Stranger Things (Graphic Novel Volume 1)
The hit Netflix series from the Duffer Brothers is now a spine-tingling comic that recounts Will Beyers' harrowing survival in the treacherous Upside Down!When Will Byers finds himself in the Upside Down, an impossible dark parody of his own world, he's understandably frightened. But that's nothing compared with the fear that takes hold when he realizes what's in that world with him!Follow Will's struggle through the season one events of the hit Netflix show Stranger Things! Written by Jody Houser (Mother Panic, Faith) and illustrated by Stefano Martino (Doctor Who, Catwoman)

Stranger Things (Graphic Novel Volume 1) Details

TitleStranger Things (Graphic Novel Volume 1)
Author
ReleaseMay 7th, 2019
PublisherDark Horse Books
ISBN-139781506709765
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Young Adult, Comic Book, Horror, Science Fiction

Stranger Things (Graphic Novel Volume 1) Review

  • David Schaafsma
    January 1, 1970
    So snatched this right up when I saw it at the library. It is a kind of cash grab-spin off, but we are big ST fans in this house, so everyone is gobbling it up. My first impression before reading it was that they were dumb in naming it, because it is not called "the other side," but "the upside down," but what they really mean is that Jody Hauser means to tell "the other side" of the story of Will Beyer's disappearance that we who have watched the tv series only know from the perspective of his So snatched this right up when I saw it at the library. It is a kind of cash grab-spin off, but we are big ST fans in this house, so everyone is gobbling it up. My first impression before reading it was that they were dumb in naming it, because it is not called "the other side," but "the upside down," but what they really mean is that Jody Hauser means to tell "the other side" of the story of Will Beyer's disappearance that we who have watched the tv series only know from the perspective of his mother. Since the series is still going on, they were prevented from telling new stories that might spoil the tv story, so the story, such as it is, is quite constrained.We don't really learn anything new about the events; we just see it from his perspective, and know what he is feeling, which we already pretty well imagined. I suppose we can now understand a bit better how uneasy Will feels when he gets back, in that he is not really fully back in his old world. The art has that unfortunate spin-off/comics novelization-type challenge (as in the Buffy series, and so on) of forcing the artist to make all the characters look exactly like the tv characters we remember. Some are spot on, some are not so good.But having said all this, I didn't dislike it. I like the ST world and the way a D & D game evolves into real fantasy/horror.
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  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    I was excited to get ahold of this. I love Stranger Things and I dig Jody Houser's work on Faith. This was supposed to be Will's story from Season 1 while he was trapped in the Upside Down. If you enjoy watching a boy wander around a ghost town and reflect back on a D&D outing for 4 issues then this is the book for you. This was so boring and without consequence. The art was serviceable at best. I'm not sure if Netflix handicapped Houser or she just phoned this one in. This is what I've come I was excited to get ahold of this. I love Stranger Things and I dig Jody Houser's work on Faith. This was supposed to be Will's story from Season 1 while he was trapped in the Upside Down. If you enjoy watching a boy wander around a ghost town and reflect back on a D&D outing for 4 issues then this is the book for you. This was so boring and without consequence. The art was serviceable at best. I'm not sure if Netflix handicapped Houser or she just phoned this one in. This is what I've come to expect from most tie-in mass media. Nothing more than a cash grab.Received a review copy from Dark Horse and Edelweiss. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.
