Black Girls Must Die Exhausted
“Black girls must die exhausted” is something that 33-year-old Tabitha Walker has heard her grandmother say before. Of course, her grandmother (who happens to be white) was referring to the 1950’s and what she observed in the nascent times of civil rights. With a coveted position as a local news reporter, a “paper-perfect” boyfriend, and a standing Saturday morning appointment with a reliable hairstylist, Tabitha never imagined how this phrase could apply to her as a black girl in contemporary times – that is, until everything changed. An unexpected doctor’s diagnosis awakens Tabitha to an unperceived culprit, threatening the one thing that has always mattered most - having a family of her own. Stress has caused a premature burnout of Tabitha’s egg reserve, and time is running out on her options to become a wife and mother. With the help of her best friends, the irreverent and headstrong Laila and Alexis, the former “Sexy Lexi," Tabitha must explore the reaches of modern medicine and test the limits of her relationships. Will she risk every comfort to address the complications of her dysfunctionally-blended family and the uncertainty of a future with Marc? Tabitha's journey brings into view the internal experience of race, relationships, and generational patterns, and how each contributed to this crossroads. She must leverage the power of laughter, love, and courageous self-care to bring a healing stronger than she ever imagined - before the phrase “black girls must die exhausted” takes on a new and unwanted meaning in her own life. A well-written character-centered dramatic novel perfect for fans of Terri McMillan, Trisha R. Thomas, Omar Tyree, E. Lynn Harris, Kimberla Lawson Roby.

Black Girls Must Die Exhausted Details

TitleBlack Girls Must Die Exhausted
Author
ReleaseSep 15th, 2018
PublisherQuality Black Books
Rating
GenreFiction, Cultural, African American, Contemporary

Black Girls Must Die Exhausted Review

  • Cardyn Brooks
    January 1, 1970
    The following review first appeared on Sunday 11/18/2018: http://blerdybingereader.blogspot.com...There is a substantive distinction between BLACK fiction and fiction written about characters who happen to be black, among other traits, that’s difficult to quantify. Black Girls Must Die Exhausted, the first entry in a scheduled trilogy, falls into the latter category. It is integrated in ways that mainstream contemporary fiction rarely is beyond ethnicity, including socioeconomic class, geographi The following review first appeared on Sunday 11/18/2018: http://blerdybingereader.blogspot.com...There is a substantive distinction between BLACK fiction and fiction written about characters who happen to be black, among other traits, that’s difficult to quantify. Black Girls Must Die Exhausted, the first entry in a scheduled trilogy, falls into the latter category. It is integrated in ways that mainstream contemporary fiction rarely is beyond ethnicity, including socioeconomic class, geographic region, age, and gender. Blend a 21st-century New Adult version of Waiting to Exhale and “Girlfriends” with candid revelations about traumatic injuries of the spirit reminiscent of For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide/When the Rainbow is Enuf. Toss in the caustic wisdom of seasoned women a la “Golden Girls” or “Grace and Frankie” into a sometimes exclamatory narrative style familiar to fans of Sophie Kinsella to create this endearing tale that’s provocative, funny, and emotionally satisfying. Of its many thematic layers about 33-year-old Tabitha’s professional and personal struggles, Black Girls Must Die Exhausted portrays the challenges of women to maintain their integrity of self and exert agency from multiple angles: career opportunities, proactive medical and mental health advocacy, family obligations, and romantic relationships. Tabitha’s, Alexis’s, and Laila’s complicated man troubles each qualify for their own “Ask Steve Harvey” segment. Tabitha broods about single, thirty-something men’s attitudes toward monogamy on page 10: They treated love like a disease you catch, and if real adult commitment was the incurable version of it, then for them family was basically death. The ensuing relationship drama practically screams validation of Dr. Maya Angelou’s quote about believing people the first time they reveal who they really are. Inclusive representation is also addressed from multiple points of view. Seeds for a less fraught variation of themes from The Hate U Give are planted on page 27 when Tabitha thinks, “Communities that were underrepresented in the newsroom were underrepresented in the news.” The words newsroom and news are easily substituted for words like innovators and innovations or executive suites and workplaces. Tabitha’s rude awakening regarding her fertility options resonates as a timely call for proactive self-advocacy consistent with revelations shared by former first lady Michelle Obama in Becoming, the #startasking campaign started by 2018 Mrs. North Carolina, and the series by Nicole Ellis for The Washington Post. The level of reading enjoyment provided by Black Girls Must Die Exhausted bodes well for the release of And Baby Makes Two in September 2019. [Proofing note: In the NetGalley ARC offsetting commas for directly addressing a person by name are frequently missing as on page 48, “Hi Nate,” and throughout the text, a pattern that was probably corrected in the final galley.]
