The (Other) F Word
The definitive collection of art, poetry, and prose, celebrating fat acceptance Chubby. Curvy. Fluffy. Plus-size. Thick. Fat. The time has come for fat people to tell their own stories. The (Other) F Word combines personal essays, prose, poetry, fashion tips, and art to create a relatable and attractive guide about body image and body positivity. This YA crossover anthology is meant for people of all sizes who desire to be seen and heard in a culture consumed by a narrow definition of beauty. By combining the talents of renowned fat YA and middle-grade authors, as well as fat influencers and creators, The (Other) F Word offers teen readers and activists of all ages a guide for navigating our world with confidence and courage.

The (Other) F Word Details

TitleThe (Other) F Word
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 24th, 2019
PublisherAmulet Books
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Anthologies, Short Stories

The (Other) F Word Review

  • Ivy
    January 1, 1970
    “I have always believed that when we learn to accept our bodies the way they are - when we learn to love ourselves exactly as we are in the immediate moment - it can shift the world.” - Angie Manfredi, Letter from the EditorThe Other F Word is an essential read for teens across the weight spectrum. Part self-empowerment, part raw confessional, 100% fat power, this book is sure to change hearts, minds and anything but bodies. If you’re open to a litany of fashion recommendations, an appropriate “I have always believed that when we learn to accept our bodies the way they are - when we learn to love ourselves exactly as we are in the immediate moment - it can shift the world.” - Angie Manfredi, Letter from the EditorThe Other F Word is an essential read for teens across the weight spectrum. Part self-empowerment, part raw confessional, 100% fat power, this book is sure to change hearts, minds and anything but bodies. If you’re open to a litany of fashion recommendations, an appropriate amount of Tracy Turnblad love and/or just feeling freaking incredible and powerful by the end, you’re perfect for this book. For fans of: (Don't) Call Me Crazy, How I Resist: Activism and Hope for a New Generation, Unbroken: 13 Stories Starring Disabled Teens
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  • Sahitya
    January 1, 1970
    When I first saw this book on Netgalley, I felt that I had to get it because it’s such an important book, and I also wanted to know about the body positivity and fat acceptance movement. And I’m so glad that I got the opportunity to read this one.To understand why I felt this book was so important, you should know a bit about me. I was once a very thin girl when I was young, who slowly became fat and I have been on a fluctuating journey with my weight since then. And it was mostly due to hormona When I first saw this book on Netgalley, I felt that I had to get it because it’s such an important book, and I also wanted to know about the body positivity and fat acceptance movement. And I’m so glad that I got the opportunity to read this one.To understand why I felt this book was so important, you should know a bit about me. I was once a very thin girl when I was young, who slowly became fat and I have been on a fluctuating journey with my weight since then. And it was mostly due to hormonal dysfunction in my body, and there was nothing much I could do except keep up with my medication. However, this also meant that I started listening to everyone around me talk about how sad it was that I had become fat, that I should try to control my diet and not put on more weight, that I was spoiling my already fragile health by not doing anything and how would I ever get married if I didn’t lose weight. All of this had a huge affect on me - I have gone on drastic diets, thought I was looking pretty just because I reduced some pounds, assumed I was normal now because I could atleast find some form fitting clothes (though the fact remains that mainstream fashion brands don’t know how to handle curves) and then felt utterly devastated when I put back the weight I had lost. And the last thing I did among all these disastrous things was going to a 15 day weight loss camp because my family insisted that was the only way I would ever lose weight - being forced to starve yourself or eat tasteless food and listen everyday to lectures about how we will die soon of numerous diseases because we are fat and need to do something about it. But after that, I just gave up. I will not say that I got enlightened about the body positivity movement or learnt how to love myself the way I am - I just found myself too tired to care about what everyone else thought about me or to conform to any societal standards. And that’s why this book is important for me at this age, even though it’s focused more in catering towards youngsters. In the world I grew up in, I don’t know if this would have helped a teenage me, but I definitely need it now. This collection of essays, poems and art by fat activists and artists is necessary because first and foremost, it’s about making you realize that every body size is natural and every person deserves to be respected and treated with dignity, irrespective of their size. It’s about understanding that our worth doesn’t depend on us conforming to the society’s beauty standards. It’s about not letting the prejudiced words of others affect us and loving ourselves the way we are and living our best life. It’s about finding a community of people like us who understand each other and can help in facing the struggles we encounter everyday. And finally it’s about fighting for the right to exist and take up space in this world, without worrying about people who feel uncomfortable just because of our existence. To conclude, I wanna say that this is brilliant collection of writings by a diverse group of people and I think everyone should read it. I loved how representative it was of race, sexuality, ethnicity and this is important because being fat is just one part of our identity and intersectionality is even more important. If you have ever struggled with accepting your body for whatever reasons and would love to find some resources, then this book has lot of information in that regard. If you want to know more about the body positivity movement or be a part of it, then this book is good beginner primer. Or even if you just want to read the experiences of other fat people who are a bit ahead of you in their journey of accepting themselves, do checkout this book. I promise you will find something in these pages that will resonate with you.