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  • Ben Brown
    January 1, 1970
    I love “Stranger Things” – it’s a great show. Sadly, I did not love this comic. I wanted to – badly. But “Stranger Things: Volume I” is pretty much the definition of a “cash-in” – a tie-in comic that exists solely to siphon a little extra dough off of the property’s current red-hot status in the marketplace. Reading these four issues is a little like reading a teaser for a big comic book event – there’s little to no real plot, the art is functional at best, and everything feels slightly obligato I love “Stranger Things” – it’s a great show. Sadly, I did not love this comic. I wanted to – badly. But “Stranger Things: Volume I” is pretty much the definition of a “cash-in” – a tie-in comic that exists solely to siphon a little extra dough off of the property’s current red-hot status in the marketplace. Reading these four issues is a little like reading a teaser for a big comic book event – there’s little to no real plot, the art is functional at best, and everything feels slightly obligatory, almost like this comic exists because, well, of course it HAS to, it’s freaking “Stranger Things”! Honestly, the whole read is slightly depressing, because as anyone who’s watched “Stranger Things” knows, this is a world that’s RIFE with story-potential, that has all kinds of cool and exciting avenues to explore. Yet time and time again, writer Jody Houser seems determined to play things safe, choosing instead to either a.) recap stuff that we’ve already seen play out way more interestingly on the show, or b.) give us extended sequences where characters monologue about this thing or that thing, but overall, nothing of consequence really happens. Maybe it’s not her fault – perhaps Netflix and whoever is in charge of managing the property didn’t give her a lot of narrative leash to play with. But regardless of WHO’S fault it is, it doesn’t change the fact that, at the end of the day, “Volume I” is kind of a bummer to read. Which, let’s face it: “bummer” should never be seen in the same sentence as “Stranger Things.”
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  • Ariyan Abidi
    January 1, 1970
    خب سريال رو كه خيلى دوست دارم. كميكم خوب بود. يه ستاره رو به خاطر طراحى ها كم كردم. يكى هم به خاطر داستان كه ميتونست پر محتوا تر باشه. ولى همه اينا به كنارممنون از عوامل نشر باژ كه كميك خوندن به صورت فيزيكى رو براى ما علاقه مندان ممكن كرد❣اميدوارم اين روند ادامه داشته باشه و شاهد چاپ بهترين كميك ها تو ايران باشيم. خب سريال رو كه خيلى دوست دارم. كميكم خوب بود. يه ستاره رو به خاطر طراحى ها كم كردم. يكى هم به خاطر داستان كه ميتونست پر محتوا تر باشه. ولى همه اينا به كنارممنون از عوامل نشر باژ كه كميك خوندن به صورت فيزيكى رو براى ما علاقه مندان ممكن كرد❣️اميدوارم اين روند ادامه داشته باشه و شاهد چاپ بهترين كميك ها تو ايران باشيم.
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  • Abdollah zarei
    January 1, 1970
    3.5قطعا برای کسایی که سریال رو دیدن به شدت خوشایند و جذاب خواهد بود. طراحی مناسب و کادر بندی نسبتا خوب و راضی کننده. تنها باید حتما سریال رو دیده باشید تا این داستان فرعی رو کاملا بفهمید.
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  • Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)
    January 1, 1970
    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here.We are never safe from ideas of expansion that capitalize on excellent opportunities. When success is tasted for the first time, a dark force takes over some individuals and allows these ideas to germinate and proliferate wildly and without control within them. While many will see this as more of what they love, others will see it as the beginning of a tumble. After all, what good does it do to a franchise to expand in uncharted territory when i You can find my review on my blog by clicking here.We are never safe from ideas of expansion that capitalize on excellent opportunities. When success is tasted for the first time, a dark force takes over some individuals and allows these ideas to germinate and proliferate wildly and without control within them. While many will see this as more of what they love, others will see it as the beginning of a tumble. After all, what good does it do to a franchise to expand in uncharted territory when it was never equipped for it in the first place? While I am all in for exploration, I was also ready for the ship to arrive broken, smaller than expected and with crewmembers missing. To see a franchise getting milked is not always a fun sight, right? Following the release of the Netflix original series, Stranger Things, back in 2016, a gargantuan fanbase came to life and grew at a phenomenal rate, where no mortal could not avoid hearing about it. Thus, right before the release of the 3rd season of the Duffer Brother’s horror series, new comic books and novels are being released to fill in the blank and allow fans to gain more insight into our favourite heroes and the Upside Down. It is now up to fans to find out if they are worth their time.What is Stranger Things: The Other Side about? This graphic novel collects a four-part miniseries and revolves around Will Byers’ survival in the Upside Down. The story presents readers with his point of view during the events of the Netflix series’ first season until the beginning of the second season. Unsurprisingly, most of his time is spent in a realm that fans have not roamed in too much, while still giving them short and quick references to the events that occurred in the TV series. The story