Glass Town
This is a graphic novel based on the Brontë juvenilia, created by all four of the Brontë children over the span of their childhoods and into adulthood. The book covers their real lives - the fascinating story of their childhood on the Yorkshire Moors, but also delves into the complex imaginary worlds they created.

Glass Town Details

TitleGlass Town
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 1st, 1970
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Fantasy, Historical, Historical Fiction, Comics, Graphic Novels Comics

Glass Town Review

  • Chari
    January 1, 1970
    Perfecto. My cup of tea. Qué bonito y qué delicia de historia. He amado cada página. Si eres Brontë fan, conocedor de sus vidas y de la importancia de la invención de sus mundos imaginarios de Juvenilia, espero que disfrutes tanto como yo con esta lectura mezcla de realidad y fantasía.
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  • Lauren James
    January 1, 1970
    I love Isabel's graphic novels, and Glass Town was just as brilliant as I'd hoped. The perfect mix of fantasy and historical fiction, it flows seamlessly between imagination and memoir.
  • Jenny Cooke (Bookish Shenanigans)
    January 1, 1970
    One of my favourite books of the year that I'm sure will stay with me. A witty and clever story of the Bronte siblings and their juvenalia writings of Gondol and Glass Town. An entertaining read that is exquisitely illustrated.
  • L.H. Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    I am increasingly conscious that I am moving closer to the world of the Brontës, falling in love with it, and not being remotely mad about this, not at all. I would have fought against this a few years ago, I think, reading them as something distant from what they are. Something dull, something 'bonnety', something related to distant schooldays and the memories of tearing a text from limb to limb and leaving little to nothing left there to love, to lose onself in. But I have learnt how to read I am increasingly conscious that I am moving closer to the world of the Brontës, falling in love with it, and not being remotely mad about this, not at all. I would have fought against this a few years ago, I think, reading them as something distant from what they are. Something dull, something 'bonnety', something related to distant schooldays and the memories of tearing a text from limb to limb and leaving little to nothing left there to love, to lose onself in. But I have learnt how to read since then, and by 'read', I mean to read for myself. This isn't about literacy nor the understanding of shapes and comprehension of words, it's about reading. Selfishly, wholly. Completely. Reading not for the reaction of others but for the reaction of myself. And to trust in that. It's something I took a while to figure out: my reading has validity. And also, that it doesn't matter what route I take to get to a text. It just matters that I take it.My route to the Brontës began with Emily and Wuthering Heights, and the slow realisation that I could not ignore storytelling as fierce as this. And so I worked my way into their world, reading books about them and books by them and books like Glass Town by Isabel Greenberg, books that are something so magical and wild and weird and delicious that they spill out of simple classifications and into something else entirely. Technically this is a graphic novel, a blend of fact and fiction, a story of the Brontë juvenilia and the stories held within, and it is that. But it's something else entirely, and I think that something is magic. Magic. We read it as one thing, but it's so often another. Opening your eyes. Picking up a pen. Pulling a rabbit out of a hat. All magic, magic things but infinitely different. The act of conjuring. The act of making. The act of faith. A thousand different things in this world are magic and they are intoxicating, teasing, all-enveloping. Writing was the Brontës magic, a way to slide from one world into another, and the moors were their magic, a way to stand on the edge of the sky, and each other were their magic, these small potatoes in their cellar, these sisters. I think that's what happens here in Isabel Greenberg's book, magic. Worlds slide into worlds, lives fold into each other, stories map landscapes, oceans are formed, stars are made, stories are told. Greenberg's art borders on a spectral edge, capturing the tense edge of life on the edge of the moor, a life fighting against everything that happened, another world haunting the skies above Haworth, a castle in the sky built by words and stories and dreams.The other great part of this book is Charlotte's story. There are moments here that are intensely saddening, handled with a great and subtle restraint, and it is remarkable. I loved it. A lesson in dreams, a lesson in heartbreak, a lesson in imagination. A lesson in heartbreak, a lesson in love, a lesson in life. This book really is a stunning achievement.