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  • Danika at The Lesbrary
    January 1, 1970
    I think this is an essential addition to any high school library, or any book collection teenagers have access to. Between the poetry, anecdotes, advice, and humour, there will be something here for anyone to connect to. This is really a book that could change lives, and I hope it gets into the hands that need it.Full review at the Lesbrary.
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  • USOM
    January 1, 1970
    (Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) The Other F Word is a stunning anthology. It is it hopeful, introspective, and intellectual. The Other F Word is one of those anthologies that demands to be gifted. After the first story, I knew I had to buy some copies and give it to some of my closest friends. It has it all. A diverse list of creators that examine intersectionality and fatness. Moments where they talk about the (Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) The Other F Word is a stunning anthology. It is it hopeful, introspective, and intellectual. The Other F Word is one of those anthologies that demands to be gifted. After the first story, I knew I had to buy some copies and give it to some of my closest friends. It has it all. A diverse list of creators that examine intersectionality and fatness. Moments where they talk about the fatphobia. But it's also a love letter to your body. That's where this anthology really sets itself apart - is how the essays feel like they're talking straight to you. Holding your hand, wiping your tears, and lifting you up.full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...
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  • Renata
    January 1, 1970
    I LOVED this book and so wish that it had existed when I was an awkward, fat teen! There's such a great range of essays, poems, and art (in the digital ARC I had some of the art was still TK but what's in here is already great). I love how intersectional it is and how hopeful, helpful, and angry it is. Both affirming and eye-opening. I F-ing love it.
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  • Jessica ☕
    January 1, 1970
    A much-needed book in the YA nonfiction genre that will appeal to young people who are frankly tired of being told they should hate their body. Told via memoir-vignettes, poems, essays, and visual art, it takes a multi-voice approach to celebrating the miracle of the human body regardless of how much space it takes up or what shape it forms.I would have liked to see more on the way body image is often weaponized against people of color (women in particular), or perhaps a discussion of body curre A much-needed book in the YA nonfiction genre that will appeal to young people who are frankly tired of being told they should hate their body. Told via memoir-vignettes, poems, essays, and visual art, it takes a multi-voice approach to celebrating the miracle of the human body regardless of how much space it takes up or what shape it forms.I would have liked to see more on the way body image is often weaponized against people of color (women in particular), or perhaps a discussion of body currency and the connection between fatness and loss of economic opportunity. It is also briefly mentions the Health At Every Size movement. More information would have better rounded the book, but at least it gives the reader something to research further.(review does not include the book's visual art, which was not available in the ARC I received.)arc received from the publisher
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  • Brianna - Coffee Books and Bullet Journals
    January 1, 1970
    Most of this book did exactly what it was trying to do. There were a few of the stories that were more self promotion and trying to sell their book/blog/etc. but overall, this was very powerful and empowering. I loved the LGBTQ+ representation of the authors in this anthology. A very enjoyable read.
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  • Erin Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent anthology of incredible voices, all with their own experiences, triumphs, and literary style. An important book, particularly for women, and of any size. It speaks specifically to and for Fat readers, but anyone who has struggled with body image will relate to this book and feel empowered. Alex Gino’s essay was a favorite for me; I read it again and again. But they were all wonderful, unique, and worthy of grand celebration.