also draws parallel to the kids’ Dungeons & Dragons board game as they each embrace their fantasy characters to find answers to their questions. This short graphic novel hence looks to fill in the blank by allowing readers to relive the horrors of Will Byers’ life while his friends and family desperately search for him in the most unlikely of places.Sometimes there are questions that should just remain unanswered for the greater good. Will Byers’ point of view was a mystery that could have stayed unsolved, leaving the viewers the opportunity to speculate on what he has been through and what was going through his head throughout the whole season. To try to cover all that ground within four issues was already, beforehand, an impossible task, or at least one that would come with severe flaws. In this case, the pacing was the biggest issue as the accelerated rhythm does not allow the reader to truly absorb and comprehend the amount of time Will Byers spends in this dark and sinister realm. The pacing does not also allow the reader to understand how much resilience was needed to fight through all the obstacles he faced. To deliver such a story simply takes away the stakes and gravity of what he goes through, even if it is for the sake of finding out what exactly it is he went through.While the story does suffer from the pacing, there are some interesting angles that were explored. The privileged information for fans of the series that allow them to explain certain things that would otherwise have never been known in the TV series is still an upside to this graphic novel. It is also fun to see how Will Byers’ Dungeons & Dragons character plays a huge role as a defense mechanism to fight the darkness that engulfs his reality. Otherwise, the artwork is decent enough to capture some of the series’ magic while adding more elements of fantasy that would have been impossible to convey in the TV series. The character designs, however, could be a bit difficult to love with the awkward facial expressions, although it does a good job in drawing the actual actors, as you know them, instead of creating surrogates. The colours used are still adequate and rightly distinguish both realities, especially through the use of faded colours.Stranger Things: The Other Side is an exploration of Will Byers’ point of view during the events of the hit Netflix original series’ first season with darkness, loneliness and hope as pivotal themes of his unfortunate experience.Yours truly,Lashaan | Blogger and Book ReviewerOfficial blog: https://bookidote.com/
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  • Rich Stoehr
    January 1, 1970
    The 'Stranger Things' graphic novel sits in a kind of weird place. And I don't mean the Upside Down.It's clearly meant to be read by those who have watched at least the first season 'Stranger Things,' the Netflix show. Those who haven't watched the show will have little idea what's going in in the comic. But for fans of the show, there's not much in the way of new material to chew on in the graphic novel.To be fair, Jody Houser does a fine job putting together a story that feels like it could ha The 'Stranger Things' graphic novel sits in a kind of weird place. And I don't mean the Upside Down.It's clearly meant to be read by those who have watched at least the first season 'Stranger Things,' the Netflix show. Those who haven't watched the show will have little idea what's going in in the comic. But for fans of the show, there's not much in the way of new material to chew on in the graphic novel.To be fair, Jody Houser does a fine job putting together a story that feels like it could have come right out of an episode of the show. The graphic novel mostly tells the story of what happens to Will while he's in the Upside Down, complete with flashbacks, pop culture references, and even a slight teaser for season two. I liked the addition of referencing Will's role-playing character, Will the Wise, in a more direct way. The art style, too, does remarkably good service in re-creating the look and feel of the show itself. This graphic novel feels right at home in the Stranger Things universe.To be honest, however, there's not much to surprise or even enhance what you already know just from watching the show. Will was a little more active than I expected, but the main function of the graphic novel seems to be to quickly hit all the main beats of the 8-episode show, where Will interacted with various characters along the way. We know talked on the phone, now we see how that happened from the other side. We know he blinked the Christmas lights, and now we see how that worked too (sort of...it's not really explained in any meaningful way). Oh, there's Barb's broken glasses, what happened to her? And on we go.I enjoyed reading the story while I was reading, but when I finished the final issue, I didn't feel like much had been added. Some of the character moments were interesting, but the story beats felt somewhat rote, since we already know the basic plot of the show. I can only imagine that someone who hadn't watched it would get totally lost.There are awful graphic novels which can't even manage to tell a story properly, and there are great ones that tell an original, compelling story we want to experience over and over. And then there are the in-between ones, which tell a good story well, but not very memorably.'Stranger Things' is about the Upside Down, but it's an in-between piece that would have a hard time standing on its own.
