Better Dead Than Divorced
"Better Dead Than Divorced," responds a young wife to those who urge her to divorce her adulterous, manipulative and abusing husband, who plans to kill her. She knows about his evil intentions and she is urged to leave him and save her life but her love, her devotion, and societal prejudice against divorced women make her stay. And dead she ends up by a commissioned assassin. Her cousin, a principled man, fights beyond his modest means in a corrupt system to have justice for her loss served.Winner of 8 National Awards-Beverly Hills Book Award, Gold for True Crime 2016-Global Book Awards, Gold for True Crime 2016 -eLit Book Awards, Gold for True Crime 2016-Readers Favorite Book Award, Silver for Nonfiction Cultural 2016-Nonfiction Authors Association Award, Bronze 2015-Indie Reader 2016-National Indie Excellence Book Award, finalist True Crime 2016-Kindle Book Awards Finalist for Nonfiction 2016

Better Dead Than Divorced Details

TitleBetter Dead Than Divorced
Author
ReleaseJul 15th, 2018
PublisherHard Work Publications
ISBN-139780692179734
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Crime, True Crime

Better Dead Than Divorced Review

  • Valerity (Val)
    January 1, 1970
    First, he romanced her and she fell head over heels in love. Then after much pressure from her family, he married her, to quiet them and save her reputation. Happily ever after? Hardly. He flitted from one conquest to the next, and in their small Greek village it was no secret that George Nitsos treated his wife Panayota badly and was unfaithful. Or that he'd been trying to hire a hit man, an assassin, to kill his sweet, loving wife so that he could be free to be with another woman. He'd accumul First, he romanced her and she fell head over heels in love. Then after much pressure from her family, he married her, to quiet them and save her reputation. Happily ever after? Hardly. He flitted from one conquest to the next, and in their small Greek village it was no secret that George Nitsos treated his wife Panayota badly and was unfaithful. Or that he'd been trying to hire a hit man, an assassin, to kill his sweet, loving wife so that he could be free to be with another woman. He'd accumulated some wealth and cultivated quite a bit of power, and he wouldn't stop until he got his way. Panayota had been urged to leave her husband by her caring cousin Thanassis when he learned that her life was in peril, but she refused, saying she'd be better off dead than have to live in the small village as its only divorced woman in the 1950's. Like a slow moving train wreck that no one could prevent, she was horribly murdered walking home with her husband one night when they were shot. When it began to look like George Nitsos was going to be able to use his influence to be able to just walk away from having his wife killed, it fired up her cousin Thanassis Konandreas to risk everything to see to it that George didn't get away with it.The story is beautifully written and laid out by Thanassis' son Lukas who was there at the time of all these events, although just 8 years old then. A wonderful peek into Greek small village life and times for periods around WWII.
    more
  • Una Tiers
    January 1, 1970
    This book was well written about a murder in a small village in Greece in the 1950s. The writing style is nearly melodious. The author spotlights domestic abuse. The author examines the social and political reactions in place. The author was eight years old when these events occurred. The writing style reminded me a Harry Mark Petrakis.Well done.
    more
  • Tina Nardi-Barbadimos
    January 1, 1970
    You don’t have to be Greek to find yourself immersed into this fascinating, sad, true Greek tragedy. A story that could very well be written about events happening in our own backyard; husbands and wives in unhappy marriages, who cannot let go without doing harm. The author, who experienced first-hand and remembered the chilling events of this murder, writes from the heart, as he unfolds the drama of an ill-fated marriage ending in the death of a young wife, and the complicated quest for justice You don’t have to be Greek to find yourself immersed into this fascinating, sad, true Greek tragedy. A story that could very well be written about events happening in our own backyard; husbands and wives in unhappy marriages, who cannot let go without doing harm. The author, who experienced first-hand and remembered the chilling events of this murder, writes from the heart, as he unfolds the drama of an ill-fated marriage ending in the death of a young wife, and the complicated quest for justice. Interwoven with the facts of the event, the author brings great insight into Greek life in the 1950’s, culture, traditions, and mentality of those involved in this intriguing story. Well written- would make a great movie!