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  • noah
    January 1, 1970
    I'm so glad I read this book. It's incredibly diverse, examining the fat experiences of people of different races, genders, abilities, and sexualities. I think anyone reading this will learn at least one thing about the world and one thing about themselves. I hope fat people reading this can figure out the next step to loving themselves, and thin people can learn to be more compassionate and be an ally to the fat community. I also thought it was cute how a lot of the authors in this anthology ci I'm so glad I read this book. It's incredibly diverse, examining the fat experiences of people of different races, genders, abilities, and sexualities. I think anyone reading this will learn at least one thing about the world and one thing about themselves. I hope fat people reading this can figure out the next step to loving themselves, and thin people can learn to be more compassionate and be an ally to the fat community. I also thought it was cute how a lot of the authors in this anthology cited each other as inspirations.p.s. all the pieces written by miguel m morales were beautiful and amazing and i loved them so much!I have a lot of time on my hands, so I did little reviews for each piece written in this book. I added content warnings to some of them, but only for the ones that really impacted me. If I missed important warnings I'm sorry.Body Sovereignty: This Fat Trans Flesh is Mine by Alex GinoA strong start to the anthologie that explains the importance of doing what you want with your body, not what others want you to do. The intersectionality of fat and trans is something I think more people need to know about. Creating awareness that there can be difficulties transitioning due to doctor prejudices against fatness is really important, but also knowing that that fat body is yours and you deserve to love it and do what you want with it is really powerful.Chubby City Indian by Jana SchmiedingA beautiful essay on how surrounding yourself with your culture and people like you can help you shine and how european beauty standards are bullshit.How to Be the Star of Your Own Fat Rom-Com by Lily AndersonThis was a fun and empowering step-by-step on being the main character in your own life and navigating the world of romance. After every step was a trope to avoid pertaining to the step. For example, Step 3 involves surrounding yourself with friends and family and the trope to avoid is The Frenemy.The Story of My Body by Renée WatsonA poem about the author’s “fat, black, girl body” and how much it has experienced in life.cw: mention of sexual assaultBrighter Than Starlight by Jiji KnightSuper cute illustration of a fat girl with a little blurb about the artists influence.A Body Like Mine by Mason DeaverNonbinary author Mason Deaver laments the exclusivity of the fashion industry and what it’s like to be a fat clothes shopper. They also talk about how things are changing and suggests ways to help the change progress.Fat, And by S. Qiouyi LuThis piece talks about identity and how people often label themselves or others as fat without looking any further into who the person is. It stresses that fat is one aspect of oneself but people are so complex and multifaceted that it isn’t the only aspect or identity they have.Write Something Fat by Sarah HollowellSarah Hollowell writes a letter to her past self encouraging her to write fat characters and telling her she is capable of living any life she wants and she can do it while fat. This was really sweet to read.7 Things I Would Tell Eleven-year-old Me by David BowlesI loved this so much with my whole heart. David Bowles talks to his past self with so much love and compassion. It’s beautiful.cw: mentions of an eating disorderBlack, Fat, Fem: The Weight of a Queen by Jonathan P. Higgins, ED.D.I was a little confused by this one but I believe the author is speaking to the reader? Basically a reiteration of all the other contributors thus far about embracing your fatness and accepting yourself.The 5 Things You Need to Start Your Own Rad Fat Babe Revolution (from Someone Who Knows) by Virgie TovarA fun guide that demonstrates how fat people are capable of having loud, joyful, glamorous, and loving lives, without losing weight.I Wear What I Want ’Cause I Want To by P.S. KaguyaA lovely message about finding confidence and loving yourself. I liked the way this was written in a tone that really encouraged the reader to find self-love. It was like “Hey! This sounds possible!”Fatness & Horror: The Match Made in Not Heaven by Hillary MonahanThis explores the inequality and disrespect of fat characters in horrorー especially comedic horror. The message was super important but there were some graphic examples of horror that made me really uncomfortable. If you’re like me and don’t have the stomach for horror, maybe skip this one or just proceed with caution.cw: graphic death and violenceA