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  • Rick
    January 1, 1970
    Basically this tells the story of what happened to Will while the events of the first season of Stranger Things was unfolding. It's good, but there really isn't anything new or particularly poignant that is revealed.
  • Dany
    January 1, 1970
    While I appreciate the idea of seeing what happened to Will when he was on the Upside Down while everyone was losing their shit in our dimension looking for it... I can't help but wonder, was this actually really necessary?
  • Ronald
    January 1, 1970
    That was disappointing. I guess writing a story with just one character is harder than it would seem. But really there was no reason for this to be a four issue comic, this story was more a one and done thing and stretching it out hurt the story.
  • Marilee
    January 1, 1970
    Loved the artwork! 4 stars for that alone. It's definitely not something that you could understand if you haven't seen the tv show though.
  • Tim Joseph
    January 1, 1970
    ... Over too soon...
  • The Artisan Geek
    January 1, 1970
    21/2:Will post my review, when this comic gets published!
  • Craig Evans
    January 1, 1970
    This only gets 3 stars because it’s Stranger Things, I mean did this story even need to be told? It gives us nothing the far superior TV series does. The art is great but the story is amateur and quite frankly, pretty pointless. Shame.
  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    Hmm. I received this as a review copy from Edelweiss. I'm grateful to them for that. The book itself seems weak. I'm not sure whether it's intended for kids? Adults? It would make no sense to someone who hadn't seen the first season, but there really isn't that much there for someone who has. A few of the full page illustrations are very nice, but I'm just not sure what need this book is supposed to fill.
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  • Giulia Rita Herondale
    January 1, 1970
    2.5Review soon
  • ❁ olivia ❁
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed the first couple of these but I don’t think i would read more 🧐It was really interesting getting to know what happened to Will whilst he was in the upside down and how he could hear them trying to talk to him and when he found Barbs glasses in the pool.However, I think this would work so much better as a mini Netflix series instead of comics. 2 stars
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  • Michael Cook
    January 1, 1970
    Stranger Things is massively successful. It's probably Netflix's biggest hit in the past five years, or so. So, it was only a matter of time before it started branching out into other mediums. Earlier this month, the first official novel - Gwenda Bond's Suspicious Minds - was released, but prior to that, Dark Horse Comics released a limited series - written by Jody Houser and illustrated by Stefano Martino - telling the unseen story of Will Byers during the events of season 1. It's a great idea Stranger Things is massively successful. It's probably Netflix's biggest hit in the past five years, or so. So, it was only a matter of time before it started branching out into other mediums. Earlier this month, the first official novel - Gwenda Bond's Suspicious Minds - was released, but prior to that, Dark Horse Comics released a limited series - written by Jody Houser and illustrated by Stefano Martino - telling the unseen story of Will Byers during the events of season 1. It's a great idea for a tie-in comic, but is the execution as good as the concept? Mostly, yeah.As I said, this graphic novel follows Will during his experience in the Upside Down during the events of season 1. Much of the story is told through word bubbles from the point of view of an omniscient narrator. This is a tactic that works surprisingly well as it allows the reader to get inside of Will's mind while also being clued into the grander scheme. There's very little dialogue in this series as Will wouldn't really have anybody to talk to in the Upside Down. To compensate for this, Houser utilizes a number of flashback sequences to D&D games Will played with his friends prior to his disappearance. These flashback sequences serve multiple purposes; the first being a way to develop season one Will Byers into more of a three-dimensional character than he was in the show and the second being a metaphor for what Will is currently going through during his stay in the Upside Down. Houser perfectly captures the voices of the characters and the feeling of the Stranger Things universe while crafting a story that elaborates on things seen - and unseen - in season 1. Frankly, it's nice to spend some more time in the Upside Down as it's one of the more interesting aspects of the series and Houser depicts the Upside Down really marvelously. She makes it feel suitably spooky and interesting.The real highlight of this graphic novel, though is Stefano Martino's brilliant artwork. In this series, he is able to take Houser's already spooky script and make it spookier. He perfectly captures the likeness of the actors while still bringing his own style to the look of this graphic novel. His style differs depending on if he's depicting the Upside Down or one of the D&D Flashbacks, and each style perfectly works for the sequence being told. He's clearly following the blueprint of how the Upside Down looked in the TV