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  • Dianna
    January 1, 1970
    Bramwell, Anne and Emily all die within 9 months of each other, leaving Charlotte alone and lost. It’s 1849 and she’s out from behind her pseudonym. She’s famous and she’s grieving.She turns back to Angria, the world she and her siblings created and wrote together. While Anne and Emily would later split, and move their creative efforts to Gibraltar, and while Bramwell’s use of their fictional kingdom could be haphazard and misaligned with Charlotte’s vision, Angria was special.I’ve read a couple Bramwell, Anne and Emily all die within 9 months of each other, leaving Charlotte alone and lost. It’s 1849 and she’s out from behind her pseudonym. She’s famous and she’s grieving.She turns back to Angria, the world she and her siblings created and wrote together. While Anne and Emily would later split, and move their creative efforts to Gibraltar, and while Bramwell’s use of their fictional kingdom could be haphazard and misaligned with Charlotte’s vision, Angria was special.I’ve read a couple of other fictional works about the Brontes and their juvenalia and this is my favourite. Of course Charlotte would be tempted by Angria, as she remembers siblings. Of course a return to that world would be bittersweet and dangerous. The art is beautiful, the sketchy style, the heavy lines make the story feel ... inky. As though it’s what writing looks like in the writer’s head.So far, there’s been a focus on the author’s experience of their fictional world and characters as real. As though Angria’s role cannot be unlinked from its creators, and look that’s definitely there: the Brontes wrote themselves into Angria from the beginning, and rewrote its history and characters as they grew up and their interests changed. I’m fairly sure that Charlotte said something, in a letter or to Ellen Nussey, about how she has to let go of Angria before she could write Jane Eyre, that she couldn’t, perhaps, separate herself enough to turn it into the book she wanted to write. This approach to Angria works well, but it still leaves me yearning for Angria to be a fully realised world beyond the Brontes, for it to be a place like Middle Earth or Narnia or Neverland. It has a map! It has politics and secret societies and wars. But I’m also aware that this is wishful thinking - it’s not, ultimately, a substantial enough place. It’s most interesting because it’s part of Bronte lore.
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  • lauren
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this! It’s my first graphic novel, and where I probably won’t reach for them often, it’s taught me that they can be a fun reading experience! I’ve always found the Brontë juvenilia a little confusing, but the visual art really helped me to make sense of it. I know some of it was based on the work and a lot was fictionalised but I didn’t really mind that!I loved how it focused on Glass Town, but I do wish it spoke of Gondal a little more! I would love to see another of these I really enjoyed this! It’s my first graphic novel, and where I probably won’t reach for them often, it’s taught me that they can be a fun reading experience! I’ve always found the Brontë juvenilia a little confusing, but the visual art really helped me to make sense of it. I know some of it was based on the work and a lot was fictionalised but I didn’t really mind that!I loved how it focused on Glass Town, but I do wish it spoke of Gondal a little more! I would love to see another of these dedicated to what we have left of Emily and Anne’s world!
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  • thehalcyondaysofsummer
    January 1, 1970
    Opening lines: ‘Who’s there..?’
  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    What a beautiful graphic novel this is! I preordered it as soon as I found out about it since the Brontë sisters are some of my favorite writers. Glass Town focuses on the imaginary worlds that the Brontës wrote about in their childhood, and Isabel Greenberg brings these worlds to life in her wonderful illustrations. If you love the Brontë sisters, I highly recommend adding this one to your collection.