Poem That’s About Nature and Fatness by Miguel M. MoralesI love a good nature comparison and this poem delivers perfection. It talks about how people don’t judge trees and flowers, etc. and so fat bodies shouldn’t be judged either because both are natural and beautiful.For the Love of Ursula’s Revenge Body by Julie Murphy I actually really liked this essay. Murphy’s complicated feelings towards Disney’s Ursula and ultimately finding her an empowering figure was really interesting. Also, the fact that Ursula was inspired by a drag queen has always been one of my favourite facts, so, shout out to Julie Murphy for letting the world know!Fat Prom by Shelby BergenAnother illustration. This one depicts a multitude of fat teens dancing at a prom. It’s fun and has a lot of energy. The artist briefly talks about being a fat artist and giving herself and others fat people in drawings that are out in the world having an awesome time.Fat and Thriving by Isabel QuinteroThis one went a little over my head, but I believe it had the continuous message of this anthology of loving yourself and owning your beautiful fat bodyCan’t Find Your Community? Create Your Own by Bruce SturgellThis was super cool. I’ve never heard of Chubstr (fashion blog for fat men) before and the whole idea and story behind its creation is pretty neat. I love the idea of just going online and creating such an awesome community and resource. It’s kinda inspiring.Your Journey to Being #fatandfree by Saucyé WestNot sure if I’m totally on board with the self-love activity Saucyé West recommends. Honestly I think basic cognitive behavioral therapy to change your negative self-talk would be better than putting up negative Post-it notes to remind you of what you don’t like about yourself. I get the idea was to keep it in mind so you want to change it, but many therapists I’ve talked to say writing down negative thoughts without writing an immediate challenge can be more harmful than good. It would probably be better to write challenging Post-it notes. Like instead of writing “my belly is too big” write something like “my belly is soft and comforting” so every time that negative thought comes into your mind you can remember your positive note.Confidence by Corissa EnnekingYeah this was awesome. This essay talks about how you should prioritize self-love over confidence because once you’ve got the self-love part down, the confidence will follow. I especially liked the author’s take on non-judgmental thinking. It’s so true that once you stop judging others you judge yourself less!Make Your Own Self-care Kit by Rachelle AbellarSuper cute and helpful illustrations of what to put in a self-care kit. Losing My Religion by Jess WaltonThis poem is about how unhealthy losing weight can be for your mental health and how beautiful your body can be when you accept it.You Are Loved by Ady Del ValleSome positivity about how fashion makes one feel fierce and how the author is out there living his plus-size male model life, so don’t give up on dreams. Fat people can do anything.Fat Acceptance is (Really) Real by Evette DionneThis was so cool. This article explains what the fat acceptance movement is. What made this so awesome were the amount of facts used. There was an honest-to-goodness reference page after the article, so you know this is the good stuff.50 Tips from a Fat and Fabulous Elder by Miguel M. MoralesMr. Morales is out here dropping some sage wisdom and I’m loving it.Does this poem make me look fat? by Miguel M. MoralesAnother beautiful poem. I had to read it out loud the second time I read it just to hear how well the words flowed.Elephant, Hippo, and Other Nicknames I Love by Jes BakerI love reading people’s personal journeys to loving themselves. This one was really neat because it talks about reclaiming and reframing words people try to use as insults. Hippos really are crazy awesome animals!cw: mentions of eating disorders Love You by Mel StringerAn illustration of popular big bodied characters from various media and a little message about finding curvy bodies in media and creating your own fat media.To All the Pizzas I’ve Loved Before by Laina SpencerThis one was about being fat and aro-ace. Short but affirming. From Your Fat Future by Adrianne RussellAnother letter to the past. This included the struggles the author experienced with accepting her weight and saying how it won’t be like that forever.Fat. Boy. Walking. by Miguel M. MoralesGorgeous little story of walking while fat and all the wonderful movements of the body.Reasons to Hang in There by Samantha IrbyFunny but also totally real and valid.Baltimore… and Me by Amy SpaldingOne of the previous pieces in this book mention Tracy Turnblad from the 2007 movie Hairspray, but Amy Spalding goes much deeper into the impact and inspiration Tracy had on her and the positive representation she brought to the screen. Also I just have to say Amy’s cat dress in her author photo is stunning!
