Fucking Law
Fucking Law is an urgent call for everyone, not just academics and researchers, to find inventive ways to question the ethics of sexuality. Since a sex life is full of so many diverse moments of joy and suffering, for each and everybody, the book attempts to bridge a gap between philosophical and non-philosophical questioning. Central to the book is the reality that everyone can challenge the ethics and laws of sexuality and ask questions, even where they seem frightening, or worse, even when we are told not to - by institutions and lovers alike. Non-philosophical and accessible, Fucking Law is risky, explicit and provocative as it bridges the gap between academic and every-day questioning of sexual encounters.

Fucking Law Details

TitleFucking Law
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 1st, 2019
PublisherZero Books
ISBN-139781789040678
Rating
GenreNonfiction

Fucking Law Review

  • Alex Sarll
    January 1, 1970
    The title is true in all senses, though in a sense doesn't go far enough because this is not just about fucking, law and fucking the law, it's also about the philosophy of sex, and philosophy as sex, and sex as philosophy. Partaking equally of poetry, porn and post-structuralism, I'm not sure I necessarily followed all of it, but then I'm also not sure it's a book to be followed so much as inhaled, gazed at, or rolled around in. It also serves as one in the eye (or somewhere, at any rate) for al The title is true in all senses, though in a sense doesn't go far enough because this is not just about fucking, law and fucking the law, it's also about the philosophy of sex, and philosophy as sex, and sex as philosophy. Partaking equally of poetry, porn and post-structuralism, I'm not sure I necessarily followed all of it, but then I'm also not sure it's a book to be followed so much as inhaled, gazed at, or rolled around in. It also serves as one in the eye (or somewhere, at any rate) for all those recent think-pieces about whether the age of offence has prevented the publication of transgressive books. Really, no – they're just happening a little more towards the margins, just as they used to back in the day outside those brief periods of celebrity notoriety. Seriously, the notion of finding Heidegger a turn-on is far wilder and more disturbing than anything Ellis or Houllebecq ever came up with. And yet after all the dicks, disappointments and Deleuze, it ends up in the entirely wholesome suggestion that what would help most is more kindness.(Netgalley ARC)
    more
  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. Fucking Law is an urgent call for everyone, not just academics and researchers, to find inventive ways to question the ethics of sexuality. Since a sex life is full of so many diverse moments of joy and suffering, for each and everybody, the book attempts to brid I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. Fucking Law is an urgent call for everyone, not just academics and researchers, to find inventive ways to question the ethics of sexuality. Since a sex life is full of so many diverse moments of joy and suffering, for each and everybody, the book attempts to bridge a gap between philosophical and non-philosophical questioning. Central to the book is the reality that everyone can challenge the ethics and laws of sexuality and ask questions, even where they seem frightening, or worse, even when we are told not to – by institutions and lovers alike. Non-philosophical and accessible, Fucking Law is risky, explicit and provocative as it bridges the gap between academic and every-day questioning of sexual encounters.Oh, boy --- I am torn on this book. I can see it as a way to look DEEP into the ethics of sexuality and its philosophy. That said, it was dry and not particularly enjoyable. Unless you are a card-carrying feminist or a philosophize about women and sex and "the damage that was done by the Christian Grey books" (oh, that was an interesting book club...) you may not get much out of it.I am going to give it a middle of the road 2.5 (rounded up to 3) of 5 stars --- it was excellently researched and well written but it is not enjoyable to this casual reader. (Your book club may love it though!)NOTE: I cannot link this review to LinkedIn - there is something wrong with the linking/programming and it will not happen. p.s. If you want a laugh, go to my facebook review where the photos came up of the "books with a similar title" that showed up on Goodreads when I searched for it by title, not the ISBN.