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  • Regina Jenkins
    January 1, 1970
    This book is now on my favorites list. I was able to relate to so much being discussed. I could really see some of myself in these characters. Everything was so relevant to current headlines we currently find ourselves dealing with now. I can't wait to see what Tabby and her friends have in store for this next phase of her life.
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  • Dora Okeyo
    January 1, 1970
    I love a book with strong female characters. I love reading about women at their best, supporting each other emotionally, financially, psychologically and culturally and this book just served me a whole series of “Girlfriends!”Tabitha is career focused. She’s got her sights set on being a Senior Reporter, but there’s also Marc, he’s educated, intelligent, sexy- but for one a half years they have been dating and when she gets a verdict from the doctor, she starts evaluating her life, priorities a I love a book with strong female characters. I love reading about women at their best, supporting each other emotionally, financially, psychologically and culturally and this book just served me a whole series of “Girlfriends!”Tabitha is career focused. She’s got her sights set on being a Senior Reporter, but there’s also Marc, he’s educated, intelligent, sexy- but for one a half years they have been dating and when she gets a verdict from the doctor, she starts evaluating her life, priorities and relationships based on that.I loved her friendship with her girlfriends, Laila and Alexis. They each have their own battles and are as bold as they come. I could use a Laila in my life, especially when she tells Tabby:“Do you want me to go key his car?..Because I will- just say the word and I will light that Porsche right up!”The author’s tone of writing is simple and each character’s voice is undeniably strong. You cannot help but also appreciate the diversity of women from age, race to social status and they all influence Tabby in one way or the other. I found her relationship with her grandmother most interesting and there’s this point where in relation to the title of the book, Gretchen, her grandmother’s friend tells her “I say, don’t ever die of exhaustion on somebody else’s terms!” I could sing praises of this book all day long, because it I could relate to it. I see myself in Tabby, Laila, Alexis, her mother, grandmother and I see myself in her career struggles, however the ending was not a reader’s paradise. I know there’s a second book, but come on…why exhaust my emotions over this?I got to read this book courtesy of the Publisher and Netgalley and that eARC was so worth it! How else would I have felt so drawn to a character like this?
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  • Jessie
    January 1, 1970
    This book, about a young woman pursuing a balance between career, family, and fertility (with a ticking clock) had a real Gabrielle Union movie circa late 90’s/early 2000’s vibe. That was who I pictured as the narrator. This isn’t my usual genre, and I think I read this expecting something a bit different or a bit more. Despite being well written it followed a predictable and normative narrative. Three girlfriends were not actually that nice to each other, and there was a lot of snark about bigg This book, about a young woman pursuing a balance between career, family, and fertility (with a ticking clock) had a real Gabrielle Union movie circa late 90’s/early 2000’s vibe. That was who I pictured as the narrator. This isn’t my usual genre, and I think I read this expecting something a bit different or a bit more. Despite being well written it followed a predictable and normative narrative. Three girlfriends were not actually that nice to each other, and there was a lot of snark about bigger bodies. This was not the type of book where the shortcomings of the narrator were about creating a true character (good writing often means unlikeable or imperfect people)- Tabby was definitely supposed to be a relatable and aspirational character - so maybe she could have been a bit less judgemental and superficial at times? There was some pretty heavy moralizing happening around infidelity, jealousy, family dysfunction, etc. I think that characters fell into tropes more than they became individuals to me. The saving grace for me was that, despite the length of time that was spent with drinking and pining and going in circles (this book was long, too long!!), things were able to remain unresolved and a bit messy at the end that indicated some growth. I would probably go see this in the theatres were it a movie, and I would probably roll my eyes a few times at the rigidity of it’s vision for Black womanhood. Thanks @netgalley for the ARC, opinions are my own.