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  • Gayatri Saikia
    January 1, 1970
    This book came to be at a much needed time. I have been stick thin every since my childhood, I have been called out by my relatives, classmates and at times my cousins for my eating habits, my bony hands and mermaid hips. Now 20 years later, I have started gaining weight. You would think, how grateful I ought to be now that I don't have to face judgmental remarks anymore. But the situation is now they have started commenting on how I was prettier before "when I was slim", "your 5'3'' height and This book came to be at a much needed time. I have been stick thin every since my childhood, I have been called out by my relatives, classmates and at times my cousins for my eating habits, my bony hands and mermaid hips. Now 20 years later, I have started gaining weight. You would think, how grateful I ought to be now that I don't have to face judgmental remarks anymore. But the situation is now they have started commenting on how I was prettier before "when I was slim", "your 5'3'' height and 53 kgs make you look fat",they say. And of-course! I feel devastated. I depress myself more looking through my old pictures and have become extremely self-conscious in everything I wear. At times, declining to go out with my high school boyfriend of eight years because I somehow feel he might be ashamed to be seen with me. To be honest, I wasn't expecting much of a revolution when I picked this book up. But, this book was like listening to an advice of a trusted best friend. One who knows us in and out. The other F-word is an awe-inspiring fat anthology that brings to us personal experiences,essays,poetry and illustrations of many known and unknown faces. This diverse collection has voices of many renowned YA authors who have also represented "fat teens" on their stories.In "How to be a star of your own fat Rom-Com" , Lily Anderson tries to shine light on how the negative representation of fat people has solidified its position in books, movies and TV shows. Be it the main character's best friend who is often the center of a joke cracked or be it the "fat unattractive best friend" playing the cupid in the story cause apparently she doesn't deserve a story of her own. "AVOID THIS TROPE : Don't sidekick yourself", Anderson speaks.Through her illustration "Brighter than Starlight" , Jiji Knight reaches out to the "fatter audience" by illustrating her own self in portraits. "When I started to draw myself in my characters and people reached out, I found something much more valuable"     - Jill KnightAlmost all the stories go on to narrate how they have positively used their art form as an outlet to create a healthy environment for themselves and aspire and continue to do their part in normalizing body fat among the younger generation mostly.
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  • Billie
    January 1, 1970
    I wish this book had been around when I was a teen.There are some points that are repeated by multiple authors, but that's to be expected to some extent in a non-fiction anthology. Fashion, especially, seems to be a focus for multiple contributors, with good reason, considering the state of fat "fashion" for most of history (and even now), but it seemed slightly over-represented to me. The variety of fat voices is to be applauded. Angie Manfredi has assembled a contributor list that encompasses I wish this book had been around when I was a teen.There are some points that are repeated by multiple authors, but that's to be expected to some extent in a non-fiction anthology. Fashion, especially, seems to be a focus for multiple contributors, with good reason, considering the state of fat "fashion" for most of history (and even now), but it seemed slightly over-represented to me. The variety of fat voices is to be applauded. Angie Manfredi has assembled a contributor list that encompasses a wide range of race, gender, age, renown, sexuality...Pretty much every fat person will find someone in these pages who has more in common with them than just size.As with all collections, not every piece was as meaningful to me, but some had me in tears and Sarah Hollowell's letter to her younger self could have been written by me. I'm not an author, not even a writer, but I was the fat girl who lost herself in books, but never saw herself in them. (How much worse this must be/have been for people who were/are fat and—fat and black, fat and Asian, fat and queer, etc. I cannot even imagine.)This is a strong and much-needed collection and I sincerely hope that it finds the readers who need it. I will be doing my part to ensure that happens.
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    This book is SO important! When I first got the email to participate in the release buzz for it I got so excited because this is exactly the kind of book I would have loved to have as a growing teenager.For years I’ve suffered from body dysmorphia and the plethora of self-love issues I’ve had since it first started. That’s why this book is so important to me.The big thing about this book is that it includes fat people from all genders, sexualities, and ethnicities. Everyone can see themselves in This book is SO important! When I first got the email to participate in the release buzz for it I got so excited because this is exactly the kind of book I would have loved to have as a growing teenager.For years I’ve suffered from body dysmorphia and the plethora of self-love issues I’ve had since it first started. That’s why this book is so important to me.The big thing about this book is that it includes fat people from all genders, sexualities, and ethnicities. Everyone can see themselves in it and this book will truly be able to help everyone. There’s plenty of different pieces in this book as well. There’s art, essays, stories, and more. I love just how inclusive this book is in all aspects.Mostly, I’m just so happy that this book exists. I needed this when I was younger but I also think that it’s going to help myself and other adults who are still struggling with accepting themselves. *i was sent a free copy in exchange for an honest review*
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  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    I ended up following so many of these writers and illustrators and contributors on social media and if I'm being honest, would even like it to be MORE real. They're true personalities that shone through their words and their blurb biographies was more fascinating than they're prose contributions about celebrating fat fierceness. It's a powerful collection that has representation and strength in it's approach. There are dozens of contributors that provide the rainbow of experiences and stories st I ended up following so many of these writers and illustrators and contributors on social media and if I'm being honest, would even like it to be MORE real. They're true personalities that shone through their words and their blurb biographies was more fascinating than they're prose contributions about celebrating fat fierceness. It's a powerful collection that has representation and strength in it's approach. There are dozens of contributors that provide the rainbow of experiences and stories starting off with Alex Gino and ending with Amy Spalding with many in between. And I want to read more about Angie Manfredi herself, you librarian you! Enjoyed the humorous and seriousness of the approaches and the artwork (can't wait for the final version since I'm reading the ARC) with a fab cover and thoughtful contribution to a short story collection. More, more, more.