    more
  • Em (Diversify Your Shelf)
    January 1, 1970
    * I received this book on Net Galley*TW: rape, detailed sex, sexual assault, gas-lighting, abusive relationships. This book is a lot to handle. I knew that going in but I had deemed it the sort of work I should read as someone who is trying to better understand how we can progress through the #metoo movement and how I could be supportive of situations that are very different than my own. This review will be a short one because, frankly, I'm a but lost for words. I knew the detailed sex would lik * I received this book on Net Galley*TW: rape, detailed sex, sexual assault, gas-lighting, abusive relationships. This book is a lot to handle. I knew that going in but I had deemed it the sort of work I should read as someone who is trying to better understand how we can progress through the #metoo movement and how I could be supportive of situations that are very different than my own. This review will be a short one because, frankly, I'm a but lost for words. I knew the detailed sex would likely make me feel uncomfortable but that is not the most discomfiting thing in this work. The overarching theme of the author trying to negotiate her own beliefs of sex while having a truly abusive relationship with a man who was married was a lot to handle. It was interesting but so, so horrifying. Brooks brought up points I agreed with and points I emphatically did not-- this is one of the reasons I requested this book as I knew that no matter how I felt about it in the end I knew I'd be exposed to new ideas and concepts. I was correct but now after reading it I'm not sure quite how to feel. The author has an interesting view about judgement and how it effects her academic and personal lives. I do not judge her for her sexual research but it does fill me with immense worry having finished the book and not seeing any indication that she is in a healthier mindset than she was during her research. She seems spectacularly unwell-- not because she decided to investigate ethics and not because of her partners but because of her toxic relationship with her 'philosopher' (who could have ended up on her PhD panel) that she seems to not have healed from. The book ends with her discussing kindness and I absolutely agree that kindness is important. However, I found it hugely disturbing when she muses that "perhaps a better question, rather than 'will you be safe,' is 'will you be kind?" (pg 110). This is in reference to the questions posed by her ethics committee in order to do her research. While, again, kindness is important and people doing social experiments should not be abusive, this is such a problematic thing to wonder about. It's all well and good to be kind but of course a committee will have to ensure her safety and its alarming that she seems to think that her kindness is more important than her safety.This was a book that was quite different than my usual pick and while I am not quite sure how I feel about it, it is important to realise how under-represented women tend to be in sexual studies and most other studies as well. I am glad I read this, even though I take issues with parts of it, but I would HEAVILY CAUTION anyone with any sexual/mental/physical trauma to be very careful. Someone got somewhat triggered just by me discussing some parts of the book that were not even (to me) the most upsetting bits and I would hate for people to have their trauma exacerbated.
    more
  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    This book falls within the category of “Philosophy of sex” but many readers will probably say it uses sex as a form of philosophy. She takes you on a journey from the University Ethics Committee (which seems to be biased towards her work because she’s a woman) and all the way to ‘Plage Naturiste’ of southern France where she carries out her research. It’s brave, provocative, liberating and passionate. It’ll make you blush and smile but most importantly, it’ll make you think. She generously share This book falls within the category of “Philosophy of sex” but many readers will probably say it uses sex as a form of philosophy. She takes you on a journey from the University Ethics Committee (which seems to be biased towards her work because she’s a woman) and all the way to ‘Plage Naturiste’ of southern France where she carries out her research. It’s brave, provocative, liberating and passionate. It’ll make you blush and smile but most importantly, it’ll make you think. She generously shares her personal encounters with bodies and sexual explosions in just 166 pages but your body and mind will crave for more. It de-stigmatizes fetishes and especially female sexuality which almost always comes with judgment. Although she describes herself as a whore, most readers will realize she’s a brave activist for female sexual liberation. Although the vulgar language may be off-putting for some readers like myself, it’s quite necessary for her agenda - f*cking law. Towards the end, the reader will find that it boils down to kindness or as the author says “kindness is the greatest thing a body can do for another body.”.