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  • Kelly-Jo Sweeney
    January 1, 1970
    I've always been told that you should never judge a book by its cover, but it was the beautiful cover that caught my interest with this one. Fortunately, what was inside certainly lived up to that cover.The idea that both women and black people have to work much harder to get the recognition that they deserve is certainly not a new one. Of course being a black woman means therefore that you have to work even harder again, which is why the title of this book proclaims that Black Girls Must Die Ex I've always been told that you should never judge a book by its cover, but it was the beautiful cover that caught my interest with this one. Fortunately, what was inside certainly lived up to that cover.The idea that both women and black people have to work much harder to get the recognition that they deserve is certainly not a new one. Of course being a black woman means therefore that you have to work even harder again, which is why the title of this book proclaims that Black Girls Must Die Exhausted. For the lead character in this book, Tabatha Walker, that is certainly true. She has to constantly fight to get ahead, without wanting to be seen as too pushy or too aggressive. Everything is a struggle and even her body is turning against her in her attempts to succeed in her career, her personal life and the dream of one day being a wife and mother. This book is not just about race, although it is an important theme in the book, it is also about relationships. Tabby has a number of strong women in her life, from her best friends Leila and Lexi to her grandmother, who is also called Tabatha. Added to this is her complex relationship with her father, less than ideal relationship with her boyfriend Marc and a long distance relationship with her mother. It is all of these relationships that add to the rich and complex mix that make this story. This isn't a fairy tale with clearly defined goodies and baddies. Although there are people that are not so good at points, there are also explanations and reasons given for the way that they act. Not that you can excuse everything, but somehow giving reasons makes people seem more real and human.I thoroughly enjoyed this book. The added bonus is that it was actually the first in a trilogy (which I didn't realise until the very end) and I'm really keen to read the next instalment. I received a complimentary copy of this book through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.
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  • Deborah Stevens
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this book!I was uncertain in approaching it, as it appears to be aimed at younger, professional women of color (none of which describe me). Yet the magic of good fiction for me is that it transports me into other lives and realities than my own, and this title delivered.Tabitha Walker and her best friends Laila and Alexis are well-drawn characters who I came to care about. And I loved Granny Tab! The male characters are a little thinner, but Jayne Allen resists making them two-d I really enjoyed this book!I was uncertain in approaching it, as it appears to be aimed at younger, professional women of color (none of which describe me). Yet the magic of good fiction for me is that it transports me into other lives and realities than my own, and this title delivered.Tabitha Walker and her best friends Laila and Alexis are well-drawn characters who I came to care about. And I loved Granny Tab! The male characters are a little thinner, but Jayne Allen resists making them two-dimensional. They are complex and human, as are the conflicts in work and romance which arise here.The plot moves right along. It nods to current cultural issues (me too, police violence) but does not allow the issues to hijack the characters (a big pet peeve of mine). I particularly appreciated the work issue that arises between Tabitha and her boss for its nuance and complexity. I'm already hoping for more from Jayne Allen.Thanks to NetGalley for a free copy in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    Black Girls Must Die Exhausted I Picked Up This Book Because: The title The Characters: Tabitha Walker: Granma Tabitha, Marc, Laila, Alexis The Story: I.Am.Bored. I have been bored since I started this book back in February. It’s not that the writing is bad it’s just slow. Nothing is happening and when something does happen we have to dwell on it and repeat it a thousand times before we can move on. I can’t stay invested in Tabitha’s journey. I did skip to the end and read the last chapt Black Girls Must Die Exhausted I Picked Up This Book Because: The title The Characters: Tabitha Walker: Granma Tabitha, Marc, Laila, Alexis The Story: I.Am.Bored. I have been bored since I started this book back in February. It’s not that the writing is bad it’s just slow. Nothing is happening and when something does happen we have to dwell on it and repeat it a thousand times before we can move on. I can’t stay invested in Tabitha’s journey. I did skip to the end and read the last chapter and the epilogue and I feel like Tab got a peaceful ending if not a traditional HEA and I’m okay knowing just that. I do feel bad for DNF-ing this book because I wanted to love it but my love stopped at the front cover. Seriously it’s beautiful and I’d hang it on my wall. The Random Thoughts: *DNF so no rating
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  • Angelia Menchan
    January 1, 1970
    Black Girls Must Die Exhausted was a good reveal on the travails of Black womanhood. It included familial struggles, the bonds we have with other women, our mothers and fathers. And of course the standard man-woman conundrum with biological clocks and fertility issues to boot. It was at turns, oh so real and other times, laugh out loud funny. Read up Black Girls, this ones for you.