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  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    I read the advanced reader's copy of this book, so I think there were a few things off about it (I think an author bio was missing, and the art was still to come) but this was such a great mix of different essays or stories about the experience of being plus-size that I think will benefit many teens (and adults). I can't wait to get my hands on the finished copy and see the beautiful art.
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  • Emmy Neal
    January 1, 1970
    This book did not make me feel empowered, it just made me uncomfortable. The quality of the contributions is inconsistent, tonally it's a bit of a mess, and some of the stories, dragging the reader's insecurities to the surface and never attempting to reframe them to something positive. I didn't like the resurgence of the shame I lived through in middle school that it made me dwell on.
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  • Mary H
    January 1, 1970
    GIVE ME IT!
  • Leah
    January 1, 1970
    I think that, like Here We Are: Feminism for the Real World, this is an important and necessary resource for young people today. The essays are written with heart and direction, in a way that is quite personal. I certainly appreciated the care that was taken to include a wide variety of voices - not every voice, but many types of people, including those who are often overlooked.I think I was a little disappointed, however, by the somewhat repetitive nature of the material. Obviously everyone is I think that, like Here We Are: Feminism for the Real World, this is an important and necessary resource for young people today. The essays are written with heart and direction, in a way that is quite personal. I certainly appreciated the care that was taken to include a wide variety of voices - not every voice, but many types of people, including those who are often overlooked.I think I was a little disappointed, however, by the somewhat repetitive nature of the material. Obviously everyone is writing their own experience, which can be similar to others' in many ways, and they are writing by themselves, without consultation to avoid overlap. But there are only so many pieces you can read about how allowing yourself to feel sexy regardless of size, or about how difficult but rewarding it can be to find clothing that expresses you the way you want to before you're wishing someone would take a new angle. The voices might be diverse, but a lot of it fell into the same sort of patterns.
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  • Cat
    January 1, 1970
    Won a copy from the publisher (thank you!), but review is my own opinion. Where was this book when I was young and thin??? Family kept insisting I was too fat because I didn't look like a pencil (4"11, 98 lbs, in a family of 5'8'' and up skinny people). My own family laughed at me for years. I got married (mocked, as my husband and I looked ridiculous for being too short.) and later had a baby and, of course, gained weight. More mocking. Tried to eat sensibly, dieted and exercised, all to no ava Won a copy from the publisher (thank you!), but review is my own opinion. Where was this book when I was young and thin??? Family kept insisting I was too fat because I didn't look like a pencil (4"11, 98 lbs, in a family of 5'8'' and up skinny people). My own family laughed at me for years. I got married (mocked, as my husband and I looked ridiculous for being too short.) and later had a baby and, of course, gained weight. More mocking. Tried to eat sensibly, dieted and exercised, all to no avail. I was never good enough and met no ones standards. I walked away and accepted me. Adult body was what it was and is. My friends, sadly, aren't accepting of theirs and it gets so depressing to see them trying so hard to become skeletons and not achieving their weight lose goals. They won't buy new clothes because they don't want to waste clothes on their fat bodies. They hate to go out to clubs, because all the beautiful girls go there and what chance do they have? And on and on....I keep telling them to get on with their lives; some for years now! And still they agonize. I wear what I love and eat what I love and if anyone makes a comment- they better be ready for a good lashing or food dumped on them.... I love this book and am glad it's out there for the young adults in our society. Someone needs to be on their side! Not everyone is skinny and that is alright! We're not all stamped out of a mold and the variety of us all is amazing. So there. Us round folks seem to be the last folks people can mock. An it needs to stop. Now. No body shaming anyone ever. This books belongs on every shelf and everyone should read it. And adults need to step up to the plate and teach their children a bit of respect for ALL people, not just the "approved" ones. It's not nice to bully, tease, or harass other people's appearances. No one is perfect. So NO ONE has room to talk or judge.Thank you authors!