    more
  • Effrosyni Moschoudi
    January 1, 1970
    As I read this compelling memoir I experienced a mixture of feelings and the most prominent one was anger. I felt enraged, not just for the murder of Panayota and for all the cruelty she had to endure at the hands of her despicable husband, but also about the terrible social restraints that led this woman to prefer death rather than become a divorcee. The latter is a notion that's unthinkable in Greece today but sadly at the time the stigmatization of divorced women was a common phenomenon. Pana As I read this compelling memoir I experienced a mixture of feelings and the most prominent one was anger. I felt enraged, not just for the murder of Panayota and for all the cruelty she had to endure at the hands of her despicable husband, but also about the terrible social restraints that led this woman to prefer death rather than become a divorcee. The latter is a notion that's unthinkable in Greece today but sadly at the time the stigmatization of divorced women was a common phenomenon. Panayota's husband was a man of no honor, no ethics and clearly had the characteristics of a true psychopath. I was relieved that he came to pay for his crime and was amazed by the steel determination of Panayota's cousin (the author's father) to make sure the killer was brought to justice, regardless of the obstacles he found in his way. The book amazed me with its storytelling style which was a lot less gruesome/depressing than I'd expected it to be. The author, much to his credit, chose to tell the story in a detached way, thus saving the reader from harsh prose heavy with hard feelings. As a result, this read like fiction even and made my reading pleasure so much better for it. I would greatly recommend this to anyone interested to sample Greek village life in a bygone era, at a time when life often led young women to impossible choices and victimized them unfairly in the hands of men. I received a free copy of this book and chose voluntarily to review it.
    more
  • Emma Pederson
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway. I was very excited because non-fiction crime is one of my favorite genres. This book begins with the relationship between Panayota and George Nitsos, building clearly from the beginning that George will murder his wife. When this happens, the book shifts to the reaction of the villagers, with a heavy emphasis on Thanasis Konandreas, the author's father. For the most part, Lukas Konandreas finds a fine balance between historical account and personal n I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway. I was very excited because non-fiction crime is one of my favorite genres. This book begins with the relationship between Panayota and George Nitsos, building clearly from the beginning that George will murder his wife. When this happens, the book shifts to the reaction of the villagers, with a heavy emphasis on Thanasis Konandreas, the author's father. For the most part, Lukas Konandreas finds a fine balance between historical account and personal narrative, though at times, switching between "my uncle" and "my grandmother" and the actual names is slightly confusing.Overall, I enjoyed this book. It was very informative about both the murder and the culture of Greek villages during the time frame. In addition, the author including personal experiences, which made the book even more engaging.
    more
  • Gretchen
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you, Lukas Konandreas, for sharing an interesting part of your family history in Better Dead Than Divorced. This story opens a window into Greek small village mores in the first half of the twentieth century. I couldn't put the book down. Additionally, I was totally unfamiliar with the Greek judicial system of the 1950's -- a creative endeavor at best. I highly recommend this book, especially to those of us who are unfamiliar with international legal systems. I received Better Dead Than Di Thank you, Lukas Konandreas, for sharing an interesting part of your family history in Better Dead Than Divorced. This story opens a window into Greek small village mores in the first half of the twentieth century. I couldn't put the book down. Additionally, I was totally unfamiliar with the Greek judicial system of the 1950's -- a creative endeavor at best. I highly recommend this book, especially to those of us who are unfamiliar with international legal systems. I received Better Dead Than Divorced as a goodreads winner. I'm sharing this book with a fellow goodreader who is also a lawyer.
    more
  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    This truly was an excellent novel. It was well written, and honest. It has everything I look for in a novel; murder, romance and scandal. I really felt connected to Thanasis who spends all of his families resources, to see that the murderer is brought to justice. It was refreshing to read of people who stood up for their beliefs and stuck together as family. I also enjoyed learning about traditional Greek culture, as well as post WWII Greece. This book was TRUE. HONEST. I have already recommende This truly was an excellent novel. It was well written, and honest. It has everything I look for in a novel; murder, romance and scandal. I really felt connected to Thanasis who spends all of his families resources, to see that the murderer is brought to justice. It was refreshing to read of people who stood up for their beliefs and stuck together as family. I also enjoyed learning about traditional Greek culture, as well as post WWII Greece. This book was TRUE. HONEST. I have already recommended this book to a few of my friends, and I know they will enjoy reading it as I have!
    more
  • Lukas
    January 1, 1970
    I am the author. The book has already wan 5 awards.
  • Jessica Ryan
    January 1, 1970
    I truly enjoyed this book. I was given a free copy for a truthful review. My full review can be found here: http://forums.onlinebookclub.org/view...