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  • cenninsbookreviews aka Book Dragon Queen
    January 1, 1970
    Strong women- character have been written with strength in mind. The book is written in such an interesting way. Really interesting to read. The cover is also beautiful Thanks to NetGalley and Quality Black Books for giving me the opportunity to read this book in exchange for my honest unbiased review
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  • LaDonna
    January 1, 1970
    Black Girls Must Die ExhaustedA Novel for Grown Upsby @jayneallenwrites📚📚📚📚📚 of 5 stacksA wonderful read!The book provides several reasons for our exhaustion, here are my top 5.Black girls (women) must die exhausted because, as summarized by Tabitha on page 201 of the book, we are  constantly fighting. We are fighting:1. for our careers and promotions. Dealing daily with overt and subtle racism and sexism on the job. Having to constantly "prove" yourself while at the same time balancing being as Black Girls Must Die ExhaustedA Novel for Grown Upsby @jayneallenwrites📚📚📚📚📚 of 5 stacksA wonderful read!The book provides several reasons for our exhaustion, here are my top 5.Black girls (women) must die exhausted because, as summarized by Tabitha on page 201 of the book, we are  constantly fighting. We are fighting:1. for our careers and promotions. Dealing daily with overt and subtle racism and sexism on the job. Having to constantly "prove" yourself while at the same time balancing being assertive but not aggressive; punctual but not anal; woke but not overly sensitive; intelligent but not arrogant; confident but not conceited. 2. with our hair which in its natural state is too wild for not only corporate America, but many of our own family and friends. In its relaxed state causes us pain and consternation as we like Zora in Trish R. Thomas's "Nappily" series are prisoners to maintaining its straight shape by avoiding sweating, swimming, rain AND humidity, as well as numerous expensive salon appointments to keep it laid and slayed.3. for our family, friends, church and community. The weight of the world is borne on the backs of black women. Zora Neale Hurston said it best, we are "the mules of the world." It is a heavy burden we carry for our children (who we nurture), our families (who we are caregivers), our churches (who we fill up the pews), and our communities (who we mentor, volunteer, and protest on behalf of)4. for our body image, which has been distorted since we arrived on American shores. We constantly fight standards of beauty that do not include us or take our bodies into consideration.5. for on sanity. We suffer in silence with mental exhaustion, depression, and stress trying to portray the facade of a strong black woman. Yeah, we're exhausted and will most likely die that way.IG: justJesusplansandbooks
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  • Mahvash
    January 1, 1970
    I don't usually pick up contemporary fiction, but I had to give this one a try due to the title! I'm glad I did because it's full of amazing, supportive female characters. I really related to the characters struggles around fertility, racism and the career issues. Having read hundreds of books to date, I am glad to finally see myself reflected in diverse fiction. I'm looking forward to the next instalment!
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  • Torre
    January 1, 1970
    What makes this book so different is the cultural perspective that you usually don't find in other books and weren't expecting in this one. It shows how family secrets shape the family dynamic, and how it plays a role in other aspects. This book has the ability to transport you to that story with those characters, it's beautiful and much needed with everything that is going on in the world. I can't wait to read more from this author. I highly recommend this book to others. I read this book in on What makes this book so different is the cultural perspective that you usually don't find in other books and weren't expecting in this one. It shows how family secrets shape the family dynamic, and how it plays a role in other aspects. This book has the ability to transport you to that story with those characters, it's beautiful and much needed with everything that is going on in the world. I can't wait to read more from this author. I highly recommend this book to others. I read this book in one day I could not put it down!
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  • Buffy
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this book! The author touched on many of the prevalent social injustices women and people of color face daily and, in my opinion, just enough emphasis was placed on these issues and it flowed with the story line. It was not over done or disjointed like I’ve seen in other novels. The author took care to raise the concerns in a deliberate and thoughtful way, weaving in enough humor to balance the heavy issues. For that reason, it is not a “heavy” read and I definitely think this n I really enjoyed this book! The author touched on many of the prevalent social injustices women and people of color face daily and, in my opinion, just enough emphasis was placed on these issues and it flowed with the story line. It was not over done or disjointed like I’ve seen in other novels. The author took care to raise the concerns in a deliberate and thoughtful way, weaving in enough humor to balance the heavy issues. For that reason, it is not a “heavy” read and I definitely think this novel can be the perfect beach read! The characters and their stories are well developed and you can get angry with them, laugh with them and cry with them. I love that we get to witness Tabitha and her Grandmother, who is a white woman, get the opportunity to candidly ask questions of each other to get a perspective of what it is like living in their skin. This is not something that is easily discussed across races. Because they love each other and are of the same blood, we get their honest responses. Tabitha struggles with family, relationships with her girlfriends and men, workplace challenges that ambitious women (more specifically ambitious black women) face and the dreaded biological clock resonates with me and many of my own personal experiences as a black woman. Don’t be fooled by the title though! While it is a fact that being a black woman in this society can be exhausting most of the time, this book is for EVERYONE, especially women! Looking forward to book 2 in the trilogy!
