Albert's Quiet Quest
Albert just wants to read his book in peace . . . why won't his friends give him some quiet? A delightful picture book about finding alone time from an internationally acclaimed illustrator.There are so many distractions in Albert's Mile End neighborhood, what's a book-loving introvert to do? Desperate for a quiet place to read, Albert storms out to the alley behind his house where his friends and neighbors often meet to play. Lucky him -- not only is no one around today, but he finds an old painting of a beach scene that someone's left for the trash. The painting sparks Albert's imagination, spurring him on a zen-like quest for a quiet reading break on a sunset beach, a moment to unplug and find peace. And he almost does too, except for those meddling Mile End kids . . . who just want to have some fun, as LOUDLY as possible. Will Albert ever find a moment of quiet to enjoy his book? Or could his friends be looking for a book break of their own?Readers will love this adorably relatable story of a quiet kid, his big imagination and bringing friends together through the magic of reading.

Albert's Quiet Quest Details

TitleAlbert's Quiet Quest
Author
ReleaseMay 7th, 2019
PublisherTundra Books (NY)
ISBN-139781101917626
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Writing, Books About Books, Sequential Art, Graphic Novels, Fiction, Art

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Albert's Quiet Quest Review

  • Jane
    January 1, 1970
    This little book just shot to the top of my favourite picks for 2019. I already knew I liked Isabelle Arsenault's illustrations -- I loved her work in Jane, the Fox, and Me -- but now she's on my *must read* list.To be honest, the first time I read through this book, I wasn't sure how much I liked this story. Some of the messaging didn't quite strike me the right way. But on my second read, I realized how truly delightful this book is.In this book we follow Albert as he leaves his noisy house to This little book just shot to the top of my favourite picks for 2019. I already knew I liked Isabelle Arsenault's illustrations -- I loved her work in Jane, the Fox, and Me -- but now she's on my *must read* list.To be honest, the first time I read through this book, I wasn't sure how much I liked this story. Some of the messaging didn't quite strike me the right way. But on my second read, I realized how truly delightful this book is.In this book we follow Albert as he leaves his noisy house to find a quiet space to sit and read his book. Unfortunately, noisy people seem to cluster around him, and while he tries to ignore the hubbub for awhile, he eventually loses his temper when things just get too loud.The illustrations are on the simple side, but there is never any doubt what is happening on each page. There are so many things going on in this story that make it a great book for opening up discussions about empathy and appropriate reactions!I strongly recommend this book and I can't wait to get my hands on more of Arsenault's work.Thank you to NetGalley and Tundra Books for providing me with a DRC of this book.
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  • Hilary
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful illustrations in turquoise and orange tell of Albert's quest to find a quiet place to read his book. Going out to the back yard he finds an old picture of the beach and he imagines he is there, reading on the sand. Soon other children come out to play and Albert imagines them into his beach scene but the noise begins to grow. When Albert demands quiet they disappear and bring back books and chairs. When Albert apologises for being cross it's his turn to be shushed and they all laugh.A Beautiful illustrations in turquoise and orange tell of Albert's quest to find a quiet place to read his book. Going out to the back yard he finds an old picture of the beach and he imagines he is there, reading on the sand. Soon other children come out to play and Albert imagines them into his beach scene but the noise begins to grow. When Albert demands quiet they disappear and bring back books and chairs. When Albert apologises for being cross it's his turn to be shushed and they all laugh.A lovely, simple story of outdoor imaginative play and the love of reading in a peace.
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  • La Coccinelle
    January 1, 1970
    Sometimes peace and quiet can be elusive. That's what Albert discovers when he goes out to the alley to read his book. Actually, he's just sitting there, daydreaming about reading on a beach. But as each of his friends comes along and starts to do their own activities, even his imagination starts to get cluttered and really, really noisy. Finally, he can't take it anymore and he snaps at his friends, driving them all away... or so he thinks.Albert's frustration is something a lot of people will Sometimes peace and quiet can be elusive. That's what Albert discovers when he goes out to the alley to read his book. Actually, he's just sitting there, daydreaming about reading on a beach. But as each of his friends comes along and starts to do their own activities, even his imagination starts to get cluttered and really, really noisy. Finally, he can't take it anymore and he snaps at his friends, driving them all away... or so he thinks.Albert's frustration is something a lot of people will probably be able to relate to. His reaction toward his friends is not his finest hour, but to his credit, he does try to apologize. His friends obviously forgive him, and everything is all good.This might technically be a picture book, but the format is really more of a graphic novel. The illustrations are divided into panels, there's onomatopoeia everywhere, and all the speech is in balloons. So, really, it's a graphic novel for kids. But that doesn't make it any less enjoyable. The illustrations, done in a limited colour palette of black and white, orange, and turquoise, are quite cute. I've encountered Arsenault's work before in the adorable Spork. These illustrations are just as charming and help to tell the story of a little boy who just wants some silence.I'd recommend this to anyone who's ever wanted to retreat into their imagination (or a good book) and enjoy some peace and quiet.Thank you to NetGalley and Tundra Books (NY) for providing a digital ARC.