  • Basil Kotrotsos
    January 1, 1970
    A beautifully crafted true story of a horrid event in the small Greek village of Koupaki. Set mainly in the 1940's and 50's the book documents the events which led to the murder of the young, beautiful Panayota. There is thorough detail in the depiction of the characters, the court cases, village life at that time, but never does it descend into boredom. Lukas description of them is brimming with colour and vitality and the story rolls forward at pace. I really enjoyed this book and the short ch A beautifully crafted true story of a horrid event in the small Greek village of Koupaki. Set mainly in the 1940's and 50's the book documents the events which led to the murder of the young, beautiful Panayota. There is thorough detail in the depiction of the characters, the court cases, village life at that time, but never does it descend into boredom. Lukas description of them is brimming with colour and vitality and the story rolls forward at pace. I really enjoyed this book and the short chapters were great.
    more
  • Bunny Turner
    January 1, 1970
    Page TurningWell written and expertly researched ,a true crime story that transports the reader to a small isolated Greek village. The customs and culture are fully depicted,taking one back in time to a lifestyle with integrity and strong moral values that are infrequently explored in our society today.
    more
  • Jenee Rager
    January 1, 1970
    The underlying story is interesting, but I feel this may be a case where the author is too close to the subject and was unable to write it in a way that was both interesting and enjoyable. While it was a fairly brief story I felt that parts got a little repetitive, and others, such as what happened after the murders were released were too brief.
    more
  • Colleen Magarian
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting true story. Learned about life in a small village in Greece in the 1940's/50's and how the society there is different from yet similar to modern society in the US. Greed, love, the desire for power playing a role in the tragic murder of a wonderful lady.
    more
  • Kathy Webb
    January 1, 1970
    I won this Kindle edition book in a GoodReadsGiveaway. Thank you to everyone involved.Well written. Highly recommend
  • Sam Davis
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a well written and fast paced book! This might be my favorite true crime book so far!
  • Carol Adelman
    January 1, 1970
    A riveting read. I enjoyed the in depth telling of this crime and the persistence in seeing through to the outcome of two trials and a lot of misinformation. very enjoyable read.
  • SundayAtDusk
    January 1, 1970
    This was an interesting, albeit confusing at times, story about life and death in a Greek village in the 1950s. Author Lukas Konandreas was eight years old when his father's close cousin, Panayota Nitsos was murdered one September night. He remembers how the outside sounds of parties going on were soon replaced by gunshots and shouting. When his father Thanasis discovered his cousin had been mortally wounded, while her husband, who supposedly was walking beside her, was not, he immediately guess This was an interesting, albeit confusing at times, story about life and death in a Greek village in the 1950s. Author Lukas Konandreas was eight years old when his father's close cousin, Panayota Nitsos was murdered one September night. He remembers how the outside sounds of parties going on were soon replaced by gunshots and shouting. When his father Thanasis discovered his cousin had been mortally wounded, while her husband, who supposedly was walking beside her, was not, he immediately guessed her husband George Nitsos was behind the shooting. Why? Because various villagers had told Thanasis Konandreas that Mr. Nitsos had been asking others to kill his wife. After being informed of that situation, Mrs. Nitsos did nothing; except say she would rather be dead than divorced, due to how those in the village would treat a divorced woman; and she didn't think her husband was serious about having her murdered anyway. She also apparently still loved her husband, regardless of his many transgressions during their marriage. Their marriage was arranged, but she wanted to marry him.After Panayota Nitsos was killed, the author's father valiantly fought to have George Nitsos and his hired gun, Socrates Karaiskos, brought to trial. He succeeded, too, but they were acquitted during the first trial due to a rigged jury. When they were tried again, this time in Athens, they were convicted. Yet strangely the jury decided while the two men weren't insane, "their capacity to fully understand the injustice of their actions was considerably diminished". (What did that mean? Maybe the author should have speculated about that a bit.) Thus, the two were spared the firing squad, sentenced to 20 or less years in jail, lost their political rights for 10 years, had to pay court costs, and had to pay Panayota Nitsos' mother "ten thousand drachmas for the mental agony their actions had brought upon her". The Nitsos family also returned her dead daughter's dowry to her. It's like the two killers were only paying time and money for property damage or something.Socrates Karaiskos was out of jail by 1962. George Nitsos was out by 1967, and returned to the village, where he was eventually accepted back by most. Go figure. He only had his wife killed. The costs of fighting in court left the author's father a much poorer man, but he was a well-respected and well-loved man by his family. In fact, while this story was spotlighting a fight for justice for a murdered woman in 1950s Greece, it was also very much a love letter to a father from a very proud son. In addition, Dr. Konandreas did a nice job describing the good things about life in the village of his childhood . . . the flowers, the fruit and other foods, the dancing, the church services, the music . . . good childhood memories that even a terrible murder couldn't snuff out.(Note: I received a free e-copy of this book from NetGalley and the author or publisher.)