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  • Nickeisha
    January 1, 1970
    I was immediately intrigued when I saw the title of this book, Black Girl Must Die Exhausted. There are so many layers to this book that are relatable, and covered throughout this book. This book touches what it is like being a black women working a mostly white field, fertility, hurtful and awkward family dynamics, relationships, and how even great friendships are complicated. The main character, Tabitha, is dealing with it all at a time, when the clock is ticking on her dream of motherhood.The I was immediately intrigued when I saw the title of this book, Black Girl Must Die Exhausted. There are so many layers to this book that are relatable, and covered throughout this book. This book touches what it is like being a black women working a mostly white field, fertility, hurtful and awkward family dynamics, relationships, and how even great friendships are complicated. The main character, Tabitha, is dealing with it all at a time, when the clock is ticking on her dream of motherhood.There were times this book reminded me of an episode of Girlfriends with Tabitha’s friends Alexa and Laila. These ladies were so different, each had a different type of relationship with Tabitha, both wore their flaws differently and were a demonstration of what real friendship looks like.Tabitha’s relationship with her partner, Marc was the weakest part of this book for me. I didn’t think there was any chemistry between them as I read. He was neither likeable or sympathetic. It seemed as if the author was trying to redeem Marc by making him a sympathetic figure, but it fell flat for me. I think this book would have been just fine without Marc.It was interesting to see that this is part of a trilogy. I’m very interested to see where this story ends up. Thanks to Netgalley for a copy of this book, and look forward to learning more about Quality Black Books.
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  • Simone
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley and The Publisher for this eARC in exchange for an honest review.3.5 stars rounded upBlack Girls Must Die Exhausted: is a well written piece of chic lit. Its about 33 year old Tabitha Walker during her journey to achieve all those things women in their 30's are suppose to do, find love, have a baby, own a house and have a successful high flying career, but in her case whilst being black but having a white grandmother. While lots of these issues have been and will continue to Thanks to NetGalley and The Publisher for this eARC in exchange for an honest review.3.5 stars rounded upBlack Girls Must Die Exhausted: is a well written piece of chic lit. Its about 33 year old Tabitha Walker during her journey to achieve all those things women in their 30's are suppose to do, find love, have a baby, own a house and have a successful high flying career, but in her case whilst being black but having a white grandmother. While lots of these issues have been and will continue to be done to death in chick lit, the relationship with the grandmother and the different generational perspectives we get in the book are a nice touch.The title is what drew me towards the book but .as chick lit is not one of my favourite genre I was a little bit unsure about whether this would be my cup of tea. However, I really enjoyed reading it. The characters are very real and relatable, if a tad cliche, but I found myself getting invested in them and I'm so happy there's a follow up,. I will definitely reading it
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  • The Happy Bibliophile
    January 1, 1970
    "There is a need for more diverse voices in literature with the freedom and leeway to write undiluted perspectives for more diverse audiences." This says everything and so, so much more. Black Girls Must Die Exhausted was my favorite read of 2019 and I am excited to continue reading this series. Jayne Allen masterfully captured so many important elements of the complexity of being a successful, single black woman in today's world. There were so many moments I had to stop and highlight or write d "There is a need for more diverse voices in literature with the freedom and leeway to write undiluted perspectives for more diverse audiences." This says everything and so, so much more. Black Girls Must Die Exhausted was my favorite read of 2019 and I am excited to continue reading this series. Jayne Allen masterfully captured so many important elements of the complexity of being a successful, single black woman in today's world. There were so many moments I had to stop and highlight or write down in my reading journal to look back on. This book is so special and a beacon of hope that one day, more literature will reflect the realities of women of color.