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  • Anya
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Abrams Books/Amulet Books for the ARC!I received a copy of this book in the mail a few days ago, and immediately dived in. In short, I love this book. It’s everything I wished I had when I was younger, even though I never realized it. I have never been skinny, but I avoided calling myself fat because of all the negative connotations associated with it. This book helped me be a little more comfortable with myself, hearing (and seeing) all the different voices praising the importance Thank you to Abrams Books/Amulet Books for the ARC!I received a copy of this book in the mail a few days ago, and immediately dived in. In short, I love this book. It’s everything I wished I had when I was younger, even though I never realized it. I have never been skinny, but I avoided calling myself fat because of all the negative connotations associated with it. This book helped me be a little more comfortable with myself, hearing (and seeing) all the different voices praising the importance of happiness, encouraging adventurous fashion, and saying it’s okay if you don’t feel okay with your body right now. It made that little, negative voice in my head a tiny bit quieter.I hope it does the same thing for teen readers, because they need it the most. Being a teenager is hard, but being a fat teenager is harder. I am so glad that clothing brands are making bigger sizes now (shout out to the clothing guide in the back of this book!) and I’m glad that there are a few more fat people in the media for fat kids and teenagers to look up too. Mostly, though, I’m glad this book exists. It is a raw, honest look at what it’s like to exist while fat, and the essays, poems and art inside give vibrant life to fat people from diverse backgrounds and life experiences. To Angie: Thank you for putting this together! 💖To the authors and artists: Thank you for showing your honest selves and letting us know, once again, that you can be so much more than the size of your body. This book comes out September 24th, so definitely go pick up a copy!
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    This is a collection of personal essays, advice, prose, poetry, art and more on bigger bodies, body image and body positivity. In a culture obsessed with beauty and body image this collection offers insight and guidance to self love, acceptance, and confidence to loving bodies just the way they are. •This collection is inspiring!I wish books like this existed 20 years ago. If they did society might be less narrow minded about body image today. I know I could have benefited from it as a teen. Bei This is a collection of personal essays, advice, prose, poetry, art and more on bigger bodies, body image and body positivity. In a culture obsessed with beauty and body image this collection offers insight and guidance to self love, acceptance, and confidence to loving bodies just the way they are. •This collection is inspiring!I wish books like this existed 20 years ago. If they did society might be less narrow minded about body image today. I know I could have benefited from it as a teen. Being able to read about people that look like you and emanate confidence and happiness with themselves is so huge and influential. The range of authors in this collection are very diverse. Voices from different genders, sexualities and races. Readers of all sizes and ages will find something to take away from this collection. It will resonate, comfort and educate.•Thank You to the publisher for #gifting me this #ARC opinions are my own. •For more of my book content check out instagram.com/bookalong
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  • Nicole Wagner
    January 1, 1970
    This is an incredibly wholesome celebration of living in a fat body, containing all of the nostalgia and pain and built-in subversion. I was lucky to receive an advance reader copy from the publisher for free, but the downfall to this is I'm missing some of the undoubtedly fun and beautiful final artwork that will be included in the finished hardcover. I didn't realize that this book is written for young people. I would have appreciated it a lot more at 11-12 years old, when I was really startin This is an incredibly wholesome celebration of living in a fat body, containing all of the nostalgia and pain and built-in subversion. I was lucky to receive an advance reader copy from the publisher for free, but the downfall to this is I'm missing some of the undoubtedly fun and beautiful final artwork that will be included in the finished hardcover. I didn't realize that this book is written for young people. I would have appreciated it a lot more at 11-12 years old, when I was really starting to critique my looks more and compare my body to others'. To me at 34 (I love myself and my body and my looks now) it was a little twee, but I am always happy to enjoy people's journeys toward self compassion and making the world better, so it was a nice read anyway. I'll be happily giving this book to someone else to enjoy. It's a welcome addition to the growing collection of body positive literature available to kids now.