series, but he really fleshes it out and makes it look and feel more like a real place than season one ever did. His artwork for the Demogorgon is also extremely spooky, giving us our best look at the creature yet. It's immediately identifiable as the same monster from the show, but it looks and feels a bit more detailed. It's horror at its finest and I loved his artwork here. Every single panel elevated the story and drew me further into what was going on.Ultimately, Stranger Things: The Other Side is an immensely enjoyable tie-in graphic novel. Nothing particularly new or major is revealed in this series, but it does elaborate a bit on what all happened to Will during his time in the Upside Down. Houser's excellent script mixed with Martino's haunting, creepy illustrations makes for an enjoyable, creepy experience. It's a quick read, but it's one that any fan of Stranger Things will likely enjoy. The four issues tell a complete story, all set during the events of season one of the show. I'm interested to see if Dark Horse, Houser, and Martino will do further volumes in this series and, if so, what stories they will tackle. I'd definitely be interested in seeing more from this team.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsI was super excited when I saw this graphic novel at the store because I had always wanted to know what happened to Will in the Upside Down during the events of "Stranger Things." I actually thought the story itself answered a lot of the questions I had about Will's experiences, but it is an absolute necessity to watch season 1 of "Stranger Things" before reading this graphic novel. Without seeing the show, there's no way to follow along and not be majorly confused. (A note just in case 3.5 starsI was super excited when I saw this graphic novel at the store because I had always wanted to know what happened to Will in the Upside Down during the events of "Stranger Things." I actually thought the story itself answered a lot of the questions I had about Will's experiences, but it is an absolute necessity to watch season 1 of "Stranger Things" before reading this graphic novel. Without seeing the show, there's no way to follow along and not be majorly confused. (A note just in case someone is hoping to read this graphic novel before watching the show.)The main gripe I had with this graphic novel was that it's really short (less than a hundred pages) and pretty expensive at the $18 retail price. This made me feel like Netflix and the other owners of "Stranger Things" are trying to rip off their loyal, dedicated fans which definitely didn't make me happy. Thankfully, I bought my copy on discount for $14, but that's still quite expensive when I can get other graphic novels that are easily twice the length at this same discounted price. I also felt that the illustrations for this book were sub par to say that least. Most of the time the characters' faces are very indistinct or oddly shaped. There's a general lack of detail in nearly all aspects which is in direct contrast to the show. This was super disappointing to me because I feel Netflix or whomever should have hired a great illustrator for this project with as popular as the show has been. Not settled for someone basic for a graphic novel they were planning to charge $18 for. Due to this disappointment and frustration, I doubt I would buy any future graphic novels, but would instead look for them at my local library.
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  • Ruthsic
    January 1, 1970
    If you found yourself wondering - huh, I wonder what Will Byers was doing during the entirety of season 1! - then this is the comic book for you. The story spans the time from him being chased by the Demigorgon to when he gets home, and touches on key moments in the series when he makes contact with the world from the Upside Down. The artwork of the comic is good - quite realistic in its approach, and gives off that eerie feeling like the show.However, this comic book can't stand on its own with If you found yourself wondering - huh, I wonder what Will Byers was doing during the entirety of season 1! - then this is the comic book for you. The story spans the time from him being chased by the Demigorgon to when he gets home, and touches on key moments in the series when he makes contact with the world from the Upside Down. The artwork of the comic is good - quite realistic in its approach, and gives off that eerie feeling like the show.However, this comic book can't stand on its own without the show - it is purely a media tie-in. The book makes no effort to explain the circumstances, or who the various characters are. Even if it from the POV of Will and therefore, a less informed POV, the fact that it would be frustrating for someone who comes to this franchise for the first time is a demerit on the comics' part. Also, it barely explains anything - if you were waiting for an explanation of HOW Will communicated, it is not here; I guess we will keep assuming magic or family bonds or something like that? After season 2 has already aired and gone, this just feels like an extraneous piece of material; a release between season 1 and 2 would have been a different matter. Anyway, on the whole, I feel it still has good artwork and a semi-decent plot about a boy who learns to be brave at crucial moments. Received an advance reader copy in exchange for a fair review from Dark Horse Books, via Edelweiss.