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  • Deborah Stevens
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this book!I was uncertain in approaching it, as it appears to be aimed at younger, professional women of color (none of which describe me). Yet the magic of good fiction for me is that it transports me into other lives and realities than my own, and this title delivered.Tabitha Walker and her best friends Laila and Alexis are well-drawn characters who I came to care about. And I loved Granny Tab! The male characters are a little thinner, but Jayne Allen resists making them two-d I really enjoyed this book!I was uncertain in approaching it, as it appears to be aimed at younger, professional women of color (none of which describe me). Yet the magic of good fiction for me is that it transports me into other lives and realities than my own, and this title delivered.Tabitha Walker and her best friends Laila and Alexis are well-drawn characters who I came to care about. And I loved Granny Tab! The male characters are a little thinner, but Jayne Allen resists making them two-dimensional. They are complex and human, as are the conflicts in work and romance which arise here.The plot moves right along. It nods to current cultural issues (me too, police violence) but does not allow the issues to hijack the characters (a big pet peeve of mine). I particularly appreciated the work issue that arises between Tabitha and her boss for its nuance and complexity. I'm already hoping for more from Jayne Allen.Thanks to NetGalley for a free copy in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Sallina Gray
    January 1, 1970
    The title of this book combined with the beautiful cover art was more than enough to draw me in and make me add this title to my ‘want to read’ list. I myself am a black woman rapidly approaching my 30’s while constantly balancing my career, motherhood, and personal/romantic relationships. The storyline of the book was relatable on so many levels. From Tabitha’s run-in with the police to her not so perfect relationship with Mark, Jayne Allen does an amazing job of capturing the essence of what i The title of this book combined with the beautiful cover art was more than enough to draw me in and make me add this title to my ‘want to read’ list. I myself am a black woman rapidly approaching my 30’s while constantly balancing my career, motherhood, and personal/romantic relationships. The storyline of the book was relatable on so many levels. From Tabitha’s run-in with the police to her not so perfect relationship with Mark, Jayne Allen does an amazing job of capturing the essence of what it’s like to be a young black woman in America. Allen’s writing style is uniquely engaging and she developed the characters in a way that by the end of the book I felt as though I knew each of the characters. The book started a little slow and I wished it spent a little more time on Tabitha’s egg freezing process and experience since it was the life-changing event that introduces us to the character. Looking forward to part two!
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  • Divena
    January 1, 1970
    This was a well written story about the trials and tribulations black women go through. But it was also a story about a struggle with fertility which is one I can't at this time relate too. However it was still a solid story and I enjoyed the friendship between the women.I received an arc from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • January Gray
    January 1, 1970
    Amazing book with fully fleshed characters and a solid plot. I couldn't put this book down! Utterly amazing! I will read it again in the future.
  • Stacie C
    January 1, 1970
    Full review to come.
  • Amina
    January 1, 1970
    4.25⭐ enjoyable, relatable, thoughtful, and now I have to call my honorary grandmother. OK, I’m back. I appreciated all the different aspects of Tabby’s life—family, friendship, complicated relationships, work, romance, etc. By the end of the book she feels like an old friend.When this becomes a movie, I’ll get a babysitter and see it opening weekend. 4.25⭐️ enjoyable, relatable, thoughtful, and now I have to call my honorary grandmother. OK, I’m back. I appreciated all the different aspects of Tabby’s life—family, friendship, complicated relationships, work, romance, etc. By the end of the book she feels like an old friend.When this becomes a movie, I’ll get a babysitter and see it opening weekend.
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  • Natasha Ellis
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it, liked Tabby a lot, and her relationship with her girl friends was very believable.Good story, looking forward to second part.
  • Nancy Mijangos
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this novel from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Empowering novel about hard choices in life and a woman who takes control of her future. This is a fun and inspiring read--it would be a great choice for a women's book club.
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  • wendy
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you #QualityBlackBooks and #NetGalley for giving me the opportunity to read this wonderful book. I have to admit that I experienced various emotions while reading this book as I am sure many will too. It broke my heart that Two had to go through the things that she did, but mostly I felt bad for her because she had such a fear of police officers. The black community has been treated unfairly I agree but every race has it just hasn't been aired. However, we must remember that we cannot allo Thank you #QualityBlackBooks and #NetGalley for giving me the opportunity to read this wonderful book. I have to admit that I experienced various emotions while reading this book as I am sure many will too. It broke my heart that Two had to go through the things that she did, but mostly I felt bad for her because she had such a fear of police officers. The black community has been treated unfairly I agree but every race has it just hasn't been aired. However, we must remember that we cannot allow those few bad ones speak for the entire group. We need less cowering and more hugging. This story also made me aware of the fact that our health care system needs to be looked at even further to assist women in dire need of help with fertility assistance. I can say so much more but I I am just going to recommend that you read this book because you will not be disappointed!!!!