    more
  • Jeff
    January 1, 1970
    Fucking Ethics and Fucking Judgments. First, I will tell you that if the word "fucking" disturbs you, this book isn't for you (but you may have suspected that from the title). If the various "raunchy" and "vulgar" words for human genitalia disturb you, this book isn't for you.But if you're still reading this review, then I assume you're at least ok with these words. In which case, allow me to tell you how sublime and thought provoking this book is. Part memoir and part academic philosophical tre Fucking Ethics and Fucking Judgments. First, I will tell you that if the word "fucking" disturbs you, this book isn't for you (but you may have suspected that from the title). If the various "raunchy" and "vulgar" words for human genitalia disturb you, this book isn't for you.But if you're still reading this review, then I assume you're at least ok with these words. In which case, allow me to tell you how sublime and thought provoking this book is. Part memoir and part academic philosophical treatise, this book truly takes a hard and intriguing look at the philosophical ethics of human sexuality. This isn't a light read. It isn't a beach read (unless maybe you're at a nudist/ swinger beach?). It is likely a read that will make you horny without actually being erotica. It is a read that will make you think. And maybe, just maybe, it is a read that will open you to the author's own brand of sexual ethics, even though it is one she does not explicitly recommend - quite the opposite - herself.
    more
  • Riasaakshi
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent, read it in one sitting. It is, to be fair, not going to sit well with everyone. The philosophy is presented at undergraduate+ level, and weaving it through part ethnography and part heavy reflective practice is difficult. But the combination moved me. I found Brooks's writting immersive and that immersion made the philosophy more tangible to me, as well as her experience more real, more relatable. I like that she leaves us to our own conclusions and does not preach or dictate, merely Excellent, read it in one sitting. It is, to be fair, not going to sit well with everyone. The philosophy is presented at undergraduate+ level, and weaving it through part ethnography and part heavy reflective practice is difficult. But the combination moved me. I found Brooks's writting immersive and that immersion made the philosophy more tangible to me, as well as her experience more real, more relatable. I like that she leaves us to our own conclusions and does not preach or dictate, merely errects a large signpost and points 'that way'... ... it was refreshing, to read a book written by someone who treated me like a peer. All too often books dumb down, over explain; take a too pop-academic, MOR stance. Its also refreshing to know I am going to come back to this book several times and learn more because of that stance. I think her work is important and would recommend anyone interested in sexual ethics, philosophy and femminism to read it.
    more
  • Kristine
    January 1, 1970
    Fucking Law by Victoria Brooks is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in early July.Sexual ethics, having pride and unabashedness in one’s body and their sexual intimate activities, reading erotic texts, and having an intellectual and intuitive dialogue with one’s partner; all from the perspective of a ‘she’ who lives in France and is reactionary in the third person to events with others and muses on philosophy and fact. Rather a lot like Beat poetry with the pulsing narrative vein of research.
    more
  • Shannaka
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.I tried my best to enjoy this book but it just didn't grasp my attention like I thought it would. I had really high hopes for it's philosophical view on sex, law and everything in between but it feel flat for me. The flow seemed a bit off and the usage of complex words throughout just seemed a bit pretentious.
    more
  • Stephanie Livingston-Bujold
    January 1, 1970
    Confusing disjointed and pretentious.The way I felt when reading this is the same way I feel when watching foreign independent films- frustrated by reading the peices together subtitles, angered wondering why she just threw a live cod into a busy metropolitan street, and just plain pissed that now I will never understand just why was that frog smoking a cigarette???
    more
  • thewoollygeek
    January 1, 1970
    I was very disappointed in this and I had been looking forward to it, what could have been a very powerful book just felt lifeless and very dry and uninteresting Thanks to netgalley and the publisher for a free copy for an honest opinion
  • Rosanna1
    January 1, 1970
    MyFriday introduction yo this author. I loved the writing style. Great sexy characters. Steamy sexy romance book. Relatable characters. Welll written.
  • Cristie Underwood
    January 1, 1970
    This was an interesting read, as it was part memoir and part fiction. It is thought provoking and erotic at the same time. An enjoyable read.
  • Crystal
    January 1, 1970
    I was looking forward to reading this book and delving into the ethics of sexuality, but I couldn't get into this book. The writing was dry and it wasn't an enjoyable read, and with far too many books on my to-read list I didn't force myself to finish.
    more
Write a review