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  • John Stanifer
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not really sure why this doesn't have a higher rating. While there were a few times where I felt the characters didn't look as much like the original actors as they could have, that never had much effect on my enjoyment.The Upside Down and the Demogorgon are almost as creepy here as they are in the show. I love how the story shows the events of Season 1 from Will's perspective, dropping in specific lines of dialogue that fans will recognize from the show.Favorite scene is a toss-up between t I'm not really sure why this doesn't have a higher rating. While there were a few times where I felt the characters didn't look as much like the original actors as they could have, that never had much effect on my enjoyment.The Upside Down and the Demogorgon are almost as creepy here as they are in the show. I love how the story shows the events of Season 1 from Will's perspective, dropping in specific lines of dialogue that fans will recognize from the show.Favorite scene is a toss-up between the funeral and the library (that's as close to spoiling this comic as I'm going to get).The way Will uses his memories of his friends and family and his knowledge of D&D and fantasy literature (and Scripture?) to survive in the Upside Down is brilliant stuff. Worthy of being canon.Watch out for a well-placed reference to Stephen King's "Dark Tower" series.I love that the Duffer Bros. are willing to let others flesh out their universe with tie-in novels and comics. I hope this trend continues (can't wait for the Chief Hopper origin story next month).
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  • Ethan
    January 1, 1970
    As a huge fan of Stranger Things, I was really excited for this and was looking forward to reading it. Unfortunately, it’s rather disappointing. The story of what Will experiences while trapped in the Upside Down isn’t particularly compelling (as one might guess, it’s mostly just him running and hiding from the monster). There’s honestly just not that much story there — there’s maybe enough content for two issues, and dragging it out into four was a bad choice. The fact that it was mostly just a As a huge fan of Stranger Things, I was really excited for this and was looking forward to reading it. Unfortunately, it’s rather disappointing. The story of what Will experiences while trapped in the Upside Down isn’t particularly compelling (as one might guess, it’s mostly just him running and hiding from the monster). There’s honestly just not that much story there — there’s maybe enough content for two issues, and dragging it out into four was a bad choice. The fact that it was mostly just art and narration also brought down the book. I was looking for an expansion of Will’a character, but all we got was text boxes describing what we could see happening in the panels. Honestly, it pains me to say this but I’d give this one a pass. Even for a die hard fan it’s barely worth it.
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  • Steve Chaput
    January 1, 1970
    Dark Horse brings us a graphic novel, written by Jody Houser, that takes us back to the first season of the show. What was Will Byers doing in the Upside Down, while his family and friends searched for him? Nice art by Stefano Martino, shows how Will was able to survive as well as some flashbacks to the gang playing Dungeons & Dragons. How did those times help Will and shape his understanding of the events happening around him. This is really aimed at folks who are already familiar with the Dark Horse brings us a graphic novel, written by Jody Houser, that takes us back to the first season of the show. What was Will Byers doing in the Upside Down, while his family and friends searched for him? Nice art by Stefano Martino, shows how Will was able to survive as well as some flashbacks to the gang playing Dungeons & Dragons. How did those times help Will and shape his understanding of the events happening around him. This is really aimed at folks who are already familiar with the show and its characters. Not a good jumping on point for anyone new to the show, but rather a little bonus for those of us waiting for the next season.