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  • Kendra
    January 1, 1970
    A stellar collection of essays, poems, prose poems, cartoons, memoirs, and other work on being fat and learning to love your body. I wish I’d had this book around when I was 12 and at the beginning of being continually fat-shamed by my family. The diversity of viewpoints, including men’s, women’s, and enby voices, queer, IPOC, ace, ace, aro, and others is fantastic and much-needed. In addition r the writings in the book, it offers links to shops, blogs, Twitter accounts, and more that are helpfu A stellar collection of essays, poems, prose poems, cartoons, memoirs, and other work on being fat and learning to love your body. I wish I’d had this book around when I was 12 and at the beginning of being continually fat-shamed by my family. The diversity of viewpoints, including men’s, women’s, and enby voices, queer, IPOC, ace, ace, aro, and others is fantastic and much-needed. In addition r the writings in the book, it offers links to shops, blogs, Twitter accounts, and more that are helpful for and supportive of fat people. Give this to fat kids and their parents. Give it to your fat friends and your not-fat friends. Let it help you teach folx that fat is not something to be ashamed of, that fat people deserve the same expect as thinner folx, and that being fat doesn’t mean you have to be unhappy or limited in what you do.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked this book. I think it would be perfect for teen readers and is a great place for fat-friendly resources and for finding new people to follow. The book is beautifully diverse and I loved the fact that even disabled voices were included. There were a couple of essays that were a bit long-winded or repetitive and just fell flat for me but on the whole, I was inspired and moved. I highly recommend checking this book out, especially if you are just starting out your body positivity/fat I really liked this book. I think it would be perfect for teen readers and is a great place for fat-friendly resources and for finding new people to follow. The book is beautifully diverse and I loved the fact that even disabled voices were included. There were a couple of essays that were a bit long-winded or repetitive and just fell flat for me but on the whole, I was inspired and moved. I highly recommend checking this book out, especially if you are just starting out your body positivity/fat acceptance/self-love journey. It makes you realise that you are not alone and there are so many more important things about you than your size. I received a copy of the ebook via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review
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  • Bethany
    January 1, 1970
    The (Other) F Word: A Celebration of the Fat and the Fierce is an anthology of body-positive essays, art, and poems-- although mostly essays. Manfredi has collected works by a variety of fiercely fat individuals: models, bloggers, authors, creators, and more. There are a number of essays written to the author's younger self about how to find confidence and acceptance; a handful that cover how to be fat /and/ xyz (queer, POC, etc.); and so on. Some of the essays feel repetitive, but different asp The (Other) F Word: A Celebration of the Fat and the Fierce is an anthology of body-positive essays, art, and poems-- although mostly essays. Manfredi has collected works by a variety of fiercely fat individuals: models, bloggers, authors, creators, and more. There are a number of essays written to the author's younger self about how to find confidence and acceptance; a handful that cover how to be fat /and/ xyz (queer, POC, etc.); and so on. Some of the essays feel repetitive, but different aspect of the creator's soul-baring will speak to different readers.This book is mostly for those individuals who are fat and secondarily for those who need to overcome fatphobia.
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  • Andy Winder
    January 1, 1970
    This was an enjoyable and insightful collection of essays, poetry, and art. So vulnerable and seems like it has the power to help a whole generation of teens feel that their body is beautiful :)I especially loved the essays by Mason Deaver and S. Qiouyi Lu on how they navigate non-binary identity and body positivity. I'd never thought about the intersectionality between transgender and body-positive movements so it was fascinating to see that perspective. Also Julie Murphy's essay was so powerfu This was an enjoyable and insightful collection of essays, poetry, and art. So vulnerable and seems like it has the power to help a whole generation of teens feel that their body is beautiful :)I especially loved the essays by Mason Deaver and S. Qiouyi Lu on how they navigate non-binary identity and body positivity. I'd never thought about the intersectionality between transgender and body-positive movements so it was fascinating to see that perspective. Also Julie Murphy's essay was so powerful but really, what else could you expect from the author of Dumplin'?
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Oh I feel like a jerk for not liking this more. Essays are uneven and repetitive. But I read a galley—maybe they tightened it up a bit? I love so many of the contributors. I love that this is exists. I just wish less of the stories felt rushed or lightly revised and reused. DThen again, it also was a friendly reminder that Samantha Irby is 10x better than an unexpected upgrade to first class.
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  • Samantha Puc
    January 1, 1970
    The (Other) F Word is intended for young, fat readers, and it is an invaluable resource for them. Not only does this anthology completely dismantle the mythos of diet culture — especially as it is targeted at kids as young as 8 — it espouses and upholds the fact (and it is a fact) that fat people can live our best lives while we are fat.Read my full review at Fatventure Mag: click here.
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  • Naomi Tajedler
    January 1, 1970
    I cried I cheered I laughed through all these stories celebrating each individual's journey toward self love and not giving a flying f*** what other people think or want you to think about yourself A brilliant read and an inspiration
  • Hazel (Stay Bookish)
    January 1, 1970
    I was bookmarking almost every page and nodding my head so much I almost gave myself whiplash. I wish I could give this anthology to younger me. Full review on Stay Bookish.
  • Cherie
    January 1, 1970
    Amazing book (YA, MG, and otherwise) on being proud of being who you are for fat individuals. Pride in size, great inspiring read. Great add to any public or school library college.
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