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  • Katie Minion
    January 1, 1970
    This was... hmm. I guess I don't really know what to say about it. I started off really liking it. I think the writing is excellent and kept me engaged throughout the whole book. But by the end, I just wasn't sold on the story. I just... didn't care about it. Or something. Maybe it was too cliche, or maybe it was too predictable. I appreciate that this story brought up a lot of good social justice topics, like police brutality against black people, and how minority women have to work 10 times as This was... hmm. I guess I don't really know what to say about it. I started off really liking it. I think the writing is excellent and kept me engaged throughout the whole book. But by the end, I just wasn't sold on the story. I just... didn't care about it. Or something. Maybe it was too cliche, or maybe it was too predictable. I appreciate that this story brought up a lot of good social justice topics, like police brutality against black people, and how minority women have to work 10 times as hard as white women do (who have to work 10 times as hard as men do) to advance in the workplace. I did like how those topics were brought up. But the situations in the book that included those pieces felt too fabricated. Maybe it was how the author wrote about those topics. Like, described the issue too straightforwardly. So, I feel bad giving it a 2, because I didn't dislike reading it. But a 2 for Goodreads is "it was ok," and that's how I feel about it. I didn't dislike it, but I didn't really like it either. If I had voted 2/3 of the way in, I probably would have given it a 3 star. The last third just kinda ruined it for me.
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  • The CurvyJones
    January 1, 1970
    Overall, a well written, engaging read. You know it's good when I talk out loud TO THE BOOK. I had a few character nits, but nothing really worth ranting about. You've heard the saying about having to work twice as hard to get just as far as our non black counterparts-- well, this is that saying, in print. Tabitha's life, from her job to her boyfriend to her family seems to be coming apart at the seams and the only thing holding it together is her grandmother, for whom she is named. They simply Overall, a well written, engaging read. You know it's good when I talk out loud TO THE BOOK. I had a few character nits, but nothing really worth ranting about. You've heard the saying about having to work twice as hard to get just as far as our non black counterparts-- well, this is that saying, in print. Tabitha's life, from her job to her boyfriend to her family seems to be coming apart at the seams and the only thing holding it together is her grandmother, for whom she is named. They simply call her Too, because she is Tabitha, too. I found Grandma Tab to be delightful and surprisingly woke... perhaps because her husband was black and her son is half black but she was progressive for an older white woman. I kept bracing for her to say something off, but of course that never happened. A common theme, and something I'm definitely going to take away from this book is 'if a man has no plan for you, that isn't your man'. Ain't that the truth, and a hard truth to learn and accept. For Tab, too... but I said I wasn't gonna rant. This was a sometimes emotional, sometimes funny look into the life of a young urban professional, just trying to life her best life, despite life itself getting in the way of that. An enjoyable read!
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  • Amiee
    January 1, 1970
    There were a lot of things I liked about this book but there were many things that just came up short. I will read the next in the series though!
  • Anya
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved this book and I will recommend it to anybody who liked THUG or books like the Kiss Quotient (minus the sexy times).It was a perfect contemporary read, with great characters and dialogue - especially Granny Tab and Gretchen were my favorites.It's an entertaining read with deep and important topics like race, equality, fertility, police brutality, relationships, forgiveness and more, perfect for a book club in my opinion!Thank you so much NetGalley for providing me with a free A I absolutely loved this book and I will recommend it to anybody who liked THUG or books like the Kiss Quotient (minus the sexy times).It was a perfect contemporary read, with great characters and dialogue - especially Granny Tab and Gretchen were my favorites.It's an entertaining read with deep and important topics like race, equality, fertility, police brutality, relationships, forgiveness and more, perfect for a book club in my opinion!Thank you so much NetGalley for providing me with a free ARC.
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  • Aggie
    January 1, 1970
    Strong female characters and lots of women supporting each other, a breath of fresh air. Very well written, and even though I'm a middle aged white female i was able to connect with the characters with no problem and really enjoyed every moment of it! Well recommended for anyone!!Thank you NetGalley for free advance reading copy!
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