Dai are salvage operators, Cassilde dying of an incurable disease, when they are approached by former partner and lover, Ashe. He has a proposal for a salvage claim t I don’t know which I liked the best in this book, the world building or the characters. Melissa Scott has created a fascinating universe where humans are climbing their way out of a second fall of civilization, scavenging remnants from the ancestors without fully understanding if they’re dealing with science or magic. Cassville and Dai are salvage operators, Cassilde dying of an incurable disease, when they are approached by former partner and lover, Ashe. He has a proposal for a salvage claim that’s too good to pass up, but they can’t trust him after he left them to fight on the other side of a war. What I love about the characters is that their strengths work so well together, but they are each products of their very different backgrounds. They have to carefully feel their way to a new understanding, while being hunted across space by Ashe’s former compatriot from the war. Then there are the AIs who legend says were created by the ancestors and then turned against their creators in a war that caused the first fall of civilization. They’re only a myth now, but of course if they were real, they would be safely locked away where the ancestors trapped them.This book reminded me in some ways of the author’s Roads of Heaven series, both have very good world building and some similarities in the characters, but a very different universe and plot.
    more
  • Margaret E.
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent new universe from Melissa ScottGreat backstory including several interstellar dark ages leading to the current to situation that includes the aftermath of a recent war II found the characters to be interesting and believable & I actually cared about what happened to them (even to the least sympathetic character) No spoilers, but it appears to be a setup for further books and I look forward to them
    more
Write a review