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  • gwendalyn _books_
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my a Graphic novel of the Bronte sisters, a delightful book!Highly recommend
  • Daisy
    January 1, 1970
    Quality Rating: Five StarsEnjoyment Rating: Five StarsIsabel Greenberg has long since been my favourite graphic novelist and one of my favourite storytellers since I first read The One Hundred Nights of Hero. While that still remains one of my most beloved books, Glass Town creeped very close to its position. Based on the Brontë sisters (and brother) and the fictional world they wrote about as children, this is part biographical, part magical realist, part fantasy epic. It’s masterfully Quality Rating: Five StarsEnjoyment Rating: Five StarsIsabel Greenberg has long since been my favourite graphic novelist and one of my favourite storytellers since I first read The One Hundred Nights of Hero. While that still remains one of my most beloved books, Glass Town creeped very close to its position. Based on the Brontë sisters (and brother) and the fictional world they wrote about as children, this is part biographical, part magical realist, part fantasy epic. It’s masterfully constructed, bittersweet and moving, and made me feel like a child in so many ways. We often forget the playful nature of creating stories and worlds and characters, especially when we think of classic authors. This graphic novel sets that right in a timeless, whimsical, melancholic way.
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  • Ally Kumari
    January 1, 1970
    I just... really love Charlotte Brontë, you know. And this book is really both imagined, but for greater part factual, journey into her own private torment. I have, also, always found her the most tragic of all the Brontë siblings, especially because of she outlived all of her siblings, and then her own pregnancy killed her. As for the publication itself, I have to say I am not a great admirer of Isabel Greenbergs art style, especially her close-ups freak me out (though the more complex pictures I just... really love Charlotte Brontë, you know. And this book is really both imagined, but for greater part factual, journey into her own private torment. I have, also, always found her the most tragic of all the Brontë siblings, especially because of she outlived all of her siblings, and then her own pregnancy killed her. As for the publication itself, I have to say I am not a great admirer of Isabel Greenberg´s art style, especially her close-ups freak me out (though the more complex pictures were nice). However she has managed to tell the story of the Brontës in a very creative and original way, by using beautiful language and packing a punch right through my soul.
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  • Andreia
    January 1, 1970
    Glass Town is so full of heart and imagination and the desire to escape. It is about the power of our ability to create something that doesn’t exist – a story, a whole world to live and fight and love in. It might be based on the Brontë children’s early works and lives but it will resonate with anyone who ever found themselves daydreaming about being somewhere magical and full of adventure.This book is pure joy – from the actual object (this velvety hardback that makes you want to rub your face Glass Town is so full of heart and imagination and the desire to escape. It is about the power of our ability to create something that doesn’t exist – a story, a whole world to live and fight and love in. It might be based on the Brontë children’s early works and lives but it will resonate with anyone who ever found themselves daydreaming about being somewhere magical and full of adventure.This book is pure joy – from the actual object (this velvety hardback that makes you want to rub your face on it) to the artwork, plot and characters. If you’re a Brontë fan, you know that it’s not going to have a happy ending but there is so much to enjoy before the end comes! Isabel Greenberg’s work is quirky and colourful and very unique and it will stay in your head, even after you finish the book. You’ll find yourself thinking in her cartoons, imagining how the people you know would look like if she had drawn them (or maybe that was just my experience).Glass Town is the perfect blend of historical fiction and fantasy and it will suck you into the reality and alternative reality the Brontë children lived in. It will remind you of the dangers of imagination which are almost as equal in power as its marvels. And it will prove to be one of the most beautiful, most entertaining graphic novels you’ll ever come across. Follow Parabatai Reviews for more.
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  • Renee DeMoranville
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advanced copy through a goodreads giveaway and glad I won!! If I hadn’t I never would have read from this author and will have to try her other books. I very interesting fictional history mix about the Bronte siblings. A pleasant quick read that anyone with a sibling would understand and enjoy.
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  • Janice Bridger
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it, want more! Based (loosely) on the Bronte children’s early works, and captures how you can get sucked into the alternative world that you may have in your imagination. Implies that you could stay for ever, certainly I will keep this book and revisit Glass Town many times!
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  • Danae Lamond
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely beautiful Absolutely beautiful ♥️
  • Joanna
    January 1, 1970
    Did I cry? Yes.
  • Dipali
    January 1, 1970
    ** A copy of Small Hours was provided by the publisher and Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review **This is everything I hoped it would be and more! The art and story are both beautiful.
  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    This is a charming graphic novel is reminiscent of Little Women and leans into Bronte’s work.
  • Marina
    January 1, 1970
    best :__
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