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  • Alicia Adams
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Edelweiss for this advanced copy. I was excited to have a Stranger Things fix while waiting for Season Three to be released. This is a companion to Season One of the series. Without watching it, the reader will not have a full understanding of what is going on. Unfortunately, the book does not provide fans with enough new material to make it worthwhile. The new information in the book is not thrilling and added nothing to the original story. I would recommend this to die-hard fans only Thanks to Edelweiss for this advanced copy. I was excited to have a Stranger Things fix while waiting for Season Three to be released. This is a companion to Season One of the series. Without watching it, the reader will not have a full understanding of what is going on. Unfortunately, the book does not provide fans with enough new material to make it worthwhile. The new information in the book is not thrilling and added nothing to the original story. I would recommend this to die-hard fans only.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    A very fast read that gives fans of the show a little something to whet their appetites until July. This graphic novel tells Will's side of the story during season one--specifically, how he survived the Upside Down while his family and friends were trying to find him. It was also a nice look into how this character "ticks"--how he relied on both his family, friends, and the fantasy he loved to give him strength to survive in such a terrifying world. If you have 20 minutes and you're a fan of the A very fast read that gives fans of the show a little something to whet their appetites until July. This graphic novel tells Will's side of the story during season one--specifically, how he survived the Upside Down while his family and friends were trying to find him. It was also a nice look into how this character "ticks"--how he relied on both his family, friends, and the fantasy he loved to give him strength to survive in such a terrifying world. If you have 20 minutes and you're a fan of the show, this is definitely worth checking out.
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  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    I received my copy of this from Edelweiss+.Like most everyone else, I'm a fan of the Netflix series, and I'm glad to have read this parallel story that was largely unnecessary. I liked the comic just fine - the art is generally good, it's what is expected, and it's not nearly as realistic as (if we can use that word to describe) the series. So the medium of a comic suits this title well, I think.I'm looking forward to the next season even more after having read this.nosenseofstyle.blogspot.com
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  • María Granger
    January 1, 1970
    Este cómic trata sobre lo que le sucede a Will en el mundo del revés, por lo que es un complemento perfecto de la serie Stranger Things.Me gusta bastante el modo el modo en que se ha conectado el personaje de Will "el sabio", del juego de mesa que tanto entretiene a la pandilla de amigos, con lo que le va ocurriendo al propio Will en "el otro lado".No obstante, el cómic no termina de aclarar por qué ocurre todo lo que ocurre al 100% (al menos para mí) y los dibujos en algunas ocasiones no me ter Este cómic trata sobre lo que le sucede a Will en el mundo del revés, por lo que es un complemento perfecto de la serie Stranger Things.Me gusta bastante el modo el modo en que se ha conectado el personaje de Will "el sabio", del juego de mesa que tanto entretiene a la pandilla de amigos, con lo que le va ocurriendo al propio Will en "el otro lado".No obstante, el cómic no termina de aclarar por qué ocurre todo lo que ocurre al 100% (al menos para mí) y los dibujos en algunas ocasiones no me terminan de convencer. Aún así, en general... ¡Está muy bien y lo he disfrutado!
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  • Sam Young
    January 1, 1970
    I haven’t watched the series on Nexflix so I didn’t know the story. The comic confused me. I wasn’t sure why or how Will was where he was, how others reached him and what the monster actually was ?? I feel there are too many holes in the Graphic Novel for a person that hasn’t watched the tv series to enjoy the story but I’m sure to all Stranger Things fans this will be a joy as they reminisce over the first story of the seasons and will be able to fill in the gaps themselves
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  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    While I wouldn’t say this is necessary reading, nor did it reveal anything extremely trivial, I was still invested. The art, as well as the reversal of many of the scenes we had seen in the show, were really well done here, and get the extra love/higher rating. Much like how I felt after the first season, which I thought was basically close to perfect and didn’t need a following amount of episodes, this was a welcomed chapter to this story, placing me in a world I enjoy getting lost in.
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  • Joe Jones
    January 1, 1970
    I read this in individual issues. I love the Netflix show so I had high hopes for the comic. It was alright, but nothing special. There may have been a slight spoiler at the end of issue 4 for the show but we will have to wait for it to return in July to see if the internet rumors are true. Die hard fans of the show might like the extra content but it really did not add anything necessary.
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