    more
  • Aphrodite Karapanos
    January 1, 1970
    Everyone has that one great story inside them and for Lukas, this is most definitely it. This story for me hit a note on many personal levels, having heard the trials and tribulations of relative’s marriages and relationships from that time period; I was able to imagine reliving parts of their histories and lives of that era and the mentality that existed towards such a scandalous event such as premarital sex and divorce. I found myself enthralled not only by the culture of Greek villages and li Everyone has that one great story inside them and for Lukas, this is most definitely it. This story for me hit a note on many personal levels, having heard the trials and tribulations of relative’s marriages and relationships from that time period; I was able to imagine reliving parts of their histories and lives of that era and the mentality that existed towards such a scandalous event such as premarital sex and divorce. I found myself enthralled not only by the culture of Greek villages and lifestyles, where much of it can still be found today in remote Greek villages, but also the history of wartime and it’s after effects in Greece. It is beautifully written and follows how society can have such high expectations and how forcing those beliefs upon someone can unravel in dire consequences. Lukas is able to paint a beautiful Greek landscape, idyllic and hopeful during the lover’s youthful relationship in prewar times. Eventually, their relationship grew starkly gray, scattered with resentment and violence during wartime which paralleled the political climate of the time and signaled the downward spiraling of the couple’s relationship. Imagine living in a place and time where you and half a village know that your spouse wants to kill you and who is openly trying to find your assassin, but somewhere the psyche still demands to keep a pretense of marital pride and personal reputation over survival. I often found myself wondering if she stayed out of guilt for her initial shocking and disgraced beginnings with him, actual love for him, a hollow resignation of his abuses towards her, or did she simply not give serious consideration to her situation. Inevitably, the worst happened. The defendant is a narcissist from beginning to end with very few soft spots. In fact, one such humble moment that garnered some sympathy from me was when he offered to ‘help’ the author when he was a boy after he was accused of his crime. It was one of the few moments in the book that he was portrayed just as a man rather than a player, a monster, an abuser, a charmer or a cheater that he consistently appeared to be. The impact and disappointment perceived in such a fall from grace of a boy’s hero are apparent throughout the book. What follows are a couple of very intense publicly waged court cases. The idyllic town comes alive with all of the characters taking sides and having strong opinions on the matter.The book was written as a tribute to the author’s aunt, however by the end of the book I found that it was much more than that. It was a tribute not only to his father as well but also to the townsfolk themselves; family, neighbors, lovers, friends, enemies and the town priest all come alive, sometimes in a dysfunctional fashion, the way they really would in a small knit community that feels like a large extended family.
    more
  • Paul Poulos
    January 1, 1970
    A riveting and completely engrossing story, passionately researched and documented by his son, Dr. Lukas Konandreas through the eyes of his father - Thanasis. It is a trip back in time to the 1940's & 50's Greek countryside. The reader will relive the true story of the murder of the author's Aunt Panayota and overcoming corrupt justice. This book has many elements to keep the reader flipping the pages: Love, Marriage, Gossip, a Playboy Husband, the Tragically and Fatally Devoted Wife, Abuse, A riveting and completely engrossing story, passionately researched and documented by his son, Dr. Lukas Konandreas through the eyes of his father - Thanasis. It is a trip back in time to the 1940's & 50's Greek countryside. The reader will relive the true story of the murder of the author's Aunt Panayota and overcoming corrupt justice. This book has many elements to keep the reader flipping the pages: Love, Marriage, Gossip, a Playboy Husband, the Tragically and Fatally Devoted Wife, Abuse, Plotting, Murder, Justice Taken Sway - then retrieved and the Hero - Thanasis - fighting adversity for justice against all odds. Take a trip back in time and let the story take you to a quiet village transitioning in culture, overtaken and divided by tragedy until justice is served. Wonderful storytelling.
    more
  • Coleen
    January 1, 1970
    This informative book tells the story of a murder, a trial, the Greek culture and Greek village life. What an education one can receive reading this interesting true tale. The legal system in the 1950's is quite different from anything I have ever known, and the Greek village family life is so close at times, it seems to be almost stifling. But this is a book that one will not want to put down until the last sentence. Written by the Greek author who experienced the activities first hand!I receiv This informative book tells the story of a murder, a trial, the Greek culture and Greek village life. What an education one can receive reading this interesting true tale. The legal system in the 1950's is quite different from anything I have ever known, and the Greek village family life is so close at times, it seems to be almost stifling. But this is a book that one will not want to put down until the last sentence. Written by the Greek author who experienced the activities first hand!I received this book from someone who had read it and recommended it to me. She had won the book in a Goodreads contest and was thrilled to have won! So was I.
    more
  • Lynn Demsky
    January 1, 1970
    I learned a lot about Greece --- hard to believe the customs they lived by in rattle trap house, no running water…………….but really boring and was a struggle to wade through…………………..took me forEVER and often just made me fall asleep.
    more
Write a review