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  • Etienne
    January 1, 1970
    Amazing illustrations. I really loved the art! The story itself is also quite good. A message and praise for quietness and tranquility, which is really right on my personal taste. But I the same time I have mixed feelings about the fact the the kid try to impose his wish to everybody...Still a very pretty and good book!
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  • Billie
    January 1, 1970
    I am Albert. Albert is me.
  • Karrie
    January 1, 1970
    Finding a quiet place to read is difficult for everyone, but Albert finds a great one. Then one by one friends come and cause a commotion, leading Albert to an outburst. The outburst causes a happy ending.
  • Abigail
    January 1, 1970
    Seeking out a quiet spot where he can read, the eponymous Albert finds that when all of his neighborhood friends begin to arrive, the peace is slowly destroyed. Eventually he loses his temper, shouting at the other children and (seemingly) driving them away. Fortunately, they like books too, and all ends happily with a group reading session...I enjoyed French-Canadian author/illustrator Isabelle Arsenault's first picture-book about the children of Mile End - Colette's Lost Pet - so I picked up Seeking out a quiet spot where he can read, the eponymous Albert finds that when all of his neighborhood friends begin to arrive, the peace is slowly destroyed. Eventually he loses his temper, shouting at the other children and (seemingly) driving them away. Fortunately, they like books too, and all ends happily with a group reading session...I enjoyed French-Canadian author/illustrator Isabelle Arsenault's first picture-book about the children of Mile End - Colette's Lost Pet - so I picked up Albet's Quiet Quest with a sense of pleasant anticipation. Although Albert might not think so, there is a quiet charm to these stories focusing on a group of neighborhood children and their experiences together. I appreciated the humorous ending here, and (as always) thought Arsenault's artwork was lovely. Recommended to anyone who read and enjoyed the first story about Mile End.
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  • Brooklyn Cribdon (Kemp)
    January 1, 1970
    Isabelle Arsenault is back with another beautifully drawn story that I wish I could jump into. I love that there is a story about a introverted reader, and friends who recognize his need not to be alone, but to enjoy a quiet environment. The story was so wonderfully designed with alternating spreads that portrayed Albert's imaginative beach, inspired by a painting in the alley. Including neighbours and friends in the alley into Albert's beach was so clever and the ending of this story made my he Isabelle Arsenault is back with another beautifully drawn story that I wish I could jump into. I love that there is a story about a introverted reader, and friends who recognize his need not to be alone, but to enjoy a quiet environment. The story was so wonderfully designed with alternating spreads that portrayed Albert's imaginative beach, inspired by a painting in the alley. Including neighbours and friends in the alley into Albert's beach was so clever and the ending of this story made my heart warm and joyful.
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  • Ms.Gaye
    January 1, 1970
    Albert wants a little quiet time to sit and read but it's hard to find with so many active children surrounding him and asking him to join them in their own pursuits. He finally decides that enough is enough...and that's when they decide that maybe Albert has a good idea.The impressive pencil/watercolor/ink artwork created in a simple color scheme of gray, green and orange allows readers to see Albert's changing mindset. Ages 3-6
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  • Great Books
    January 1, 1970
    Albert is just trying to find a quiet place to read his book. Instead he discovers a beach painting and gets immersed into its beautiful scene. A delightful book with minimal words, would be great for art exploration. Reviewer: 7
  • Amanda Piccirillo
    January 1, 1970
    Albert is just trying to find a quiet place to read his book. Instead he discovers a beach painting and gets immersed into its beautiful scene. A delightful book with minimal words, would be great for art exploration.
  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    A new addition to the Mile End series written and illustrated by Isabelle Arsenault, Albert’s Quiet Quest introduces us to Albert, who just wants to find a quiet place where he can kick back and read. Unfortunately, all of the neighbourhood children find his quiet place and it quickly becomes just as loud as the house he escaped to find quiet in the first place.Isabelle Arsenault so beautifully created the neighbourhood of Mile End in her first picture solo picture book and Albert’s Quiet Quest A new addition to the Mile End series written and illustrated by Isabelle Arsenault, Albert’s Quiet Quest introduces us to Albert, who just wants to find a quiet place where he can kick back and read. Unfortunately, all of the neighbourhood children find his quiet place and it quickly becomes just as loud as the house he escaped to find quiet in the first place.Isabelle Arsenault so beautifully created the neighbourhood of Mile End in her first picture solo picture book and Albert’s Quiet Quest follows in those same footsteps. The illustrations and book design have a comic book quality to them making the story so accessible and providing a little extra whimsy. Beautifully dreamy illustrations in a simple orange and blue colour palette evoking all the calm and wonder of the beach so lovingly depicted in the illustrations. There is a comfort in Isabelle Arsenault’s work. Everytime we read one of her stories there is a clam that descends and envelops us. Something about her illustrations have the ability to calm and centre and there is the same feeling in the books she writes and illustrates as well. At the end of Albert’s Quiet Quest we get a lovely gentle reminder to take some time to be quiet and enjoy a really great book
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